5 Burst results for "Victor Verster Prison"

"victor verster prison" Discussed on History of the 90s

History of the 90s

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"victor verster prison" Discussed on History of the 90s

"The day that Nelson Mandela walked out the front gate of Victor Verster prison in Capetown South Africa exploded with joy. It was February eleventh. Nineteen thousand nine hundred. A Beautiful Sunny Day made even more spectacular by the release of Mandela. After spending twenty seven years behind bars he walked to freedom arm-in-arm with his wife Winnie. They each raised a fist in triumph. It is one of the most memorable moments of the ninety s and it also marked the beginning of a new chapter in South Africa. Nelson Mandela had become the symbol of the anti-apartheid movement in the nineteen eighties while serving a life sentence for sabotage. After his release he became the face of a free South Africa and was elected. The country's first democratically elected president for years later in Nineteen ninety-four his story and the sacrifices he made during the struggle for a free South Africa are well-known. So we wanted to go a little deeper and expand our focus beyond the nineteen ninety s as we take a look at some aspects of the story that you might not know. I'M CATHY CANS AURA. And this is the history of the nineties on this episode. Were diving into pirate radio and protest songs to better understand the pivotal role. They played in helping to free Nelson Mandela and end apartheid.

Nelson Mandela South Africa Capetown Victor Verster Winnie president
"victor verster prison" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

KTKR 760AM

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"victor verster prison" Discussed on KTKR 760AM

