17 Burst results for "Victor Talking Machine Company"

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company meant that RC a was now getting into the consumer Electron IX business. Keep in mind up until 1929. Garcia was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine. And they created a subsidiary company called Arcia Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell. There was also called photo phoned. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of R C. A So the development of the RC a photo phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created our CIA. The Hawks is work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hock sees work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone. Vita phone. You had record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. When you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The width of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive film so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on a audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running Ah little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp and it all gets synchronized together. So and playback. It's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs in synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of dust behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put it in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format, and it also did battle with the Vita phone approach, where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side, if you were making films, it also changed how movies were made because of you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it. You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well. This was largely because of the limitations of the sound recording equipment. At the time, microphones were large and bulky and typically omni directional. Actors needed.

CIA victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company General Electric RKO Pictures Arcia Victor RKO Garcia Syncopation Warner Brothers J. V. C. Alexander Graham Bell Hock Charles A Hoxie Hawks Edison
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones Now. Previously, those gramophones had relied on hand cranks so you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device. And turn the platter so that you could listen to the disc being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank C man. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller, a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. For nearly a decade, Comcast has been helping students get ready. We've connected four million low income students to low cost high speed. Xfinity.

Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company Berliner victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Comcast Radio Corporation of America Nipper salesman Frankie Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank C Eldridge
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company meant that RC a was now getting into the Consumer Electron IX business. Keep in mind up until 1929 RC was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine, and they created a subsidiary company called Arcia Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell. There was also called photo phoned. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of R C. A So the development of the RC a photo phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created our CIA. The Hawks is work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hock sees work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone. Vita phone. You had record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record, And when you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The Jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film, and the audio track is on one of those edges. The wits of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn Is used to treat this this photo reactive film so that it has this record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that. You know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back, you have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip. And you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier, which can then boost the signal strength so we can go to an amplifier and then ultimately, speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running Ah little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp and it all gets synchronized together. So and playback. It's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs in secret ization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put it in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format, and it also did battle with the Vita phone approach, where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side, if you were making films, it also changed how movies were made because of you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it. You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well. This was largely because of the limitations of the sound recording equipment. At the time, microphones were large and bulky and typically omni directional. Actors needed to be close to the microphones so that they could be heard clearly, But they also couldn't move around very much because the microphones would pick up everything. So you just have a lot of noise..

CIA victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company General Electric RKO Pictures RKO Arcia Victor Syncopation Alexander Graham Bell Warner Brothers J. V. C. Hock Charles A Hoxie Hawks Edison
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And so is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be R C a tow launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920, Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded our CIA to do so. They gave him some funds so he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated U. S champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event. Back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. RC a began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when R C A made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and 18 T. R C. A formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions, with stations being part of the overall network. Which was a new idea. The time Neil creates your your content in a central location and then distributed using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had two semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC Red. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called WJZ, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on, Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 R. C. A transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions. When the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive. They're very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real boon would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir Warrick in and if you've listened to my episodes about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file. Oh, Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund his Warrick ins work and in 1930 R C A would take over the research as working would actually go over to Garcia as well becoming our CIA employees. Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case and R C a would have to pay fines and royalties to him, But by that time His health was in shambles. He had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff Solent litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment. So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was the company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders did as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC CIA Jack Dempsey Farnsworth Blue Network Red Network New York City Sarnoff Solent George Carpentier Berliner Gramophone Company Emile Berliner Vladimir Warrick engineer victor talking machine company United States U. S National Broadcasting Company
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company meant that RC a was now getting into the consumer Electron IX business. Keep in mind up until 1929. Garcia was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine. And they created a subsidiary company called Arcia Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell. There was also called photo phone. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of R C. A So the development of the RC a photo phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created our CIA. The Hawks is work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hock sees work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone. Vita phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record, And when you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer. Which debuted in 1927. RC a photo fun used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The width of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive film so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on a audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running Ah little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used so and playback. It's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp and it all gets synchronized together. So and playback. It's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs in secret ization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put it in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format, and it also did battle with the Vita phone approach, where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side, if you were making films, it also changed how movies were made because of you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it. You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well. This was largely.

