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38 Burst results for "Vietnam"

Fresh "Vietnam" from Healing Quest

Healing Quest

00:40 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Vietnam" from Healing Quest

"The wave spilled over into parking lots and nearby Streets. I'm Ra well. Balon checking kfbk Traffic Auburn Highway 49 both north and south bound between 80 and Dry Creek Road, At least one lane is shut down intermittently in both directions. You have the installation of the bike lane and road improvement works still taking place and that continues until the summer of this year. Obviously expect some delays, then keeping track of Woodland South bound five at the Vietnam Veterans Rest area. This is a long term closure because of landscape work taking place. This is not set to re open until December 1st, so naturally look to exit elsewhere. Alden Jacob News, 93.1 Kfbk..

Vietnam Veterans Rest Alden Jacob News Woodland South
Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:25 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Day hours north of Garden Highway, so make sure to use alternate routes. Businesses, though, remain open in the area. Keep in mind in Woodland South Bound. Five. The Vietnam Veterans rest area remain. Shut down until December 1st. Alden Jacob News 93.1 Kfbk Well, it will be heating up through the rest of the afternoon hours. Science, which is running in the mid to upper nineties.

Woodland South Bound Alden Jacob Vietnam Veterans
Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on KFBK Weekend Live With Sam Shane

KFBK Weekend Live With Sam Shane

05:02 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vietnam" discussed on KFBK Weekend Live With Sam Shane

"What You are going to be a grandfather. Great. Not too long ago almost like this, and my daughter would have been a challenge. It was a long road for me to find myself again after Vietnam. He was my neighbor, Jim, Another Vietnam veteran who funded convinced me that I could still conduct with my family and find that fulfilling life. I'd lost and went for help. If I could take that first step after almost 50 years. I know other veterans skin too. Visit, make the connection dinette to find out more. First Amendment 101 You're listening to Tom Sullivan frying time all the time with Tom Selleck. One time it is thanks for coming by. So we're talking about this big story. It's the top story. Today. Everybody is ah, questioning everybody about the president and Russia. And why did he not do something about Russia? Pain? Bounties to Taliban to kill Americans. And then we've got people going well. He was never told about it because it never rose up to the level of presidential daily briefing. Well, why did it not well, because there's conflicting information Now. The Pentagon just chimed in 10 minutes ago and said, We can't confirm any of that. At teams like this is One of the little trips they play that are full of partisanship make people really angry. Against the president or for the president. One of the two It's got all those got all the check the boxes. It's got it all. What do you think? What's the What Do you think the truth is behind this phone number 855295 6600 Jerry in Milwaukee, Jerry I know how you feel about Donald Trump. But what about this? Conflicting information. Conflicting stories. What do you make of it? Okay. Well, Tom, I don't know for sure if Russia is paying for bounties on American soldiers would puke and do that. Yeah. Putin is horrible, Despicable murderer. Just a cute in his her horrible person so I could see. Sure suited doing that. What do I know that we do that They're doing that. No, but What I don't do is trust Donald Trump. If this was true, and there were credible confirmation that there was true, I don't trust Donald Trump to really stand up to Putin. You know, Trump was an apologist, which Russia hacking into our election system. Trump didn't really believe our own intelligence agents he believe Putin when Saudi Arabia murdered a US nationalist journalists He He he He believed Saudi Arabia. Crown Prince the murderer, right right around friends, So I don't write. Trust Donald Trump. You stand up to people like this and already, like your previous call, I heard already out here in the sense is if this is true, and if we don't do anything, well, you know, we're just part of war. You know, if this is the thing that happens, know if this is true. Donald Trump's got to take action. You can't just let this slide well. Apologies. Here's the problem. Jerry is a lot of people crucified W And still do to this day for taking actions about weapons of mass destruction, and they went But they couldn't find any. And we went to war over. Why did George Bush Take action when we did not have good, solid intelligence. So You're right. I don't know what you do if you were president. What wi I I know. I already said what I would do, I would tell them. Conflicting agencies. Go figure it out and then let me know. Come back when you know I don't know. It's it's Oh, him. Great. We'll also even if we cannot verify it, too. Like what? Whatever degree Trump's gonna have a real conversation. Puting. You know, Trump's gonna make it clear that this stuff will not be tolerated that there were the actions destructive actions taken against Russia. You know, he's from whatever read the reports of him. He basically gravel's, too. Hughton and just, you know, try to both himself often persecute, and it just It's embarrassing if the reports of his conversations with pizza and surgery So he gets criticized because he is nice to Kim Jonah on his nice to another President Xi president Tonight. He likes all the The hardliners gets right Nice to him..

Donald Trump President Trump Russia Jerry I Putin Tom Selleck Jerry Vietnam Saudi Arabia JIM Crown Prince Pentagon Tom Sullivan Hughton Kim Jonah George Bush TOM Milwaukee
"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:45 min | Last week

"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

"From. nyu You received your MFA from the School of Visual Arts also in New, York City how important are those degrees to supplement your ability as director? I mean I, think for. You know film, school and Education, the most important thing I take away from it is like building a community and finding like minded people who love films and you kind of carry on that love after you graduated in your work together on your on your feature, your future projects and and I mean obviously the education is important, but I think the relationships you take away from it or more important now. Is there I mean I know? For those who see the documentary, they know kind of what influence you partially to really loving a certain aspect of Bruce Lee, but is there any other driving forces that really kind of? Propelled you where you are today whether it's a filmmaker or an actor or a movie itself. I remember seeing a hoop dreams when I was pretty young. I was about ten or eleven, and it was just A. He's the first time I really saw documentary like a feature length documentary, and it's such an epic story right also an intimate at the same time, and I think it's informing me of like the type of story said I'm interested in the type of storytelling I'm interested in and also kind of the power of sports in the drama of Sports, and and how you can use sports as a way to talk about bigger issues in society, and so I think that film definitely played a role in how I. How I became a documentary filmmaker and I mean it's not a directly to to be water I. think he can maybe see. Some of the piano correlation. Oh absolutely, absolutely and you know. You've done some really creative and really great projects, but we documentary like be water that you're connected. Do personally that you? Again for anyone that has seen it. For the thirtieth. The world seated at this point. You know you really have a fondness in a your linked emotionally to the person you're you're you're making the documentary on become something else at that point? Right because it's still such a beautiful work of art, but because of your connection because of the way Bruce Lee moved you. Does. It become something else at that point bow. In your for me when I'm making it film. Tired of want to infuse my own voice in the not literally. You don't hear me speaking as a narrator anything like that, but I think that films at I'm kind of drawn to are the ones that feel personal and honest and authentic, and you can really feel the directors hand. Especially in a film, we were talking about such an icon that maybe anyone else could have done a certain style of Bruce. Lee Fill of documentary about Bruce. Lee But I wanted to make sure that this felt like my film, and by kind of going deep into my roots my parents Vietnamese refugees. They left Vietnam on a boat. We're living in Hong Kong refugee camp for for six months and then. Went over to America the very similar story to Bruce's in terms of coming to America. And not having connections, not really having any money, and that was sort of the Bruce Lee that I felt like I didn't know too much. About Bruce Lee as the immigrant American as Asian, American as the other American. So, I tried to infuse like what lessons I learned from my parents, and for my own upbringing as a child of immigrants and use that to make the films feel personal and have that touch point in a way. So yeah that was that was always the intention and I hope people. Felt that kind of personal filmmaking style. Even though we're talking about an icon like briefly. Yeah, I can't even imagine what it's like. Because you talk very very early in a documentary about you know, it's the very first time you recognize yourself. Somebody on screen. That isn't stereotypical or lacking the respect. They deserve I. Mean I can't believe I mean it. Had to be an. You've answered this such a passion project just because of the effect man had on you and millions of others as well. Yeah I mean I could say that. I was in like one of those huge Bruce Lee fans at went out and collected everything and. Watched every single movie ten times over, but as a symbol, and as an icon for representation for kind of hero, and fighting for the underdog, definitely left a mark on me and again it was just trying to unpack that that that iconography that mythology that I felt. Everyone knew, but they didn't know the person, and and that being said I agree responsibility, obviously telling the story of someone like Bruce Lee but I started to think of it more as a privilege that I'm privileged to have the opportunity to tell lead story into. You know mess it up in many ways and I once. I understood it more as a privilege recognized. It made it less of a daunting task I

Bruce Lee School Of Visual Arts Lee Fill School And Education Sports Director Hong Kong York City America Vietnam
Media, power, and political communication

Pat McDonough

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Media, power, and political communication

"Let's talk about the media yeah the media is a powerful Trojan horse seven mereka if it's not a and I mean they have attacked president trump relentlessly yeah and the problem we have is we have fox okay yeah now fox is okay but Rupert Murdoch is ninety years old right and his two sons are liberals okay we have newsmax rage has been growing and that's a good thing yeah we have one America right which is a good thing but these are national programs they don't get into Vince's crab house they don't get in the fells point being close they don't get into those things go and they don't get into helping our people who need help to fight against the beast and as you pointed out the Baltimore sun doesn't report on any of these issues involving her son is one of them yeah right exactly the Baltimore sun is part of the super shadow government yeah they protect them yeah people say that the media has fallen in the tank for the left they fell in the tank for the Obama no the media never found the check for anybody the media are leaders in this offensive they are legally are part of the natural America they were and and they were targeted specifically for that purpose because of the vast influence they have they were targeted for subversion and infiltration by the Soviet Union in the nineteen thirties and we could go on for hours about how that happened and who infiltrated but just for example one person remember Edward R. Murrow of CBS Edward R. Murrow is one of the people primarily responsible for bringing communist it's two Columbia teachers college to begin inserting all of these destructive America narratives into our universities he was responsible for bringing those people over and he worked with a guy named Laurence Duggan whose son was an actual Soviet agent and he was friends with his son and he became a news anchor for CBS that's just one example there are many many trusted a man in America yeah right right he he gave the Vietnam War at eight a story that was a hundred and eighty degrees from what the truth was riled tell your doctor about with Walter Cronkite yeah that young people don't know who has what we member we only had three major networks in this country now I can tell you let me say some about yeah because the networks are required by FCC regulation as part of their contract to provide unbiased news nobody has ever called him that if I were in a position to do so I would pull their FCC licenses tomorrow and tell them that they better straighten out their newsrooms and start reporting what's going on because they should be challenged in the courts right absolutely be challenged because they have been really but they have such power and such influence and Americans have to get a constitutional public there operates through elections has to be given the facts at what's happened instead is they've been given the left narrative for sixty eighty years in World War two The New York Times was engaged in treason it was exposing things mark Levin's book yeah I mean it's just stunning it's stunning when CNN first started Ted Turner used to go on a show and he would bring some five Soviet KGB agents on the show with him had a first among them was Georgy Arbatov who is the head of member for US and Canada old KGB agent they would talk down president Reagan they would just sit there and terror attacks president right that was C. N. N. the communist news