"Chris Brockman now has nine hundred straight games scoring ten or more points extends the longest such streak in NBA history. The current active player closest to that nine hundred streak of ten of ten or more points in a game is James harden with two hundred eighty five that's your old gen stats. Wow. All right. We had the subject matter of this thirty for thirty on last week. And now the thirty for thirty is about to air on ESPN. It's called forty two one. It's about Buster Douglas beating Mike Tyson and the co director the man behind forty two to one along with Ben Houser, one of my good friends. Love this man, Jeremy shop here on the show. How you been Jeremy? I don't get to see, you know, enough, Richard. Mutual. But but I've been well been since his regards as well, it's run prompter for you. Hanmi shots sheets in the middle of the night. Two thirty in the morning. Remind rich that I was I was his prompter operator when I was coming up and look now now he's a big director. I know. So he does speak. Well of me though, right? Jeremy? He does he does everybody ESPN does at the mothership. It's been like it's been like twenty five years since you. Still fell fifty every day. Jeremy's fifteen it's just fifteen but whatever I am. I am sort of the Mike Holmgren of of broadcasting in the fact that everybody thinks I've been at ESPN longer than NFL network, and I've actually been at NFL network twice as long as I was ever at ESPN in the same way. He spent more time in Seattle than he did Green Bay. And then other than that. There are no other analogies that can make to that. I'm trying to think ours. Is there anything else with home grin? No, it's Viteri to write a vegetarian. Time in the mid west. Both of you are from the coast. But a lot of time in the midwest. We both sing do up in our spare time. No, that's just that's just not me. Jeremy why did you make this? Because I I mean, look we're the same age. And there was something about this moment in time for me. This remains the most thrilling with the possible exception the miracle on ice and a couple of things as New York sports, San that have occurred over the years, the most thrilling thing I've ever seen in sports, and certainly one of the most unexpected Mike Tyson as you well know was a colossus. He was the biggest story in sports. Nobody thought Buster Douglas had a chance in there's nothing bigger in sports. Then the heavyweight championship. You could say it's been diminishing last couple of generations. The Klitschko is kinda ran away with them to Europe. And we didn't see him for a while. But the heavyweight title is still something of mythic significance in sports in Buster Douglas became the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the lineal champion, the man who, you know, keep the man who beat the man who beat the man all the way back to John l Sullivan in the biggest upset in sports history. And he didn't do it. We'd lock it wasn't a fluke as you know, you interviewed BUSTER last week. This was a ten round ass kicking in the one second in the fight that he wasn't really dominating the eighth round. He gets forward by Tyson uppercut, which would have ended the fight any Tyson. The previous thirty seven fights. He gets up off the canvas after getting walk like that in seventy eight minutes later, he's the heavyweight champion the world. There's there's still with a story like it. And and yet, I don't think people really know the Buster Douglas three, we know the Mike Tyson story, you'll be Mike Tyson story more than I have frankly would last like twenty years in this is this is BUSTER story. This is about the guy won the fight. And we we did speak to him last week. And just, you know, give me your favorite story that you learned through this about Buster Douglas that you didn't know already going in Jerry. I mean, there's there's a lot there. I mean in terms of a story, and I think one of the things if I may say so in the credit really does go to our friend bed. Hauser he really did all the work here one thinks filmed as well is we've d- stories together with different voices telling the full story in one of those stories is after the fight is made in. Buster gets you shot at Mike Tyson. And he sees it as this remarkable opportunities second title shot and heavyweight division to win that crown. He's mother Lula Pearl. Douglas asks his father had been a great price fighter himself. Bill. Douglas. You know about this Mike Tyson guys he really as scary as everybody says and Bill Douglas says, yeah, he really is. She goes to busters house that night to talk him out of fighting, Mike Tyson. We're talking about, you know, a guy who was you know, a heavyweight contender. He was the number two contender at the time. The IBS number two contender. Maybe even moved up to number one. At that point. He's the guy fought for the heavyweight title before he's from a boxing family. His brothers are heavyweights. His father's middleweight light heavy. It is mother goes through Tom. You can't fight this guy. He's too scary. And he says to his mom. No, no, don't be worried about me be worried about that guy. I mean, you can't make this stuff up. And you know, what it turned out? Buster was right. Jeremy shop here on the rich Eisen show. And having BUSTER on last week. It was a fun moment for me where I was able to thank him for helping me procrastinate in my studies as a senior at the university of Michigan. We are of the same age. But I, you know, Jeremy might have a little bit more on the shoulders than you. Because I skipped kindergarten back in the day to be a great ahead of you. And the rest of all of us in our. That's why your classes ninety. Yes. So you were a junior in Cornell if I'm not mistaken when the half were you skipping out of classes to see this. Do you remember where you were? The weekend. So there were no classes, but I mean stunning. It was on prime time in the US. It was an afternoon fight on Sunday in Tokyo Japan at the Tokyo dome, and they were fighting he was about eleven o'clock eastern time. I think about eight o'clock. I mean, it would have been obviously, eight o'clock a west coast. I think it was eleven eight maybe it was more like twelve nine, and I was in of all places that boxing, hotbed, Hanover, New Hampshire covering a college hockey games. Contest between the very formidable big red of Cornell and the not-so-formidable green of darkness, and I was trying to find somewhere to watch the fight. It was on regular HBO in back. You know in a in the dark days of cable television. It was hard to find regular HBO in a place like Hanover, New Hampshire. I could not. But it asked around some people Dr meant that they added the didn't or at least they told me they didn't. Maybe they just didn't want me hanging out out with them watching the fight. And then later in the night. I I ran into some guy. Wait ask early. Nice. Did you hear what happened? And of course, like everybody else. I was stunned. I was floored. I made an attempt to see because I was a fight fan in particular fan of the heavyweight division. But I was like what's the big deal? Anyway. Right. Well, of course, it ended up being a huge deal, but you'll like this Richard because you were shooting of history a consummate student of history connoisseur. Yes. Consequential as it was seven hours later something much more consequential took place on the planet that was delete story. The next day in the New York Times rather than Buster Douglas defeating Mike Tyson. Do you have any idea what being despite being the connoisseur that you did point out to me a fill in the blanks from Jeremy what was it? Mandela walked free after more than a quarter century in prison about seven hours after Buster Douglas became the heavyweight champion the world walked out of Victor Verster prison. See, that's you Jeremy being you right there. That's your next level right there. That's your next. And that no. That's another reason. Why I mean think about that? I mean, you got this massive event in sports, and then you've got this massive event for the entire planet taking place, right? Right. Right. Right. What is your dad think of the fight? What was his take? When he heard about Jeremy. I mean, I didn't go back. It would have been interesting go back and look at the sports reporters from that morning. But the sports reporters, which of course, was on Sunday mornings back, then would have been the first place where many people found out about the outcome because you know, a lot of people were in bed by the time. It ended around midnight and people wake up would wake up on Sunday mornings at intern on ESPN in my father. He was just doing the sports reporters. He was like doing the Sunday morning like hosting thing. He would do typically was Robin Roberts. Sure. And she'd been bristling he'd be New York. So, you know, actually, I should have gone back and looked exactly what they had to say. But he'd been to a lot of Tyson fights step when I'm sure he's stunned is everybody else if he hadn't been able to put money on on Douglas. Jeremy shop here on the rich Eisen show. And this is another reason why you're perfect for this sort of stuff, Jeremy for this piece in general for the amount of you know, boxing, you're exposed to as a kid through your dad. Give me your favorite Ali story. When did you first meet him? When did did did you did you just walk into the house one day? And he's sitting there in the living room. Did that happen? Yeah. Definitely I remember. I remember him being around. My first memories though. I remember going to see him at his home in cherry hill, New Jersey. I think that would have been around seventy four seventy five I was only four or five. But I remember it in that. I remember spending time around him in the Catskills when he was training for one of the Ken Norton fights, you know, he fought Norton three times. I don't remember which one specifically. So you know, he was kind of a constant presence around you in in my day. We're so close. My dad knew him before he went to Rome is an eighteen year old fight in the Olympics. When he gets back from Rome, you know, he's come through New York. My father was in. Newsweek, they spent the whole day together. My father spent the night and Ali sweet. My father had to have Ali call is white at the time is first wife to to trim that he was actually with the champ. He wasn't doing something you have been doing. But but there's so many great stories. I mean, the two that immediately come to mind one one in my dad had a lot one is nineteen sixty nine early seventy. My father's with Tom series has written a book with Tom Seaver. Tom Seaver is arguably the biggest star in sports at that point the miracle. Mets he was twenty five and five I guess between five and three whatever it was. He wins the Cy Young award. He wins the World Series all that stuff. He's reading a book during a promotional toward their in. Chicago were Muhammad was living at the time. He was banned from boxing at the time fighting that fight to get to Chicago. My dad says, hey, you wanna go have dinner with Muhammad Iverson? Of course, I'd love to meet Mohammed Ali, they go out to dinner. They have one of these big dinners for hours at some steakhouse in. Lease holding court. He's telling stories he's talking about himself in the third person. And finally at the end of the night, the rapid up to paying the check. Mommy turns Tom Seaver. He says, Tom. You're nice fella. What paper you write for?.

