26 Burst results for "Victory Gardens"

"victory gardens" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:25 min | 3 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"I heart radio. I'm Annie Reese. And I'm Lauren Vogel Bomb and today we're talking about Victory Gardens. Yes. Which was a listener suggestion from Alison. So thank you, Nelson. And this is another one that I'm not sure I would have ever thought to do it episode on myself. So you listeners always sending is the best magician. Oh, absolutely. And thank you. Yes, on Daz. It turns out we are sort of in a time of victory Gardens are in people who board previously garden incarnated trying to get food out of that's Yeah, Yeah, I I know a lot of people who who who started up during quarantine a little bit of Ah, backyard garden or or a little bit of Ah, potted garden somewhere. In or around their home here, here at the house. We usually have a bunch of plants doing things, some of them grow food. Not reliably. I wouldn't say. I wouldn't say that. We have a lot to do with it as much as I like. We pay them just enough attention to not kill them. And sometimes we get produce out of it. Yeah, I was. I was always impressed. When I would see whatever random things in my mind you're It is quite a collection between myself and my roommate. There's the probably the silliest thing we've got. Are these two avocado trees? Um, that want to live in Florida in the ground, and instead we have them in these. Increasingly large pots on one of them is I'm going to say I'm going. I just looked up as though I could see the top of it from my desk. I cannot dear listener, but it's maybe like Nine FT. Tall now, Wow. And this is the thing that we have to bring into the house for winter. Wow. So that's cool, huh? Yeah. That That seems like a This kid a story line on a sitcom that I want to see every year. Like with a long running sitcom. It gets bigger and bigger and more and more difficult. Yeah, that's yes, That is precisely how that works every every year. We're like, Oh, man, I guess it's time to do this silly thing again. Yeah. Do you put it off like we kind of do? Yeah. I mean, I I always tell Heidi I'm like I'm like, dude, any time you want to do this, let me know waken do it. And she's like, No, not today. E. Don't have it in me today. Do you get avocado from it? Oh, no, It's offic. Oh, no zero avocados have ever come out. Zero blooms have ever come off of this plant. Yeah, That's why every year I'm like Man, This is okay. No, no. Great. If I were eating avocado, I would be like, Yeah, we've got this avocado tree. It's the best thing in my life. Of course we move it in and out of the house. You know, maybe any year now, Lauren, And you're no sure. Sure that Zoe. Lovely Anne. I like your I like your moxie. Yeah, I like to have some optimism possible off. Kado excited, which is funny because I actually have a really bad track record of growing things. Um, I was telling Laura and I started with 14 14 herbs, and now I'm down to Shoe and I'm accidentally growing cucumber, which is also a very silly thing on I have, like since quarantine. I've definitely been more What if I could grow this? And I did grow scallions for a while. But the smell was quite strong because I live in a very small Yeah, Very small. Yeah. Um So no more no more of that. But it was really exciting. It was exciting to be like, Ah ha! Look at it. Go! I can use this in food. It is and yeah, it's a It's a very It's a very nice feeling growing stuff. Um, it is. It's It's fun to do I enjoy it. And I guess this this brings us to our question. Yes, Victory Gardens. What are they? Well, Ah,.

Annie Reese Laura Nelson 14 Florida Lauren Heidi Alison Anne Lauren Vogel Bomb Zoe today two avocado trees Zero blooms 14 herbs zero avocados Nine one of them Victory Gardens Victory
Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

04:00 min | 7 months ago

Why Beef Isn’t Necessarily the Enemy

"I want to sort of elephant room. Which is the conversation about meat. Itself is a good for you. Is it bad for. You is bad for the planet is a good for the planet is bad for the animals. Is it okay to eat animals. Because the conversation it's really emerging in many many circles is that we should become vegan or to save our health and save the planet. And you put up a very different conversation about this How how do we become to understand. That beef is the enemy and and why why is why is it not absolutely i mean. There's a series of cultural conversations. That happened after the industrialization of beef production that shifted the arctic millennials reviewed beef. You know the narrative. Well i'll repeat it. The broad brushstrokes. That story after the second world war we had a major consolidation agriculture many of the ammunition factories converted to fertilizer factories. Which made we had basically a vast infrastructure loot fertilizer factories. That were ready to go. We started to make fertilizer much much cheaper. We had a bigger industrialisation of agriculture. At the same time we had a different approach towards food security is what we call them today but the government after the second world war and around that time was very concerned about america autonomy understandably and invested in systems that ensure that we had enough corn wheat rice soy those key crops and a few others cotton sorghum tobacco that we had those introduced in volume sufficient to feed the american public in the us. The conflans those two things is an overabundance of food crops starting in the fifties that we began to understandably redivert to be feed developed. The world service's in too much food so we feed. It does something else right and the thing is to mark. It's a bunch of rational things that we did right. We are like okay. I don't wanna have another. You know victory gardens and terrifying end of the world scenario. Understand right we have all these huge factories that we need to do something else with understand. These are all rational economic. It was good. It was good intentions with bad consequences and longer term consequences. You know these are sort of short term pivots responses. I think sometimes. And i do agree with some of the broader kind of conspiracies time around big ag but the way that it's been built up i think was a normal reaction to a bunch of social and economic forces and so we ended up with though is by the fifties we were realizing we could get fatter. Beef faster feeding it. Human food right and then about ten years later diet for small planet planet was one of the first book said that hit around those but then by ten years later people started to say but wait a second. This is devastating for the environment. Right because we're basically producing resource intensive crops that are maladaptive for beef diet right And are also bad for the planet being produced at the scale for this usage and effectively we created a very unsustainable beef supply system so the way that it happened is that we pivoted how we produce beef from a natural regenerate traditional system to the modern industrial farm. Yeah and then we started to understand. I'd say they the the response to that was for many people will. We're going to be vegan now the response but just like oh my god. Look what's happening. These factory farms and then of course literature came out. That meat is bad for you as got saturated fat. We shouldn't be eating. It causes heart disease right. Yes yes. And i think a lot of they you know they the conversation around beef and how bad it is a lot of it. I agree with directionally in that confinement. Beef is really bad.

Arctic United States Heart Disease Right
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

01:42 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"For writing in <Speech_Female> you'd like to <Speech_Female> write to us you hand. <Speech_Female> Our email is hello <Speech_Female> at saver. <SpeakerChange> Pod <Speech_Female> dot com or also <Speech_Female> in social media. You <Speech_Female> can find us on facebook <Speech_Female> twitter and instagram. <Speech_Female> All <Speech_Female> three places <Speech_Female> are handle is at <Speech_Female> saver pod <Speech_Female> and we do hope <Speech_Female> to hear from you. <Speech_Female> Save is production <Speech_Female> of iheartradio. <Speech_Female> Four more podcasts. My <Speech_Female> heart radio. Visit the <Speech_Female> iheartradio <SpeakerChange> app apple <Speech_Female> podcasts. Or wherever <Speech_Female> you listen to your favorite shows <Speech_Female> thanks <Speech_Female> is always tour super producers <Speech_Female> dylan fagin <Speech_Female> andrew howard <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to you for listening <Speech_Female> and we have. Let's market things <Speech_Male> coming your way. <Music> <Music> <Music> Today's episode <Speech_Female> is brought to you by purina. <Speech_Female> Beyond <Speech_Female> what are you look for in <Speech_Female> pet food. Lauren <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you know i just <Speech_Female> wanna make my friends <Speech_Female> happy and healthy <Speech_Female> and and that <Speech_Female> can mean different things <Speech_Female> for different pets <Speech_Female> right like <SpeakerChange> our bodies <Speech_Female> are all different <Speech_Female> and that applies <Speech_Female> to our pets too.

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

04:46 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Listen to your food. Hannibal episode and your new episode about care. I've been which andy said watching hannibal might have influenced her care seed cannibal all. That sounds terrible. would you put it up. Accurate she continues. I firmly believe that hannibal might have caused this. I do have been the victim of hannibal related nightmares. Several years ago. Right after getting amazon prime i got the flu and while feeling miserable the best way to pass the time was to binge-watch hannibal dull probably not the smart plant. That's i ended up having dear fever. Gbs be trainable. The next time. I went to the doctor for a checkup. I surprised my doctor had been pushing flu shots. On me for years by demanding i be vaccinated for everything. A bola hepatitis. Flu athletes whatever available now and people. Tell me they're anti vaccine. I start my spiel with. Call me the next time. You're sick. I have a show over you. Hey hannibal nightmares.

Hannibal hannibal flu amazon andy
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:41 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Episode is brought to you by china brand which provides durable products that you can trust and i know that this time of year is all about people coming together and celebrating which is a little complicated giving covert and quarantine and isolation. But i'll tell you what lauren. I'm determined to have my cheese giving safely at half with my friends. At a safe distance many cheese will be had many wines will be drunk at the china brand is helping us do that in a convenient way. I believe in you. And i also believe in.