CIA victor talking machine company General Electric Japan Victor Company RKO Pictures Arcia Victor RKO Garcia Syncopation Warner Brothers Alexander Graham Bell J. V. C. Hock Charles A Hoxie Hawks Edison
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. This were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to be roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. His old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and Even though it grew out of an older a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. Saint John Paul, the second national shrine provides hope to all seeking spiritual growth visit us virtually to learn more about our great patron,.

Emile Berliner Berliner Gramophone Company Johnson Johnson victor talking machine company victor company gramophone Company United States Francis Philadelphia Saint John Paul salesman Nipper Radio Corporation of America Frankie Mark Mark Sarnoff Frank Seaman Eldridge
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Communications across vast distances, and various companies began toe work toward the goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be R C a tow launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920, Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded our CIA to do so. They gave him some funds so he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated U. S champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit RC a began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when R C A made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and 18 T. R C. A formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations. In different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time. Neil creates your your content in a central location and then distributed using these various radio stations. That was revolutionary. NBC had two semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC read. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called WJZ, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on, Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television. 1924 R C a transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions. When the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature. I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive. They're very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real boon would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir Warrick in and if you've listened to my episodes about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file. Oh, Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund his Warrick ins work and in 1930 R C A would take over the research as working would actually go over to Garcia as well becoming our CIA employees. Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 RC a would file a patent suit against file? Oh, Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case and R C a would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to CERN obstinate, litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC Farnsworth New York City Red Network Jack Dempsey United States CIA victor talking machine company Blue Network George Carpentier U. S National Broadcasting Company Dr Frank Conrad Pennsylvania Pittsburgh
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in RCs early history. Now, If you've heard my episodes about the history of turntables, you'll remember the early days of the photograph and the gramophone and the gramophone. I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I had to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Now, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife Berliner and gets the credit for inventing the first flat disc record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a school. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disks were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space and as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman. And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. I mean, they were the ones who had created this technology, and now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company. That took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 1901. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones. Essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't they started calling it things like the Victrola that was one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to be roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked, and that led Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller, a company and that would eventually get incorporated. Into R C. A I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break. In a country where the color of.

victor talking machine company Emile Berliner Johnson Johnson Berliner Gramophone Company victor company gramophone Company Victor United States Jonathan Strickland Francis Radio Corporation of America salesman Nipper Philadelphia Mark Mark Frank Seaman Sarnoff Frankie Eldridge
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Victor talking machine company meant that was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until 1929. Garcia was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine. And they created a subsidiary company called RC Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell that was also called photo phone. No. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawks his work and that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. But by the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone. Vita phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. And when you are ready to play the film, he would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer. Which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film, some actual photo reactive film. Ah, the band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There was a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film. And the audio track is on one of those edges. The wits of this strip on the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially, you have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn is used to treat this this photo reactive films so that it has this Record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that, you know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back You have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip and you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through, and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running a little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used. So in playback, it's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp, and it all gets synchronized together. So in playback, it's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs and synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format and it also did battle with the vital phone approach where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side if you were making films but also changed how movies were made, because if you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well, this was largely because of the limitations of the sound recording equipment. At the time, microphones were large and bulky and typically on the directional..