Fired captain of USS Theodore Roosevelt will not be reinstated

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fired captain of USS Theodore Roosevelt will not be reinstated

"Guys the Pentagon has reversed its decision to reinstate the aircraft carrier commander who blew the whistle about a covert outbreak on board here's CBS's candy McCormick chief of naval operations admiral Mike Gilday said the carriers captain will not be rejoining the ship I will not resign captain Brad crozier as the commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Gilday said crozier and an admiral on the carrier failed to take enough precautions after the Roosevelt left Vietnam hundreds of the ship's crew became infected with a corona

Pentagon Commander CBS Mike Gilday Officer Theodore Roosevelt Gilday Mccormick Chief Of Naval Operations Brad Crozier
The World is Watching Us

Why It Matters

03:46 min | 2 weeks ago

The World is Watching Us

"Why it matters spends a lot of time discussing how things that happen around the world of us at home. It's kind of our thing. But today we're GONNA flip that around because the killing of George Floyd, the protests against police, brutality and systemic racism, and the administration's response are not only unfolding here in the united. States the world is listening to and depending on where you are, the echoes can sound different. To better understand how this is playing out, we turn to two American journalists who've spent their careers. Reporting abroad will ask them to give us their own thoughts and experiences, and to describe what America looks like right now through the eyes of those who are watching from afar. They told us to places Africa and Hong Kong. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today. Diplomacy starts at home. This kind of reminds me how throughout history and on I've studied history and political science, and throughout history, America's goal and mission of trying to go around and promote democracy and human rights around the world has constantly been undercut by how they treat minorities and particularly African Americans at home. I'm Keith Rich Berg I'm currently the director of the journalism and Media Studies Center at the University of Hong Kong, but I spent most of my career about thirty four years as a reporter and correspondent for the Washington Post. During the Cold War The old Soviet Union. Propagandists used to take great pleasure in pointing out. How Black Americans were treated in the American south during the Jim. Crow, era. Know the propagandists during the Vietnam War would like to point out how American blacks were being treated that we were not able to really as strongly as we wanted to stand up against the apartheid regime in South Africa in its early days, because the apartheid regime in South Africa was in many ways modeled on the Jim Crow segregation laws of the American south, so I think throughout history, America's stated mission and goal of promoting democracy and Human Rights and Roosevelt's four freedoms around the world have constantly been undercut by enemies who are willing to point out the hypocrisy of America's positions in America's promotion of human rights by saying before You Cup lecture US wanted you deal with their own problems at home. It's quite painful for me because I do have both experiences you know living in, America when Nigeria I do have both us. I've experienced racism in America. My name is Chico Odwalla. I am an independent multimedia journalist I am based in West Africa and I cover the entire continent for various international media outlets. Killing of George Floyd was very jarring. It was a wakeup. It was a brutal awakening for people who actually don't quite believe. Racism is as real as African Americans say that it is. You still got people who don't believe. It's that strong. Who believe that it's from the past that there have been many moves towards overcoming you know some people still believe that. America is a post racial society so for this incident. This killing of George Florida's like Oh. Actually it's still there and we saw it on TV we saw this guy breathing for his life for nearly nine minutes. So that aspect it is a rude awakening. It's really provoking some nations to look inward. Look at their own injustice for example in France. A people they're calling for an end to the chokehold that some police officers us, and so they're having debates on how to handle people

America George Floyd Jim Crow Gabrielle Sierra Hong Kong Africa South Africa Washington Post West Africa Soviet Union France Keith Rich Berg University Of Hong Kong George Florida Chico Odwalla Nigeria Roosevelt
A Look At Spike Lee's "Da 5 Bloods

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

A Look At Spike Lee's "Da 5 Bloods

"There's some strong language in this next interview Spike Lee has a new movie out like a lot of his movies the central characters are black Americans who talk honestly sometimes angrily sometimes humorously about racism unlike many of spike Lee's movies it takes place over six defied bloods is about four black veterans who go back to present day Vietnam to bring home the remains of their beloved former squad leader who was killed in combat there's also a subplot during the war these men found millions

Spike Lee Bloods Vietnam
The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts by Maxine Hong Kingston

Books and Boba

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts by Maxine Hong Kingston

"I've never taken in Asian American Literature Class I've I barely read books spy asian-american. In in high school, and also in college. And I. Really didn't know what to expect. I just knew that it was a classic. It inspired a lot of Asian American writers specially today. maxine is a is a writing professor at Berkley so she's taught a lot of Asian American writers But From what I had gleaned was okay. This is a memoir. I'm expecting it to be about generational gap and culture gap. This was written right after a Vietnam and I wonder like if it's going to be about like pacifism. And I. Start Reading The book and I'm like honey. This is not this is not a memoir. This is not a memoir or traditional definition of memoir. I know back then in the seventies. Memoir was still a new genre, so there wasn't like the conventions of. Of like a memoir like we have today with like a bunch more linear. Yeah, yeah! So I was really surprised by the structure, and by how it blurred nonfiction with miss and folk tales and talk stories but I remember you telling me that this is like a typical thing in in Chinese storytelling. In terms of like I think. And, maybe this is something that. Resonated with because my grandfather was a storyteller, he liked the talk. He couldn't see or hear very well. All we can do is talk, and so he would just sit and tell stories and we would you know listen because we? There's there was nothing else to do. but I think in terms of like. Like I feel like in especially in Chinese culture. History is told through story Ray. A lot of the histories that we learn isn't really through text, or at least in my experience, and maybe it's because I didn't go to a Chinese school. like I went to Chinese school to learn Chinese, but that was like in the states and. I I was educated in like a Chinese or Taiwanese system right so I never had a academic. exposure to how they teach history, so a lot of my history came through story read like the the legends of you know, lose hin, or the three kingdoms or like. Stories from like the civil war. Things like that like it's. It's all through oral aural tradition. And so I thought that was. That was something that I found was interesting is allowed. This book is kind of that still onto the page right like. It opens with a secret, a family secret tothrough through story, but never like written down until I guess or until maxine wrote it down in her in her book, and I'd be interested. I don't know if there is like an interview of her like talking about how what her family thought about her like airing her family's dirty laundry to like the mass audience, but like. those stories of like hidden hidden family members who are like quote, unquote chain for like loose face. is something that's really. It is something that happens in Chinese families like there are relatives that like. Either we don't talk about or I don't talk to. Because something that's happened the past. Right and Like for my specifically like I know because of the civil war because of our relocation to Taiwan. There's a whole side of my that i. have no idea about like my. My family goes up to my grandfather, and that's it I don't know about his brothers and sisters and. His. we just kind of lost contact and they don't talk about it, and at this point, the only way I can learn about them is through my dad because my grandparents are gone right so. I don't know just something about that. Got Me Thinking about my own family histories and like stories that we don't talk about because either. We're ashamed or they're ashamed or. Is just not something like you know you don't want to. You don't want to take up. Go Right. That's a big A big theme in this story is like the concept of ghosts and being worried about what they're doing what they do. What they here and like. How goes can still cling to, even though they're gone in even though they're not Caprio, immigrant parents love secrets

Maxine Caprio Asian American Literature Clas Chinese School Professor Berkley Vietnam RAY Taiwan
'Da 5 Bloods' Movie Review

Roe Conn

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Da 5 Bloods' Movie Review

"We mentioned yesterday defied bloods four stars you gave that four stars and Spike Lee film about for Vietnam veterans all African Americans in present day go back to Vietnam to retrieve the remains of their fallen squad leader it's a great film I believe it will get multiple Oscar nominations Best Picture best screenplay probably a Best Actor nomination for Delroy Lindo and of course we've got the interview with Delroy Lindo was up on the website of U. G. N. right now great

Vietnam Delroy Lindo U. G. N. Spike Lee Oscar
Spike Lee's 'Da 5 Bloods' Out Now on Netflix

The Breakfast Club

00:28 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spike Lee's 'Da 5 Bloods' Out Now on Netflix

"Spike Lee, the five bloods that new Netflix's drama make sure you guys check that out. It's about the Vietnam. War and four black men in their sixties. Meet up for a happy present day Reunion Matter Hotel Vietnam so they're called the blood. They call themselves bloods and. That's kind of what this movie is about, but everybody's saying it's a great movie. I haven't seen it yet, but it's on Netflix so I know. Everybody's always thinking about good things that they can watch on television. So that's something that's out now

Reunion Matter Hotel Vietnam Spike Lee Netflix Vietnam
Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

The Big Picture

04:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Spike Lee: a new black wave of cinema