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

03:16 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Like professional farmers to these urban farmers And within a decade or so they were working with some two hundred thousand urban gardeners across the country producing like twenty two point. Eight million dollars worth of produce on a budget of like three point. Five million dollars But the program was shut down in one thousand nine hundred four The the practice though has survived In in some cities and we should really do a separate episode on urban gardening. in general. it's a it's a deep and fascinating Subject There was another small resurgence. Starting in about two thousand and eight You know after the economic bubble burst The the burpee seed company reported a forty percent spike in seed sales in two thousand eight alone And michelle obama reinstated a food garden on the white house lawn And yeah yeah now. Now we've got some of these cove quarantine gardens as early as early as march twenty fifth papers like the new york times reporting on this huge surge in seed sales and like citizen interest in food gardens I did want to put in here a parallel. It's easy to forget. I think That the same year that those world war one war gardens or Or liberty gardens were first flourishing was thousand nine hundred eighteen which was the year of the influenza pandemic. And so yeah. I don't know just just taking taking a little bit of control back. Even pits just a single potted plant. There has been a push to avoid calling these modern gardens victory gardens to avoid like the connection to military operations provision gardening's a term that i've seen but it's just not as fun i of like quarantine garden because it sounds a little funny but menacing. That's my corn team..

michelle obama new york times influenza
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Forty eight points of processed food and the had to be exact and their calendars republished in newspapers. So this all amounted to thirty three pounds of processed food per year which was thirteen pounds less than pre war levels the saints. That'd be ripped off in front of the grocer to discourage fraud This system was improved upon over the years and by nineteen forty four or shoppers received. Plastic tokens for change. So you didn't have to have exact amount anymore. A survey conducted that same year. Found that seventy five percent of american housewives canned. They were canning. Wow when the war ended the gardens largely went away as well and some foods at been very easy to grow like kale. Sorta got a bad rap after this. Yeah yeah about that. In our kayla food you know and and keep in mind here you know. It was seen as unnecessary after the war. And also you had this this big boom in in this in this new science food It was considered very posh To use all of these Helper products that were processed and packaged And also keep in mind like is hard It's a lot of work. The results can be discouraging. Especially if you don't really know what you're doing In nineteen forty-three the new york times ran a story with the headline. The first years the hardest who's trying to reassure readers that they could make their victory gardens. Happen oh i mean inflection mine but i yeah it feels right And so we've been talking a lot about the united states here but of course the us was not the only country where home gardening picked up Especially during the world wars. The british ministry of agriculture launched there dig for victory campaign in nineteen thirty nine. Five million family produce gardens popped up over the next three years alone Apparently pigs were also kept in some united kingdom gardens and like we were talking about earlier. The food supply was never really in trouble in the united states during world war. Two the way that it was in the uk. France germany and and other parts of europe in the world that that saw conflict on an over there soil You know attacked and war is to starve the enemy out So the food supply chain was disrupted on purpose in a lot of these places Like there were some two hundred thousand produce gardens in berlin alone..

united states fraud new york times british ministry of agricultur europe France uk berlin germany
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

03:42 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"And providing supplies where possible sharing tools sharing food the department of agriculture and were production produced their own victory garden. Fertilizer excess produce was encouraged to be canned for the winter and these gardens were advertisers. This fun important. patriotic thing. Not everyone was encouraged to plant a victory garden however people living in cities were not pushed to grow gardens for fear of wasting seeds due to lack of light and soil health again. They were always kind of told not to do it but people really wanted to. Yeah a year into the war. The government introduced the food rationing program as a complement to this officials urged americans to plant victory gardens while farmers grew the essentials and reminder. Many farmers were drafted to fight. In the war and many japanese americans were imprisoned in internment camps. A in that removed farmers from the workforce as well Some some of the people who were interred in those camps also grew gardens there though. Yeah and the food wasn't just for america. Either sometimes it went to american allies and the need was only exacerbated by the targeting of boats curing food in nineteen forty two sales of season the. Us rose three hundred percent. Ooh hoo yeah and over. Five hundred gardens sprung up in. San francisco's golden gate park alone during world war two. Yeah cities would hold these these gardening fairs two two draw citizens in with a entertainment and advice. Some private landowners donated land to eleanor roosevelt. Part of the front white house lawn into this. You've led victory garden Other well known. Sites like fenway had their own victory gardens. Fenway's is still operating today on. The same site attended by the boston community. Yeah i think i think the smithsonian house onto yeah these are still around. According to one source at one point these gardens were responsible for up to forty one percent of the vegetable produce for civilians in america courtesy of eighteen to twenty million families historians estimate that these gardens produced somewhere between nine to ten million tons of vegetables. That's like fifteen billion pounds. who is they lack. Yeah and these vegetables didn't just go to private residences. They also went to businesses and school. Lunches kale caesar lettuce peas. Swiss chard kohlrabi turnips. Carrots cabbage were just a few of the things people were growing and victory. Gardens are responsible for bringing some of these foods to american tables on a more widespread basis. Some people raised chickens as well In nineteen forty-three to aid in canning american families bought three hundred and fifteen thousand pressure cookers. Up from sixty six thousand the year before dang speaking of canning. I guess beginning in march nineteen forty-three. The us started rationing canned fruits and vegetables primarily to ration the tin yeah commercially produced canned. Yes at the time. Japan controlled seventy percent of the world's ten because of these gardens. Many americans actually better during the war. Then they had over two hundred items. Were rationed and these rationed items. Were assigned a point. Value that could vary based on supply and demand. The grocer had to update point value month to month and then war arash to came out around the same time and it came with monthly stamps for.

Us america fenway eleanor roosevelt department of agriculture San francisco golden gate park Japan boston community
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

03:44 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"There was some federal resistance to it at first early days like the thought being novice gardeners would waste valuable resources however people were so into they remembered for one they remembered this call to participate and the interest was just dare people really really wanted to do their part or feel like they were doing their part and victory gardens. Were part of that and you know as we set the messaging was so it works so well remembered it so even if you have government officials being like actually don't do that but i remember trenches and munitions plas- help out and officials did understand the morale-boosting nature of these gardens and there were multiple pamphlets guides and articles put out for all like degrees of gardeners lawn with those patriotic propaganda posters. Were all familiar with they. Look the same. Oh yeah yeah. And i love a propaganda poster and some of these are are just great. Dig for victory now grow vitamins at your kitchen door. Food is the mightiest weapon of the mall. So the seeds of victory. I love this. I feel like. I need to start saying these things are growing. Then my neighbor's they were worried before. It'd be really worried and it got it got serious. There's one instructional filmer educational film. I guess that was. That was all like no work. No turnips no tanks. No flying fortress known victory. No turnips note thinks yet. No turnips tanks. I think that's a sounds like a fun thing to say. I think that's a phrase needs to come back. Yeah yeah yeah. I think so too. I think we haven't designed to new t shirt in a long time. Yeah that's right. I like it lauren. So in nineteen forty one. The war food administration here in the us created the national victory garden program and this got big agricultural companies involved as sponsors and executive on this on this board that they'd give away seeds and in return get marketing exposure and tax break and so it became a very very corporate thing And there was even a lot of their their marketing materials at the time because the us became the primary seed producer for most of the western world at this time. Because you know we weren't. We didn't have the same kind of of military involvement on our soil or in our skies as As europe dead and so So yeah we were producing seeds for a lot of places and yeah there was just all of this really heavy handed patriotic imagery and thought process put into it but another organization that came about during this time was the women's land army And this was. This was an organization for women who were Working both in victory gardens and also those who were replacing some of the three million male farm workers who had joined the war effort either in industry or overseas. Yeah and. That was something i noticed when i was looking at some of these drives and organizations is they got really involved. They would contact like women's magazine. Oh yeah women's organizations trying to really get women involved in all of this neighborhood. Committees formed around these gardens dedicated to helping along newcomers.

us europe executive producer
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"For exporting importing purchasing and storing food so in nineteen seventeen just after the us entered world war. One hoover helped launch the us school garden army A national program that lauded a garden for every child in every child in a garden And and this is where that soldiers of the soil thing came and this was marketing to youth encouraging. Them to grow their munitions plants their air gardens everywhere producing as much ammunition or food as possible. Garden rose were called trenches was a whole thing and And it was successful. There were thirteen hundred school gardens just in los angeles urban and suburban communities alike. Got into it Some two point five million kids were involved all told dang and it wasn't just kids Some three million families planted food gardens in one thousand nine hundred seventeen and that number rose to over five million by nineteen eighteen There was a lot of of propaganda. Turn your reserves and preserves Every kitchen a canning factory and backup the cannon with the kanner. yeah. I got an l. l. home. Production of food was worth five hundred. Twenty five million dollars though so all of that. Good good pun. Writing was was come. come in handy. Well it is so funny to me. And i'm i'm not immune to it at all. You get a good name. You turn it into a game for kids trenches and get your munitions plant. It's amazing to me how effective that is. Yeah and Yeah and on everyone. Not just children. Just yeah or like oh munitions plant. That's clever. yeah. Yeah i would have been in there and through strong messaging. Do the american people around consuming lasts while producing more rations or pretty much avoided during world. War one This whole consume less idea was nicknamed who've arising and was promoted by entities like the national war garden commission asset commission. Tried to keep the spirit alive. Post war one pamphlet from nineteen thousand nine hundred said prevention of widespread. Starvation is the peace time obligation of the united states. The war garden of nineteen eighteen must become the victory garden of nineteen nineteen but but farm production And the economy were were pretty good for a couple years after a and so so Home gardening like this dropped off. A bed writes But then world war two was a different story because america was recovering from the great depression soon after the. Us joined world war. Two you the us. Agriculture secretary start espousing the benefits of victory gardens..

united states hoover Starvation los angeles secretary kanner. america
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

02:55 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Seventeen hundred families have covered four hundred acres with food gardens and that a lot of the unemployed where recent immigrants who had been farmers Over in central europe other cities picked up the detroit plan to like new york city and Philly there were also school gardens that sprung up during the progressive era. That's eight hundred nine hundred nineteen twenty though though. Yeah they they really got started after the turn of the twentieth century and these these gardening programs for urban kids and these gardens were thought to build strong moral character. Keep kids out of trouble improve. Health care more beautiful and also americanize immigrants In the us when we say victory garden what we typically are referring to what we're thinking of our public and private gardens planted during world war one and world war two some historians specifically pinpoint one businessman in particular charles land up pack reportedly got the idea before the war suggesting it as a way to lessen stress on american food ways after riots broke out in new york due to food shortages yeah nineteen sixteen was a year of crop shortages around the world and And so a lot of a lot of folks again especially in urban areas where hurting once world war one was underway. A pack organized the national war garden though they were not officially affiliated with the us government and the government was not a fan of this impact. Believe that media messaging was the way to accomplish more widespread gardening. He allegedly came up with the idea to call these gardens. Victory gardens himself Yeah and that was as the war was coming to an end They were called war gardens or liberty gardens through through the end of world war. One a war garden sounds so much more intense garden garden of law tomato blight. That's like when it is like. I'm imagining to how neighbors the neighbors comparing their gardens to shade like what you've got grown over there or either i know is popular in some games to garden competitively. So yeah we're garden. Would really we called of that. So these victory gardens went up everywhere. Churches parks playgrounds backyards. As the name suggest they served not only as a way to relieve stress. I put on the food supply but as a way to rev up patriotism and support for the war effort it was a way to make people at home feel like they were doing their parts Soldiers of the soil was a popular phrase and people. They really got into it. Yeah yeah. President woodrow wilson appointed. Herbert hoover to head the us food administration during world war one and this position made him responsible.