Victor talking machine company CIA Garcia General Electric Japan Victor Company RKO Pictures RKO Syncopation Warner Brothers Alexander Graham Bell J. V. C. Charles A Hoxie Hawkes Arcia Hawks Edison
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio have mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920. Westinghouse launched de que es el of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded RC a to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired an ad in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when I made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and ATT and T are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your You're content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed. So it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So you had NBC Blue and NBC, Rhett. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E a F, which was founded by a T and T in 1923. While all this was going on star enough, was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of electronic televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results. Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions. And that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now, this is not Entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Zoric in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case, and RC would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in Garcia's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth. Siri's in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you had put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship, and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders did as well. It took a while to get the right materials. But once they did Those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinists named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platters that you could listen to the disk. Being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably, but Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman..

Westinghouse Sarnoff NBC Emile Berliner Jack Dempsey New York City United States CIA Garcia Berliner Gramophone Company Blue Network Red Network victor talking machine company engineer Farnsworth U. S George Carpentier Dr Frank Conrad National Broadcasting Company
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company that was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until 1929 was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine, and they created a subsidiary company called Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell that was also called photo phone. No. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Garcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawk sees work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called.

RKO Pictures victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company Garcia General Electric Syncopation Alexander Graham Bell Warner Brothers CIA Charles A Hoxie Edison J. V. C. Hawkes
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company that was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until 1929 was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine, and they created a subsidiary company called RC Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell that was also called photo phone. No. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawk sees work at that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. But by the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone via phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record. And when you are ready to play the film, you would synchronize the film playback with the audio from the desk. So that was a pretty primitive approach. But it was how some early talking pictures were made, including the first one. The jazz singer, which debuted in 1927. RC a photo phone used a totally different approach. The sound was recorded in a narrow band on the side of the frame of film some actual photo reactive film, The band would be out of you. When the film was put through a projector. There's a frame on a projector that covers up the edges of the film, and the audio track is on one of those edges. The width of this strip. On the side of the film varies with the frequency of the sound that was recorded onto the film. So essentially have sound that's transmitted into a microphone. It is turned into an electric signal, which in turn Is used to treat this this photo reactive films so that it has this record of the frequency. It's almost like a wave form. If you were to think of that. You know, in the modern sense if you were to look at an audio file on audio editing software, so then when you're playing it back, you have a bright lamp that shines light through this narrow strip. And you have a photo cell that picks up the light that's coming through and it generates an electric current that matches the amount of light that's hitting the photo cell. And that signal goes to a pre amplifier which can then boost the signal strength so I can go to an amplifier and then ultimately speakers. The lamp for reading This optical sound and the photo cell are not in the same position as the projection lamp that would just get in the way. So this is actually It creates something of a challenge. It means that the soundtrack is offset from the actual frames of the film itself. The soundtrack is either running a little ahead or a little behind the action of the film, depending upon The method that was actually used. So in playback, it's all synchronized. Because if you as long as you put the film through the right type of projector, the audio track gets read through the audio system. At the same time as the video or the film. Rather, the images are being projected through the projection lamp, and it all gets synchronized together. So in playback, it's synchronized. But if you were to look at the film itself, like if you took the film out of the projector And you held it up to the light. And you saw where the audio track is. The audio you were looking at would not be the audio that occurs and synchronization with the image you're looking at. The advantage of that approach. Was that all the synchronization would be done beforehand. You didn't have to set up a disc and a film in separate chambers to try and match up to each other. It was all in one. Piece of film. But the format itself changed several times, sometimes with the optical soundtrack, running ahead of the actions of those behind the action. This meant the movie theaters had to invest in different equipment to play back those films properly. Because if you put in a film where the soundtrack ran a little ahead of the action, but you put in a projector that was designed to run a film that had the audio a little behind the action. You would have Terrible experiences because the audio would not be at all synchronized with what was happening on screen. It would just be a total mess. This ended up creating kind of a format war that waged in the late twenties. After our CIA's approach debuted. It was not the only audio on film format and it also did battle with the vital phone approach where it was the recorded two disc version. Now on the production side, if you were making films, it also changed how movies were made, because if you watch some of the early films with sound like some of the first films that had sound in it You might notice. People don't move very much. Shots are pretty static. Actors tend to remain in place. Well. This was largely because of the limitations of the sound recording equipment. At the time, microphones were large and bulky and typically omni directional..

