17 Burst results for "Victor Gruen"

"victor gruen" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

Inside Intercom Podcast

01:39 min | 5 months ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Inside Intercom Podcast

"Of this store is intention to do something out. Sneaky feel something. And then like you said fulfillment stories where people have chosen shops online. The fastest way can get something or the preferred way for example. Because we're convenience. Just pick it up rather than getting delivered. That journey from window shopping to k. Chopping certainly signs particularly familiar to me. Have to be the only earn your point there. Parole around how these new mediums. Or media's arc sort of defined by what came before that's jump back a bit and look at the traditional american style more then because when victor gruen originally designed now we're really familiar idea to earth anchor store surrounded by smaller shops. It was really groundbreaking at the time. And you'd almost call it a disruptor to use tack vocabulary. What was it. Do you think about mid twentieth century lights that mated so successful as a design at the time one which we saw spread well beyond america to our own shores here. I'm beyond lows of dance implications like society in suburbia constructed. Like a again. All these technologies when you kind of go back and study the history things very common themes would appear so for example one is access so excessively something is is something that really changes in determines how people live. None is convenience. So i teased the modern example. Just more accessible unconvenient pick up your phone sitting at home and start window shopping better days to actually your guard at the door head into designing and so on right so.

victor gruen Chopping america
"victor gruen" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:06 min | 5 months ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"By Sam, Wetherell. You will not be surprised to hear that twenty twenty has been a bad year for shopping malls. It is projected that twenty five thousand stores could close this year as a result of the pandemic by the end of next year it is likely that more than half of the department stores that Anchor Trade in malls in the US will be gone. During a time when purchasing shoes and person risks inflicting an unwitting form of violence against yourself and others the evacuation of capital from commercial buildings is underway. It is tempting to mourn the death of malls with nostalgia for those of us who grew up in the suburbs. Malls were where we came of age where we first met Santa went on dates, encountered wage labor and. Committed petty crimes. The website dead malls dot com lovingly documents the ruins of former malls with many visitors, posting memories and photographs of places they had once shopped or worked. This nostalgia is particularly acute at a time when the site of crowds of happy masks, Lewis strangers roaming through poorly ventilated concourses feels like it belongs to a lost golden age, the strange and troubled history of the US shopping mall however is a reminder that even those who celebrate their passing should also be wary about what might replace them. If anyone can be credited with inventing the shopping mall. It is Victor Gruen a via knees socialist architect who fled Nazi controlled Austria in nineteen thirty eight grew in settled in Los Angeles, and quickly began to think of ways that his passion for top down planning and beautiful public spaces could be grafted onto the expanding suburban landscape of southern California. In nineteen forty three gruen and his wife Elsie Cruch Co authored an essay for the architectural forum in which they proposed a new type of space. A fully enclosed landscaped and pedestrian is mall that would house stores art installations, concert halls, and spaces for community gatherings. This new urban forum they hoped would rein in the chaos and sprawl of suburbia filling people's lives with art and music, and giving order to an expanding free market of consumer goods. By, the mid nineteen fifties grew wins vision had been realized in the Northland Center in suburban Detroit and the South Dale Center in Edina Minnesota. The elements that propelled grew into nationwide fame and established the shopping mall as a familiar type of urban space to be replicated by developers. Within, a few years shopping malls along with federally funded freeways, manicured office parks and affordable tract housing. became part of the infrastructure of American suburbia as civil rights. Victories legally desegregated the commercial spaces of downtown's shopping malls in mostly white neighborhoods quietly oversaw the defacto re segregation of. Space. At the same time malls helped CODA fi the patriarchal geography of US suburbia. Grew imagined that malls would be alternative cities just for women and children spaces where these groups could enjoy the richness of urban life while their husbands were working downtown. They were also spaces where women didn't just shop, but also worked usually in low-wage on unionized retail jobs. From the nineteen seventies shopping malls spread across the face of the earth like mushrooms after a rainstorm by the Second Decade of the twenty first century, there were more than five hundred shopping malls in Brazil six, hundred in India and four thousand in China. There is a case to be made that shopping malls have resulted in one of the biggest global standardization of urban space that has ever occurred. Hundreds of thousands of acres of urban land on every inhabited continent of the world are enclosed, heated and lit to international standards with profound detrimental consequences for the preservation of public space and the mitigation. Of Climate Change. Grew and helped create a world from which there was no escape. In nineteen, sixty, eight depressed by the fact that his creations had exacerbated. Than cured the alienation and inequality of American suburban life grew and move back to Europe there with almost dizzying irony he discovered that his childhood second home had been demolished to make way for a shopping mall. Even. So the temptation to mourn shopping malls becomes acute. As soon as you consider what is replacing them as covid nineteen tears through the social fabric of the US shopping is becoming increasingly uncoupled from urban space. Since the beginning of the year, Amazon has hired over a hundred thousand new workers to distribute goods through warehouses and postage networks adding somewhere between seventy, three, million and one hundred, thirteen, billion dollars to Jeff bezos fortune. More than half a million instant cart shoppers have been mobilized to act as human barriers between wealthy suburbanites and deadly disease. Inequalities of wealth and race are intensifying and rapidly changing coronavirus economy service workers are relegated from shopping malls and box stores to windowless distribution centers where wealthy consumers remain in their homes. Meanwhile, people are moving back to the suburbs. While it's still early. It seems likely that the post covid nineteen city will be an intensification of the isolated racially segregated carbon intensive built environment that emerged in the suburbs of postwar American cities. Shopping malls might be dying. But perhaps more than ever. We still live in the world that they helped make..

US Grew Victor Gruen Anchor Trade Wetherell Sam twenty twenty Northland Center Europe Santa Jeff bezos Los Angeles Amazon Edina California South Dale Center
"victor gruen" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