us new york President woodrow wilson Herbert hoover detroit Philly
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

03:08 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"You by jafaria so lauren. How are you getting up in the morning. not good. not good I you know. I've talked before in ads about how migrate cat. Waking me up is the best part of my day but Actually going to sleep again immediately. Afterwards is probably the best part because then i've got kittens snuggles and i'm sleeping however i will say that the smell of coffee in the morning. We'll get me right out of bed and one coffee. That do drink is jabalia You know in the yellow bag. Yes yes the wage of all you awakens your senses. It doesn't hit. You like a freight train like some coffee does Java's is more of a gentle nudge to volume low roasts their coffee beans to fully develop a rich flavor and quickly stop cools the beans. At just the right moment to stop the roasting process and lock in the aroma. And that is some fully caffeinated care and listen. Mornings may not be our favorite time of day but volumes is our favorite thing to put in our cups always rich never bitter so look for jovana yellow in the coffee or on volume dot com is the perfect care for the perfect cup this way of sucker punching you through the day. You don't know it's they it is. That's all burnt breakfast. No hot water female from your mood roast best and we're back. Thank you sponsor. Yes thank you okay. So of course perhaps obviously The idea of people who are not farmers by trade growing small edible gardens at home to supplement the food that they buy from people who are farmers That's not new. That's not a new shiny idea. A germany for example started a movement of Gardens for the poor in the eighteen sixties the burgeoning industrialization and urban ization without the proper like agricultural infrastructure had created this this lack of access to good fresh food in these growing urban areas These are still around today. There sometimes called schreiber garden for physician. More it's traber who campaigned for them. Also sometimes called allotment gardens some of the first widespread urban gardening for sustenance movements in the united states. Though happened starting in eighteen. Ninety three with the coming of the panic This massive economic depression Lots of folks especially in big cities were unemployed. And we're hungry over in detroit. Then mayor hazen pingree. I didn't look it up. But that's a great name and hazen. Lingering started what he called a potato patch program where in the city allocated a vacant land to families for growing food within three years..

mayor hazen pingree schreiber garden detroit germany united states
"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

05:58 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Victory garden is a term for a garden kept up by someone at home or in their community who probably does not work in agriculture. For the purpose of growing edible plants with the idea of the produce being a supplemental food source end and these serves a few purposes Better food security Better nutritional health but also better mental health. The ideas that it gets you outside. Maybe it it. It gives you something to do with your hands it gives you these palpable results and and the term came that the reason that they are called victory gardens is that they came from the first and second world wars and We will get deeply into that in our history section here. this is a really history heavy one. Yeah yeah and lord. And i were discussing how that is just such a great piece of propaganda essentially but it's fun. It's like it makes you feel like turtles mine rain and like what a great term for them. Whoever whoever did really come up with that i just had their finger on something beautiful because right yes if you call it what else. What else do you call it like like. It's because if you grow if you grow a cucumber anne yeah that will be a victory cucumber. Oh i will be and then. I will fill very victorious. I have to say. I have a friend who's really into gardening and i showed her a picture because i was so thrilled. I'm like wow. I'm accident linger on her and i sent her picture and she's sitting back. This huge like. I really appreciate it but she was mad at me because it's that's not the right containers the right side. I don't like that you're not taking care of your plan. If i was like you know not being mean to a pet defensive of my cucumber play. It made me feel very chest. Oh well i can i can. We can give you a few tips to to help it. I mean it sounds like it's doing just okay on its own but but if you if you haven't already i it'd help if you cut a few drainage holes in the bottom of the container and then set it on a plate or something so that when you water it The some of the water can escape through the bottom and out into the world but not all over your stuff Because you always want you always want and drainage in those kind of this.

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Savor production of iheartradio. I'm and i'm laurin mogul. By and today we're talking about victory gardens. Yes which was a listener suggestion. From allison's ellison and this is another one that i'm not sure i would have ever thought to episode on myself so you listeners. Always sending is the best suggestion. Oh absolutely and thank you. Yes and as it turns out we are sort of. In a time of victory gardens are in people who weren't previously gardening gardening right trying to get food out of that. Yeah yeah i. I know a lot of people who Who who started up during quarantine a little bit of a backyard garden or or a little bit of a potted gardens somewhere in or around their home here here at the house. We usually have a bunch of plants. Doing things Some of them grow food not reliably. I wouldn't say. I wouldn't say that we have a lot to do with it as much as like we pay them just enough attention to not kill them and sometimes we get produce out of it. Yeah i was. I was always impressed. When i would see whatever random things in my mind. It is quite a collection Between myself and my roommate. There's the probably the silliest thing we've got are these two avocado trees That want to live in florida in the ground and instead we have them in these increasingly large pots and one of them is. I'm gonna say. I just looked up as though i can see the top of it for my desk. I cannot dear listener but it's maybe like nine feet tall now. Wow and this is the thing that we have to bring into the house for winter. Wow so that's cool. Yeah that that seems like a skit. A storyline on a sitcom that. I don't wanna see. And every year like the long running sitcom bigger and bigger more and more difficult yet. That's the yes that is precisely how that works every every year. We're like oh man. I guess it's time to do this silly thing again. Do you put it off like we kind of do. Yeah i mean. I'd i always tell heidi i'm like i'm like dude anytime you want to do this. Let me know we. We can do it. And she's like not today. I don't have it in me today. Do you get avocado from it. It's avocado zero avocados. Have ever come zero blooms. Have ever come off at this plant. That's why every year. I'm like oh man. No no if i were eating avocado. Yeah we've got this avocado tree. It's the best thing in my life. Of course we move it in and out of the house. You know what maybe any year now or an year now. Sure sure that's a. That's a lovely anne. I like your like your moxie. Yeah yeah. I like to some optimism possible avocado which is funny..

ellison allison florida heidi
"victory gardens" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on Gastropod

"Have stayed home can fight this war. Many ways for us to give our time and energy and loyalty and devotion to the back of for freedom, but of them all. None is more appealing than this. And Year in year out, if need be with our own hands, we can grow the gardens of bickering. We're war one. The government didn't initially think oh I know gardening will win this war. That's why the Liberty Gardens effort was led by private individuals World War Two. There was enthusiasm for gardening. Right off the Bat so Pearl Harbor Launches United States into the war, December seventh, nineteen, forty one. Within two weeks of Pearl Harbor they have assembled a national task force comprising governor's private industry media, folks and federal bureaucrats to organize a national gardening program. This was a complete about face. This time they were determined to not let themselves fall behind private individuals and promoting what turned out to be the most successful homegrown food movement up the twentieth century part of the reason it was such a success is the. The government hired top public relations, firms and artists, and they created pro gardening propaganda, and so they're all sorts of newsreels, their advertisements there are promotional videos and pamphlets being handed out that are encouraging people to get out there and grow as much as you can as efficiently, and as well as you can lift them challenge to every loyal American citizen. What can we do to help? Win The war with food. The answer to that challenge come from Washington. From the Office of Civilian, Defense Victory Gardens that's the answer, Hacky Ah people were encouraged to grow food in their own backyards and bacon lots and everywhere else. Besides people grew food anywhere they could. People grew food. Yes, literally and window boxes and cities people. Greek food on rooftops in cities, people grew food on the Greens and lawns in front of city halls. There were people growing victory gardens, even at their workplaces corporate factory campuses where renting out plots to workers, there are fantastic pictures of people growing victory garden plots on railway easement where they're getting strewn by colds from the trains as they go by and. And people are growing victory gardens there there are few places that people did not grow food in World War Two. US Homefront, but even though everyone was responding to the call to grow food, there were some challenges. It's not like the government can say hey, everyone, grow some food and the food appears. Remember what Grandpa told me no work, no garden to take some know how to even know what to do. Says there was actually a fair bit of media panic about how Americans were so urbanized, they'd forgotten how to grow food. It was like wait. How do we do this again? People thought the Victory Gardens. Movement had the potential to be a gigantic fiasco. Oh my Gosh! I'm going to pull up a poem written by Ogden Nash. That is absolutely made me laugh out loud the. The first time I read it Ogden Nash was poet who is particularly famous for his rather silly versus today, my friends I. Beg your pardon, but I'd like to speak of my victory garden with the whole first sword and Citronella for armor I ventured forth to become a farmer. I toiled with the patience of job or Buddha, but nothing turned out the way that it Shoulda. Would you like a description of my parsley I can give it to in one word Carsley something Crawley has got into my chives. My lettuce has hookworm..

