3 Burst results for "Victoria Gillick"

"victoria gillick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"victoria gillick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Week from Mexico City and bringing you the story of a remarkable, and paradoxical. Species of animal I'm Victoria Gillick, BBC finds Clark's London This boat is taking me to one of the last refuges of the Mexican accidental strange looking salamander barely clinging to existence in its natural habitat. But thriving. In countless numbers in captivity I can't think of any other species that has a. Story like it you name it is hitting. The world accidental so here we have an animal that is. Well known all around the world. And lives, in the wall is. Nearly extinct accidental is an amphibian and a true legend it's fascinated scientists across the world for more, than a century we need to protect the, species you know it's an amazing species Quite amazing powers of regenerating so if they lose a limb they can. Grow another one can regenerate the brain you. Can generate a heart Jared spinal cord and you can regenerate. The lens and the Aztecs it. Was God, and a health food It also represented. A culture of Mexico the, importance that they, have I think if we lose the species we. Lose from Mexico a cultural emblematic species I'll vote is gliding deeper into xochimilco a suburb of murky. Waterways and small neighborhoods in the southeast of Mexico City's metropolis I'm on my way to meet the scientists who are trying to save, it from extinction it's. Only natural heart along the way we pass other colorful boats carrying partying locals escaping the concrete jungle Sperling away to the north just two kilometers away the canals here are, all that remains of the once rape system lakes and wetlands from which the. City itself rose through reclamation starting seven hundred years ago in Aztec times. The Mexican acts lotto yeast to live here, and only here in huge numbers but, now researchers reckon there could be as few as five hundred left but before. We get to our first stop here's, another strange facts about the. Axle Richard Griffiths and I'm Vivian conservation biologist UK's university of Kansas unusual in it It is what we call Peter more fake or near tunic and that actually means that never actually grows up, like other amphibians it lives and breeds in water and the eggs hatch into. A lawful fall but they never actually transform into a form lives on, land so the accidental keeps on growing with, its gills and actually can breed as, sort of adult level so it's like a baby amphibian never actually grows up It's. An odd creature fishy looking salamander with feathery gills on either side of its head Gilles that frame. Of face that seems to have a permanent Keat smile My only guaranteed chance of seeing one. Face to face with Seebeck the center for biological. And aquatic research run. By the metropolitan university of Mexico right on the banks of such milk as main canal my guide was researcher an excellent bet Erica serving Right, now is very hard to find them in the in the habit that you know they're just a few. Are right there for it here in the laboratory we've had a lot of them we've reproduce them especially for research and education or right now, this is a big glass tank where you can say. About at twenty at these grownup these mature excellent Sends me kind of ambling around his. Feet and swishing their tails like. Fish but walking, at the same time this one just turned, two faces when a face on those little is in that little smile that faces quite, captivating isn't it That's right that's right you know this name of of. The action It's It means that they have the mount like a. Teaspoon Math like a teaspoon shake it looks like little it does look like a. Little stone scientific names manse that. Very dark in color they're sort of Charlie, immodestly colloids they, leave in. The bottom of the lake which is very very dark, so they can hide in the. Bottom of the lake and people waiting just right there A little fish passing Jump at the account executive is wasting. The way they can't this is a natural colour is it's more common to find in a. White astronauts, as pets. It's very very common but this is the natural system original because the ones that you see in aquaria that people, have as pets pink The pink ones cannot survive in the wild Everyone can see them very. Well so that's why nature put.