07:53 min | 6 months ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"To manifest the world being free my dad. He lives in a Dr. And he says, you know anything that you put in the ground grows. So why do people still go hungry and I like that in theory, but I was like man farmer is really hard though, man. I think you know, I might go hungry if I have someone apart from this book. It's like but you know back in the days. We we had that skill set. Now, we're losing these skill sets that actually walk-in sustain off of so with this and I love giving you guys my wrists. I'm like a human version of Instagram. When you look at Instagram you look at you know, you would like a hundred images a day. Well, I've got millions of images in my mind and the majority of them haven't Been realized yet, you know, there's some images that are from my memory, but I got this whole the future that's in my mind that has to be brought. So this is you know, we talked about hype culture and choose been sold on the, you know, the resale market and Yeezy lives in that place, but you know, I don't like the idea. I don't love the idea that some of the reasons why people buy it is just for hyper culture or you ain't got this so I got this color way and you don't have it that type of mentality. I mean, it's I'm an essentialist wage. I'm a I'm a minimalist and like I I I have to I will bring the the fully A to Z our existence version to Long existence like Victor Gruen designed the Shopping Center's but he designed full utopian communities and people were like, we're just cool with the shopping center. That's all we want off. These ideas that he had never got brought to fruition a little bit like Disney cannabis Epcot Center on like on Victor Gruen but these this next Frontier of these communities and Villages of Happiness are way closer to a Kenyan Village than it is to like a gated community Village but one of the things about your life this a version the hype culture one of the good things about the hype culture is if people get into your products they're going to get into you and they'll get to get into your ideas and all these ideas that you have money will become a part of their thought process. They'll start thinking about it and they go hey, he's got some great points if people really get into your shit. They're also really going to get into your ideas. I think it's one of the things that make people uncomfortable about you as you have the courage to have all these bold ideas and to implement them and to do all these different things that bothers people and there's a lot of people that don't have that kind of Courage. They are straddled down by anxiety and they see a guy like you and they like try to find flaws. They try to find things that are wrong with it instead of looking at the positive aspects of it. The only console on the negative aspects of it. I don't think I don't see it that way. I've never saw it that way. I look at you. Look at that guy fucking do anything. There's people like Tesla and there's people who you know, there's a person who killed the channels would test the cords to make people not like Tesla. Yeah, the person citizen. Yeah person made the electric chair be made with the test. Of course for people with Mike Testa. Tesla still has inventions that haven't been brought to our society that would have brought more Simplicity and happiness to our society like the Westinghouse ability to transmit electricity through the air which is fascinating. I don't know if that would have worked in today's world would cell phones and all the different electronics and even you know, modern air travel. I don't know. I don't know what if it would have worked but things would have been different people are over designing wage. Two industries where they see they can make some money as opposed to stepping back and saying how do we look at the entire Earth as an opportunity to free everyone and create happiness for for everyone. So like only there's only a billion people on the internet you never think about that the seven or eight billion people on the on Earth, but then there's only a billion people that are influence and that are on the internet. We feel like the internet is everything is only like 15% you know, sixty 18% of human beings. But in order to make as far as civilization forced to survive, we have to make more human beings we have we have family we have we have to have food we have to have shelter but we don't have to have the internet. We don't have to have music. We don't have to have you know, that that's a conversation. I mean, I mean it enhances life. Yeah, and it has the quality of life is better, but look at the music look look at look at what the information were were were putting it in like I feel bad when I hear our songs. I feel bad even the stuff that you know, I just recently put out I was like, you know how you listen to lames. They did imitation man. Like why is that's just I don't like that message because we're all the imitation of our parents and imitation this imitation and then imitation of Adam and Eve, you know, we're in we're we're all the next versions there. Should be the V to v e Like, you know Michelangelo and da Vinci had the same teacher, you know, there's times where you know, my like people work with me or say like my mental whatever will go out and they'll do something that I wanted to do. And then I'm I'm torn because as a man, you know, I'm I'm jealous and I'm proud at the same time and it's like a father-son relationship because sometimes when the when the Sun goes out and is more successful at things the father wants to say that's a good job. But every time the sun does something as a group of mine's the father of his failures. Yes, so I was just I mean, it's it's it's a it's a strong Dynamic that that's where I have to lean on God to not be like, you know, this just like prick that's jealous of you know, people who are innovating or taking off. Of the the goal line because we got to realize we're in a relay race of humanity at a certain point whoever you know, what what the inventors and the in the past. It has now handed over Winters today that handed over to the next vendors the good thing about the walls and the perception and all that. Is this like Smaller barrier-to-entry allows there to be, you know a Walt Disney and a Steve Jobs and a Henry Ford. So what I'm doing right now, there's a there's a there's a real barrier to entry to doing is constructing homes and communities and farm. Like you can't you can't just do it like how you can just you know, it's hard for someone I go from I'm not saying it can't happen. I'm just saying that it's difficult for someone to go from you know, programming and put in their music out in the internet today to what it was that Michael Jackson had to do that. Barry entry was so hard for him that he says he this guy was the leader of the Jackson 5 when he was five like his entire life led up and this is what he focused on and it made and it was all focused on that. So it may the great Michael Jackson now, I want to do this comparison a Disney Steve at a Henry Ford and what Yeezy is dead? It's really hard to make houses..

Tesla Victor Gruen Michael Jackson Henry Ford Walt Disney cannabis Disney Michelangelo Mike Testa Adam Barry Westinghouse Winters Steve Jobs Yeezy
"victor gruen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:56 min | 7 months ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Extremely small. That's my loss prevention such a big deal because your body is small. But at the same time I look at Kroger having record profits now because of covert 19. Those things are both true how they co exist because of that they're so they're making their money not by what we bought unnecessarily getting the money from the companies with about making money off the companies would buy them from because essentially that shelf space at Encamp whatever it might be there, reading that space if you have a I don't know one of those King's Hawaiian bread display. Is it on an island right in the bakery? That's premium space there. They're paying for right of that cost money. I mean that those types of spaces Apaid pay big dividends. Hewas a manufacturer you are, you know, Detective boost sales 500% by having the right, you know, and tested, But actually, every inch of many change is available, so even the space You know, on the top shelf that can be sold space, Um and and those are often not nearly as probable end caps, but this door for the manufacturer, but for the store there a great source of income. And you know, to answer your question about how they could be making so much money. I mean, truthfully, the grocery store is a volume game at the end of the day, and people are encoded spending much more money on groceries than they ever were before. Largely because they just don't have other avenues to spend that, you know, used what usedto spending. A restaurant is now being pushed into grocer spending at home, and that's why you see people now the Flower Island is Desolate because everyone is taking a more elaborate home cooking projects. They have time to space, and they don't have the other avenues. Yeah, and that makes sense a lot, Benjamin. I've kind of It's kind of like, sounds like it's a casino, right where the you know casinos pump in oxygen and things were laid this way. Here's the machines were put here for a reason that every square inch of the casino is designed to keep you there longer. So you spend more your money from the free drinks to the atmosphere of the lighting all the colors. All of that. There's no clocks, and they're in the windows. In order to entice you is supermarket the same thing. I love it. Yes, And I say it's actually that's a great metaphor is a lot closer than the one that typically here. So typically, I hear Oh, supermarkets put the milk away in the back and They try to, you know, force you to stay there by disorienting you and leading you on this path and making your life more difficult, and and that the myth. I think supermarkets are more like a casino in that They're trying to make your stay there pleasurable as possible. They're trying to get you to spend as much time in there as possible by Giving you what you want and making it an atmosphere where you want to dawdle and you want to explore new things. So they are designed down to a T. Um, I spent some time with the book with original architect of having talent. He's a brilliant guy, but his whole philosophy was. How'd y Study the customer and give them a designer store that is like there, they'll feel a meaningful connection to on. He did that. It was much more anthropology and sociology and doing character studies of shoppers and just interviewing them in a parking lot than it ever was about. Creating some type of base to confuse. People are fatigued them, in fact, and you know, one of the one of my favorite moments talking to him was he studied people walking in the convenience stores, and there was something I had never noticed. But now it's like every time when you walk into a convenience or people free. For a second because they get started. They don't know what to do with this anxious moment that happens at the entry toe almost every convenience store. They're just overwhelmed by for a second, and he saw that and he said, How do I get rid of that? How do I make people? Ah, relax and you walk into the store and feel like they're at home. That's really fast. I mean, it's it's true, right? You walk because every comedian stores even utf is laid out differently. Depending on where you are at a grocery store. You could go into pretty much almost everyone. And now granted, some of the aisles are backwards or whatever, but you gotta feel you know where the milk is going to be. You know, the produce and the Delhi are going to be. You can figure that stuff up fairly quickly. It is still strange for a minute if you typically we shop at our local grocer, throwing closest to us are our favorite one front of reason. And you go there and there's a There's a relationship there. And if you're away and you go to another grocery store, it's just a little bit different. So it's a little more awkward. Yeah, I totally get that. Yeah. Yeah, And I think it's something that people misunderstand for years. So there was another sociology just designer called Victor Gruen, who who who notice that same thing of this kind of moment of disorientation, and he thought of it as this like positive. Course we're going to disorient people and they're gonna stay longer. They're gonna forget what you came to the store, and I think you know that's all backwards That really doesn't understand the mentality of the grocery managers. Ambrose manager does not want to confuse you and disorient you. They want to please you and get you the dog with state, which is why I love free samples to the free What? You can't do any more cover. It's funny because they want to make it comfortable. Ikey is the story that makes it uncomfortable. It's like a Swedish corn maze. You can't get it. If you don't like it, you're gonna be there forever. There's no eggs you can come in, but you can never leave its like an eagle song, Benjamin Laure real real quick here. Can I just find this is so fascinating to me because you like, he says. It's about 2% your life inside a grocery store shopping some of us longer some of us less, but that's a lot. It's a significant amount of time the grocery store and they want you to stay as long as possible for that whole comfort. Even the music is that I've noticed, depending on when I go to the store, and I hear like that used to be Muzak right. The benign UN offensive music But I noticed depending what time a dago and the playlist is different. Yeah, I think it again that they're dead. They're going for those energetic upper music. You know, I spent a lot of time with the book with Trader Joe Joe Kalume who I got the pleasure of interviewing on and he I've started started goes back in the 19 fifties really late 19 fifties started a chain of convenience source that would morph into Trader Joe's, and they he Read some article in the New Yorker that said that if you play Hawaiian music, and we'll get customers to slow down, so he just started blasting Don ho and I'll record tables turn tables at the time. Ah, and then quickly his employees revolted and started smashing the record and he realized that there is no secret that you like playing music and create like a great atmosphere. You have to be a little bit more death than that. And Morse with Trader Joe's He was He really design things that people walked it. There's no doubt about it and they absolutely training..