"We've spent past two weeks in a collective state of horror and anger over George Floyd's killing at the hands of Minneapolis police, officer Dirk, Shaaban, just one thousand unjustly killed by police. It's hard to look at what happened. Floyd, and not think of Radio Raheem Bill. Nuns character from do the right thing. Or countries fucked up needs to change. No American filmmaker has had the foresight or insight about that need for change quite like spike has. Some directors interpret the past some capture the present spike does both and he sees the future. Spent some time in the past few weeks. Returning to some spikes movies in anticipation of his new film to five bloods, it's a staggering body of work as wide as it as deep as warm and inviting as provocative and laden with traps ever. Spike isn't the totality of the black filmmaking experience and I don't want to suggest that, but for forty years he's told stories about that experience that have been seen more widely and discussed more feverishly than anyone and they still haven't been seen enough. Of the conversations you've been having with loved ones this month about the problems that people are forced to look at more closely police brutality, systemic racism locally sanctioned violence gentrification, tribal loyalty, the failures of government, personal sacrifice versus public good hiring practices, power, art and money spike was ahead of most Americans for decades on these issues, but while the stories he tells are frequently polemical. His movies are quite nuanced. They rarely tell you exactly what to think. Instead foisting contradictions and crises, interviewers, laps and making them decide. He crafts extraordinary dilemma movies inspired by the new Orrin Westerns and social dramas that he studied at Nyu and even though he doesn't force a conclusion is movies are frequently an intelligence test over the years, critics and audiences have repeatedly shown their ass immediately upon exiting a spike movie. For person like me seeing his work at a young age me up, helped me see beyond my keyhole-size view of the world, but it's not like spike wasn't relatable. He was the Avatar of new. York Knicks FANDOM! He was a regular presence on TV and Jordan commercials. He was directing music videos and frequently according controversy in the movie world he consistently challenged fans and detractors to reexamine their beliefs, and he always destabilized our comfort at sixty three. He is still very much a vital filmmaker. Twenty eight teams Black Klansman was among his most honored films and marked his First Competitive Oscar win for best adapted screenplay. Spike is a hall of Famer on this show and his work accounts for some of my favorite movies ever made. This episode is dedicated to those movies and will include conversations with a couple of his key collaborators as well as a part of a conversation that was more than I had on the watchable last summer. About Lee's nineteen eighty-nine masterpiece. Do the right thing. That movie redefines the term remarkable. In it! You can see and hear the pain and conflict. We're talking about right now. Watch it again. If you haven't really later in the show, we'll have a conversation with jazz. Musician and film composer Terence Blanchard a longtime contributor of spikes. They've teamed up on fifteen films including two five bloods, and he is truly one of the great writers of music for movies. I also wanted to share a conversation I had with the film editor Barry Alexander Brown in February. Two Thousand Nineteen, after he received an Oscar nomination for his work on Black Klansman they've been together since spikes first movie. She's gotTa, have it? Like so many great filmmakers spike works with the same crew over and over again, not just Aronson Berry, but production designer when Thomas Costume. Designer Ruth Carter casting director Robby Reed, and that incredible troop you've seen over and over again in his movies Denzel Washington, of course, Johnsboro on Davis Samuel Jackson Roger One of Your Smith Arthur Nas. Kerala Delroy Lindo is Ahah whitlock junior Alleluia Debbie Masar Ruby Dee, the list goes on. Later this week will be back with a review of spikes, the five bloods, which will be available to watch on Netflix on Friday, it's the story of four black Vietnam veterans who return to the jungle for some unsettled business, its reunion of sorts of some of those actors, and for it's a kind of mission statement about missions. Lastly. We'd like to top five on this show. Spike is made more than thirty feature length films, many of which are indisputable classics to cover every style and format under the Sun. Drama Comedy Crime Films Romances Documentary Sports Movies farce satire musical. He's really done at all. I would recommend virtually every movie he's ever made, but before I share my five year a few places, you can watch his movies just in case you're trying to bone up on some of the ones you've missed. Overlook along the way.

Spike Black Klansman George Floyd Oscar LEE Raheem Bill Minneapolis Terence Blanchard Kerala Delroy Lindo Orrin Westerns Netflix Officer York Knicks Dirk NYU Debbie Masar Ruby Dee Ruth Carter Aronson Berry Shaaban Barry Alexander Brown
Vietnam ratifies major trade deal with the EU

Dennis Prager

00:24 sec | 3 weeks ago

Vietnam ratifies major trade deal with the EU

"Vietnam is ratified is significant three deal with the European Union that's expected to boost the southeast Asian country's manufacturing sector and exports when it takes effect next month the E. you will live most tariffs on Vietnamese goods and cut the rest over seven years Vietnam left about half of its import duties on EU exports when the agreement to starts and phase out the rest over a ten year

Vietnam European Union
Barr: 'I don't think that the law enforcement system is systemically racist'

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

07:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Barr: 'I don't think that the law enforcement system is systemically racist'

"The Attorney General William Barr denied there was systematic racism in US law enforcement racism in the United States still but I don't think that the law enforcement system is systemically racist I understand that the distrust however of the African American community given the history in this country since the nineteen sixties I think we've independent phase of reforming our institutions and making sure that they're in sync with our laws so how then to continue to reform the U. S. police Chuck Wexler has been trying to do that for years he's a former senior policemen in Boston and is now the executive director of the police executive research forum the first awesome warrior policemen in Minneapolis had to use such forceful tactics against the unarmed George Floyd it was not necessary it was a complete police failure the Minneapolis police that day failed George Floyd there was nothing to justify their actions nothing zero it's horrible from a professional policing standpoint that video represents everything we are opposed to that is not what professional policing looks like it is apparent one of those of us outside then we think well given what happened and the reaction to it and the legal moves we would think the police would be extra vigilant but we then saw the seventy five year old man knocked to the ground and no police helping him and then when charges were pressed the rest of the force resigned so how do we understand that that's wrong too what happened in buffalo what you're referring to that is wrong too I don't know what those officers were thinking I have no idea what they were thinking this is an older man pushing him it was completely uncalled for completely uncalled for these officers that resigned they should resign from the department that would be a good thing I don't know why they stop resigning from those positions they should just leave policing it they think that incident is worth resigning for they should resign from the department they are idiots you are working on police reform you've seen time and again questions being raised about both race and police brutality do you think this is a turning point I think what this is making everybody to is is take a hard look at what is good policing look like what people are asking why hasn't it happened before president Obama set up a task force on twenty first century policing why was that not implemented in US states has eighteen thousand police departments so policing is very uneven there's no quality control there's no national standards my organization the police executive research forum issued guidelines on use of force we have training on de escalation but how do you reach all of those departments and hard what kind of oversight you have so it's a challenge American policing is very decentralized it's very personal there's been attempts to try to consolidate regional allies doesn't happen so until we have an investment I think in training and holding officers accountable and the big look at our unionization unionization and United States plays a real role in making it hard to discipline problematic officers will be on the union problems you've been citing is it simply that it's simply the model is a very very brutal one well let's be let's be clear what use are in Minneapolis was a failure Erica now we see the pictures from New York we see Chicago we've seen lots of images from across the United States of the right of the police reacting very force we haven't there been challenge obviously but is there something about the the essence of the policing well I can't explain what happened in buffalo or some of these other cities and those offices need to be held accountable there's been some real steps taken to hold those officers accountable I don't think the level of violence we have seen in America as a result of the Minneapolis situation we haven't seen that in probably since the Vietnam era we're gonna have to take a hard look at some of our tactics and how we approach these things this other side of this issue too is that you even in these demonstrations you basically have three groups you help by large you have peaceful demonstrators then you have a smaller group but a very difficult group all they wanna do is cause destruction and are very difficult and sometimes violent you have had police officers who have had Molotov cocktails thrown at it who could stand up to big shot who have had brain damage in the hospital of brick so you have that group that's causing that then you have the third group looks you know in some cases in some cities you have looting so it's it has been a very strong vitriolic outcome and mostly those situations in many cities do not result of what you sorry and buffalo in the both the reminder yes again if one was needed to about how the African American community people of color suffer disproportionately in the criminal justice system is this going to concentrate minds now in a way that there will be this the kind of significant reform people have been calling for for a very long time race race is very important and you are right about the disproportionate number of African Americans in the criminal justice system and I think you know that that's been throughout the system whether it's you know the police or prosecutors or prisons of all of that Sir I I think the whole issue of race in the criminal justice system is huge and some attempts have been made to try to deal with that in policing as many police departments in this country now teach implicit bias many departments have body worn video camera so that when someone makes an allegation against them they can quickly review that and then traffic stops there's been concern the police make a disproportionate number of traffic stops involving African American so attempts have been made by police departments to try to honestly deal with the race issue in terms of recruitment trying to hire a diverse workforce all of those things are hiring recruitment promotion trying to promote African Americans but you know we're not there yet we have a lot more work to be done but I think it's also important to recognize that I don't think American police are in denial at that race is an issue five years ago there was an accusation that the police gauged in racial profiling and the police were into the aisle but I think I think what you've seen is a recognition that you need to recognize that race is an issue and that you know society as a whole has racial issues how can the police operate in a way that respects everybody's rights but that's just not enough you need to put in place accountability he'd need to refute body one camera video you need to have implicit bias training you need to be pushed to diversify your work force you need to reach out to the African American community so I think police rather than being in denial I think at least for the most part more the larger cities recognize the importance of dealing with

William Barr United States Attorney
Demonstrators will continue protests until change happens in US

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:25 min | Last month

Demonstrators will continue protests until change happens in US

"Protest is stirred by the death of George Floyd, vowed to turn an extraordinary outpouring of grief into a sustained movement, as demonstration shifted to accommodate, but no less determined focus on addressing racial injustice in Minneapolis, where floyd died in police custody, the city agreed to ban police choke colds and require officers to intervene anytime. They see unauthorized full by another officer. The changes apart of a stipulation between the city and state officials who launched a civil rights investigation into Floyd's death. The country's most significant demonstrations in a half century rivaling those during the civil rights, and Vietnam War eras resumed for an eleventh day nationwide with continued momentum as the mood largely shifted from explosive anger to more peaceful calls for change, formal and impromptu memorials to floyd stretched from Minneapolis to North Carolina where family members will gather today to mourn him. Protests across the country had initially been marred by the setting of fires and smashing of windows, but yesterday marked the third day of more subdued demonstrations. As a heartfelt tribute to Floyd in Minneapolis on Thursday, the Reverend Al Sharpton outlined plans for a commemorative march on Washington in August. Vowing the movement will change the whole system of justice. In Washington City, workers and volunteers painted black lives, matter in enormous yellow letters on the street, leading to the White House in a sign of local leaders embrace of the protest. Movement. The mural stretched across sixteenth street for two blocks ending just before the church where Donald trump staged a photo op earlier in the week after federal offices forcibly cleared a peaceful demonstration to make way for the president and his entourage meanwhile assign protest voices were being heard more symbols of slavery in the confederacy came down. Mobile Alabama removed a statue of a confederate naval officer after days of protests there while Fredericksburg Virginia removed to one hundred and seventy six year old slave auction block after several years of effort by the Naacp community activists were working to convert anger and grief into long-term action.