Defense Victory Gardens Ogden Nash Liberty Gardens Pearl Harbor Grandpa US Washington Office of Civilian Crawley Buddha United States Greens
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:15 min | 1 year ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition so we just heard from some industrial. Who actually started her. Culinary career at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and. Her Mentor was none other than Alice. Waters Alice daughter Fanny Singer. Join me to talk about how shape unease is doing during the crisis and how we can keep local farmers and business by buying straight from the source Finney. I know that you are sheltering place that your mom right now in Berkeley of all. How are you guys doing? How are you holding up? It's it's sort of strange very surreal. Moment I live in San Francisco and I do still have apartment there. But you know it's a one bedroom apartment and my partner and I are together. We both were working at home. And there's no outdoor space than being in Berkeley was not just to be with my mom who I obviously concerned about to. Just because I wanted to fee `sort sort of insane person about disinfecting nail and all the things in a little bit more German centric than my mother so these things were these work concerns of mine but also I mean to be Berkeley in a place that has really rich outdoor environmental NGO to walk through one hundred thirty seven pad this in the hills of the Berkeley into just feel to walk for ten. Miles is like the only thing I think kind of keeping me from total insanity. Alice tell us a little bit about. What's going on with Chez Panisse right now? Obviously you've been closed for five. Maybe six weeks. What's going on with the staff right now. We really paid the step their time off so that when it comes time to reopen that they would be there and available we had the good luck to get a kind of bridge loan from some wonderful friends of the restaurant that are helping us get to the point where money comes from the government to pay people. Some are on unemployment and some are being paid a portion of their salaries. But it's really important to me that people are paid at this time. If I have to ask my friends I have my friends Alice. One of the things I read about which is super cool. is that Obviously you work with a lot of small farmers all over California and a lot of these farmers presumably. I mean they supply restaurants so first of all from your conversations with with farmers that you work with you supply your restaurant and other restaurants. I mean what is their situation like I mean? How long can they go like this without having restaurants to supply? It's very serious. What's going on with our whole organic farm community because they really have a only the farmers markets to bring food to and the number of people that are going to farmers markets is not what it usually is so. We're trying to figure out how to buy that food from the farmers and we have a project in Stockton California The mayor of Stockton is very enthusiastic about getting or Ganic Food in the public school system and serve at this moment in time. He asked if we could help buy food from the farmers said that he can give an stockton and I thought that that would be a perfect way for us to begin building that network that we're going to need for the public schools and were putting little recipes into the box so that people know how to make very simple dishes and may given at least four thousand pounds of food away in Stockton Alice. I I mean you've talked about this for years that when you were a little girl. Your parents had a victory garden at home in New Jersey and that you really are encouraging people to plant their own. Things actually inspired me so much. I've got some ceilings. Here can you see some big lettuce there? You go and I'M GONNA hopefully. That'll be lettuce in a couple of months. I mean I don't have a big backyard. I have a small space and got a planter but for people who don't have a backyard who might live in an apartment I mean what are some ways that people can think about growing their own food that keeps looking at Brown Finley and he started by chanting food out in front of his house? In that little parkway between the sidewalk and the street and it caused a lot of controversy and he actually cited for violating. Some ordinance got any went to court. He wanted his case and he actually has planted that whole strip of land. So sort of thinking about him. I did the same thing I cup. That little plop right in front of my Bad I think you can plant like you have done and planter boxes on a balcony. I hope that the community gardens began to surge research and unite. My mom planted the little section. That's just in front of our house because even though we do have a garden in the back she wanted people to think about this victory garden moment and the potential for even the most throwaway pieces of land. It's now planted with a few different edible things and she's already gotten notes through our mailbox thanking her for taking this kind of actions embolic being encouraging people. And you've just seen this proliferation of gardens now in people's sort of little forgotten front yards and people sowing seeds all around the neighborhood now and way. It's really incredible. I've just never seen anything like it before you know. One of the things that you've talked about is the idea of buying local produce supporting local farmers wherever you are in the country around the world and you know one of the questions that that we're getting from folks on facebook Tuesday from Bell Zelezny also which what are ways that we can help. Small farmers are other ways of their places where we can go buy things from them especially farmers who are used to providing restaurants. I if you are at a loss for who you're farmers are do. The work researching call the pharmacy. Are you having trouble? Are you imperilled? Is there a way that I can help? You facilitate a network of deliveries. Can I help you deliver? But also it might be a question of just helping them figure out logistics or even knowing who they are. Where their farms are I mean? I have friends in. La The lines were so long that they weren't able to get any food so they just started figuring out who the farms were that they could drive out to so they could still got great produce. And I mean it's been a little bit more problem solving and resourceful and also knowing that the farmers are maybe really good at growing vegetables. That don't necessarily know how to work. A whole distribution network. And if that's something that you have extra time for facility with like make the effort because they do need us

Berkeley Alice Chez Panisse Stockton Alice Stockton Fanny Singer Finney San Francisco Ganic Food Partner New Jersey Miles Facebook California Brown Finley Bell Zelezny
"victory gardens" Discussed on Beekeeping Today Podcast

Beekeeping Today Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on Beekeeping Today Podcast

"As? It's very tough. You know if you're in a suburban line you're keeping bees to provide all the resources that you need but take an inventory from early spring if that's when your season starts delayed fall if that's when your season ends like it does here and see where the gaps of Blu Mar and fill those gaps and since we wanNA feed a lot of different pollinators. Hang a bit of attention to having different flower colors shapes sizes and structures having a diversity of bloom throughout the seasons really helpful too. So you know amid Length Tongue D- Be like a honeybee can access no flowers at reasonably open but a long tubular flower is is going to be useless to one hundred unless of course get smart Nectar Rob's but A lot of our long time native bees that's essential or for hummingbird long tubular. Flower will be essential source of nectar. Makes Perfect sense? You're exactly right You also talked about okay. I'm I want to do something and I do. I get started. What do I do where do I go? How do I get my plants? And can I do it on my deck Well you know any any place where you can grow. Plants outside is viable in terms of Pollen support obviously the more space. You have the more you can do. But even using say some native perennials and a container especially long blooming ones if you have a small deck or patio urine. Urban Gardener Can Be quite useful. let's face it. It's not going to support a colony of honeybees right but it. It may be useful as as a resource where there was none before And so like in my own landscape. I never have enough plants. So my patio is filled with containers. That have Blooming perennials in them starting in spring all the way to fall. So I don't I don't use annuals it's such an expensive thing to be doing and of course you know If used perennials. They'll come back every year. Disuse frost proof proof pots. That's the key. I do the same although I do. Some annuals. Beekeeping is harder than you thought frustration ignites innovation and the High Butler and the High Butler uncapping tank our products designed by frustrated beekeepers. Hunting harvest.

High Butler Blu Mar
The Power of Seeds and Sunflowers With Ken Greene

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

06:00 min | 1 year ago

The Power of Seeds and Sunflowers With Ken Greene

"It's not just me. That ordered more seats the last week or two right is it. No it's not and we're really grateful because you know some of our in person events like the Boston Flower. Show got cancelled. Sure right in the middle and we really depend on an income and also we love you know interacting with all of our customers there. We were a little worried when we were coming home early from that and we came home to find a real increase in online seed quarters like we haven't seen for years so is it all edibles that people are ordering I mean. Is this a victory garden emotion at work? Do you think you know it's still all over the place. It's really interesting. We have expanded our flower offerings a lot. Over the years I would say primarily. Our customers are still Vegetable Growers So yeah but I think like you were saying it's not even just that we're seeing more customers but people are ordering a little bit more than they normally would which gives me the sense that people are thinking about expanding their gardens right over last year right so you're not merely a seed company like not just in the business but as I mentioned in the intro. You have this nonprofit entity. You're an advocate I. He'd preservation and the diversity both sort of culturally and genetically that seeds represent and preserving that. You're nonprofit work speaks to that so tell us what seed shed is. Just so we can have before. We digress into specific seeds and eventually sunflowers that we can understand the rest of your world and consciousness because it sort of relates to changing times as well and historical thinly. Yeah I mean I still. I still think that I you know. I like to complicate things as much as possible. At least that's what I'm told but for me. Seeds are connected to everything and my journey was sees started with starting a seed library. Which was the first. Eli in the country and was really more community focused in terms of how we door seeds within our own communities and and what are seed sharing systems that we can set up for our communities That EVOLVED INTO DOTS and belly seed company which the idea was Can we create a model of an ethical? The company one. That's focused on a region that only shares from pollinated seeds And that is really focused on. I'm thinking about where seeds come from. How seats are grown. Who's growing them at how we share them and so see? Chedda is the most recent an outgrowth Of My I want a year journey sees where We're really thinking about. How do we empower communities to grow towards these sovereignty and in that? There's not really like a good fix definition of cede sovereignty. I think you've talked to different people about but see ethics means or what see justice means or what cede sovereignty means. And you'll get a lot of different permutations of that but for us. What we're really thinking about is in. Many cases seeds are very culturally embedded. When we LOSE SEEDS WE LOSE CULTURE? We lose language. We lose ceremonies and traditions. We lose a of who we are and where we came from And so what? Seeds mean community by community can be very different and so each. We're really saying. How do we think about this larger seat system which is mostly commercial right now And how do we get that back down to the community level? And what communities need to make sure that they're caring for the seeds that are important to them And are most like our one of our main programs and one of the ones that I feel most attached to as I work with the aqua sauce name Mohawk nation in northern New York which is a partnership where there's varieties that are disappearing And we work with indigenous seed keepers network and our partners innocuous Hosni who are the leadership of the program to grow thieves that are culturally important For that community back here in the Hudson Valley. Which is there in central lands. That were lost through colonization And remai- treat those seeds back to their home communities for food precede but also to make sure that the culture doesn't disappear. Some of them have ceremonial roles and great traditions. Don't they I mean yes absolutely something like that and some just to be able to eat. The food of your people yeah And and for that to be threatened because of our current food system And inequalities in our food system So we're very you know we feel really grateful to be able to be part of some of those solutions And so see literacy workshops a big part of what we do we have the seed. People Portrait series. That were coming out with where you get to meet. Deeds through their people And Get to learn about the person and why certain seed is very close to their heart and why it's important to them Some really sort of this continual evolution of my relationship with anyone sees mean in the world

Chedda Boston Flower ELI New York Hudson Valley Hosni
Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:26 min | 1 year ago