Flower Island T. Um Benjamin Laure Trader Joe Joe Kalume Encamp Trader Joe Victor Gruen UN Delhi Don ho Ikey Ambrose
"victor gruen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:20 min | 7 months ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Whether that causes more frustration for the consumer is as an open point or whether that creates isles discovery where you're finding things. Um on another level. However, what you have to understand is that the grocery store doesn't operate as making profit off you as a consumer, so those shelves Are actually much closer to channel. The grocery stores relationship is much closer to a landlord's relationship to the units, an apartment that they're selling, and they're actually selling that space to manage. So if they want to rearrange the store to create more opportunities for particular manufacturer that will certainly happen. And AH, category management is its own fascinating science. How do you squeeze both the most margins from consumers. And how do you squeeze the most trade spend, which is the euphemism for all that? The fees and taxes and outright charges of a charge manufacturers for that shelf space out of the manufacturer and kind of balancing those two things is a science and those guys, they're constantly redesign store. Kinda maximize. Yeah, I think that's fascinating because you hear this and it's almost like wait a minute. This can't be. You can't have both being true, but they are and that is that the margins on on the items that we buy are extremely small. That's why loss prevention such a big deal. Is there much of small, but at the same time I look at Kroger having record profits now because of covert 19. Those things are both true how they co exist because of that. There s so they're making their money not by what we bought unnecessarily getting the money from the companies with about making money off the companies would buy them from because essentially that shelf space at Encamp whatever it might be there, reading that space if you have a I don't know. One of those King's Hawaiian bread displays that are on an island right in the bakery. That's premium space there. They're paying for right of that cost money. I mean that those types of spaces Apaid pay big dividends to you as a manufacturer. You are you know, Detective boost sales 500% by having the right you know, and chest but actually every inch of many chains. Is available, so even the space you know on the top shelf back and be sold space and and those are often not nearly as probable end caps, but those whose door for the manufacturer but for the store there a great source of income. And you know, to answer your question about how they could be making so much money. I mean, truthfully, the grocery store is a volume game at the end of the day, and people are encoded spending much more money on groceries than they ever were before. Largely because they just don't have other avenues to spend that. You know, Houston? What usedto Spending A restaurant is now being pushed into grocer spending at home, and that's why you see people now the Flower Island is Desolate because everyone is taking a more elaborate home cooking projects. They have time to space, and they don't have the other avenues. Yeah, that makes sense a lot, Benjamin. I've kind of It's kinda like sounds like it's a casino, right where the you know casinos pump in oxygen and things were laid this way. Here's the machines were put here for a reason that every square inch of the casino is designed to keep you there longer. So you spend more your money from the free drinks to the atmosphere to the lighting all the colors. All of that. There's no clocks, and they're in the windows. In order to entice you is supermarket the same thing. I love it. Yes, And I say it's actually that's a great metaphor is a lot closer than the one that I typically here. So typically, I hear Oh, supermarkets put the milk away in the back and Try toe, you know, force you to stay there by disorienting you and leading you on this path and making your life more difficult, And and that's a myth. I think supermarkets are more like a casino in that they are trying to make your stay there as pleasurable as possible. They're trying to get you to spend as much time in there as possible by Did you what you want and making it an atmosphere where you want to dawdle, and you want to explore new things. So and they are divine down to a T. Um, I spent some time with book with original architect of having talent. He's a brilliant guy, but his whole philosophy was how do I Study the customer and give them a designer store that is like there, they'll feel a meaningful connection to Andi did that It was much more anthropology and sociology and doing character studies of shoppers and just interviewing them in a parking lot than it ever was about. Creating some type of base to confuse. People are fatigued them, in fact, and you know, one of the one of my favorite moments talking to him was he studied people walking in the convenience stores, and there was something I had never noticed. But now he had every time when you walk into a convenience or people free. For a second because they get startled. They don't know what to do with this anxious moment that happens at the entry toe almost every convenience store. They're just overwhelmed by for a second, and he saw that and he said, Oh, how do I get rid of that? How do I make people relax and you walk into the store and feel like they're at home? And I just thought that that's really fast. And I mean it's It's true, right? You walk because every comedian stores even utf is laid out differently, depending on where you are at a grocery store. You could go to pretty much almost everyone. And now granted something styles are backwards or whatever, but you gotta feel you know where the milk is going to be. You know the produce and the deli you're going to be. You can figure that stuff out fairly quickly. It is still strange for a minute if you typically we shop at our local grocery store, one closest to us are our favorite one front of reason. And you go there and there's a There's a relationship there. And if you're away and you go to another grocery store, it's just a little bit different. So it's a little more awkward. Yeah, I totally get that. Yeah. Yeah, And I think it's something that people misunderstand for years. So there was another sociology just designer called Victor Gruen, who who who notice that same thing of this kind of moment of disorientation, and he thought of it as this like positive. Course we're going to disorient people, and they're gonna stay longer than forget what you came to the store, and I think you know that's all backwards. That really doesn't understand the mentality of the grocery manager them. Bro's from managers not want to confuse you and disorient you. They want to please you and get you the dog with state, which is why I love free samples to the free What? You can't do any more cover. It's funny because they want to make it comfortable. Ikey is the story that makes it uncomfortable. It's like a Swedish corn maze. You can't get it. If you don't like it, you're gonna be there forever. There's no eggs you can come in, but you can never leave its like an eagle song, Benjamin Laure real real quick here. Can I just find this is so fascinating to me because you like, he says. It's about 2% your life inside a grocery store shopping some of us longer some of us less, but that's a lot. It's a significant amount of time the grocery store and they want you to stay as long as possible for that whole comfort. Even the music is that I've noticed, depending on when I go to the store, and I hear like that used to be music write thie, benign UN offensive music. But I noticed depending what time a dago in the playlist is different. Yeah, I think it began that they're gay..