General Electric victor talking machine company CIA Japan Victor Company RKO Pictures RKO Syncopation Vita Phone Alexander Graham Bell Warner Brothers J. V. C. Charles A Hoxie Hawkes Arcia Edison Garcia
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization. And this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. With Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business history. It shows a dog, specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 sterling. Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901, and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company victor company Berliner Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff CIA
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And so is our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920. Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that can pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916, Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd 1920. Westinghouse launched de Que es el of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded RC a to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event. Back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired an ad in New York City two years later. In 1924, there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when our CIA made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and Auntie are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations. In different regions with stations being part of the overall network, which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your your content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations. That was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So you had NBC Blue and NBC read. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E, a F, which was founded by a T and T in 1923. While all this was going on, star enough, was already looking at the potential future of television. In 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of Elektronik televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results, Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions, and that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now. This is not entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Warrick in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win That case, and Garcia would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time His health was in shambles. He had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in our CIA's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles and the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth series in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks. So you would literally turn a crank, which would then turn the gears inside the device and turn the platter so that you could listen to the desk being played back on the gramophone. Johnson did good work. He created a spring motor that worked reliably. But Berliner would enter into a sales agreement with a man named Frank Seaman, and this would lead to massive trouble..

Westinghouse Sarnoff CIA NBC Emile Berliner Jack Dempsey New York City United States Farnsworth Blue Network Berliner Gramophone Company Red Network victor talking machine company engineer U. S George Carpentier National Broadcasting Company Dr Frank Conrad
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The acquisition of the victor talking machine company that was now getting into the consumer electronics business. Keep in mind up until 1929 was primarily in the business of operating radio broadcast stations and selling what was effectively industrial equipment. But now our CIA owned the company that had created the iconic Victrola machine, and they created a subsidiary company called Victor. That company also took a majority ownership in the Japan Victor Company. Which is also known as J. V. C. Also in 1929. RKO radio Pictures released a film called Syncopation, which relied upon a new technique called RC a photo phone, which is not to be confused with the technology developed by Alexander Graham Bell that was also called photo phone. No. This was a technique of recording audio onto film for the purposes of synchronized visuals and audio. In other words, a way of making talking pictures and the formation of RKO Pictures itself is a great story that ties directly into our history of Arcia. So the development of the sea a boat a phone technology would date back to the early 19 twenties. There was a man named Charles A Hoxie, who was working on recording Audio two photographic film as a project for General Electric, which you'll remember was one of the founding partners that created Garcia. The Hawks is work and that time was more about preserving audio recordings for playback, not necessarily as a way of creating talking pictures but just recording audio in itself. By the mid twenties, General Electric was thinking about applying. Hawkes is work in the direction of talking pictures. Now the desire to match sound to moving images. Dated back to the earliest moving pictures. Edison himself worked on this challenge, and a lot of different companies were taking various approaches to this problem. So, for example, Warner Brothers had created a system called Vita Phone via phone. You would record a soundtrack onto a disk similar to an LP record..