Buster Douglas Mike Tyson Jeremy ESPN New York Mohammed Ali Tom Seaver Tom Richard James harden Mike Holmgren NBA Ben Houser Chris Brockman Europe director Bill Douglas Seattle HBO Muhammad Iverson
"victor verster prison" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

The Rich Eisen Show

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"victor verster prison" Discussed on The Rich Eisen Show

"I think about eighty would have been obviously, eight o'clock west coast. It was eleven eight maybe was more like twelve nine, and I was in of all places that boxing hotbed Hanover, New Hampshire covering college hockey game contest between the the very formidable big red of Cornell in the not so formidable Dc green of Dartmouth. And I was trying to find somewhere to watch the fight. It was on regular HBO's right in back, you know, in in the dark days of cable television. It was hard to find regular HVO in a place like Hanover, New Hampshire. I could not. But it asked around some people Diarmid they added the didn't or lease. They told me they didn't. Maybe they just didn't want me hanging out out with them watching the fight. And then later in the night. I I ran into some guy white asked earlier night at did you hear what happened? And of course, like everybody else. I was stunned. I was floored. You know, I made an attempt to see it because I was fight fan in particular fan of the heavyweight division. But I was like what's the big deal? Anyway. Right. Well, of course, it ended up being a huge deal. But you'll like this Richard because you are shooting of history a consummate student of history connoisseur connoisseur. Yes. It is. Consequential as it was seven hours later something much more consequential to place on the planet. That was the lead story the next day in the New York Times rather than Buster Douglas defeating Mike Tyson. Do you have any idea? What was not being despite being the connoisseur that you did point out to me a fill in the blanks from Jeremy what was it? Nope. Mandela walked free after more than a quarter century in prison about seven hours after Buster Douglas became the heavyweight champion the world walked out of Victor Verster prison. See, that's you Jeremy being you right there. That's your next level right there. That's your next. And that no. That's another reason. Why think about that? I mean, you got this massive event in sports. And then you've got this massive event for the entire planet. Right. Right. Right. Right. What is your dad? Think of the fight. What was his take? When he heard about. Jeremy? I mean, I didn't go back. It would have been interesting go back and look at the sports reports from that morning, but the sports reporters, which of course, was on Sunday mornings back then would have been the first place where many people found out about the outcome because you know, a lot of people were in bed by the time. It ended around midnight and people wake up would wake up on Sunday mornings than it turn on ESPN in my father. He was just doing the sports reporters. He was like doing the remember that Sunday morning like hosting thing. He would do typically was Robin Roberts. Sure, and she'd being bristling he'd be New York. So, you know, actually, I should have gone back and looked exactly what they had to say. But he'd been to a lot of Tyson fights that point. I'm sure is stunned is everybody else if he hadn't been able to put money on a on Douglas. Jeremy shop here on the rich Eisen show. And this is another reason why you're perfect for this sort of stuff, Jeremy for this piece in general for the amount of you know, boxing, you're exposed to as a kid through your dad. Gimme your favorite Ali story. When did you first meet him? When did you did you just walk into the house one day? And he's sitting there in a living room. Did that happen? Yeah. Definitely. I remember. I remember him being around. My first memories though. I remember going to see him at his home in cherry hill, New Jersey. I think that would have been around seventy four seventy five I was only four or five, but I remember it. And then I remember spending time around him in the Catskills when he was training for one of the Ken Norton fights, he fought Norton three times. I don't remember which one specifically. And so, you know, he was kind of a constant presence around, you know, in in my day..