Garden as refuge with Ken Druse

"Kind of an eerie juxtaposition out the window and unfair days outside when we can go outside right now unfolding beauty and innocence. You know tiny bulbs plump Little Buds and the headlines. Hourly and daily so You know I wanted to backtrack about what gardening means tests and sort of what brought us to it. What brought you. How long have you been gardening since I was very young house was a teenager and I started with indoor plants and got really turned on and then when I went to college in Rhode Island I was kind of close to Danielson Connecticut which is where low Geez is and you know I was thinking about all this stuff and I think that shopping has a lot to do with my acquisitive NECE and interest in? You know seeing the new plant finding new plant thing will there? Also incredible and shopping online is something you can do now so really well. So you're GONNA be spending some money and when you you said you were a teenager and so forth. What did it besides these sort of amassing a collection? That sort of instinct. That you apparently had Was there some other escapism or something else that brought you to it or you know. I don't know I don't want to project too. I mean I can tell you mine but I just you know I don't know I I know I have a need to nurture and I just love. It's so exciting to see you know. It seems like slow-motion in most cases but to see a plant grow and thrive or something from seed that sometimes. That's pretty fast and from sea to in your case edibles. It's a miracle and to participate in that it it. I'm thinking how heartwarming it is. And that's it's you know it's a boost. Then it makes you. It makes you think about tomorrow. Yeah Yeah I mean for me. I was in my twenties and I mean you know the story most of my listeners. Know Story You know as my twenties. My father had died the next year. My mother was forty. Nine was diagnosed with early onset. Alzheimer's disease I don't even think they called it that at that time but that was the idea and so there. I was called home for my to cover my widowed mother and that unfolded this strange time in my young life and I was close to home to stay close to home during the day. I had a job at night. Someone else came and care for her at night. And what are you GONNA do? I mean as I say you can only watch so much daytime. Tv When you're twenty four twenty five years old and so I got a garden book. As someone gave me Crockett's victory garden and I would seem sad expression. Victory Gardens seems appropriate right now and I you know and I just started doing the stuff in it like I started going to the local garden center and whatever it said I just bought those seeds or that plant or just did these crazy experiments and obviously killed most of the things in the early going. You know I didn't know what I was doing. But that was my entree was during a very dark time and my my younger life So it's been a refuge for me You know number of times it seen me through. I have often said my gardens has saved me many times so I find I'm thinking of spending more time outside because I can't go at the moment And all of my vents. I'm sure like yours have been postponed at least through. May and I'm sure through June and whatever as well Are you thinking of doing more are you? I'm trying to assign myself some projects things I've put off because usually I have garden visitors and I can't make a mess and leave the mess there for weeks while I you know do a Jew Be Greenwich Ovation or something. I'm thinking well. This is the time Margaret. Nobody's coming right well. We we already talked about me shopping. I haven't really gotten that into that but I probably will usually I shop for something because I see something and then I track it down online and then that leads me. Oh they have a minimum order. Oh and then there's five plants and you only wanted one and then there's shipping savings if you buy forty nine dollars for the plant's not that. I've ever done that but I it's almost time for me to spruce up the house plans and that's something. I can do something I should do. You know do a house plant Rehab. I every day I run to light cart to see who's changed or what seed has sprouted. Miracle never tired of that miracle so there there's that Planted some perennials. Yesterday that came in the mail and they were dormant. How so that's happening already in? That's going to continue. I got a Beirut Cherry tree that I'm growing pot I don't know why right well but whatever gets you through. I mean I think right so you said I loved. You said WHO's changed. You went to the light cart To look at your all your little babysit who. You didn't say what she said. Who and I think of them. The same way to plants are not some inanimate objects some it right. You know I think of them as as as who not one but so you said House Plant Rehab. So this is a time for that and we have time. 'cause we're home and we have time to notice and we can. That's a good suggestion for me. Because a lot of years. I get so hectic. Try and get ready for the open gardens. I don't do my repotting of those house plants on their way out the door for the summer or do you know what I mean. I skip it. So that's a really good one when they're on their way out which is late usually mid. May and wouldn't it be great to for me to clean the leaves with a sponge and a little couple of drops dish soap in accord of warm water? And just clean off the dust but also some of them get a little city mole alden. There's all sorts of insects that can actually be removed with a sponge in a tiny bit of soap and water so The things that have ever removed most of the house plants and things that have firm leaves like citrus and Camelia. If you grow things like that and philodendron which you can go anywhere some philodendron. I put my hand under the leaf than just rub the top brush sponging were almost everything comes right off. The plants look so much better and then they say thank you. Yeah Yeah 'cause I mean. Spending a winter indoors is not really their thing. And all that unseen dust that moves around in the air with The heating system when heating systems on in any house right. And you find that fine dust like my clive is all have that by this time of year and they need a nice Tending you so you have you have a Camelia You Grow Hoyas don't you? I I do. There's one at the kitchen window and luckily that's very close the kitchen sink because the plant small enough. It'll go right in the kitchen sink and get washed off there or you have the climate as you. Probably take him to the shower. Yeah I do I do but Yeah but the hoyas. I've never grown them. I've grown them somehow as needed greenhouse. And well we can talk about what they are. They used to be part of the milkweed family but I think they've separated them now but they're semi succulent. They have thick leaves. They're pretty slow growing except in the spring when they kind of shoot. I have one wonderful one called Hoya Carey. I and I started with one leaf in a pot and it stayed that way for about five years. Want an apart- many years ago and then all of a sudden it just exploded a now. It's a very big viney plant. I have it on a a wreath circle. You know stuck in this well. It's a long story but I wound round and round and it has beautiful flowers when it blooms in the summer and it has heart shaped leaves. I have another one that has purple flowers. They don't flower very often. And it's important not to trim eight trim where the flowers come because it blooms on Spurs Kinda like an apple tree and it'll bloom over and over again on the same spurs so you have to not cut those dead head so to speak to the flowers and their fragrance almost all of them and if you do cut it or it will bleed white. Latex like a lot of succulents and milkweed male creates right. Right right

House Plant Rehab Camelia Victory Gardens Rhode Island Danielson Connecticut Spurs Alzheimer's Disease Hoya Carey Crockett Margaret Beirut
"victory gardens" Discussed on The Dr. Gundry Podcast

The Dr. Gundry Podcast

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on The Dr. Gundry Podcast

"It's more profitable for the farmer. I know regenerate farmer. He says he doesn't use any chemicals or pesticides. Save Tons of money and he makes better food more food and makes twenty times a prophet his neighbor and he's drought and flood resistant and climate resistant on his farm. Because it's a diverse ecosystem as Jenner farm and there are a lot of techniques to get it gender farms on ways to do this. A lot of it's talked about in drawdown. Which is a great book about how to Drown Carbon and the Food Systems? Also the number one solution to climate change. Not Fossil fuels are renewables. It's that and I mean those are things that are important but it's not as important as the food industry and fixing the food system and they found that you can actually add so much carbon in the soil by using these methods that I it. Such a powerful tool and the quality of the food is better. People make more money and everybody wins and the things like crop rotations or cover crops or using animals in the ecosystem to rebuild soil with their poo in their p. It's about very specific techniques use chemicals or no chemicals no we were Gatien and very low irrigation and you create a whole healthy ecosystem that has all these extra benefits and people are now paying for this. So so there's companies out there that are paying farmers to add value to the ecosystem to build soil to increase biodiversity conserve water so these are called ecosystem services and the farmers are actually benefiting from this. We're talking about. How do we do that? In America and denote is now paying farmers to convert and journalists to convert their farms to regenerate farms. And they know US better for their supply chain. It's better for their business better for everything so even see big companies that are the evil terrible food companies starting to move in the right direction so why I mean? Why wouldn't a farmer do this? What what's what's stopping this from happening. I don't know what you talk a lot about this. And the food fixed but in a nurse we've got policies in the government that are locking farmers into a way of eating. I mean producing food that is dependent on chemicals dependent on large industrial scale agriculture. The funding the Cremona crops of soy and corn and wheat and cotton and others. That are really doing all the damage. They're not funding. The right things so the obstacle is really to get the government to start to support incentives for farmers to be able to actually do this and that's happening but this is already acting on this. You've got big companies like general mills and Danone actually funding this. It's not they're not just talking about it and that to me is very impressive. I think that will drive the government to change and slowly. It'll all ships so there's definitely an interest in Virginia Mackerel. Congress as a food as medicine working group. There are people are talking about it. Like our Blumenauer Shelly. Pingree Cory Booker and Tim Ryan and a McGovern. So there's die. Parson side Groups that are talking about how to actually work on this issue. So it's going to happen. It's coming it's the right thing to do. It breaks on the mid you need. Massive industrial scale agriculture. To speed the world you can actually produce more food better. Food more distributed way is a lot of the adverse consequences of the food system including the chronic disease the economic impact of it and of course the climate environmental impact speaking of environmental impact. You mentioned food fix about Roundup glyphosate and having yourself tested you. Read the book on cars. I I I'm not GonNa Talk to you unless I read the book. For goodness sake so give us give us a primer round up so for those round up is a weed killer. It's probably seventy percent of all the cultural chemicals used in the world. It's made by Monsanto the same company that brought you Agent Orange Dioxin and pcbs and this chemical views on soy's and other crops as a weed killer but if working less and less well so the use of it has to increase more and more and it's become an extremely abundant in the environment in our food supply. In fact in Kellogg's I mean I think it was a gentleman cheerios. There's more glyphosate than there is vitamin D and B twelve which they add to the food and it has terrible effects. It destroys your microbiome which I know you talk. A lot about has epigenetics effects that causes generation harm over generations in terms of cancer and hormonal and other issues in has been linked to cancer. Multibillion dollar suits now the CEO of bear was just fired by the board so this is not good for them. And I think we we really are swimming semen and I try to eat organic. I try to have non GMO everything. I'm super careful. I travel someone they can't you know but I don't want to go like E. GMO corn or soy. I don't even processed food and I check my urine. I Like fiftieth percentile. Glyphosate which freaked me out and I'm like Oh my God. And how much are people getting getting to know? And it's it's an I'm controlled experiment on the population that the government allows and they were like glyphosate is fine. That's not a problem you know. And it's not allowed in many other countries but here in Europe they don't allow it here. We go about it as if it's nothing and Bagger just ready to read a paper this morning that the honeybees gut microbiome is totally altered by the glyphosate. That's been sprayed on anything and it as I think you mentioned. It's actually in most honey now being. Yeah because beazer collecting this but yeah microbiome. The Honeybee has been totally change. And as you mentioned we don't have any honeybees anymore and it's it's because at this lovely stuff I mean i. I don't know if Einstein was right but he said that when we lose bees face the earth we have four years to live. Oh Oh so. Actually you know what you know. What'S REALLY TRAGIC. Scene is that now there are non a BS and there are humans. Doing the job of bees literally hire farm workers to go around a little feather dusters and pollinate all the trees. Because there's not an obese to do it so when humans have to start doing the job of nature. It's a losing battle. Yeah you're right you know You mentioned in food fix. I totally agree. Some of our most vulnerable people in society are the people who are most affected by this and tells the stuff is doing to our brains all this wonderful ultra processed food. Well you know to poor minorities that are more targeted affected. Our children is what scares me. The most because we're literally poisoning the future generation of Americans and pretty much the world If you eat studies have shown if you eat processed food as a kid your brain is ten percent smaller in your I. Q is seven points lower that should be terrifying to people and the CDC report about nutrition and academic performance and they found that these kids who ate poorly and nourish is from the food. They're eating food or not eating or showed poor grades. Poor academic performance trouble concentrating trouble problem solving trouble focusing trouble with attention. I mean these are real things that are going on these kids. Brains are being affected by this. I had a teacher come to me other night. I gave a talk at the ninety second street. Y and she's like you know I just. I'm so frustrated because our schools have such poor nutrition. Kids are struggling so much to learn. The principles are squeezing the teachers because the kids are getting bad grades but was changed the food and this is not my opinion. This has been shown over and over again even even behavioral issues. We see so many behavioral issues in kids in violence oppositional behavior and even adults. You know the divisiveness our society is crazy now like I just don't remember it being so crazy and everybody hating each other. And everybody's fighting whether it's your Paleo or you're begin or you're on your off lack of each other and it's like why can't we get along and find common ground and there's a lot of science about how he's processed foods Dr Inflammation in the brain that the decouple the frontal lobe? Which is your adult in the room with the reptile in your brain. That's your fight or flight mechanism. And so they're not talking to each other so when something triggers you might be triggered but I'm GonNa to take a breath and like have a rational response. We're just in this constant state of conflict. And they took these kids three thousand juvenile delinquents in a controlled environment shop that bad food for good food and these kids had dramatic reductions in violence restraint. Seventy five percent reduction in restraints. A hundred percent reduction in suicide in you in suicide is thoroughly and cause of death in kids tend to nineteen years old. Yeah so so think about that. I mean if our kids are killing themselves because the food they're eating that's terrifying all right so we're going to conclude because I can't take this any longer but no it no solution exactly so. It's not all doom and gloom right. The book is called Food Fixed. Not Food Apocalypse. Plenty for sure but a lot of good news about what we can do. What businesses can do while your local governments can do and what our state and federal government can do to make a difference to fix the food system and I have a whole action guide with all the Solutions Food Fixed Book Dot Com and the Action. Guide is free and it gives you the twenty top solutions for you. As a citizen. The twenty top solutions for governments businesses farmer farms farmers. So it's really. It's really an exciting moment where we actually know what we need to do. We know how to fix it. It's a solvable problem. It's just GonNa take political will it's GonNa take consumer activism and it's GonNa take people standing up and doing the right thing. Tell me about victory gardens. Most people don't know that during World War. Two forty percent of our food in the United States was grown in Home Victory Gardens and I know personally growing up and after the war we had a victory garden in our yard and I actually did it when my kids were growing up. Yeah where's the Victory Gardens? And how do we do it? As a great point so in World War Two we came together to fight a common enemy and we were willing to make sacrifices. We really need rationed. Food Have Victory Gardens. And we're willing to do all sorts of things turn lights out at night because he didn't want the enemy to give me a little Caesar cities where and so we really had a really robust coming together as a society. We need to do the same thing for what's going on today with chronic disease with all these social problems that are all connected to food and with climate change in the environment. It's a it's an existential threat to us and I think most of us just go about our daily life and we wear about corona virus in acute thing. This is slowly boiling a frog right if you if you boil a frog and you drop it in boiling water jump right out. If you turn the heat up slowly. He'll just sit there and boil the debt and that's what we're doing now is terrible so there are there are A lot of things that we can do whether WanNa have choices in our own diet for example just say. I'm not going to buy Jim Foods anymore. That alone will make a difference in your health. And we'll stop the demand for these foods to you can become a regina -tarian which is a new idea that I came up with. Just how do you source your food? For Morbid genitive farms seen for example go to Mariposa ranch dot com where they've all kinds of poultry and meats are generally raised and you can get a direct from the rancher and fascinating fabulous discount. I'm about two dollars a serving on average for originally raised which is affordable for most people. So we have the. We have the technology to do that. You can start.