Benjamin Laure Flower Island Victor Gruen Encamp UN T. Um Houston Andi Ikey Bro
"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"She wasn't there long. She took the New York State Architects Licensing Exam and she passed it on the first time which everybody doesn't do even though it was a really tough days long test and she became a licensed architect in nineteen fifty four and that was when I first comes along she became New York. State's first black woman licensed architect so she was hired by a private architecture firm at that point after she quit her job with the city even though her supervisor gave her a bad rep friends and relationship with that supervisor with her boss wasn't there wasn't anything wrong with it so he but he said that she was lazy. She got to work late a lot that she didn't anything about design and Architecture. Nazi socialized a lot so he had a lot of really negative things to say about her even though she never had any issues and she thought it had to do with the fact that her boss wasn't a licensed architect and was older and she was a younger black in licensed architect So a Job. She was a threat. Yeah I'm sure like old dude is like pain. I've done nothing we feel this way similarly but we don't lash out recommendation saying felt threatened so even though she got out of her old job because she felt like she was wasting her potential she was still doing small tasks like designing bathroom layout so she's still kind of felt away about that. She spent a year at that small firm and in nineteen fifty five. She joined the office of Skidmore owings and Merrill. She ended up working there until nineteen sixty so that was a pretty big firm and at that major firm. She was working on large scale projects and teaching evening architecture courses at New York City community college and so around this time. She was a single mother of two children. She had already been married in been divorced and her mother took care of her children while she worked so she did have a support system is not like nobody was there while she was doing all this stuff and in nineteen fifty nine. She became the first black woman to be a member of the American Institute of Architects Loon. Wow in one thousand nine hundred sixty. That's when she moves to California and there. She took a job at Gruen and associates in Los Angeles and just a side note about gruen. Victor Gruen was is the person who is credited with being a pioneer in American shopping. Mall he did a lot of work in that area. I think I talked about him recently. Because we were talking about food courts pointed me Your Hutch Lord. Yes shopping malls are I feel. I don't know how sad I am about them. Leaving but I I do. Remember the glory days of going into the Disney stores. Oh Yeah and into double layers and then you see store Tom Tom. Trying to outwit ago cookie inbetween. Always feeling like you were this close to like falling over the edge because they always had those on the top level. The glass and I would always be scared. Like oh my gosh. There's not perfume every funny things years. No one else would say as you can look down smell. Perfume everywhere. Kin Small town with three giant mall. A yeah I went out. Well you've been to China. I'm not sure if you have. But they had a million shopping. I don't yeah they have so many mall. It is ridiculous. And they're huge there. There's a basement and then there's a basement under the basement Organiz Organiz. You're probably isn't something that they would name what. The categories of things are on each floor when you got to that floor. Yeah I was like wow. This is only makes sense very organized like anyway. Go-to malls in China. You'll be there for the next ninety years. So when she was at grew in she recognized how much scrutiny she was getting from her boss. There she didn't have a car and she got rides with one of her colleagues. Who was a white man to get to work? And later she said in an interview. It took only one week before the boss came and spoke to me about being late yet. He had not noticed that the young man had been late for two years. My solution was to buy a car since I the highly visible employees had to be punctual and I think it's funny how. She said highly visible employees. I feel like this is definitely skating around all the black woman. Yeah I'm they wanted me to see my mistakes. We we get the subtext there. She got her architecture license in California in nineteen sixty two and so she was the first African American woman to have one in California and she remained the only one for twenty years. Wow until the eighties. Yeah Wow Jeez. That's the way we're all about it today. Sorry speaking of Weird noises. We should be right back.

New York Victor Gruen Merrill California supervisor China American Institute of Architec New York State Architects New York City community colleg Organiz Organiz Skidmore owings Disney Tom Tom Los Angeles
"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Keep her from coming back after the summer, she came back in the fall. Like many of her classmates were war. Veterans somehow bachelors or Masters degrees so basically they have people around them, and they already had all experienced able to help them through the process of getting through these. Amazingly I can't even imagine how difficult courses they were those people what kind of work on assignments together, but she had this situation where she was commuting to school, in sometimes had to finish her work on her commutes or at home alone, and so that kind of having. We know like having how having that support system is important when you're going through school. Right, Oh, yeah. She got her bachelor of architecture degree in nineteen fifty, as she was one of two women in her class in the only black win after that she applied to nineteen architectural firms, she said in interviews like I won't forget that number nineteen while but was turned down every one of them. Yeah and she got hers on She got the Twentieth This is a coat that she said she said I don't know. If the rejections were because I was a black person, because I was a young woman, or because of the economic recession at the time, but she said that those places weren't hiring. Women are black people so I think we can kind of go like. What the issue was here Yeah. So she her twentieth, that was when she went to work in the city of new. York's Department of Public, works, as what she says, it's a junior person. And, she didn't like that job because she couldn't really be creative in. It so she wasn't there long. She took the New York State Architects Licensing Exam and she passed it on the first time which everybody doesn't do, even though it was a really tough days long test and she became a licensed architect in nineteen, fifty four, and that was when. I first comes along. She, became New York State's first black woman licensed architect. So she was hired by a private architecture firm at that point after she quit her job with the city. Even though her supervisor gave her a bad rep, friends and relationship with that supervisor with her boss wasn't. There wasn't anything wrong with it, so he but he said that she was lazy. She got to work late a lot that she didn't anything about design and architecture Nazi socialized, so he had a lot of really negative things to say about her, even though she never had any issues. and. She thought it had to do with the fact that. Her boss wasn't a licensed architect and was older, and she was a younger black in licensed architect. so. A. Job. She was a threat yeah! I'm sure like old dude is like pain. I've done nothing. We feel this way similarly, but we don't lash out. Recommendation saying. Felt threatened. So, even though she got out of her old job, because she felt like she was wasting her potential, she was still doing small tasks like designing bathroom layout, so she's still kind of felt away about that. She spent a year at that small firm, and in nineteen fifty five. She joined the office of Skidmore owings and Merrill. She ended up working there until nineteen sixty, so that was a pretty big firm. And at that major firm, she was working on large scale projects and Evening Architecture courses at New York City Community College and so around this time she was a single mother of two children. She had already been married in been divorced, and her mother took care of her children while she worked, so she did have a support. System is not like nobody was there while she was doing all this stuff. And in nineteen fifty, nine. I by to be a member of the American Institute of Architects. loon wow. In, one thousand nine hundred sixty. That's when she moves to California and there. She took a job at Gruen and associates in Los Angeles. And just a side note about Gruen Victor Gruen was is the person who is credited with being a pioneer in American shopping mall. He did a lot of work in that area. I think I talked about him recently. Because, we were talking about food courts. Point me I don't know. Your Lord. Yes, shopping malls are. I feel. I don't know how sad I am about them leaving, but I I do remember the glory days of going into the Disney stores. Oh, yeah, and into. Double layers, and then you see store, Tom. Tom. Trying to outweigh ago. Cookie in between always feeling like you're close to like falling over the edge because they always had those on the top level, the glass and I would always be scared like. Oh, my gosh, there's. Not Perfume every. Funny things years. No one else would say as. You can look down. Smell perfume everywhere. Kin, small, town Walmart with three. Giant Mall. A yeah I went out well. You've been to China. I'm not sure if you have. But they had a million shopping. I don't yeah, they have so many mall. It is ridiculous. And they're huge there. There's a basement and then there's a basement under the basement. Organiz. Organiz. You're probably isn't something. That they would name what the categories of things are on each floor. When you got to that floor. Yeah, I was like. Wow, this is only makes sense. Very organized like anyway. GO-TO malls in China. You'll be there for the next ninety years. So when she was at grew in, she recognized how much scrutiny she was getting from her boss there, she didn't have a car and she got rise with one of her colleagues, who was a white man to get to work? And later she said in an interview it took only one week before the boss came and spoke to me about being late yet. He had not noticed that the young man had been late for two years. My solution was to buy a car since I. The highly visible employees had to be punctual. And I think it's funny how she said highly visible employees. I feel like this is definitely skating around all the black woman. Yeah. I'm they wanted me to see my mistakes? We we get the subtext there. She got her architecture license in California in Nineteen, sixty two, and so she was the first African American woman to have one in California and she remained the. For twenty years wow until the eighties. Geez. We're all about it today. Sorry. Speaking of weird noises, all we should. Be Right back..