Jeremy Buster Douglas Ken Norton New Hampshire Mike Tyson Hanover New York Times New Jersey Cornell Robin Roberts New York ESPN Richard Mandela Victor Verster Ali seven hours one day
"victor verster prison" Discussed on Ridiculous History

Ridiculous History

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"victor verster prison" Discussed on Ridiculous History

"Warning. From the perspective of the Pru poor tied national party, the activities of the National Congress are terrorism essentially, that's that's what they're, that's what they are perceiving it as. That's what they're portrayed it as in the international media, but you gotta fight fire with fire ban. I mean, these these is essentially a fascist regime. You know, that is that is trying to utterly crush any kind of resistance with violence and the only way to fight back against that is with more violence. And unfortunately, a lot of time. I mean, that's the thing. The history of this country is is so rooted in conflict. Just constant conflict from the beginning until apartheid came to an end in the early nineties. Well, the conflict change, perhaps that's what I'm saying. The notion of coming to an end in them establishing real demain. Crecy that does not happen overnight, especially when you've just had constant struggle for decades and decades becomes ingrained. You know, in nineteen sixty seventy black demonstrators are killed in Sharpeville and the African National Congress is officially banned. So just just like ten years after the government comes to power, they classify everybody by race. Oh, they also banned the communist party as well in in nineteen fifty. Let me go back for a second in nineteen fifty. Nelson Mandela is responding to the banning of the communist party these racial classifications and such by launching a campaign of civil disobedience. But when the ANC is officially banned in nineteen sixty one year later, Nelson Mandela nineteen sixty one heads, the African National Congress's new military wing, which launches sabotage campaigns. And these become these become on the ground operations. So no more civil disobedience. These are acts to meant to purposely in some way cripple the function of the government. I'm -solutely. I mean, they they are in open rebellion and Nelson Mandela, after many of the leaders of the movement were jailed or executed Mandela was imprisoned, as you know, for quite a long time from nineteen sixty three until believe, just nineteen ninety, and they kind of bounced him all over town and they've been, yeah, yeah, he was. It was originally jailed in Marshall square prison in Johannesburg. He along with his co-defendants admitted that they had committed acts of sabotage but denied that they were waging guerrilla war against the government's. Of course, there's some insta- life in prison. Although the prosecutor demanded. The death sentence Mandela is eventually transferred to Robben Island where he is forced to live for the next eighteen years. And at this point he's thinking, you know, I may be in jail for the rest of my natural life. He gets transferred to a couple of different prisons. There is also a free Mandela protests taking place that time. The politics don't stop because he is imprisoned. And he many ways becomes a symbol for the fight against apartheid. He gets transferred to a prison in Cape Town called polls more prison, and the conditioner a little better than they are at Robben Island. But then he gets transferred to Victor Verster prison near a place called part, and he eventually going back to what what you said. He eventually in nineteen ninety is freed. He is freed and he in. I'm in league with the current president FW declerk who was the head of the government at the time they were together to repeal many of these apartheid laws that had been on the books for so long and establish a new constitution, which gave African black citizens,

Nelson Mandela African National Congress government Robben Island communist party Sharpeville Cape Town FW declerk prosecutor president Marshall square Johannesburg Victor Verster nineteen sixty one year eighteen years ten years
"victor verster prison" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"victor verster prison" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Allowed to hug him on a prison visit in nineteen eighty five as the nineteen eighties progressed the legend of nelson mandela only grew sympathetic governments named streets in public squares after him colleges granted him honorary degrees in absent shy of course there was even a song free nelson mandela performed by the specials which became an international hit mandela's importance as a symbol was a concern to the south african government as they did not want the international community to turn against them so president p ta a hardliner elected nineteen seventy eight offered men della his release in nineteen eighty five however it was only on the condition that the african national congress renounce all violence mandela rejected the conditional release saying quote i am not prepared to sell the birthright of the people to be free winnie continued her activism sometime citing for with the militants in the movement than she did with mandela in nineteen eighty six when he gave a speech that condone the practice of necklacing this was a form of torture and execution where a rubber tire was forced around victims chest and arms filled with gasoline and set on fire when he said quote with our boxes of matches and our necklaces we shall liberate this country when he was also accused of wrongdoing through the men del united football club which acted as her personal security detail in nineteen eighty eight the club kidnapped for young men from a methodist ministers home when he said it was because she suspected they were being sexually abused by the minister but a witness claimed that the boys were tortured by winning and the football club and one boy who was suspected of being an informant was later found stabbed death stricken with two berkey los in nineteen eighty eight mandela was transferred to victor verster prison.

nelson mandela president african national congress football victor verster prison