Victory Gardens Glyphosate US glyphosate Jenner farm Gatien Danone Pingree Cory Booker Monsanto Cremona Europe CEO Virginia Mackerel America
China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

John Batchelor

09:14 min | 1 year ago

China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

"China expels three Wall Street journal reporters sub head China revoke the press credentials of three wallstreet journal report is based in Beijing the first time in the post Mao era that the Chinese government has expelled multiple journalists from one international news organization at the same time to help us understand this puzzle and also to look beyond this to the up to students of the reporting out of China these last weeks of the covert nineteen crisis we welcome Jonathan ward author of China's vision of victory Jonathan the expulsion of the newspaper reporters for a regime that is fussy about its world image does this make sense our it does this demonstrate in some fashion the brittleness of the Communist Party good evening to good evening John good evening court it's going to be well I I think in reality this is an old piece of the playbook for great for Beijing not just the expulsion of journalists but the desire to control the narrative and they've been doing this to countries with the think they have sufficient power to do so for quite a long time since the days of now say don't next on this with Indian media back in the days of the border where they are doing this in South Asia even today where you have investors from China telling individual newspaper editors of the call that they can't publish this or that on China and today they think they can do this to the United States and it's very similar I think to what they did with the NBA at the end of last year where the essentially said you can't say this you know tweeting about Hong Kong and then asking for an official in the NBA to be hired so this idea that China can intimidate or whether it's media entities are business entities I mean the shows I think if anything the confidence that China has today to state that it can control the narrative not only inside China but outside China because of course the Wall Street journal is being tried as far as I'm aware and so are you know many of the you know weeds in which we use media outside they seek to influence all so a lot of this you know just says to me you know one China's political system is to simply incompatible with that of the United States is incompatible with the modern world and kind of power is growing far too great and that is what we will have to deal with going forward Jonathan you talk about confidence of the senior Chinese leaders let me put this another way so for instance right now those senior leaders face an existential crisis for themselves and for the regime and they need the help of for instance the United States and yet they're doing something that is just going to aggravate their image problems in Washington and elsewhere I would think that this is an instance of China lashing out doing something that is against its own interests and shows therefore that something is really wrong in Beijing what do you think of that theory and and how do you parse through it as you go forward I think we have to understand what China's leaders think that China's interests are this is not a nation state whose regime has hearing that essentially it can unleash a billion people on the world and and come to rule the world because of that so they're very much in their own ideology when it comes to how to appeal power in the sense of what they've achieved in the last thirty years of their sentences so you know the whole idea of the great the Cuban nation of the Chinese nation which is the central narrative of the Communist Party the idea that they will rule the world by the year twenty forty nine the belt and road will be built me to try to twenty twenty five will allow them to dominate every major industry and these ideas have not gone away even with coronavirus on the other hand what you have had is is a a real you know almost shut down slow down in the Chinese economy in the first quarter of this year that I think is is is yes putting the pressure on and showing the world that our dependency on China is going to come at two great a price I mean all sorts of companies initially sought apple missed quarterly earnings and such and those that are really buying into the idea that China will continue to ascend we're gonna have a very tough decade going ahead because of China's confrontation with the United States and I I think that the sense of destiny the sense of the great because the nation that's held by the Communist Party and its core leadership is absolutely a very dangerous path for China because it leads to this confrontation with the world and that that needs to control essentially information even in a time of crisis home Jonathan he maybe I'm out of touch maybe I don't see this but my sense is listening to what you're saying is that we're talking about a leadership in Beijing which is kind of view of the world which doesn't correspond to anything that we know because China right now does appear to be weak and I don't think that they got the position to be able to intimidate countries for very much longer because what we have seen during this crisis is the one victim the one real problem for Beijing is that it's lost its image of invulnerability so I would argue based on what you say China's leaders are just themselves out of touch I think it depends on what the world does to come together against essentially through the rise of China at this point I mean look at what we in Britain and businesses causing huge problems for the US U. K. special relationship and look at China's economic ties in Southeast Asia and the way that that creates a difficulty I think for diplomacy in our ability to bring country centerfold I mean they're able to accomplish a great deal and it's still requires a concerted effort from the rest of the world I think to to say that China's ascendancy at this point cannot go too much further if they're going to have a regime like this and I don't think the world has come together to do that yet but it's what must be done Jonathan is there one explanation for why she gin paying didn't go to the center of the virus right away he simply could Chang why didn't why didn't she go there what it what is the thinking have any leadership in the west would demand it well I I mean some analysts have pointed out that this would be consistent with you know prior for instance now and and others that remaining in control of the crisis it involves you know being pulling back and working from behind the scenes and then sending essentially another delegate out she has tried to cultivate an image of him as a man of the people but you know in this case it probably says more than anything how dangerous this fires with his dangerous yes but he is a puzzle did they have another way of looking at the world when the general doesn't leave he's not the general that said you know I I'm not being fancy here but she marching around in Beijing with a mask on was absurd well John do you know it's interesting that you say that because on social media in China many people were saying that seizure being was a coward and they contrasted him with what you mentioned the Primera Li ka chunk actually going to move on talking to doctors in a hospital and they said see Jim paying just stayed in Beijing and did a photo op yes Jonathan you know as well as I do that you the measure of the leader's how he does in crisis not how he does on a good day right that's true and I think we have yet to see with the with the real consequences are going to be in this I mean you could certainly be an interesting position it also could offer an opportunity for those who are against in circles of power to come together you know I vote for term what about your garden well you know I I just don't see how they get out of this because they're lashing out and whatever friends they need they're alienated them very quickly yes I I you know we used to tease him as being looking like Winnie the Pooh put in that mask in Beijing he didn't look anything like Pooh bear eight eight it looks like a well all right sign leave it alone Jonathan to you they were using the term Chernobyl for awhile the clock is running if that's applicable do you believe explicable because the road the clock says five years and they're gone that's what happened the Soviets is that a fair analogy we have about thirty seconds I think it depends on how well they're able to gain control of information and how effective the surveillance state that they still in you know centric social credit score and all the rest of it is I mean this is going to be a real test of he simply to tell her an apparatus they built are they able to control them that should message sufficiently to essentially roll over all the dissent that will come from this we will see Jonathan lord he is the author most recently of China's vision of victory garden Chang of the daily beast on John

China Beijing Chinese Government Wall Street Journal
China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