George Floyd Minneapolis Officer Washington City Donald Trump Naacp Al Sharpton White House Alabama Fredericksburg North Carolina President Trump Virginia
Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

Software Engineering Daily

20:28 min | Last month

Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

"Honest welcome back to the show. It's great to be back under so thanks so much for having me. Of course you run. PRISMA and PRISMA is involved in workflows for accessing data. Can you describe the AP? Is that sit between the front and the back end database layer, and where PRISMA fits in sure so I think that's a pretty complex questions. It's always. Always depends on what your application architecture looks like, and there's so many angles to take does feed for example, take a more mortar jam, stag texture, or if you take a micro services architecture, the onset is always depends. What's always the same as if you build application that requires state of assistance? Then chances are you're using database and how PRISMA fits into. Is that it tries to help application developers built applications more easily was working with the databases so typically that means you're using a part of PRISMA. What's called the prisoner client that sits typically in your application server? That's typically an API server and talks to your database. Typically, this part of the stack is known as an or layer or data access layer. PRESI-, in particular is not an Orem can talk about that separately. The pretty nuanced topic, but prison up to. The main function is to serve to access state. I'm more easily in your application language. Can you talk about that in more detail? Like? Why would I need a additional layer of access I? Mean I think in general? I if I'm sitting on the front end and I want to access the database I m hitting some service that services talking to a database and the service is requesting the data from the database. Why do I need prisma to help out with that database access so this setup just to recap one more time, so you have your fronton application. Let's say you have reactive of you up on the other end. You have database. Let's say you have a more traditional postures, my sequel database, but would also apply to same for more modern. Modern Dynamo DB etc, and then typically have this middle tier that's let's say an API server, and where you would use prisma for is just having an easier time building your API server in order to talk to the database, so let's say you're using pastas. The most barebones thing you could do is implementing your Api Server and just writing implementing your points, or let's say rebuilding a graph gals over implementing overs, and then just talking directly to the database by writing raw sequel. Curry's and that works, but that comes also was some problems. Problems typically in terms of productivity, and does not quite abstraction level that you want as an application developer to be productive and confident in what you're writing the same way as fronton applications are built through abstraction layers. Let's say react angular view. It's the same on the back end that you also want more application at U. Matic obstruction layer for away you talking to the database, and historically there's been many forms of the most common one is in Orem, and they're on more modern ways of how you build a better abstraction on top. Top of fear database for data access, and that's a pattern that implementing was prisma that to be referred to as careerbuilder. Can you explain in more detail? What is the difference between a query builder and an OEM right? So that comes down to the way how you're thinking about these application patterns, an Orem stands for object, relational knepper, and the idea behind an orum is mapping a typically a database table to a class in typically object oriented programming language, and this is a pretty intuitive model and is widely used in tons of. The most prominent one of be being active record as part of friggin rails, but there tons of other ones as well and the Java world. There's hibernate and the idea there you have tons of tables in your database, and you want to map that somehow and Julia programming language and your programming language. You're typically working with classes as opposed to a career rebuilder with looks more like sequel way, but maps you sequel statements into statements in your programme language and the difference really come down to how much flexibility and control you need, but they're tons of downsides of or and that as Good more widely used became more and more well known, so there's a great block posed called the Vietnam of computer science, which is all about or ems and the problems behind orum's most importantly one thing called the object relational impedance mismatch. Talks about the problems of mapping databases database tables to objects where he's just a big amount of oven, impedance mismatch, and the way around that is that you should think about the craziest that you're writing a database instead of obsessing too much about the classes and objects, and your curry should really determine the shape of the data. You're getting back in the same way as the British striking analogy to how gruff LDL's was the sort of pattern where draft, but L. is all about the quarry writing that you need in your components, and it's a pretty similar pattern that you're now applying the way how you do. They access on the back end. If I was to set up PRISMA for Miami application. What would the life of a query look like and the structure of a query look like? So what you'd be using concretely, there is prisoner. Database took. And what you would use to career database is a part of prisma called the PRISMA Klein's. The prisoner client is basically just a Java script library that you installed installed from NPR. And you're. Writing that query ones in your coat. One great advantage is that it's fully type safe by leveraging type script, so you're writing that query and then strode run times when your application is deployed. That code gets invokes that under the hood generates a database dependent query, typically a sequel query, but as we were supporting of databases, swell could generate dynamo queries, Atra, and these queries are centered underlying database, and the data's returned, and then returned injury application code. Got It and. What the difference between using PRISMA AND USING GRAPH KUNAL! So, it's a really two fundamentally different technologies for different use cases I. think a good way to think about is where into application stack. These technology said so graphic. L. is typically used for fronton applications to talk back end up locations whereas prisoners specifically the prison. My client is used for typically your backup location to talk to your database so analogous in this way, but typically the different layers of the stack. However, it always depends was newer approaches like the jam stack your friends and education can statically directly talk to

Prisma Orem Prisma Klein AP Developer Curry U. Matic Julia Careerbuilder NPR Orum Miami
How did America get to its current state?

Between The Lines

05:06 min | Last month

How did America get to its current state?

"The scenes across the US in the past week or so, they have been profoundly disturbing heavenly. The protests are in response to the horrifying image of George. Floyd an African American man and Minneapolis. Police officer who killed him by kneeling on his nick for close to nine minutes to spot. He's pleased that he could not brave. Those demonstrations as we all know turned into, want him violence and destruction, not only in the twin cities, but all across American CDs. Today's are quiet and peaceful, but it's really the evenings in the night, so usually bring that fury. Those frustrations attend to boil over in the results or these fiery clashes that we've seen across the country, and of course here in New York. We've already seen dozens of people injured. Hundreds of people arrested in tonight. The expectation is that we could see more of these demonstrations. How did America get to this point? And who precisely are Antioch, the militant left wing political protest movement that part of these rights. Face because Nazis, thank. and. That is a very bad thing because harass people Lemay Organiz they kill. People hurt people. They fight people. And we're the ones who fighting back there. The second coming of Hitler for several decades America has I deeply divided nation. Just go back to the mid to late nineteen sixties when America experienced those long hot summers, protests and riots, Vietnam Rice and Martin. Luther King's assassination. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns and then great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate massive violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease to me that black people are in the streets. Has Do the lives air force lead in this country? And unfortunately lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy. And a certain kind of ignorance, willful ignorance on the part of their citizens. According to British historian Max Hastings Pass guest on this show in those days quote. It seemed that rice the election and the Vietnam. War would tearing asunder the greatest country on earth. And to think is deep divisions in America have clearly grown since the sixties especially in the trump era, just think of that toxic polarization, hyper partisanship in Washington and elsewhere not to mention the crisis engulfing American cities. So. How did America get to this point? Robert DALIC is arguably America's most distinguished living presidential historian. He's author of fourteen books including on Presidents FDR JFK, LBJ, Richard, Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The latest book is called. How did we get? He from Theodore Roosevelt? To Donald Trump it's published by harpercollins. Robert Delic joins me from Washington DC hi Bob. Hi Tom Lovely to hear from you. Great to have you on the show now they adopt is in Washington and across other use CDs, but America as I mentioned, before has experienced similar protests in violence. What do you think distinguishes this crosses? The widespread unrest in nineteen sixty I'd. Well, Tom. One of the things that distinguish did was the fact that Lyndon Johnson of course was. President then, and was presiding over the Vietnam War, which was at the center of what? Disturbed so many people in the United States and triggered so many of these. Demonstrations but Johnson had the good sense. To? Give up running for president. He was very skillful politician. Now we have a president who will not give up who would not resign and the only way we're going to get him out of office is by feeding him in the election. Night comes up and five months from now it's very disquieting situation and the demonstrations across this country. I believe on not. Simply a response to the tragic killing of that black man in Minneapolis, but it's also a protest against Donald Trump's presidency. You Know Tom. He's never reached fifty percent approval. And the going on for years he's been office. And this is unprecedented. No President in terms since we've had polling in the Mid Nineteen Thirties. Has Gone through a whole first term without ever reaching fifty percent approval.

America President Trump Lyndon Johnson Tom Lovely Donald Trump Floyd Robert Dalic Minneapolis United States Mid Nineteen Thirties Washington Vietnam George Luther King Officer Max Hastings Lemay Organiz New York Ronald Reagan
Larry Kramer, groundbreaking author and Aids activist, dies aged 84

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

03:13 min | Last month

Larry Kramer, groundbreaking author and Aids activist, dies aged 84

"A man named Larry Kramer died and he's not a household name except in some households. he is in mine. He was the CO founder of gay men's health crisis which is one of the first and largest AIDS service organizations ever. He was also and this is what he'll go down in history for for he was the founder of act up which is called the AIDS coalition to Unleash Power. And what act up did what they aim to do was unleash the power of the communities that were being killed hand over fist by the AIDS epidemic in its first years an act up tactics in the mold of Larry Kramer were impolite and pushy and often Cathartic and ultimately very effective. There's really been nothing else like it in my lifetime. How would you define the objectives of we want to end the AIDS epidemic? Simple as that plane. Simple cleaning some by whatever means necessary. We tried being nice. I think we've had to resort to these tactics because nobody listens quite frankly we now have some seventy chapters around the world with over a quarter million members. So I think what's happening is that the backlash is not against us. The backlashes against the system more and more people are so furious that they perceive the government. Not doing anything in this case is is the is the end so desirable that any means justifies well. We are a non-violent organization. I don't think we're here to to make friends. We're here to raise the issues no matter what you do. X. Number of people are going to approve and x number. People aren't so you might as well get your message across the best way you can. You would allow. You're not making friends. I would allow that. Aids is a very complicated issue and that we are now at last beginning to make friends. And as I said I think the groundswell of new chapters of new members is very similar to what happened during the Vietnam War where people got so angry at the government that they were forced into this frustration. And I think that's definitely what happening now. It took fifty took ten years for the first one hundred thousand cases the next hundred thousand cases. They're all going to happen. In the next fifteen months took ten years for the first hundred thousand cases the next hundred thousand cases are going to happen in the next fifteen months and our case with this epidemic took three months to get to one hundred thousand dead in the last epidemic to kill tens of thousands of Americans and the AIDS epidemic. Act UP WAS ABOUT. The people most affected by the virus speaking for themselves rather than being ignored or spoken for or worst of all spoken about it was also about unapologetic uncompromising anger at government response. That was slow and stupid and callous and not driven by science and ultimately fatal to thousands of US peaceful. Yes but angry loud at times. Profane unafraid confrontational confrontational protests backed up by willingness to do the real work of ending the epidemic

Aids Larry Kramer Co Founder Aids Coalition United States
US virus death toll passes 100,000