Gruen Victor Gruen California Tom China supervisor New York State Architects New York City Community Colleg Giant Mall New York State York Disney Skidmore owings Los Angeles American Institute of Architec Walmart Department of Public
"victor gruen" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Not be too harsh on the the grand details of Austrian design which I have dedicated a little bit of space to one of the interesting things about Australian design. Is this just inherent love for detail for quality and you know those chairs that you were talking about the net. Chaz that's still in production today. They've been in production for maybe two hundred or so years. People are still buying them. There is something that can be said to that. But also you know. There is a whole new world of contemporary Austrian design that we dug into our grand Austrian design tour. And as I look through these pages they look very fetching lovely mix of short stories of illustration that. You've really gone into the details. Their stories about typography `grats their stories about the manufacturing sector about making tractors and things of that nature which are bit less obvious late known on the world stage about hoster. What was some of the stories that kind of stuck out for you? Yeah I think just going back to what I was saying before attention to detail. Kind of marks everything. That's don in Australia. They really really care. About every little component of design so that could be like you say in the manufacturing where we looked at vehicle design so we have an amazing tractor by a company called Linda. Here who basically you know deal with very fussy to rolling farmers who want the very best looking tractors for this lips to impress rivals across the field but also super functional as well so this thing is not going to break down like no matter how deep the snow is when they're doing the winter work and then they're lighter elements to with regards to vehicles so another great example is this device called Ziesel which is a wheelchair that goes off road to takes disabled people wherever they want to go on the slopes and a nice bit branding their on the name Ziesel. I'm not sure what it means in Germany but it sounds like a bit of Fun Nippon. Z's left I needed to think it means Squirrel Australian type of girl but yet great name. Oh I love that. You've done amazing thing here which I really liked. I suppose the Austrian diaspora the modernists who were integral to designing the California of the fifties sixties and seventies with thinking about Richard Notre. A little known fact the mole was invented by an Australian guy. Could Victor Gruen. Do you think the Austrian designers beyond Australia. I know there's a lot of manufacturing home. We care about that. But do you think Austrian designers played a role on the world stage? A little bit as well. Yeah I love this piece. That one of our journalist Andrew Romano wrote forest where he really goes into this impact. Those modernists that you were talking about Hatton California residential design across the states which went on to inform the amazing modernist houses. You'd see as far away as the Gold Coast in Australia. But I think today perhaps not so much in the architecture certainly in the world of graphic design. The Austrians really are ahead of the pack and a lot of ways but it tends to be Austrians that go abroad Australia. Using the the knowledge and the practical way of design that they've lead at home and take it into far flung corners of the globe. And and really push it so Steph Elsag maestas a really good example of that someone you know who learned his craft in Austria moved to New York went onto establish one of the most important graphic design companies in the world and their names continuing to do that but on the home front and I think this is kind of interesting as well looking at what separates that designers in Australia. A lot of them really pick up on the grandeur. The beautiful inglorious old past old glamour of Australia really is them. You're a big fan of Vienna. I know like when you walking around these coffee shops. You really almost feel like you're stepping back in time. And for people like Verena penholder. Who's a Vienna based graphic designer direction? Expert that we profiled. She really feels that in her work. She really can just take inspiration from the old building. The old signs and then I guess because you know you're so open to international clients these days she's able to translate that into a really strong global body of work absolutely and just to Andrew. Romano piece actually lives in annoyed tra- house so he would know he saw town. Amazing modernist birth to live in as well for people that maybe aren't familiar with Austria. One of the reasons that we decided to approach editorially was we feel like there's a space in the world for positive stories and one of the things that really sticks out. The I think the world can learn from Australia is about keeping crafter home. Savannah is the biggest landlord in Europe and it allows people to run a business close to where they live in affordable price and actually make things and as. I flicked through your designed directory. It could be beautiful old silver. That's been made in the same place for one hundred years in the sixth or seventh district could be accompanied like cow. Model that makes lighting spur. Roszke did a piece of advertising in the issue but we're also obviously a fan of them. How important do you think? Croft is to the Austrian story overseas in the UK of sold all that to The Far East but they've managed to hold onto a bit in Europe. I haven't yeah. I think it's incredibly important. It really does mark everything that they do that in terms of design and particularly industrial design. And I'd like to point out a story about a lovely lady and design curator called elite Story Liechtenstein who? I've had quite a lot to do with in the last few years because she's always at every single you know important. International Design of 'em whether that's designed Miami or Milan Design Week and she really champions Australian Kroft through the Lens of young designers all around the world. She invites these young talents from Miami or Mellon to come and take pot at residency that she hosts in her Schloss Josh. I think you'd be for this. You get to spend two weeks there. Go around this incredible old. Cosso filled with the most beautiful furniture and furnishings. Take inspiration from it and then channel it into a new project often working with artisans and makers in that part of Rural Austria near Grottes so I mean as an experience is absolutely incredible. It really speaks to this idea of maintaining this strong relationship with Croft Mowlam's sold. I'm waiting for my invite just looking elsewhere in the issue. I mean we have interviews with Lily Line. Who is the head of Vienna Design Week? Her brother Max Jalan important curator in New York just showing that kind of Austrian connection around the world. There's also a lovely story that equity could have sat in the design sanction but ended up in culture about the R F if. I'm saying that correctly Austrian Broadcasting Radio House but I'm GonNa bring things a little bit closer to home for my final question. Roland is well known in the design. Press that you've just moved house. You're furnishing a lovely new home. Here in London. Did any Austrian buys. Make it onto the longlist. You know they don't need to be sitting on the coffee table just yet but have you got your eyes on anything that would be not massively unaffordable rare one of peace from the early twentieth century. But just a bit approachable Austrian designed to honest to might want to indulge in. Well I was a little bit cheeky. When I reported this design section I went to Vienna and hung out with a couple of guys who I think absolutely incredible what they do is they buy old villas and old mid-century buildings in parts of Rural Austria and convert them into incredible new hotels and stayaways and have really attracted the crowd from Vienna to head to these places and they furnish these villas once called Villa Antoinette. The other one's called hotel firm Blake with fines. Mainly from this one market which I was so keynes's check out that I had to write a whole story about so myself and Michael. Who's one half of the developing? These hotels went down to Nash. Mocked in the middle of Vienna on a freezing cold morning and just spent the morning bogging and buying pieces. He bought most of the pieces. He has a bit more money May and put them all together and made a beautiful story in photo. Shoot out of that so that was a cheeky for me. I also worked with the photographer. Who Shot with that to do a story later in the issue about cakes which is very exciting and why the little a tourist mainstay and have survived from the. Habsburg days but the photographer told me a very cold on the national. He's got some good portrait view. Bundled up in a nice fleece jacket. My sincere thanks..