Mexico City Peter Mexico Seebeck Victoria Gillick metropolitan university of Mex Clark BBC Richard Griffiths university of Kansas Jared London Sperling account executive rape Gilles UK Charlie Erica
"victoria gillick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"victoria gillick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Airport from capitol hill by dave lee now kneels back with my news desk an alleged serial killer has been charged with a seventh murder in canada's largest city toronto bruce macarthur a landscape gardener has been accused of killing a man who disappeared in twenty ten his remains were identified among dismembered body parts belonging to several men found implant containers belonging to mr macarthur police have said that most of his alleged victims were a gay detectives had they had reopened investigations into another fifteen on solved as dating back several decades but they said they hadn't found connections to the killings with which mr macarthur has been charged if on staples one of the last surviving members of the american gospel group the staple singers has died she was eighty and managed as well as sang in the family group if on performed with her sisters mavis and cloth and their father pops on hits in the nineteen seventies including i'll take you there and let's do it again which are both us number ones a system of atlantic ocean currents which helps keep western and northern europe warm is weaker today than it has been for over a thousand years a study published in the journal nature revealed a significant reduction in the strength of this conveyor like system scientists say this could lead to cooler temperatures and effector deep sea ecosystem science correspondent victoria gillick explains system acts like a radiator sending warm water north from the equator and by studying layers of sediment on the deep ocean floor the researchers found that it's weakened by about twenty percent over the last hundred and fifty years they say the trend is likely to continue in response to fresh water from melting ice sheets being added to the ocean surface disrupting the circulation scientists don't anticipate a catastrophic shutdown but they will continue to monitor this pattern to understand how our own climate and delicate deep ocean ecosystems will be affected as the north atlantic heater is dialed down on a singing road that rewarded dutch motorists with a tune if they drove over it at the correct speed has been scrapped daddy after its installation because it was driving residents to distraction strips of different lengths resonated with the notes when a car drove over them to play the.

dave lee murder canada mr macarthur europe victoria gillick toronto bruce macarthur thousand years twenty percent fifty years
"victoria gillick" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:16 min | 2 years ago

"victoria gillick" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Years. Two years ago, I was editing a collection of Guardian journalism and my publisher questioned whether I should include any pieces about the transgender debate on the grounds that it was so last year by which meant that we'd carried a couple of pieces on it in the two thousand and fifteen edition. Maybe it was time to move on. I had a visceral sense that she was wrong, that this is one of the most important interesting And in some quarters of course, contentious shoes facing our culture and our society. As indeed, it has proved with the swelling, tide of memoirs, and an increasingly acrimonious standoff between feminists in the Trans community. But where is the history to Ankara strong opinions? It's between the pages of a new book crowd funded by more than five hundred donors and its editor is Christine Burns a veteran campaigner for transgender rights who is assembled more than twenty writers to address everything you ever wanted to know, but didn't debt ask. When Christine came into the studio, I began by asking how the idea first came about. When he came about because I'm friends with the summit east beat the litteria Detroit Independent on Sunday. And she said to me, Look, I'm going to join his new company at this new this new publisheH. Have you got a book? You won't put me. And I had already written a couple of self books about a particular aspect of trans history. So I said to a well, I'll go and I think I sat down and I started sketching ideas. And then I saw I'd always thought with what I'd done before the There was a so much bigger story to be told. And it came along at a time at the end of 2016 when people were starting to say in the press television. Oh, it's all a fat, Isn't it? Because suddenly transpeople itself leaving popping up everywhere and local sets a ridiculous idea. But because nobody's ever written this history before, you can understand people thinking that. But it's interesting that you have chosen to write this history by calling. Lots of people's different experience Now you haven't set out to write the definitive trends, history yourself And now because I think that's very difficult to do. I thas got involved with that with Trans stuff in the 1960s as a as a teenager I member discovering. There was There was a word for what I am on my knees in the kitchen. My parents pop reading the and use of the world, and I was reading about April, Ashley, And it was not a good way to discover what you are. So and through the 70s there was practically nothing to find out from nothing was 1974 the John Morris, His book came out pounced on earth conundrum conundrum, yes. And that was that was the first time anybody had written an autobiography. And that was I think, written for the perceptions of what the audience really wanted at that time. So there was That's not be much over the years and people that to find out what they can find out hard way. I mean, I just. Covered that there were other people I could meet by ringing up smartphones, petty drunk, and saying Help