RKO Pictures victor talking machine company Japan Victor Company Vita Phone General Electric Syncopation Alexander Graham Bell Warner Brothers CIA Charles A Hoxie Edison J. V. C. Arcia Hawkes Hawks Garcia
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"And this would lead to massive trouble. Frankie wanted more money for himself and eventually began to sell knockoffs of Berliners works while simultaneously bringing legal action much of its spurious in nature against both Berliner and Johnson. The process eventually prevented Berliner from selling gramophones in the United States and nearly bankrupted both Berliner and Johnson in the process, and this was infuriating to them. They were the ones who had created this technology. And now this salesman they had worked with Was claiming that they were the ones infringing on his patents, his ideas and his trade secrets. But in 1901 Johnson, Berliner and some other entrepreneurs got together and founded a new consolidated company that took Berliners facilities and Johnson's manufacturing plants as the basis for the new organization, and this was the victor talking machine company, which incorporated on October 3rd. 90 No. One. So the victor talking machine company was older than the Radio Corporation of America that would not be born until 1919. But Sarnoff looked at the victor talking machine company and thought this is a way I could sell more radios. I could take this company and take their product. The The gramophones, essentially, although they didn't call it that in the United States, they couldn't that they started calling it things like the Victrola, those one that the victor company made. I can take that I can incorporate a radio into the design of those machines, sell it as a new product and sell more radios this way. Also, just as a quick aside, the victor trademark is one of the more famous ones in business. History shows a dog specifically a fox terrier sitting in front of a gramophone horn and the dog's head is tilted slightly. From a painting titled His Master's Voice, and the artist was Francis borrowed, and it was made in 18 99. The dog was named Nipper and once belonged to the roads, nephew Mark Mark had tragically passed away. And then Francis saw Nipper one day sitting near a gramophone with his head cocked in that lead, Francis to wonder what the dog's reaction would be if they had happened to be playing a recording. Of his old master mark speaking. That was the inspiration for the painting. They tried selling the painting as a magazine illustration to no avail, and ultimately sold it to the gramophone Company for the princely sum of £100 Sterling Johnson got permission from the gramophone company to use it for his products under the victor company, and Berliner had trademarked the design and, at some point transferred that trademark over to the victor company. The whole story is super fascinating, and I'm sure I'll devote a future episode to the victor talking machine company. But for now, let's remember that it started in 1901 and even though it grew out of a Noller company and then would eventually get incorporated. Into our CIA. I'll explain more in just a moment, but first, let's take another quick break..