AP News Radio

01:04 min | Last month

US virus death toll passes 100,000

"The virus pandemic has now killed more than one hundred thousand Americans and president trump is struggling to respond to a national tragedy in the same way his predecessors did there was George W. bush after nine eleven in Barack Obama after twenty first graders were killed in their Connecticut classroom I come to offer the love and prayers of the nation those were cited tragedies the pandemic built over months with president trump brushing it off in February one day it's like a miracle it will disappear two weeks after that the question is how many people will die and in mid April I think will be substantially hopefully below the hundred number more Americans that were killed in the Vietnam and Korean wars combined with critics insisting far fewer would have died had he acted sooner the president insists it's the other way we would have had anywhere from ten to twenty or twenty five times the number of deaths tweeting a similar message to quote all the political hacks out there Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump George W. Bush Barack Obama President Trump Connecticut Vietnam Ani Washington
Coronavirus: The human cost of virus misinformation

BBC World Service

04:26 min | Last month

Coronavirus: The human cost of virus misinformation

"We here at the BBC have been tracking the human cost of coronavirus misinformation this includes the souls awesome injuries and deaths as a result of room is false speculation bogus cures and fake posts online Mariana spring from BBC trending has some of the findings Brian lives in Florida in April he posted his thoughts on corona virus on Facebook he wasn't quite sure what current advice really was but because of things he read online he was convinced that the expats were lying I saw those may be is there you know are they still working on the five G. because I've heard rumors not from any news sources but people talking about old you know it could cause fax people getting sick over a five G. towers and being too close just one of the many conspiracy theories that have been circulating online during the pandemic Brian and his wife didn't keep away from other people or seek help when they fell with corona virus the couple ended up in hospital that's why he was when I speak to him by fighting he was getting better but still struggling to breathe his wife was in a much more serious condition one of until later in a nearby ward the battle that they've been having is with her longs there in flames and they've trying to get to the best medication that they can sign I was available to be able to help with that and her body just is just not responding Brian is no longer karenna vice conspiracy theorist and this case is just one of many examples of how dangerous misinformation can be the BBC's anti disinformation unit has investigated hundreds of misinformation cases and found dozens resulted in real human cost like the virus is spread all over the world misleading information about the drug hydroxy car Quinn has let the poisonings in the U. S. Vietnam and Nigeria online remiss led to multi tax in India those conspiracy theories that Brian mentioned about five G. mobile technology well fed masa possess a light in the UK and other countries perhaps the deadliest incident happened in Iran where health authorities say misleading messages about the preventive effects of drinking alcohol went viral on social media Cheyenne's Atari's all day is a disinformation expert with BBC monitoring we start seeing posts eighteen telegram which is one of the most popular messaging apps in Iran I'm also on Instagram that was means videos that was suggesting drinking alcohol can actually boost the immune system and disinfect the body and soul and someone from catching Corbett ninety the authorities say the room is because nearly eight hundred deaths is difficult to verify each case in a country where the media is heavily restricted experts say there's no reason for the Iranian authorities to downplay the deaths coronavirus present something of a nightmare situation for fact checkers like clam mailed from the British organization full facts we know that bad information can ruin lives and at the moment in the middle of such a huge part of that make such great potential for harm if people aren't getting the right information it's not just touchy Facebook group so what messages causing harm some of the most misleading information comes directly from world leaders and public figures and then I see the disinfectant we're not set up in a minute one and is there a way we can do something like that doctors and poison centers in the U. S. told us they've seen patients coming to die right Tom because of misinformation promoted by president trump and others Dr Duncan Marie treats crate of ours patients at Elmhurst hospital in New York City I do think that president trump's comments are a really tragic example where I think that the spread of misinformation actually influenced some of the messaging that comes from our public officials particularly if they have constituents who are vulnerable to that misinformation throughout the pandemic conspiracy groups have seen the number swelled on Facebook this is what some doctors respect T. fear the most Brian the current of ours patient in Florida has a message for the conspiracists we just can't be playing around anymore distancing Israel and yeah sure we'll listen from the beginning I agree I didn't do that and I'm sorry I don't know the people there won't forget me

BBC
Marseilles, IL Pays Tribute to Soldiers Who Died IN Middle East Conflicts

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:15 min | Last month

Marseilles, IL Pays Tribute to Soldiers Who Died IN Middle East Conflicts

"In just about every community there is a memorial look for those who died in service to our country A. B. C.'s Ryan burrow takes us to a newer memorial welcome to our sales Illinois located about eighty miles southwest of Chicago for decades the sleepy town of about five thousand people along the banks of the Illinois river was best known as the home of a Nabisco cardboard box manufacturer but today people flock to this town and specifically to this site along the raging river to pay homage to service members who have made the ultimate sacrifice not in Vietnam or World War two but in Middle East conflicts such as Iraq Afghanistan and numerous other conflicts some of which don't even have names dating back decades there is nothing else like this in in the entire country we are the only one Middle East conflicts wall memorial I met by ray pro Caskey president of the Illinois motorcycle freedom run a key supporter did this privately funded massive monuments born in Afghanistan in all the different battles you have in Iraq and what not nine eleven basically kicked this all off at the entry point of the memorial of granite slab edge to the lines a tribute to her role ex servicemen and servicewomen who sacrificed their lives in Middle East conflicts while keeping America

A. B. C. Ryan Burrow Illinois Chicago Illinois River Vietnam Afghanistan Ray Pro Caskey Iraq America Nabisco Middle East President Trump
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"<music>. Let's get to the things that are closer to the world of programming and coding education the world of enterprise software in Vietnam. <hes> one phenomenon that we've seen is that a lot of the software that has been made in the West is the same software that people want to buy abroad so slack for example. I don't think there is a slack for India for example. I think it's just slack I'm sure there are some variations on slack but I think slack has gone a really headstart and they really good headstart and they've just doubled down relentlessly that also true for other categories like you know salesforce or Zen desk or or even know even know about these these other categories like I'm just curious about how Vietnamese enterprises by their software if they buy it the same way softwares purchased in the West. That's a good question in my my experience with that is the use the same authoress West so when he comes running a business. I've always had this interesting because kind of like you can't expect maybe if G._D._p.. Earth may per capita income has lower here like you would expect some discount or some way to make things more accessible accessible but my experience like the big corporations. It's just a costing business if you need S._A._P.. You Need S._A._P.. And you have to find ways to make that work and generally speaking. I don't think as a piece going to give discount or changed. Their product significantly for this market are their regional all business software products that you've seen decatur to particular like I've see for example <hes> like I again at that. There are regional consumer products. You know particular regional ridesharing APP for example but have you seen any regional enterprise software pressure. Has It really just been predominantly the the Western companies like S._A._p.. Or whatever right I think if the most part it seems like you know this big businesses are operating at the same kind of high levels so using the same as S._A._p.'s or oracles of the world the maybe like one thing I have seen as not sure if this counts enterprise but there have been homegrown solutions to maybe common business problems for example P._S.. Software I find fascinating because that's all done here like the deleting ones are all built in Vietnam. You wouldn't use like a foreign countries pugh offer just because it's cost prohibitive. Let's talk post public education system..

slack Vietnam. authoress West India decatur S._A._p.
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The biggest minority group hereby <unk> numbers of Knob you to me is the biggest foreign population is actually Korean Salah people. You'll see cacao talk here's while to it's really interesting. How this all these players? It's kind of like melting pot of technologies Vietnam. which is maybe part of the reason why so fun to be here? Although I'm sure it gets like annoying at times we have to swap between like fifty different. Messaging eggs is already enough in western messaging APPS and now you've got like five other ones that are just you probably you have different sets of subsets of people that just have different norms and cash cow talk because of the stickers or something yeah but also funny how I think in America we tend to want one winner like I think as Americans like no we only only have one APP. You don't have the APP and I WanNa talk to you and lots of countries. I thought here it's like you don't have that actually from the beginning people just like oh you want. How do you want to be contacted and it's not a big deal? Actually we don't have to talk about this but given given that you are. Somebody who's worldly and only mean that in the sense that you've been to places around the world. Do you have an opinion on the norms that are developing in China around and how how the government is using messaging APPs to coordinate the public behavior in in certain ways. Do you think that is that. Is that a feature a bug yeah. That's a pretty spicy question. Hard are to answer on my personal views on it. I will say though that I think regardless of what that's a feature a bug. I think that's a question that's facing a lot of countries today. N. Vietnam's no exception so one of the bigger things happening in Vietnam is Vietnam past this data privacy law recently which is saying that kind of more China ask approach saying information about Vietnamese citizens needs to be kept in Vietnam so like facebook with Saturday have to start keeping information about their users here in Vietnam Google as well and it's right now. It's kind of trying to carefully 'cause but yet right now. That's I think that's kind of open issue on what the rights on what the past this country will go down while it's going to be more like whether they're going to go with Chinese viewpoint or perhaps American viewpoint indeed what about consumer apps so I don't travel that much but I went and this is not like a travel drop here but I went to Tel Aviv recently and there was like so much scooter usage in Tel Aviv like scooters were really practical in for tel-aviv and scooters pretty practical in San Francisco scooters practical and other areas of of the United States but they were extremely practical in Tel Aviv and there's the first time I realized okay all right. I am a scooter. I'm officially a scooter believer like I am officially believed that this is something that's going to be a big deal and I've had similar experiences with things like food delivery. Tell me about things like food delivery and ridesharing and scooter sharing. How have these technologies impacted Vietnam? That's a good question. I think the biggest thing I the first thing I thought about when you ask those questions is what's different about Vietnam or or perhaps other emerging markets in the biggest difference is the overall cost of labor is much lower in the U._S.. So the solutions here tend to be a bit more manual but also like like I think they can scale much faster uh because they don't have as many like headaches on the on the Labor side so in terms of food delivery food delivers everywhere. It's fantastic actually and I think it's a lot easier and faster than perhaps in San Francisco intensity technologies as I remember the biggest in the past four years there used to be these guys that would these motorbikes mopeds that would just be on the corner winning two people out. You'd actually have he friendly neighborhood motorbike guy who ticket work those guys have all all been completely replaced by the APPS the big one out here in Southeast Asia has called grab their competitor Uber in the space until Hooper left half years ago but that's completely changed landscape..