end than those days they used to be they used to have a filing cabinet full of addresses and they said, all call these people. And our Member. It was It was old Victorian house in pace. And this is this kills in camps Street in so foot mansion Stars a student in Manchester in the 1970s And I went to this place on the Wednesday evening. Now in my car across the road staking it out Just like I was on a spy assignment to my soul. People coming going in an adult is, is of enormous step to go knock on the door and say his this, where the uh, the Trans people meet, Um, and was admitted inside and I'm happy said the people and the There was Springs coming out of the city and the coffee cups were cracked. And it was an again was awesome, sir. High-quality stuff really. I I was so scared at that time and that was nineteen 75 that I ran away again. Vote for my PHD and tried to I thought I did a deal with myself. I thought if I if I go away and make a you live for myself in industry, I can get past Forget all this stuff Mitton a snake. Another Fresh Start a course that never works. I want to bring you back to square one to these two terminology because you have a bit. There's a bit of debate about trans, transgender transsexual. Yes, it's how how it What is the vocabulary? The language has evolved over the years when I first in those times, I'm describing in the 1970s They were really to words. People were transvestites which a people who just episodically dress up for vote for the pleasure of it for an evening and in other every other respects there, the heterosexual men, but they just have that that that liking for doing that. And then there were transsexual people who were a world apart, people like me who you're really feel inside that we are of the gender opposite. The one that we were we born us and that was that was. The vocabulary that was with us until right up until the second half in the 1990s Andy one, my other books, I dug the correspondence where we actually discussed what terminology to use, be causes a political activist organisation. We have to think really had really hard about language and what it meant, and we know that, um, being called transsexuals contributed towards being exotic sized seeing at the sexual bit, I was a big, big flashing alarm bell, and we wanted again to make a fresh start with the language. So we conferred with our associates across the pond in America, and people with starting just two trips strip it right down to the were trends. And the vet. The rationale there in 1997 at the time was that you aware as people can treat transsexual as announ or and act Vervoort nitric tip all sorts of things. It was. It was as problematic as somebody saying that. That's the black and people of color heat that because it reduces everything that they are to a announ which is about Nicola, and we felt the same way we felt that if we introduced trans to the language, it's extremely difficult to use that as a noun that is extremely difficult to use it as anything other than an adjective. And we could pay play games with that, and we had discussions how on earth we can do this because people are immensely stubborn. I always it will. The only way we did is we're not gonna tell people who are going to do it, which is going to introduce it language. And I was writing most of the content for in those days the activist website Press change. That was our campaign for the gender recognition night. And I just started flinging the word in a my colleagues did a we would consistent. We got to two thousand and two with government. We were trying to persuade them in their initial policy documents for what became the gender recognition bill. We said, Can you use trans? And he said, Well, it's sad. We don't think it's it's commonly enough understood Amendment, we're going to use transexuals who had to live with that, but it was really gratifying as time goes When by to actually have people start to use it. 'cause it's such an easy tempt use and also it can be used as such a big umbrella. It had no package as terminology. So you could It was what you said. It walls and the the the case-law for introducing there, the gender recognition bell and all the other protections for transpeople which you did by stealth as well. We did you. Yes. Yes. At Well stealth in the to the extent that we use the European Court Fumin writes, European Court of Justice in order not to have to get it through the courts in this country. And no, no, it was noted in fact to get the European Court of Human Rights. You have to reveal exhausted all the courts in your own country. But it was one of these things that nobody will in this country wanted to deal with. They will said it posse Dutton partied up, and we took oaths. What we had full goes a getting through the European Court of Human Rights. First was my Michael. Mark Greece in 1980 six and he lost his case an it's taken him seven or eight years to get to that point, but at least he actually had people talking about the issues that he raised. And that was very important to us because by taking out case to cold, We had a place that was knocked his Tarico and with which out she could just deal with the facts and no disrespect to your profession in journalism. But that wasn't happening for us. We were having no way of actually being heard. So to actually have those things disgusting court. And then to have people like clad DIA legal correspondence, The Guardian at the time you're talking about watered happened That was really important to us was that we'd we lost sat and then about three years later, another case almost identical uh, walls Caroline Kasey, who was a television host stats an immortal very like Paris lease these days and. She took a no and I did an identical case to the European Court of Human Rights. She lost as well, but actually by a considerably smaller margin. And then another couple of trans women, they went to the European gold fuming writes in 1997 