victor talking machine company Berliner victor company Sterling Johnson gramophone Company Francis United States Nipper Frankie Radio Corporation of America salesman Mark Mark Noller Sarnoff CIA
"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"victor talking machine company" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Our CIA oversaw radio station's transmitting communications across vast distances, and various companies began to work toward a goal of building consumer radios. The race was on for the first true commercial radio station. And it wouldn't be RC a toe launch it. Instead, Westinghouse applied for a license to operate such a transmission station. They applied to the U. S government and received permission in 1920 Westinghouse was in the business of manufacturing radios, but demand for radios was lagging behind. And so leaders at the company reason that one way to increase demand would be to create programming. Now today, that seems pretty clear that if you want to sell a technology to someone a technology that allows people to access content, you need to create content for people to access. Otherwise, they just have a useless tool. But this was a big step in 1920 radio had mainly been used as point to point communication at that at that stage, it's just that the points were undefined because there were no wires. So you know you had a receiver that could pick up a signal. That would be a point. So this would open up the possible uses for radio and allow them to become entertainment devices. It was precisely the stuff Sarnoff had been saying In his memo. Back in 1916 Westinghouse approached a ham radio operator named Dr Frank Conrad, who had already been playing records over the radio for some of his other amateur radio operator, Friends. And on November 2nd, 1920 Westinghouse launched K D K a. L. Of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. There was the first commercial radio station Sarnoff had been working on his own approach. Receiving the blessing of the companies that founded Garcia to do so. They gave him some funds so that he could pursue this. And on July 2nd, 1921 Sarnoff showed off the market potential for radio by broadcasting a boxing match between Jack Dempsey and George Carpentier. Dempsey was a celebrated US champion. Carpentier was a boxing hero in France, and he had a reputation for knocking out British champions. So this was a super hyped event back in 1921. Dempsey would win by knockout in the fourth round, and the broadcast was a sensational hit. Arcia began to sell more radio receivers to customers and radio stations began popping up all over the United States. The first radio commercial on record happened in August 1922 when a New York real estate developer aired and add in New York City. Two years later. In 1924 there were more than 600 commercial radio stations in the United States. These were mostly independent stations, and that's when our CIA made a really big move in the industry. Partnering with Westinghouse and ATT and T are formed a new company called the National Broadcasting Company, or NBC, which had its first broadcast on November 15th 1926. The concept was that NBC would produce material for broadcast, which would then be sent out over different radio stations in different regions, with stations being part of the overall network. Which was a new idea of the time, you know, create your your content in a central location and then distribute it using these various radio stations that was revolutionary. NBC had to semi independent networks under its governance shortly after it was formed, so it's split off its its operations into two networks. One was called the Blue Network, and one was called the Red Network. So he had NBC Blue and NBC Rhett. The center of the Blue Network was a radio station called W. J. Z, which had been founded by Westinghouse in 1921. The center for the Red Network was a station called W E. A F, which was founded by a TNT in 1923. While all this was going on. Sarnoff was already looking at the potential future of television in 1924 transmitted the first transatlantic radio photo from New York to London. This is before the invention of Elektronik televisions when the early prototype TVs were largely mechanical in nature, and I talked about that in the history of television episodes on tech stuff. So there was a limited market for mechanical televisions. They really didn't make a lot of progress in the consumer market. They were very expensive, very complicated, and they had limited Successful results. Let's say, but the real Boone would come when inventors began to create Elektronik televisions. And that wouldn't begin until the late 19 twenties. And when we talk about commercial TVs you're talking about two more decades. On top of that now, this is not Entirely a happy story. In 1929 Sarnoff met with an engineer at Westinghouse named Vladimir, Oregon. And if you've listened to my episode's about the origins of television you knows working is one of two inventors who typically get the title of inventor of television. The other would be file Oh Farnsworth. Sarnoff convinced Westinghouse to fund Zoric in's work, and in 1930 RC would take over the research is working would actually go over to see as well becoming our CIA employees? Sarnoff, Seeing the power of patents wanted to run out of business. Any person or company he felt was horning in on his action, and so in 1932 Garcia would file a patent suit against file Oh Farnsworth. The case would last seven years. Ultimately, Farnsworth would win that case, and RC would have to pay fines and royalties to him. But by that time his health was in shambles, he had had a nervous breakdown from all the stress. And I'm going to get back to Sarnoff litigious ways throughout these episodes, but bouncing back to 1929 for a moment, So this is before all of the legality issues with Farnsworth. I need to talk about another company that would play a very important part in our CIA's early history. Now you heard my episode's about the history of turntables. You'll remember the early days of the photograph and the graf a phone and the gramophone I covered a little bit of the turbulent patent battles in the cutthroat business strategies that were all part of the early days of home audio. And I'll have to do a more in depth. Siri's in the future to really focus on it because it gets nasty. All but the victor talking machine company was born directly out of all that strife. Well, since this is not an episode about Victor, I'm just going to give you the super short version, which let's face it. I'm Jonathan Strickland of Tech Stuff. Super short for me is a lecture for anybody else. But let's go with it. The Berliner Gramophone Company of Philadelphia, founded by Emile Berliner. Was The company. That really was the focus of this this strife. Berliner gets the credit for inventing the first flat disk record before his invention, engineers would press recordings on two cylinders. So you had these cylinders that you would put on a spool. Essentially, that would then rotate and you could play it back on various devices. The disc were much easier to store right. You didn't have as much space as much bulk as a cylinder dead. They were easier to ship and once the manufacturing process was refined, they lasted a lot longer than cylinders dead as well. It took a while to get the right materials, but Once they did those disks just seemed more practical. Berliner made a deal with an enterprising manufacturer and machinist named Eldridge are Johnson Johnson developed a wind up spring motor for Berliners gramophones. Previously those gramophones had relied on hand cranks..

Westinghouse Sarnoff CIA Jack Dempsey NBC United States New York City Red Network Emile Berliner Garcia Blue Network engineer victor talking machine company Farnsworth Berliner Gramophone Company George Carpentier U. S National Broadcasting Company