Australia Vienna Austria Andrew Romano Europe New York Victor Gruen California Germany Ziesel Verena penholder Miami Hatton California Croft Mowlam Nash Steph Elsag Fun Nippon Roszke Richard Notre Croft
"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"I don't know about y'all but like architecture's very interesting too. I can never I could never do it. They like but I think it's amazing in just something that's grown like become so innovative so quickly but just like it has so many different elements of things like there's two are. There's the math yeah they're the visuals in my you know to so many the physics of it like so many different things that go into it and so as a child she exhibited all these signs of being good and all these different areas so she had this art things he sketched she painted and she drew anti carpentry work irks. She worked on furniture yeah so she was really a cool. Gal since he was young and she went to public. Girls School called Hunter College High School while she was a high school student to and some of those same fields. She said that her grades were pretty good and pretty much everything I love it. I I know but she was really good at art sciences and math which is still pretty much everything good in general but it was her father who suggested to her that maybe you should do architecture and obviously then as there aren't there aren't many black people who were in the profession but but that didn't keep her from pursuing it so she wanted to go to Howard her father did but her father didn't want her to her parents wanted her to stay closer to home and so to prepare for Columbia University's architecture program she took liberal arts courses at Barnard College and Barnard College was associated with Columbia University versity but it was for women like for Women as Columbia didn't accept women students so she went through that those courses and then she got into the Columbia University School School of architecture so she remarked on how her first year there was super hard but that didn't keep her from coming back after the summer she came back in the fall like many of her classmates were war veterans Somehow Bachelors and Masters degrees so basically they have people around them and they already had all experienced unstable to help them through the process of getting through these amazingly can't even imagine how difficult courses they were so those people what kind of work on assignments together but she had a situation where she was commuting to school and sometimes had to finish her work on her commutes or at home alone so that kind of having we know like having how how having that support system is important when you're going through school right. Oh yeah she got her bachelor of architecture degree in nineteen fifty and she was one of the two women in her class and the only black win after that she applied to nineteen architectural firms she said in interviews like I won't forget that number nineteen eighteen but was turned down to every one of them yeah and she got hers on. She got the twentieth This is a quote that she says she said I don't know if the rejections were because I was a black person because I was a young woman or because of the economic recession at the time but she said those places were hiring. Women are black people so I think we can kind of go like right. We know what the issue was here yeah so does she herd twentieth one that was when she went to work in the city of New York's Department of Public Works as what she says. It's a junior address person and she didn't like the job because she couldn't really be creative in it so she wasn't there long she took the New York State architect's licensing exam and she passed stay on the first time which everybody doesn't do even though it was a really tough days long test and she became a licensed architect in nineteen fifty four and that was when I first comes along she became New York State's first black woman licensed architect so she he was hired by a private architectural firm at that point after she quit her job with the city even though her supervisor gave her a bad rep our friends and her relationship with that supervisor with her boss wasn't there wasn't anything wrong with it so he but he said that she was lazy she she got to work late ally that she didn't know anything about design architecture and that she socialized a lot so he had a lot of really negative things to say about her even though she never had any issues and she thought it had to do with the fact that her boss wasn't a licensed architect and with older and she was a younger black in licensed architect so a job she was a threat yeah I'm sure like old dude is like main. I've done nothing we feel this way similarly but we don't lash out the bad recommendation. I'm just saying felt threatened so even though she got out of her old job because she felt like she was wasting her potential she was still doing small small tasks like designing bathroom layout so she's still kind of felt away about that. he spent a year at that small firm and in nineteen fifty five she joined the office of skidmore more owings and Merrill ended up working there until nineteen sixty so that was a pretty big firm and at that major firm she was working on large scale projects projects and teaching evening architecture courses at New York City community college and so around this time she was a single mother of two children she had already been married and been divorced and her mother took care of her children while she worked so she did have a support system is not like nobody was there while she was doing all this stuff and in nineteen fifty fifty nine she became the first black woman to be a member of the American Institute of Architects Loon. Wow in one thousand nine hundred sixty that's when she moves to California and there she took a job at Gruen and associates in Los Angeles and just a side note about grew in Victor Gruen was is the person who was credited with kind of being a pioneer in the American shopping mall. He did a lot working. I think I talked about him recently because we were talking about food courts on others. Roy pointed me. You're not Florida. Yes shopping malls. Are I feel I don't know how sad I am about them leaving but do have I do remember the glory days going into the Disney stores. Oh Yeah and into the double layers and then you see store John Tucker trying to go right cookie inbetween always feeling like you were this close to like falling over the edge because they always had those on the top up level to like glass and I would always be scared like oh my gosh perfume every funny that things years no one else would yeah you can look down all you could smell perfume everywhere as a little kid mall town and with a giant mall yeah I went out well. You've been to China. I'm not sure if you you you have not but they had a million shopping. I don't yeah they have so many mall. It is ridiculous and they're huge. There's there's a basement and then there's a basement under the basement like you're still organiz now organized. You're probably like name what the categories of things are on each floor when you got to that floor yeah. I was like wow this makes sense. This is very organized like anyway the go-to malls in China. You'll be there for the next ninety years so when she was at grew in she recognized how much scrutiny she was getting from her boss there. She didn't have a car and she got rise with one of her her colleagues who was a white man to get to work and later she said in an interview it took only one week before the boss came and spoke to me about being late yet he had not noticed that the young man had been late for two years. My solution was to buy a car since I the highly visible employees. Employees had to be punctual and I think it's funny how she said highly visible employees. I feel like there's definitely skating around all the black woman yeah wheel and they wanted me to see my mistakes. We we get the subtext there. She got her architecture license in California in nineteen sixty two two and so she was the first African American woman to have one in California and she remained the only one for twenty years. Wow until the eighty s yeah wow jeez hey noise. We're all about it today. Sorry the peaking of weird noises we should pause for an advocate be right back in this episode of stuff. Mom Never told you is brought to you by Pantene so y'all I've been using the new pantene rose water collected and it's amazing anything not only does it smell incredible.

California China Columbia University School Sch New York Barnard College Victor Gruen Columbia University supervisor Hunter College High School New York City community colleg Disney Girls School Florida skidmore New York State American Institute of Architec Columbia Howard
"victor gruen" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on KCRW

"Firm of Victor Gruen associates that he designed the Pacific design center or PDC three whimsically shaped colored glass structures on Melrose Avenue that towered over neighboring houses and stoles the gigantic center blue nicknamed the blue whale opened in nineteen seventy six center green followed in nineteen eighty eight and the complex was finally completed in twenty thirteen with the addition of sent to read during that time he designed and built another Southland institution the wavy glass Renee and Henry Segerstrom concert hall in Costa mesa we actions to the PDC have long been mixed but Pelley was proud of it telling the LA times in nineteen eighty six that the blue whale quote sits there like an intruder in an environment filled with little houses yet in juxtaposition it does not destroy the scale for morning edition I'm Francis Sanderson host of KCRW's DNA and the author and radical activist Paul Krassner has died he passed away over the weekend in desert hot springs he was eighty seven Craster together with Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin started the youth international party or yep fees which became famous for publicity stunts like running a pig for president in nineteen sixty eight Prancer was an advocate for free speech **** and recreational drug use support for NPR comes from NPR stations and from trader Joe's where new products arrive in stores weekly and new episodes of the podcast inside trader Joe's arrive online occasionally and apple podcast and were pock cancer found more a trader Joe's dot com and from the financial services firm of Raymond James offering personalized wealth management advice and banking capital markets expertise along with the legacy of putting clients financial well being first learn more at Raymond James dot com it's seven thirty five.

NPR Raymond James apple Jerry Rubin Paul Krassner Francis Sanderson Henry Segerstrom Joe Victor Gruen associates Prancer president Abbie Hoffman Craster KCRW LA times Pelley Costa mesa
"victor gruen" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"None of the stuff we're about to talk about came from Victor Gruen as you can probably guessed by now. He was fundamentally opposed to any design choice aimed at manipulating customers into spending more money. I think he would have felt like he was betraying that sense of community that he was hoping to instill in these malls. Yeah, there's another dark layer to the story because despite his principal approach design grew and still wound up having shady mall tactic named after him. Sometimes you get disoriented intermodal, or a big store like you're just walking through this giant maze. And you kind of lose track of where you are in the building. Or how long you've been there that's known as Gruen transfer and Grunwald hated the name. But the fact is a real thing and stores put a lot of effort and thought into how best trigger this reaction the customers. So Victor groom might have wanted malls, that were easy to navigate, but future designers learned that confused shoppers, actually spend more money. And that's why so many malls have these maze-like like layouts with difficult find exits and while you're wandering around other carefully designed coordinated features kind of do their part to keep you feeling be an engaged you can think about things like music, that's relaxing, and played through the pipe speakers, or eye-catching entrance displays and the more time you spend, in this mall days, the more likely you are to make impulse buys, right? Like in article scientists describes it as being confused into his state of unplanned. Consumption, I call this, the Ikya fact I think. And all this make sense. I get why they call it after grew in. But you know, because he helped build these malls, but actually help me out with that, last part the word transfer. Yeah. So what's actually being transferred is the desire to have specific item? So you go to the mall to buy sweater. And it's only whether that you're looking for. But if the designers play their cards, right, you'll be so dazzled. By the time you get to the store that your desire for what are will already have been transferred to a bunch of different items that you never planned on buying. Okay. That makes sense, but I'm still curious if grew didn't come up with the different sales tricks that we find in malls now than who is responsible for that, like it was just mall. Architects who followed him or what I mean? That's where some of the ideas came from and new methods were added over the years. Certainly, but a lot of the common features in malls, actually originated with one of gruden's contemporaries. This fellow storefront designer his name was a offered Todman, and he goes on to be a huge mall. Mogul in late nineteen fifties Todman followed gruden's lead. By building his own indoor shopping mall in California and over the next fifty years, or so he just kept on building. So he actually passes away in two thousand fifteen at age of ninety one but his company's still going strong with twenty four malls spread across eleven different states, plus Puerto Rico, South Korea, and China and each of them incorporate special designs, all developed by Todman over the years. All right. So can can you give me some examples of what these designs are? Yeah. I mean, this is gonna sound a little hyperbolic, which I guess it kind of is. But a lot of men's innovations were sort of, like perversions of what groom had designed so, you know, we talked about grew in wanting this two level mall. It was so that people could circulate easier and bump into more people, but Todman kind of took that trick and move the escalators the ends of the buildings so you wouldn't meet up in the center, but rather you'd have to make the full loop around the mall and buy more as a result, kata and Tomlin's malls also applied the circulation theory to the exteriors. He was actually the first to put a circular road around a mall and Atta bunch of extra entrances. So that shoppers could easily get to any part of the building. It's interesting that bit about the moving of the escalators. It's such a good example of how a simple tweak can change the focus from, you know, customer comfort to some that really more benefits the sellers, and I'm curious, did you find any other cases like that? Yeah, so another good example is what Tubman did with lighting. So he kept all the skylights from Bruins designed, but he made them recess. So the sunlight would never directly affect the storefronts, and he also added these tiny lights around the skylight so that when the sun started to go down customers wouldn't take the shift in lighting as this cue that it was time to leave. And speaking of his ability, Todman insisted on using transparent, handrails, and his mall, so that you could always see the stores around you regardless of what level you were at. I mean, apparently, it was he was trying to battle something called threshold resistance, which, I guess, refers to both the physical and psychological barriers that might prevent a custom. From entering store like they could block your view and keep you from seeing store on the upper level that you might otherwise go inside, I guess that's part of it. Well, speaking of psychology, we were talking about muzak earlier, and I have to mention this weird fact, I came across this week so according to two thousand eleven report from Stanford all the malls in America, put together, consume more than a gigawatt of trysofi every month just from playing that awful background music post to make you shop more. And when you do the math on this that energy usage comes out to three thousand metric tons of CO, two added to the atmosphere each year, just from this stupid music. Yeah, I guess not only knowing manipulative, it's also contribution to climate change. Well to be fair, human society minutes around thirty gig tons of greenhouse gases per year. So it's not like three thousand tonnes from a mall, is doing that much damage. But I just thought that that was interesting. You know, of course, once you factor in all the energy that malls us to heat cool and light, these massive interiors around the clock. Their contribution actually start to look a bit more significant when you put it in, you know, as a whole guess. Yeah. I'm sure I actually gave was telling me about this one mall. He visited in Kentucky, where there were only like two or three actual stores and the entire complex still open like every other one had been shuttered, but the AC delays escalators the music all that was still going on throughout the building. And that's not a one off thing. They're hundreds of miles like that across the country. I feel like you see them on YouTube lot like urban explorers will will go and take videos of them. But a lot of these dead malls. Are actually just limping along kind of on life support like the one. He's on Kentucky. Yeah. I feel we should probably talk a little bit about why that is and the state of malls, you know, today, but let's take one more quick break. And then we'll get back to that. I can't believe it. That Gerald is presenting the quarterly budget report with finger puppets..