Ninety-eight. And if one judge at decided to vote the other way we would one at that time. But in a way it was good for us because we just had a change of government, and we need to to lay the ground for what we wanted to happen is all about being it being taking this very slowly and tactically and uh, and and not rushing into things. So that when we finally had the case In two thousand and two coud Gordon and I versus the UK, and the European Court of Human rights bodies point was totally pissed off with Brit Britain because they felt milk. You've had fifteen years of these cases in which to do something. Nothing's changed the arguments for exactly the same if that we understand better. And all the other spurious stuff you'll flinging out really If that's just since you need to do something, says, seventeen judges from seventeen countries, including the British judge said unequivocally Britain. You've got to do something about this. But winning this LIGO victory has not actually put paid to controversy has it? I knew I must have been a huge amount of trans phobia among sort of old lefty feminists. Yom thing in that yet using exactly the same script they were using when they were when they were young. A baby feminists in the 1970s is exactly the same arguments. That's depressing thing for people who say that they wanted debates and they're they've been asking the same questions for forty years. They'd been getting the same ounces The odds as haven't suited them. And so the keep Hocine them. That's not a genuine debate. If you're going to go into a debate, then you have to accept on both sides. You might actually have your mind changed on something because you've got more information. There are two particular issues. It come up time and time again, and one is pre-pubescent children And the other is trans women in prisons in women's. Yet the lights franchise would be this deal with a preview Bessant children. The sad thing about this is that the discussion in public is so dishonest and so misguided. The truth is that nothing is done to pre pubis and children other than to watch them and to give their family support the nor given any drugs, The not pushed down any particular relevant homered. They never out the no other other O'Keefe impunity Premier League Dungs Nope. Priority blockers are introduced once the first stage of puberty is well underway service and the child at what Now the young person, the adolescent who is actually of an age where legally they are entitled to have a view on the medical treatment they receive is cool Gillick competence it it goes right back to out of your Member Victoria Gillick on other issues to do with whether doctors. Five birth control pills, Two teenage girls. And when that went all the way up legal system that produce the precedent that said, if a child is capable of understanding the issues involved in that treatment than they are also entitled to actually have a say in it and Bonn at points, the medical system has already been dealing with that child for years and years. And the key thing about treating Anybody who is gender non-conforming going to this one clinic in the country is that they have to be insistent and persistent in the pace of everything. So eight that yet you grow up trans faced with the world, which overwhelmingly is telling you you are your natual gender. And this child is still saying in spite of all the social costs up at that involves no, Uh, you know, in my case I'm ago you wrong yet out of children don't do that. People might play about withdrew. US up, But it's not the same thing. If they're not there is nothing like being a trans child and you actually have to Noah trends child in order to actually understand that as it this chapter in my new book trans Britain where one of the founders of the charity that support mermaid mandates that site actually tells the story of how Mates was created in them in the early 1990s I was there to reassure some of those parents at the time thinking, what's going to happen to my child when they're older? And I was the older chance woman to say, Look air. I am. I note an I'm a jet-setting IT consultant, I'm making money, I'm happy I've got partnerships. And and I really having a good time and I'm living the life that I was born to live And and they will sort of you could feel a collective sigh of relief in the room and they felt, okay. It's okay now to support my children. My child. So what about this second issue? Prisons prisons again, The This is. A debate this being held on the basis of false information. It's always been the case out, although there is There is a policy that says, when somebody has agenda recognition certificate, The Prison Service will look favourably on accommodating them according to their legal gender overriding that is a policy that says, the part Prison Service will always accommodate prisoners According to an assessment of safety. So that means that if some if they had any doubts about a prisoner than they would put them in a in a combination appropriate for the safety, both at prisoner and the rest of the prisoners in the press in the state. What that means in in practice, for instance, is that they're all kiss gender women nightly women who are not held in the female estate because they are deemed to be too dangerous to the other women and women's prison. They'll put in a secure unit in one of in one of the men's presence. So it's it's not the case that you can get agenda recognition certificate and tomorrow. You'll be shipped off to account think of a women's prison. Holloway Holloway, Yes. An anonymous China than of yachts are I could picture the Holloway wrote, couldn't get neither. So what one of things you deal with this history and you take the history

European Court Trans community Britain Christine Burns Detroit Holloway Holloway Ankara editor John Morris Manchester publisher Victoria Gillick Um China Ashley America part Prison Service European Court of Justice Andy one