John Batchelor

09:25 min | 1 year ago

China Expels Three Wall Street Journal Reporters

"However tonight there is a twist on the reporting of the casualties and the doubts and the non transparency to twist is this headline in the Wall Street journal China expels three Wall Street journal reporters sub at China revoke the press credentials of three wallstreet journal report is based in Beijing the first time in the post now era that the Chinese government has expelled multiple journalists from one international news organization at the same time to help us understand this puzzle and also to look beyond this to the up to students of the reporting out of China these last weeks of the covert nineteen crisis we welcome Jonathan ward author of China's vision of victory Jonathan the expulsion of the newspaper reporters for a regime that is fussy about its world image does this make sense our it does this demonstrate in some fashion the brittleness of the Communist Party good evening to good evening John good evening court it's good to be well I think in reality this is an old piece of the playbook for great for Beijing not just the expulsion of journalists but the desire to control the narrative and if in doing this to countries with the think they have sufficient power to do so for quite a long time since the days of now say don't need done this with Indian media back in the days of the border what they're doing this in South Asia even today where you have investors from China telling individual newspaper editors of the call that they can't publish this or that bone China today they think they can do this to the United States and it's very similar I think to what they did with the NBA at the end of last year where the essentially said you can't say this you know tweeting about Hong Kong and then asking for an official in the NBA to be fired so this idea that China can intimidate or whether it's media entities are business entities on the shows I think if anything the confidence yeah China has today to state that it can control the narrative not only inside China but outside China because of course the Wall Street journal is beyond trying this person aware and so are you know many of the you know we'd in which we use media outside and they seek to influence all so a lot of this you know just sense to me you know one China's political system is to simply incompatible with that of the United States is incompatible with the modern world in China's power is growing far too great and that is what we will have to deal with going forward Jonathan you talk about confidence of the senior Chinese leaders at this another way so for instance right now those senior leaders face an existential crisis for themselves and for the regime and they need the help of for instance the United States and yet they're doing something that is just going to aggravate their image problems in Washington and elsewhere I would think that this is an instance of China lashing out doing something that is against its own interests and shows therefore that something is really wrong in Beijing what do you think of that theory and and how do you parse through it as you go forward I think we have to understand what China's leaders think that China's interests are this is a a nation state crews Regina has hearing did essentially it can unleash a billion people on the world and and come to rule the world because of that so they're very much in their own ideology when it comes to how to appeal power in the sense of what they've achieved in the last thirty years of their sentencing so you know the whole idea for great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation which is the central narrative of the Communist Party the idea that they will rule the world by the year twenty forty nine but the open road will be built made in China twenty twenty five will allow them to dominate every major industry these ideas have not gone away even with coronavirus on the other hand what you have is is a a real you know almost shut down slowdown in the Chinese economy in the first quarter of this year that I think is is is yes putting the pressure on and showing the world that our dependency on China is going to commit to great a price I mean all sorts of companies in the service on apple missed quarterly earnings and such and those that are really buying into the idea that China will continue to ascend okay never very tough decade going ahead because of China's confrontation with the United States yeah I I think that the sense of destiny the sense of the great because the nation that's held by the Communist Party and its core leadership bond is absolutely a very dangerous path for China because it leads to this confrontation with the world and that that needs to control essentially information even in a time of crisis Jonathan he maybe I'm out of touch maybe I don't see this but my sense is listening to what you're saying is that we're talking about a leadership in Beijing which is kind of view of the world which doesn't correspond to anything that we know because China right now does appear to be weak and I don't think that they got the position to be able to intimidate countries for very much longer because what we have seen during this crisis is the one victim the one real problem for Beijing is that it's lost its image of invulnerability so I would argue based on what you say that China's leaders are just themselves out of touch I think it depends on what the world does to come together against essentially to the rise of China at this point I mean look at what we in Britain this is causing huge problems for the US UK special relationship and look at China's economic ties in Southeast Asia and the way that that creates the difficulty I think for diplomacy in our ability to bring countries into a folder mean they're able to accomplish a great deal and it's still requires a concerted effort from the rest of the world I think to to say that China's ascendancy at this point cannot go too much further if they're going to have a regime like this I don't think the world has come together to do that yet but it's what must be done Johnson is there one explanation for why she didn't being didn't go to the center of the virus right away he simply could Chang why didn't why didn't she go there what it what is the thinking any leadership in the west would demand I mean some analysts have pointed out that this would be consistent with you know prior for instance now and and others that remaining in control of the crisis it involves you know being pulling back and working from behind the scenes and then sending simply another delegate out she has tried to cultivate an image of him as a man of the people but you know in this case it probably shows more than anything how dangerous this fire threatens dangerous yes but he is a puzzle did they have another way of looking at the world when the general doesn't lead he's not the general that's it you know I'm not being fancy here but she marching around in Beijing with a mask on was absurd well John do you know it's interesting that you say that because on social media in China many people were saying that seizure being was a coward and they contrasted him with what you mentioned the Primera Liga Chung actually going to move on talking to doctors in the hospital and they said see Jim being just stayed in Beijing and did a photo op yes Jonathan you know as well as I do that you the measure of the leader's how it does in crisis not how it does on a good day right that's true and I think we have yet to see with the with the real consequences are going to be in the Sunni could certainly be in a dangerous position it also could offer an opportunity for those who are against in circles of power to come together you know I'd love for term where does your garden well you know I I just don't see how they get out of this because they're lashing out and whatever friends they need they're alienated them very quickly yes I I you know we used to tease him as being looking like Winnie the Pooh but in that mask in Beijing he didn't look anything like Robert eight eight it looks like a well all right sign leave it alone Jonathan do you they were using the term Chernobyl for awhile of the clock is running if that's applicable do you believe explicable because the roof the clock says five years and they're gone that's what happens the Soviets is that a fair analogy we have about thirty seconds I think it depends on how well they're able to gain control of information and how effective the surveillance state that they built in you know centric social credit score and all the rest of it is I mean this is going to be a real catastrophe something to tolerate apparatus they built are they able to control connection message sufficiently to essentially roll over all the dissent that will come from this we will see Jonathan war he is the author most recently of China's vision of victory garden Chang of the daily beast I'm John Batchelor

Wall Street Journal China Beijing
What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

BrainStuff

08:30 min | 2 years ago

What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

"Putin. Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff loin Vogel bomb here in September of nineteen forty two US army, Lieutenant General Leslie groves commander of the Manhattan project. Those secret US crash effort to develop the atomic bomb faced a critical decision. The project needed to produce uranium-235 an isotope of uranium who's unstable nucleus could be easily split trigger efficient chain-reaction and release enormous amount of destructive energy, but that would require a massive complex manufacturing process involving tens of thousands of workers which needed to be kept secret to thwart interference from spies and saboteurs. But the question was where those priscilla's possibly be hidden U S officials had already identified potential sites in several parts of the country, but all of them had drawbacks Shasta dam in California. For example, was too close to the Pacific coast and this Volna rebel air attack in several locations in Washington state would have required construction of long power lines to provide the massive amounts of electro. Needed for the work site in Illinois near Chicago was also out officials didn't want to be close to a big population centers since the potential health risks of the work were not clear, and it would have been easier for enemy Asians to blend in around a city. So instead groves quickly settled upon fifty two thousand acre. That's twenty one thousand Hector site in rural eastern, Tennessee later expanded slightly not only would it be inconspicuous to anyone outside of the sparsely populated area. But it was also close to hydroelectric plants operated by the Tennessee valley authority, which could supply the enormous amounts of electrically that the plans would require it was the perfect place to build both the Clinton engineer works, which would be the atomic complex and secret city to house the workers the government decided to call the secret city oakridge because it sounded quote, sufficiently bucolic and general according to an article in a nineteen sixty nine government review of the project, not long after choosing the area, the US government quietly started moving small farmers who had land on the site paying them compensation, but not telling them why then came trainloads full of construction equipment and building materials construction crews quickly erected the buildings that would comprise the nondescript we named campus as well as. Thousands of houses for scientists and workers. Many of the homes were be one flat tops, a designed fashion from prefabricated panels and roofing to save construction time building the secret industrial facilities and housing for workers cost around one point three two billion dollars. That's about eighteen point five billion in today's money that amounted to sixty percent of the Manhattan, project's total budget over the next few years oakridge grew into a community of seventy five thousand people. We spoke with de Ray Smith, a retired historian for the UAE twelve national security complex who also is the historian for these city of Oak Ridge and a columnist for the Oak Ridge or a local newspaper Smith explained people came from all over the world. Many of the scientists were Hungarians a lot came out of Germany and Great Britain. He explains that others were recruited for the Clinton engineering works by big US companies working on the Manhattan project who scoured campuses if US colleges and universities for bright students with needed science and technical skills. For example, a young chemist named Bill Wilcox who was approached by an Eastman Kodak recruiter in nineteen forty-three later recalled that he was only told that the job was some sort of secret war work. He said I asked where I'd be working. He wouldn't say it was secret. I asked what sort of work. I'd be doing. He wouldn't say it was secret Wilcox eventually ended up at the Clinton engineer works. According to Smith, those who turned down jobs might end up being drafted into a special engineering detachment of the US army. And sent to Tennessee anyway. Those atomic workers arrived at a place shrouded in secrecy, locals knew something mysterious was going on at the site. But only those who are part of the mission were allowed inside past. The guarded gates on the access roads, the atomic facilities themselves were surrounded by digital security. The work itself was highly compartmentalized. So that most people knew only about the small portion of the effort that they themselves were working on. And only a select few new. The overarching mission was to help make the atomic bomb access to buildings other than the one you were working in was highly restricted to keep information from getting out oakridge became a self contained community with most everything that its workers needed secret city had stores movie houses, a high school a Bank, a three hundred bed hospital, tennis and handball courts and even its own Symphony Orchestra led by a Manhattan project. Scientists people who live there tended victory gardens raised families, and led what was pretty much normal American existence. That is except for the secrecy that surrounded them in their work. A billboard reminded workers. Let's keep our traps shut. They knew they had to be cautious. Not to say anything about their jobs to anyone even their own spouses, a young scientists told one of the first reporters tried about the subject when Louis Feldstein would sit around the dinner table, and the strain was terrible. But it was all in the difficult effort of producing uranium-235. There's only a tiny amount of the stuff zero point seven percent in uranium or most of which is uranium two thirty eight which doesn't fit in as easily and above such as little boy. The one dropped on Hiroshima required. One hundred and forty one pounds. That's sixty four kilograms of uranium-235. You have to separate a lot of material to get that much to thirty five to solve that problem. The Clinton engineer works y twelve plant used special devices called Cal trans which utilized the electromagnetic separation process developed by Nobel winning physicist Ernest Lawrence, the university of California, Berkeley, the Cal trans used heat and powerful magnets to separate the two isotopes and then to collect just the uranium-235 isotope because it's so much lighter in weight together. Enough uranium-235 for the projects purposes, the y twelve facility employed twenty two thousand workers to run one thousand one hundred fifty two Kalua trans literally around the clock. Meanwhile, another part of the works. The x ten graphite reactor. Used neutrons emitted from uranium-235 to convert uranium two, thirty eight into an isotope of a different element. Plutonium two thirty nine another easily fissionable material suitable for making Tomek bombs as myth explains after x ten demonstrated that the process could work the actual plutonium used to make Fatman the bomb dropped on Nagasaki was produced in the b reactor at the Hanford engineer works near Richmond, Washington. Finally on August. Sixth nineteen Forty-five the world witnessed the results of the secret cities. Labor's when the United States dropped an atomic bomb containing uranium-235 produced there on the Japanese city of Hiroshima the Knoxville, Tennessee, new sentinels front page headline proudly proclaimed atomic super bomb made it oakridge strikes Japan that wasn't completely correct though, the uranium-235 came from Tennessee parts, the bomb were made it three different plants. So that none of them would have the complete design the destruction at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was horrific, and it was a or perhaps the turning point of the war. After the war. The various parts of the once secret, Tennessee, atomic complex were split up part eventually was reborn as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which helped pioneer the field of nuclear medicine present isotopes for use intriguing cancer and as diagnostic tools in addition to doing cutting edge research areas ranging from nanotechnology to wireless, charging of electric vehicles and other portion became the twelve national security complex, which produced components for tens of thousands of thermonuclear weapons in the us arsenal during the Cold War and leader helped disassemble US and former Soviet nuclear weapons third part is now the site of the east Tennessee technology park, though, there's no evidence that German or Japanese spies ever managed to infiltrate the Clinton engineer works. A Soviet spy named George co Ville did manage to get a job there. And apparently passed along information about the atomic work to the Soviets in two thousand seven he was honored posthumously with a hero of the Russian federation medal. The nation's highest honor I Russian President