N. Vietnam Tel Aviv Vietnam. China San Francisco America Southeast Asia facebook Hooper United States four years
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Wow Oh wow so it says there are lots of technologists even perhaps enterprising technologists in Vietnam but they don't have an ethos or they don't have high enough standards or they don't have guidance towards a higher ideal than just copy pasting an APP and then launching in the APP store. Yeah I would say that there are a lot of year people people who are smarter figure technology may be on their own embiid lots of great things but perhaps not having a long-term vision or knowing exactly what they want to build an add to the world. What's the public perception of the Tech Industry and Vietnam like an in America become pretty aspirational to go into the technology world? Do People aspire to become software engineers in Vietnam this funny question when I came here for came from San Francisco so it was already being into me that technology is the cure to all the world's problems and sway to change the world hugh when it first came. Actually I think Vietnam was transitioning shing a bit historically. The big multinational corporations that came here opened up marketing here first so you have your big global brands your consumer product brands are hiring to sell approximate Vietnam in those people always always inevitably start with marketing sales business type operations so I think historically all the best jobs kind of international scale where on the business marketing side encoding was that as more of the outsourcing <hes> kind of the factory worker esque thing back in the day now. Let's change really rapidly I think today you've had a lot of really successful. Vietnamese software engineers builds amazing. Things and people are starting to see the true. Impact Technology can't have half on the world and it's become much more aspirational yeah there was this thing in the I think it was like the nineties in early two thousand and I guess it still exists some degree today this the word outsourcing sourcing where you would send your tech technol- kind of undifferentiated heavy lifting technology like building Your Java J. E. E. APP to Vietnam or a place in India somewhere. This was never a very good strategy or was it was a good strategy for getting getting stuff out there quickly I guess but it led to on maintainable code it led to a lack of creativity developing among those engineers who were stuff was outsource to so you're saying that that was endemic in Vietnam yeah all the early industry <music> softer wise was completely around that mystery and you talk by that sounds terrible. One of my favorite stories is one of our students that we taught rebound rails to he came from literally programming Fortran for bank so it was sorry it wasn't Fortran. He has cobalt Obama <unk> Cam yeah so using COBOL for bank in France and look at. I think that one thing I've learned actually is how big industry really is in. How much software is be maintained by people all over the world hand? It's helps make the world go round so he can't disparage the importance of the industry but at the same time you're absolutely right. I don't think it instills good sufferings during principles in and people to be in the industry. I think there's emphasis on maybe doing things as quickly as possible as cheaply as possible without always weighing the long-term interests of architecture or or what the customer needs in the instance someday. I'm going to look up what Cobol Code looks like. I have not seen it. I just talk about it like it's like something that would be found in archaeological dig but it's it's it's alive and well. I need to do some shows about it to perhaps chiefs. This show is about does there are many experts that go to Vietnam to have a cheap standard of living while they work remotely for a Western Company or they are an entrepreneur her why is Vietnam and appealing place as a digital no man. I really cringe it hearing that term till no really yeah..

Vietnam Obama Impact Technology America San Francisco Western Company hugh India France
"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Charles Lee Welcome Software Engineering Daily High Pleasure to be here today. We're GONNA talk about the technology landscape in Vietnam and particularly the world of coding education in Vietnam. Let's start with the tech industry. Describe the technology industry and Vietnam yeah if I did describe the tech industry in Vietnam and use one word which is growing so it's growingly fast as a lot of companies both within Vietnam I an from outside Vietnam. They're coming here and setting up shop in hiring developers building awesome products. I've been here for about four years in that time. I've seen explosion of developers but even when I came here for years ago I remember the statistics six being that Vietnam had the most apps on the Google play store by large margin of any country in Southeast Asia. That's a strange statistic yet at the time actually four years ago the talk of the town was flappy bird flappy bird so there's a lot of emphasis on mobile applications at a time. How is it possible that the most smartphone apps from any country come out of Vietnam like were they? Eh what were the APPS. What were they even doing? How are there so many of them yeah so that's kind of a dark side test statistic which also is part of the reason that we're here to try to fix a few these things which is their most number of APPS and most developers but the <unk> overall quality as Google find it was not very high meaning? There were a lot of kind of copies of other apps and people are just quick to can copy APPs or make. These kind of absent didn't create a lot of value pushed him to play store..

Vietnam Google Charles Lee Southeast Asia four years
"vietnam" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"If not currently amongst the happiness, there are the happiest more on that later, the richest amongst the Vietnamese owned water buffaloes to help with the farming duties, the Vietnamese for the most part before the French really got over there and stirred shit up for a peaceful rural agricultural people women were stores treated relatively well. In Vietnam when the Vietnamese govern themselves and women had a surprising amount of thirty for their times for that time. But eighty percent of eaten AMIS people were literate and equality of education. In the villages was high the v. Amis learn to read and write in their own language through a form of calligraphy talk to them by the Chinese the average Vietnamese citizen before the French colonization was wearing homemade clothes traded for goods only within the village, he or she was most likely Buddhist, and we practice these beliefs concert with the Buddhist priests or consort with the Buddhist priests and partake in customary rituals. And then again, France came and fucked everything up for the Vietnamese, and the French occupation of Vietnam would lead directly to the Vietnam war in eighteen Fifty-eight, France invades and takes control of Vietnam by the end of the nineteenth century. They would also take control of Cambodia and eighteen sixty three in Laos in eighteen ninety three that big block of Asian land would become known collectively as French Indochina. The French takeover had been hundreds of years in the making in the sixteenth century. European missionaries brought in modern weapons and western goods. The missionaries were also welcomed by the locals for their technical skills by the late sixteen sixty the French East, India company in organization credited with both expand trade and Cathal. Says had a foothold in Indochina over the three centuries of French occupation and pattern of controlled merged. Every once in a while when a French priest trade trader or soldier was attacked or killed by the locals, the France would retaliate by taking more control and extending their power, eventually the French seize control officially taken over much of the people's land making a class system with privilege French at the top they took over and carved up a part of Asia, just like they done in Africa as we learned back in suck seventy two the colonial destruction of Africa. The French also played rival factions of the Vietnamese against each other. They intervene and land disputes, and the winning faction would reward the French with moorland and the right to spread French trade influence in religion. And in eighteen ninety three like mentioned, the French made Vietnam part of French Indochina by the nineteen twenties. A French bureaucracy.

Vietnam Indochina France Amis Africa Cambodia Laos India Cathal Asia three centuries eighty percent
"vietnam" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weather batteries would drain too quickly since there's would go dead earlier than expected. It was also really hard to get an accurate placement of sensors the sensors were being deployed from aircraft and dropped directly onto the jungle floor in some cases without a parachute. They acted almost like a spear and went straight down and would imbed into the ground. So it was kind of hard to get them placed. Just right. Plus it was very dangerous. There were flight crews that were constantly under fire while trying to deploy the sensors so it was a very tough thing to do. And it never quite got out to the level that the Jason group had really envisioned, and it didn't really pan out for Vietnam. But it did prove to be a powerful proof of concept for unmanned sensors and system of systems in which a large amount of data could be fed into an analysis system for real time combat conditions in decisions and essentially a lot of military officials after the fact said yet didn't. In Vietnam because it never been done before it didn't it wasn't fully baked, but it was a proof of concept that would become invaluable in future. Conflicts back at home are pa- provided funding to the Stanford research institute in in the efforts to develop a robot with the ability to navigate its way through a set of rooms which was a truly revolutionary chievements back in the mid nineteen sixties Arpaio would agree to the proposal that Stanford gave to them and so work began on what would eventually be known as shakey the robot. It's called shaky because the robot would shake as it moved this project took several years the actual robot wasn't ready for a demonstration until the early nineteen seventies. But it began in the mid nineteen sixties Arp is research and work during the Vietnam conflict stuff that would impact the Vietnam conflict continued throughout the entire history of our involvement in the Vietnam war, and it would continue to harm the reputation of the agency as. Well, in many ways by the time, the United States would withdraw from the Vietnam war Arpaio would end up being separated from the Pentagon and set up a new offices and also have a much lower budget than it had before. In our next episode. I will talk a little bit more about some of the final projects that are did in connection to the Vietnam war. Also, talk about some of the crazy, psychological projects that are got involved with as well as some of the other cool technological projects that the agency got involved with now because this history is so dense, and because it involves so many different topics and technologies of many of which we are enjoying the benefits of today. I am probably going to break this up. So that our next episode will be the last one in this DARPA ark. And then I'll take a break from DARPA, and we'll talk about some other technologies, and then perhaps a few more weeks from now I'll come back, and we'll continue the story of DARPA because I don't want tech stuff to become DARPA stuff. But I do think that the full story of DARPA is fascinating. And we will have to come back. To it. So next episode. We'll probably wrap up the nineteen sixties since I've done four episodes. And I haven't been able to get through a decade yet. And then we'll see where we are after that. And continue it further into the future. If you guys have suggestions for topics I should tackle and future. Episodes of tech stuff. It doesn't have to be a multi episode arc. It could be.

Vietnam DARPA Arpaio Stanford research institute Arp Jason United States pa Stanford Pentagon
"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"It was a very different postwar world for the veterans who came back from Vietnam because this was a war. We lost and Americans. I can again say from experience we used to be very proud of the fact that you could say we never lost a war. You Canadians do not need to write me about the war. Eighteen twelve I realized that that say I of the beholder issue a little bit. And I don't wanna get new couple of others with you. But you know, what I mean, theoretically, kind of sort of in our own minds never lost a war. Vietnam was hard to deny. Vietnam also broke the army for a while. And this is a a point. That's well understood. If you read about this kind of stuff, it's not talked about a lot what it did to the US army between let's just say sixty five and seventy was amazing again, something you wouldn't have thought could happen to an American army. But then it hadn't been put in that kind of situation before as we said look at the French Algieria you find yourself in these kinds of of situations. And all of a sudden, it's a little bit different. You had drug abuse. You add the short to reduce either a lot of things the army really looked at a lot of things after the war trying to figure out what had happened. And if you're interested in that subject, by the way, Andrew j baseba has written several books describing the rebuilding of the US military after Vietnam, and what was required and the safeguards that the military brass tried to put into place to keep the civilians from ever putting them in that situation, again didn't work, but. There were safeguards put into Colin Powell's written about this too. And he was involved in some of this stuff. But people don't talk about that very much for the you look at the American army in nineteen Seventy-three who and that's from the Vietnam war. And it wasn't just you know, the morale and whatnot. I mean, there was a real. I mean fragging was something that was talked about a lot, you know, at fragging is right. The shooting of your own officers or the throw a grenade at them. When no one's looking. We were fragging our officers. Sometimes you don't find a lot of that from the second World War. But in the second World War, we had a very different kind of US image. And the thing about the images you kinda live up to that. You try to stay Americans. Don't do this. It became hard to say Americans. Don't do this after Vietnam. It was it was the the war that proved that we were human. Right. We we we were as good guys as we tried to be, but we were human. Anybody who goes back and dives deep into things like the Philippine insurrection or you know, some of the native American war, certainly we've proven this point before in US history. Nonetheless, kinda need to relearn it every generation or two it seems..