Victor Gruen Todman gruden Kentucky principal Grunwald Puerto Rico Stanford YouTube Atta Tubman Gerald California Bruins Tomlin America China
"victor gruen" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

15:51 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"I'm Chelsea handler. And I'm launching a brand new podcast with iheartradio called life will be the death of me. And I'm gonna talk to all these different people, my BFF Mary McCormack. That's what we should call. My book tour the apology, or great idea. Sorry. Everyone on this whole pot should be called. It should be called with the orange because of the orange theme in the book Archie. Glad I went to therapy. Life will be the death of me with. Chelsea handler listening subscribe at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to part time. Jesus production of I heart radio. Guess what mega? What's will? All right. I know you love shopping mall. So I'm sure you've noticed these people. But, you know, the people who like to exercise by walking back and forth through them all. Sure mall. Walkers, it's like half the country's grandparents at least as you mentioned. It's especially popular with senior citizens, but they're actually not the only ones doing this, there was this two thousand fifteen report from the CDC that shows that shopping malls are now the second most popular place to go for a walk just behind neighborhoods. How weird is this? It's weird. But why is the CDC doing reports on mall walking? Well, this isn't a small report either. It's actually fifty six pages long. And I'm reading every word riveting, but to be fair taking walks is a way to prevent certain diseases, and the CDC is actually the center for disease control and prevention. I bet you forgot that silent P CDC. There's one funny thing that I learned it actually turns out that most mall. Walkers don't actually shop at the mall it mows. They might buy a coffee. At the food, court or something like that. But according to the CDC report, they really just want the camaraderie, you know, to spend some time strolling and socializing that actually puts mall. Walkers, right in line with the original idea for shopping malls. So the architect who designed the first mall in America's name is Victor Gruen. He actually envisioned the mall as a place to quote, find opportunities for social life and recreation and protected pedestrian environment. Now that's interesting. So by that measure despite not buying anything mall. Walkers of really the only ones doing malls, right? Yeah. I don't know about from the mall manager's perspective. But definitely from Gruen, and he clearly had more in mind for shopping malls than what they would alternately become. But what exactly did he envision? Why didn't it work out? And most importantly, is there still a chance that his high hopes for shopping malls could still be fulfilled. Those are just a few of the questions. We'll try to.

CDC Victor Gruen Chelsea Archie Mary McCormack apple America
"victor gruen" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on KCRW

"Mall architect, Victor Gruen well, actually worked on the south shopping center, Minneapolis, if you're if you're city building if you're serious about the city. Architects have a role which we shouldn't advocate ourselves from the were too precious to be doing stuff like to be doing commercial right nation. I think I like it. He started a break from what he saw as conventional architecture in the nineteen sixties. And then he catapulted into the public eye in the nineteen seventies with the design of his own house in Santa Monica in which wrapped a Dutch, colonial house in chain link and plywood siding inspiration for his new direction came from his artist, friends and LA itself. Well, it was wide open spaces. I don't think there was a lot of context to worry about to relate to. Few buildings the city hall the library. But there wasn't much to anchor to hang onto except the weather. The son of landscape cars cars were building thousands of track houses, and they were all I remember seeing acres of wood frame tract houses under construction was so beautiful. I think the woods structures. Definitely. Sent you into the president's in Japan. We're gonna agree and we're doing would structures. Frank, Lloyd Wright. Japanese aspect to his work. So I think the city was very Asia Centric in terms of architecture. But the tract houses that you find so beautiful you found the beautiful when they were under construction and the framers. Right. Just when I first met Gary in the late nineteen eighty s that was a decade when lots of architects felt they'd had enough of a kind of doctrinaire modernism, and they went back in time for inspiration to classical buildings and created what became known as post modernist architecture, cold steel and glass was also invoke. Gary was interested in warmth and decoration too. But not through pastiche. I came a school where in fifty four nineteen fifty four so post-war everything was modern steel and glass, and it's cold and and. Of putting but I think that that was a turnoff, and they nobody, you know. Minimalism became the kind of an point. Mel ended up with a square coroner. Couldn't go anywhere. It's a dead end. Minimalism is always been kind of we flirt with it. But it's always come up against the wall were how much more minimal can you get? And it doesn't talk to human the way we live the way we like to live the way we entertain the way we things we by the way, we decorate our homes. So there needed to be another way. He did find another way to curvy Kabul, chairs and fish shape lights, and then the discovery of digital technologies that could help him make voluptuous new forms most famously the Bilbao Guggenheim, then the Walt Disney concert hall. But that didn't mean he didn't draw lessons from history. If you look at the grand, you will see the hotel and office buildings won't make such an architectural statement as the concert home. They will be rectilinear step back blocks. I've always thought that history show that cities build iconic buildings for their city halls their library their courthouses houses. Their churches civic buildings concert hall. Theater, and those are the buildings that you recognize towns and cities by quite often right through history. So what about the grand? Well, it's a commercial development that hopefully won't feel cool. Put the goal is to enliven the streets, and to create public spaces, the main thing for us for the city is the levels of retail and restaurants ground level and above when you're sitting in those restaurants, have you ever look out at Disney hall because that's obviously a really fascinating piece. I I would imagine intensive thinking about the design which is this project is going to face a building that you designed I should get a Royal. And there will be a fish sculpture. There's a big sculpture at the grand with three fish in. And they're Hyder both high-seas who's doing sculpture. I don't know some guy named Frank Gehry. Sachse dental accidental we needed to put something there. And I had this fish. We fish sculpture just lying around. Is it from another project that? No, I was exploring a larger thing and as a placeholder we put in it needed. Something had to be there for Gary the highs of come with some lows the recession hit him no eight like everyone else around. Then he also found himself the target of criticism. From a new generation that labeled him a stark attacked. He's worked to defuse that image with projects in low income communities like a new performance space for the youth orchestra Los Angeles in Inglewood and at the river in south LA. We're looking at a piece of land in south gate that we may be able to have to build a cultural center, and we wanna put y'all youth orchestra. And and LA county museum wants to know post. So we would build a community cultural center, we have some money from the state to start it that would recruit kids from the neighborhood. So it's not gentrification and we want to build some low cost housing with it. So we're looking at a couple of pieces of land to do that. It took several decades for Frank Gehry to be taken seriously in LA and for design and architecture in LA to be taken seriously now, east coast is and Europeans who used a sneer at and sultana are fighting to come here. He can look back and see the upside of being off of the beaten track early in his career. Well, you were under the radar from the east. Right. So it was good back. That is great. I think the cover for all of us was the movie business because they got stuff nobody paid any attention to slept the architects, so you able to play right talked a lot of people creative people that felt the same was paying much fight, and you could grow and feel. Now, there was one thing that has never changed for Frank. And that is a desire to build at whatever scale he's currently working on skyscrapers in Toronto an art center in Arlon, France. He's in conversation about designing a concert hall in the London borough of Wimbledon. Yes, Wimbledon that is famed for its tennis until celebrate his birthday in Berlin. At the Pierre Boulez saw that's an auditorium and musical academy. He completed two years ago back at the related event. He mused on some unfinished tasks at the Walt Disney concert hall. Specifically the steps that go up the side of the console to the garden that is tucked away up there on the terrace behind the building the plaza and those stairs, which I thought would be used more. And they're not. Is this much as we thought they would be. So.