United States Manhattan Engineer Tennessee Oakridge Hiroshima Ray Smith Bill Wilcox Clinton Nagasaki Capital One Tennessee Valley Authority Washington Us Army Lieutenant General Leslie Grov Putin. Oak Ridge Illinois Pacific Eastman Kodak
Do Carrots Really Help Your Eyesight?

BrainStuff

05:00 min | 3 years ago

Do Carrots Really Help Your Eyesight?

"Hey, grainstuff listeners instead of an today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast. But I think he might dig u-turns change is hard. But is it possible to make it actually feel good? Join co co-hosts Lisa Oz 'em Jill hers, egg as they end their expert guests share their most powerful end proven advice as well as stories of change from their own lives. Switching careers relocating adjusting to a new relationship or leaving old one having a first child or becoming an empty nester. The circumstances may be different. But the big question stays the same. How do we stay? Fearless. When we feel uncertain u-turns has an answer. We get honest and start talking and laughing about the stuff everyone goes through because shift happens check him out, even listen and subscribe to u-turns. That's why oh you turns on apple podcasts the iheartradio app and everywhere else that podcasts are found. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb. Hear anyone else have the common childhood dream to be able to hit Clay Pigeons with a crossbow in the dark at three hundred yards while riding on the back of a beautiful Pegasus just me. Anyway, when I told my parents, this they told me Lauren if you want to have that kind of hyper acute night vision, you've got to eat your carrots. It's common wisdom eat a lot of carrots. If you want is like a jet pilot, but do care it's really give you better eyesight. The short answer is if you already have enough vitamin an your diet, probably not. But if you don't a big old sack of carrots might be exactly what you need carrots are packed full of nutrient called beta carotene, which is kind of natural die for fruits and vegetables. Plants. Use beta carotene in their bodies is a pig bent that gives them a yellow orange color. But when you eat foods containing this natural pigment, like sweet potatoes, spinach or carrots, the beta carotene gets absorbed by your intestinal wall and converted into vitamin A. So. Oh, here's the true part of the myth. If you want to maintain normal. I health you've got to get enough item. In a and carrots are a perfectly good source in regions where people don't get much vitamin a in their diets vision problems are rampant without vitamin A. The photoreceptors in your eyes start to deteriorate and your corneas can actually vanish. But if you don't have a vitamin a deficiency. And your vision is already healthy stuff in your face with carrots or any other source of the vitamin will not lead to superhuman eyeball powers. So where did we get the idea that carrots can do to your eyes, but spinach does to Popeye's forearms believe it or not this myth got a big boost from World War Two propaganda during World War Two the United Kingdom underwent air raids conducted by axis powers, the German lift Buffa would strike at British cities in the night over the years, the British Royal Air force had some success pushing back the German air attacks one explanation for their success. Is that from nineteen thirty nine onward, British pilots. Had access to a technology called onboard airborne interception. Radar to help them spot enemy planes great distance. But the UK ministry of food launched a propaganda campaign claiming that its fighter pilots could pick out an aircraft in the dark because they honed their eyes with carrots. Some sources have speculated that the story was designed to hide the existence of the Royal Air forces onboard radar system from the enemy another explanation might be simple economics German set up blockades to you starvation and discomfort as weapons which meant that many goods like sugar had to be rationed, the UK government encouraged citizens to turn to sugar substitutes, for example, carrots which were plentiful even during the war could be used as a sweetener in foods like carrot pudding, and carrot fudge or as a substitute for meat in the infamous Walton pie carrots were so plentiful because they could be grown by citizens at home and around their communities in its so called victory gardens food supplies were low due to those blockades and canned fruits and vegetables. It's largely went to be the military citizens were encouraged to make up the difference. The slogan of the campaign was dig for victory. Two million private gardens were constructed and some public ones as well. The dry moat surrounding the tower of London was filled in with growing vegetables. Today's episode was written by Jim McCormack and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other sharp, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, their brain Steph listeners, we need your help. So the ads that you listen to make this podcast possible. But we want you to listen to ones that are actually useful. We have a listener survey up on our show website, brain stuff show dot com where you can go, and let us know what you're most interested in it should take less than five minutes. Just head on over to brain stuff, show dot com. And let us know. And

United Kingdom Lauren Bogle Vitamin A Deficiency Lisa Oz British Royal Air Force Jill Hers Apple Tower Of London Clay Pigeons Royal Air Steph Popeye Jim Mccormack Buffa Tyler Three Hundred Yards Five Minutes
"victory gardens" Discussed on One Hundred Centuries

One Hundred Centuries

06:25 min | 6 years ago

"victory gardens" Discussed on One Hundred Centuries

"The period about your book. Well i i tell you i have absolutely nothing but respect for that generation but i also i also really the time period was that people just didn't they didn't give up in fact. I just read an article recently about how there was no gasoline. There was everything was rationed at that time. And in digging in we get more into rationing ration tickets ration books and coupons and. Thanks in people would you will would build furnaces in the back of their car and run pipes around the outside of their car over the top or whatever and they would run their cars off of steam and i wanna say that was called gasifier and there are pictures on internet of the gasifier help people would just. It wasn't very attractive. You know there was a huge furnace behind your car and being huge pipe running around sides the front of the engine but you know they just. They didn't complain about stuff. They just fixed it you know they whine and cry bring their hands and gnash their teeth they just they just figured out how to make it work and they made it work and it wasn't pretty probably most of the time but it still works still got to where they needed to go in that sense of can-do spirit. No i think we've lost that and to some extent and i would love to see more of that comeback especially to the younger generation of just kind of. Don't complain about it. Still cry about it. I mean cry. If you want to but then wipe your tears poli boots up and let's figure it out so i i have huge respect generation in previous generations as well. I don't discount them either. But i'd love to see that that sense of let's just do it back in back in our society in. Maybe it won't come. Maybe it will but at least people know that it is possible. Great message gasifier. I've never heard of that before. I sounds of really interesting. Yeah show up in the third book somewhere along. Along the way aid they are very interested as As as the year long in the launching of the us s new jersey launched out of philadelphia. It was the biggest warship ever created and my father's actually from new jersey. So this part of this motivation you know. My family does come from new from the area and apple. Side is the town. And it's actually Completely modeled after a real life town in new jersey called pittman new jersey and pitman's where my father grew up and there's a lot of history going on and pitman and so now the boys are very interested in the next that'll ship to be launched. And i'm thinking maybe they might have to drive to philadelphia in gasify truck. Oh yeah you've got to put the gasifier that needs to be a book a rate will thank you again so much for coming on the show So we know that readers can find your first on amazon Is there any place else that they should find you online. Well you can look for me at Lee sharon dot we dot com I am on twitter at least sharon. I'm also On instagram as winter rest farm. And but if you go to win we turned dot. We dot com Oh my contact. Information is here and you can send me an email. If you can't figure it out. And i will i will you by the hand and i will show you where to go all right. Thank you again for coming on. The show is been our pleasure. Thank you so much. Thank everybody thinks everybody And sorry about the of rocky start. But i think this was turned out pretty good. Thanks for your patience. I appreciate it all right. We'll We are about wrapped up so aloe. Stop the broadcast and say Good evening okay coty. Thanks take care all right you too. Thank you for listening to one hundred centuries and thanks again to leave for coming on the podcast before we go to a couple of quick announcements. Stephen and i are expecting a baby pretty much any day. Now so if you try to get in touch on the podcast it might be a little while before we get back to you. If i'm still waiting around for the baby then i'll probably get back pretty quickly but if there's a bit of silence it means that he came and we're really busy But we prerecorded stuff I said in the last podcast civil becoming out even during the super busy new parent time but we might not be super responsive but we are listening and we do appreciate your feedback. Another announcement is that if any of you are wide pat readers Let's watch pat w. a. t. t. p. a. d. it's a platform for authors to put up stuff for free for readers to look at and comment on and i'm now on what pad and have the first short story called ian and darlene up and you can find me at By looking for connie beadle on what pad so. I would love to connect with you guys. If you're out there thanks again for listening is one hundred centuries signing out..

dot philadelphia Stephen amazon us pittman pat w. a. connie beadle apple sharon ian gasify darlene