Vietnam US American army army Colin Powell fragging French Algieria Andrew j baseba
"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"Hundred pages or twenty six hour Harker history series on the first World War either way. It's it's explainable, you know, understandable. The most interesting part to me since I already know the battle stuff, although if you're into the battle stuff, he's awesome, historically. He's awesome. The most interesting thing for me, though, is to see how he can synthesize. All this stuff. That's happened in the decades since that era. I was born in nineteen sixty five nineteen sixty I was born by the way on on the one of the worst battles of the war the one that made the movie about that's my birthday, November fourteenth nights sixty five battle of the valley. But when I was a kid just starting to become aware, you know, it's all the older brothers. And those people who were the ones being drafted who were living through all this stuff. So in the nineteen seventies. It was it's hard to explain this was a transition period in US history. So this is what I want this introduction to max things. Cirmac Hastings interview to be let me sort of cover the bases again for those who weren't there and try to set up a little of this and let you know why it's important to you. And why it matters and history in this case there is a before and after in US history, and we all know. There several right. You've got before. And after the civil wars classic one for people use before. And after the Vietnam era go look at a photograph of Americans. We'll just choose a big city because there was a lot of continuity in some of the less big cities where people look the same over the decades, they they are more conservative changeless, slowly less flash. More down to earth people, but you get some photos from an LA, Chicago, Miami, New York, some of the hip places supposedly, and you show a photo from nineteen sixty three and you compare those same people in a photo in nineteen seventy three, and you don't even have to say another word, you know, that the culture has totally changed. The Vietnam war is one of the major factor points that account for this and there's several and they're much talked about birth control pill, the sexual revolution music. I mean, just there's a number of major factors, but without the Vietnam war, you might not have any of those things it's one of the prime movers. And as a friend of mine who is at the protests back in the. Day pointed out, and the prime mover was the fact that many people might have go and suffer in a war that they really didn't wanna be a part of that tends to concentrate the mind in a way that just some ideological 'cause wouldn't that prime mover pushed forward a lot of the Aarhus change in the zeitgeist for lack of a better phrase. It's kinda strange changing zeitgeist. But I mean, the the culture flipped now once again, not in some places, the American heartland was remarkably consistent, but in many places, and in terms of what Madison Avenue is feeding you Hollywood's feed you and all that the culture release Vietnam is an important point in that. It was also an era of extreme disillusion with the government. It's hard to explain once again, how different Americans were before Vietnam. And after if I just said, we believed our government that right? There is hard to square. It's so far beyond what most people today are raised with. And it wasn't just. Believed the person in your party in general, Democrats and Republicans believed the president it didn't matter who the president. Was you didn't think your government lied you?.

Vietnam US president Cirmac Hastings Aarhus LA Hollywood Chicago New York Miami twenty six hour
"vietnam" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"And I think it's because I was so fucking enraptured in the present day Pearson's that them going back to Vietnam. I just kept waiting on like a flash forward to like, okay, so how does Rando right now, and and when I realize I over not getting any of that, this is just jacks, like well, written back story or whatever. I was like, okay, so we're here now. And if felt like because of the ending which will get to if felt like we're coming back here and I don't know. My mom's thought we would just kinda get, okay, this is what happened in Nikki. This is kind of his war experience and then back to the few back to the present next week or whatever. So, but yes, it was well done stuff. So. Let's get into the breakdown. All right guys. So this joint stars with Jack in Vietnam, and they're playing Vietnam because Vietnam media after play that like seventies rock. SO playing Vietnam using and stuff. And we see Jack in uniform with a gun hopping on a helicopter being like we gotta go like, oh, getting dropped off and his and his, the guy in the back of the helicopters like, no, you gotta do that top secret government stuff. I was like, was Jack in black ups. Is that. Down this saddening leader shit like. But then he gets out and he walks over like through Vietnam, I camp and everything, and there's a guy who's burning. Like burning materials or something. And he turns around and he's like, hey, little brother something. And so at that point, we know like, oh, this is NICKY who also went to Vietnam and his jacket said, died in Vietnam. So I'm like, okay, he got to go see his brother somehow. I also did not realize this episode would be taking place backwards. So I was like, okay, so then what did they say to each other? And you don't know. You never find out. But you know, I did have many questions like, can you do that in or can I be like some I brother is like two towns over. Is it okay much hop a helicopter and go check them out. So I did want to know how they did that. So at this point it does do that. This is a slight trickery storyteller net. They're so great at because then it's like everything is what happened just before that. And so this one. Is Jack his platoon, I guess, is that what we're. I don't know. Okay, his war, his Apocalypse. Now, his friend. I don't know back his troop of people. He is a sergeant apparently staff sergeant. He's been promoted over the black dude named Donny Robinson who has been there twice as long ready or something. And Jack is like, yeah, I don't know why they promoted me to sergeant and I was like, yes, you do. You know. Roberson a him. I really good friends and they're walking through the jungle, whatever, and Jackson, all the military stuff. You know that you see in the movies where it's like, you know, squirrels soa. So check the rear look at our plane, whatever. And Roberson does things in every war movie. That means something bad happen to you starts talking about. We're going to get home and I said, no, no, no, no, adorable black people. Please never talk about what you go. Always same. I got a little girl named best it when I get back to Memphis, and I'm gonna tell you right now. I'm on hugger and I'm gonna marry as soon as I get my. Nope. Nope. You know, I did. Always the thing that whatever they say they want to do or going to miss always correlates with how they die or what they lose may. I can't to use my. I can't wait. I'm gonna tell you right now. I'm used as painless. That's what I'm telling you. So, yeah, he's like. Op plan? I'm gonna play baseball. I'm a d. go trial for the giants, and I'm gonna make the team and they're like Jack, like, nah. No, you can't do that or whatever, whatever, like you just full share jet Roberson right now. And if I don't make, I'm go to Pittsburgh and I'm gonna take this other players and I'm gonna take his wife, his house, his car, and I'm seeing you take Jackson, I believe that wanna see, you know..

Jack Vietnam Roberson Jackson Rando Pearson giants Donny Robinson NICKY baseball Pittsburgh Memphis
"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Obsession. The suicidal Ita Shen embarrassed of shine. If I don't get help and get what I need to get. You know, I did some horrible, horrible things and I'm not going to be here much longer God. I wish I could go back and undo them, but I can't snipers, which shoot in her science. My father was a notorious pimp in Boston. I can't do this anymore. It was kinda like Skopje's chain. So many life just by listening to former ability comes. It felt like I've been holding a sword and shield and dropped. And to this day I had never had a better. Actually, I started crying and a job that of you say like eludes, horrid man, Elise. And I didn't get that job. With Michael Duffy, who is Vietnam vet and author of a book called from Chicago to Vietnam memoir of war and. Man, some of the descriptions in that book of things that you encountered and Vietnam. I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. You are exactly right for once. Well, I don't know you well enough, so I don't know what happened yesterday. First of all, I want to say, welcome to a Chicago win. And can I just tell you how sickly comforting? It was to hear somebody using the word Jag off in a book. It's such a Chicago word. I don't hear it anywhere else at guys that guy's a fucking Jag off my God. Yeah, Jagath was probably the first slur that was hurled at me and grade school. So I went back and I thought jeeze should I asked my dad with that means and I didn't. I found out from a neighbor kid in the next apartment building over. But yeah, we use it a lot in Chicago. I don't use it much anymore. So I was saying that I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. Well, that's right. And there's so many. You know, every war is different. This one happened to be the unpopular one. So you know, they weren't sending us care packages and and rally round the flag. It was difficult because we, we all were listening to and reading the news back in the United States with the the tumbled with the convention in Chicago, the democratic national convention and all of the protests. So we had this angst. We carried with us when that happened, but some of the descriptions I put in the book of over and above combat, which in itself is, you know, almost another world, the just the living conditions, the bureaucracy that was the thing that. That really struck me. Michael opens his book with describing landing in Vietnam and. What did you tell them? Yeah. So in mcchord air force base out of Washington, we were issued all our clothes for Vietnam, jungle fatigues, silly hats, the jungle hat, combat boots. So I went over in a khaki, short sleeve, shirt and kicki pants landed and Cameron bay about three in the morning. And they through our duffle bags in a big pile. Everybody Claude through them. And I ended up as being the last man standing without a bag. So I had nothing. No weapon. No. Now the weapons interesting because no one had a weapon, they are issued down at the company level. Certainly the people that that greeted us. Yeah, they had weapons, but the soldier when it gets to his individual company or my case battery and artillery battery unit, that's when we were issued the weapons. But really you, you stand out like a big sore thumb with these bright khakis. So I was told on more than one occasion, Lieutenant Duffy you better get out of those khakis. You look like a target as it because you you look like an officer. You looked a little of both. We have little. I was I had a gold bar and of course that reflects the sun. But mainly everyone else had green fatigues and and a blended in with. The olive drab of our equipment in Vietnam, and I was walking around with these. Khaki fatigues. I don't know. At first I was relaxed, but when the next morning I was sent to Saigon and ran out on the tarmac and that's where they told me the base is under attack..

Chicago Vietnam Lieutenant Duffy Skopje Ita Shen Boston Jagath Saigon Elise Cameron bay United States Washington Michael Claude officer
"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"Obsession. The suicidal Ita Shen embarrassed of shine. If I don't get help and get what I need to get. You know, I did some horrible, horrible things and I'm not going to be here much longer God. I wish I could go back and undo them, but I can't snipers, which shoot in her science. My father was a notorious pimp in Boston. I can't do this anymore. It was kinda like Skopje's chain. So many life just by listening to former ability comes. It felt like I've been holding a sword and shield and dropped. And to this day I had never had a better. Actually, I started crying and a job that of you say like eludes, horrid man, Elise. And I didn't get that job. With Michael Duffy, who is Vietnam vet and author of a book called from Chicago to Vietnam memoir of war and. Man, some of the descriptions in that book of things that you encountered and Vietnam. I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. You are exactly right for once. Well, I don't know you well enough, so I don't know what happened yesterday. First of all, I want to say, welcome to a Chicago win. And can I just tell you how sickly comforting? It was to hear somebody using the word Jag off in a book. It's such a Chicago word. I don't hear it anywhere else at guys that guy's a fucking Jag off my God. Yeah, Jagath was probably the first slur that was hurled at me and grade school. So I went back and I thought jeeze should I asked my dad with that means and I didn't. I found out from a neighbor kid in the next apartment building over. But yeah, we use it a lot in Chicago. I don't use it much anymore. So I was saying that I can't imagine anybody goes through that and comes out unchanged. Well, that's right. And there's so many. You know, every war is different. This one happened to be the unpopular one. So you know, they weren't sending us care packages and and rally round the flag. It was difficult because we, we all were listening to and reading the news back in the United States with the the tumbled with the convention in Chicago, the democratic national convention and all of the protests. So we had this angst. We carried with us when that happened, but some of the descriptions I put in the book of over and above combat, which in itself is, you know, almost another world, the just the living conditions, the bureaucracy that was the thing that. That really struck me. Michael opens his book with describing landing in Vietnam and. What did you tell them? Yeah. So in mcchord air force base out of Washington, we were issued all our clothes for Vietnam, jungle fatigues, silly hats, the jungle hat, combat boots. So I went over in a khaki, short sleeve, shirt and kicki pants landed and Cameron bay about three in the morning. And they through our duffle bags in a big pile. Everybody Claude through them. And I ended up as being the last man standing without a bag. So I had nothing. No weapon. No. Now the weapons interesting because no one had a weapon, they are issued down at the company level. Certainly the people that that greeted us. Yeah, they had weapons, but the soldier when it gets to his individual company or my case battery and artillery battery unit, that's when we were issued the weapons. But really you, you stand out like a big sore thumb with these bright khakis. So I was told on more than one occasion, Lieutenant Duffy you better get out of those khakis. You look like a target as it because you you look like an officer. You looked a little of both. We have little. I was I had a gold bar and of course that reflects the sun. But mainly everyone else had green fatigues and and a blended in with. The olive drab of our equipment in Vietnam, and I was walking around with these. Khaki fatigues. I don't know. At first I was relaxed, but when the next morning I was sent to Saigon and ran out on the tarmac and that's where they told me the base is under attack..

Chicago Vietnam Lieutenant Duffy Skopje Ita Shen Boston Jagath Saigon Elise Cameron bay United States Washington Michael Claude officer
"vietnam" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"What vietnam showed people at the beginning of the war these lies that were told were seen as unusual and bat by the end of the war they were bad but they were not so unusual anymore and you know now we're in a situation as we know in which in in some way what politicians do what what our leaders do is neither unusual nor bad because we can all defined that i think i think differently so that the the cynicism is a problem it seems to me and it's at least partly vietnam because it corrodes our faith in government it also corrodes it seems to me or can corrode our faith and democracy because you have a sense that will nothing i do matter sir dern there's no point in trying to affect change because of this and i think vietnam at least has something to say about this i would also say very briefly that in terms of foreign policy which is another way to assess this that we should take away from vietnam and i'm not sure that we fully did with respect to our more recent interventions taking iraq and afghanistan in afghanistan in particular but maybe some others that um it's ultimately about politics and its of ultimately about politics in the place in question and you can have all the military firepower in the world is the united states of course does but as i suggested a moment ago if you don't have political stability in saigon and if the south vietnamese cannot on some level win their own fight at least substantially it isn't going to happen and of course there's a dilemma for the united states from the beginning the dilemma is how do you wager counterinsurgency that will involve using violence in the countryside when that use violence risks alienating the very people that you want to bring to the government side that was never slept but i thought the idea behind counterinsurgency is that was supposed to solve the problem that was a way of sugar squaring the circle the as you would win the hearts and minds woodland norton why not this power not art i certainly if we're gonna talk about alternative strategies.

vietnam united states saigon iraq afghanistan
"vietnam" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"About his new book the road not taken edward lansdale in the american experience in vietnam max boot is my guest today he's a senior fellow for national security studies of the council on foreign relations an author of the new book the road not taken edward lansdale in the american experience in vietnam so new york times bestseller seller already we have an excerpt of his book on our website on point radio dot org now max uh you were saying before the break that uh he a lot of cash aaa uh within the american government but your book traces the change in that when he uh ultimately came to be regarded as a bit of a crank coups advice wasn't uh welcome i want to play one clip of the united states president lyndon johnson a nineteen 65 announcing a major troop surged to vietnam after eleven years of war between the two countries and we can talk about whether this was the point where he began to lose influence i have today ordered to vietnam there our mobile division and certain other forces which will raise are fighting strength from seventy five thousand to one hundred and 25000 man almost immediately additional forces will be needed later and they will be sent as requested max was the moment when the us government scaled up the war dramatically the moment when they decided that what uh ed lansdale was talking about was to smallbore to be successful and they can actually occurred earlier than that i think the turning point uh was really 1963 uh one you had the military coup in south vietnam that overthrew note in gm that was in many ways that pivot point uh in the vietnam war because prior to that we had a bunch of advisors in in vietnam american troops were not find large in leading the the actual combat operations but after you had those em cu uh the stability in south vietnam all but collapsed one coup.

edward lansdale senior fellow american government united states lyndon johnson vietnam gm vietnam war american troops york times president ed lansdale smallbore eleven years
"vietnam" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on The Moth

"It was in saigon the capital of south vietnam in at the end of the vietnam war i was fourteen at a time old enough to understand that south vietnam was facing a grim situation so vietnam was collapsing rapidly under the advancing force of north vietnam i could send the panic intelligency in the airport was buzzing with military airplanes vehicles push now but four might do brothers and i the only thing though was on our mind at the time was that we're going to america this was a dream coming to for us nine years before that our dad had die fighting ended the war in a year later a mom died in a traffic accident so the neighbors bought the three of us to an orphanage it was while living endorphin it that i came to the realization that the my brothers and i would not be an enormous education the we didn't have parents like briggler kit to provide for us to us to give givers our futures but our futures were unknown uncertain as the oldest child of the three i took over the reason the pierre and responsibilities fall into vietnamese tradition so as a seven your perrine i worry del lost a lot for the seven years we were living in the orphanage i constantly worried about how i'm going to take care of my brothers how we are going to survive in a land that even ordinary people were having a tough time because of the war.

vietnam war vietnam pierre america endorphin seven years nine years
"vietnam" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The north vietnamese had a plan for a big offensive a game changer what was it well they decided to launch attacks on just about every city in south vietnam so the north vietnamese strategy was to infiltrate large numbers of troops throughout the south and launch on the teat the eve of tet their big holiday attacks in all these cities the largest of the offensive was planned for highway and way hole held a special place in the country's cultural history tell us about well it it it's it really is a beautiful city and in in ages past was the imperial seat for the unified country of vietnam it had you know the citadel which was a giant fortress which contain the imperial palace which is where the emperor's used to live and rain the city itself was home to the major universities in vietnam it was big buddhist centre and also fairly large catholic center it was the home to a lot of intellectuals of and if so it had of of a deep cultural meaning in vietnam that i think frankly escaped of the american command and it had largely been on unmarred by the war right that's right out of partly out of respect for the institutions in way for the historical treasures the buddhist pagoda as the imperial palace where had been kind of an oasis and troops who were stationed there american troops you know of sod as a as a rear.

vietnam american troops
"vietnam" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"We looked for i wouldn't even know the way in where'd even start that that was the question we asked ourselves what are we going to do we know we wanna do this how do we deal it and we have very luckily got connected to a guy named tombali who is that the kennedy school at harvard he's a vietnam veteran and he got involved in politics after the war and he then got involved in developing programmes in vietnam to harvard and through the fought right program to educate vietnamese served midlevel government officials and so he's extremely wellconnected in vietnam he knows everybody has important and he was willing to help us he became a senior adviser and he introduced us to people in the government vietnam and two vietnamese producer kwonho dang wa who helped us there and meet essentially told the government look we're going to make a found that the human story of the war we wanted to be from all sides not just amac and speak has just telling the american side of the story seems like a complete waste of time we really want to understand what it was like for the vietnamese and not just from the leadership by from the perspective of ordinary people the officials that we spoke she said wow you know we never really think about the war in those terms and what can we do to help you and i made four trips to vietnam over the course of the project to get to know people and to spend time with them and share meals and just the same kind of things we do here and then go back with a camera and sit down and julian entities so there is certainly a reluctance which i i guess has abated in recent years for the veterans the american veterans to talk about it it's more social whereas that country is you know freedom house does not read them as an open society did you sense any of that that some of what was prescribed about what they could talk to you was essentially by government decree either explicitly or implicitly.

kennedy school harvard vietnam veteran vietnam senior adviser government vietnam producer julian
"vietnam" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"vietnam" Discussed on KOMO

"The ap has given you gps coordinates were where did fisher purchase out of the water no they haven't built one yet that we know of what we do know is this is insane link complicated much like the contraptions me by baen villa charlie harger komo news one take another look at the vietnam war of wilt couples brian calvert reports of wellknown fainter filmmaker is helping you do just that he's taken us back in time for a look at baseball arguably a topic many like to talk about but can burns newest project is on a subject some would rather forget the vietnam war unfortunately our leaders have been telling everybody that you know everything was hunky dory good evening my fellow americans i believe that one of the re for the division about vietnam is at many americans have lost confidence in with their government has called them about our policy is fraud in the north and south first 10part eighteen our look at the vietnam war vermeer's sunday on the yes i think because it didn't turn out so well for us a lot of us buried our heads in the sand and and actually didn't talk and didn't think and didn't consider what had happened in vietnam he says decades later there's a different perspective to consider but to get there he says he fears had to remind us that this war was and still is a taboo topic for some it's no accident that the ten teen our series begins with a highly decorated marine talking about coming home from vietnam was nearly as dramatic as the word self and that he and his wife had been friends with another couple for twelve years before the wives discovered that both their husbands had been marines in vietnam because it was something you just didn't talk about and he he said it was like living in a family with an alcoholic father sh we don't talk about that and the continued in people suddenly coming forward veterans people who oppose the were willing to sort of speak about it and speak about it from the perspective that those years have given to them and are willing to bear witness to their experiences and and we try to listen to those and also we had extraordinary access to vietnam itself not just the country not just its archives which have never been seen before but to the people.

ap vietnam war baseball vietnam fraud vermeer brian calvert twelve years