Frank Gehry Los Angeles Gary Disney hall Victor Gruen Santa Monica Minneapolis Asia Pierre Boulez London president cold steel Japan LA county museum Mel Kabul Lloyd Wright Hyder Berlin Bilbao Guggenheim
"victor gruen" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"This. I know I remember in my own experience growing up in New Jersey when the first mall opened anywhere near me when I was in high school, this is Ellen Dunham Jones. She's a professor of architecture and urban design at Georgia Tech. It was cool to go to the mall. But I mean, literally, it was air conditioned. My home wasn't air conditioned. My school wasn't air conditioned today. Most of us are spending our days and our nights in completely thermally controlled environments. A lot of us are craving being able to be outdoors in recent decades. Our tastes have aired away from climate controlled environments and away from the indoor mall mall construction actually peaked in nineteen ninety. It's been declining ever since. And by two thousand six is really the last brand new kind of standard conventional mall. That's. Built in the US and a new product has entered the scene a kind of shopping center that the IC SC. The international council of shopping centers hotels, a lifestyle center lifestyle centers started appearing in the nineties, and they tend to be open air. So you don't have that roof anymore. But you have a lot of boutiques and a lot. More restaurants, lifestyle centers are moles disguised as mainstream and even though they're full of chain stores, lifestyle centers are sunny and walkable and bustling and kind of Victor grown imagined and some of the old style. Indoor shopping malls are being repurpose. Several of them are being retrofitted into Hispanic community centers like in plaza fiesta at side of Atlanta. A lot of the stores have been cut up into much smaller mom and pop small shops selling. Western wear selling Konare addresses plaza. Fiesta also has a steady events calendar of performances. In this too was kind of what ruin imagined these sort of community malls, or truly places together and spend money in the shell of the failed design most people are sexual stories. Specially the grew in was horrible architect. And you know, I can see where they're coming from his exteriors of building are uniformly boring. But for grew in that wasn't the point. It was the interiors that were really the point those fountains, the cheesy statues, the elevator music, piped in through all those speakers, those are all part of the goon effect, and they help turn shopping malls into spaces where we felt comfortable staying and spending time and money. A lot of the original indoor malls or abandoned. There's a website that's become sort of a graveyard of dead. Moles cold, dead, moles dot com. Users can log on submit stories of the dead malls. And their towns there around four hundred and fifty malls listed there submitted as sort of four O histories in particular. What's interesting, I think about dead, malls dot com is how nostalgic a lot of this is, and it does make sense in so many suburban communities the mall became the defacto town center, it was really the center of social life other than the school. I would be very sad. If all Victor Gruen Smalls were demolished, we should certainly work to preserve at least one. The most famous mall in Minnesota may be the mall of America with its roller coaster. It's applying query waterpark, but the most architecturally significant mall. It's grandfather is the one. That's just a twelve minute drive away in the Dyna. Jeff Hardwick spoke is called MoMA ker Victor Gruen architect of an American dream, an Ellen Jones book is called retrofitting suburbia, social thanks to clear Dory for research. One of only nine percent of his bowl is produced by bonanza low from Nocturne and Joe Rosenberg mix tech production by schrief Yousef music by Sean Rio per two was produced by Avery truffle men in early twenty fifteen Katie mingle is senior producer Colston steadies, the digital director. The team is senior editor, Delaney hall and FitzGerald, Vivian Lee. Turn Maza and me. Roman mars. You can find Venizelos haunting show Nocturne at Nocturne podcast on org. We are one point seven KLW in San Francisco in produced on radio row in beautiful downtown, Oakland, California. Don't

Ellen Dunham Jones Fiesta Victor Gruen Smalls senior editor New Jersey Victor Gruen Victor US Georgia Tech professor of architecture Maza Venizelos Konare San Francisco Oakland Minnesota Ellen Jones California Delaney hall
"victor gruen" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"The story was a co production with the KCRW podcast Nocturne, which is produced and hosted by Vanessa low Nocturne is an exploration of the night and the landscape of the unseen ov- link on the website in the show notes. Coming up, we go back to the mall, specifically the mall that started at all. After this. Almost is America's original butcher since nineteen seventeen. That's over a hundred years there. Master butchers have delivered perfectly aged hand-cut meets so you can order with complete competence, and right now, you can also order with a pretty big discount Omaha Steaks dot com and enter code nine nine in the search for and get seventy four percent off Omaha Steaks family gift package. No only forty nine ninety nine. The family gift package comes with eight ton of stuff forehand cut tops. 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Fifty that's invisible and the number of fifty at checkout, enjoy free shipping and every fourth order free with your subscription. Visit Gillette on demand dot com. Ninety nine percent of visible supported by article inspired by mid century modern and Scandinavian simplicity. Oracle is an online only furniture company that offers beautiful well-made furniture. Oracle is online only because price matters. No retail stores means they don't have expensive rent to pay every month. And they pass those savings on to you, for instance, though, singer entire order almost anywhere in the US and Canada for a flat rate of forty nine dollars. We'll send you a couch for forty nine dollars. They're serious about shipping. So you can expect you're in stock items in two weeks or less. I love article furniture. They give the office one free piece the bone Atsuko sideboard and since then I filled my entire house offense with their stuff. Couches chairs sideboards some coffee tables, dining room table, all article. I think my favorite is the teardrop shaped amoeba coffee table. It's just great. Join me in my love of their furniture contemporary. High functioning home decor from article. For fifty dollars off your first purchase of one hundred dollars or more. Go to article dot com slash nine nine and your discount will be applied to your purchase. That's article dot com slash the numbers nine nine. No that we've sneaked into this weird public private space that is the mall. I thought it'd be fun to revisit the origin story of this incredibly intriguing location which Avery reported for us a few years ago. Revolt. You go to the store for a pair of socks and come out with a mega pack of soda you. Go out to get shampoo and come back a fancy razor. It's hard to stick to what's on your list. A challenge you to go to Kia and leave with only the thing which you game. Just try to buy a lamp without buying a cutting board. It can't be done. You absolutely knew this. But retail spaces are designed to do this to you producer Avery trophy. The store is trying to look so beautiful. So welcoming the items so enticingly displayed in such vast quantity that you cannot help drawn in and then drawn towards something. You don't need. This is the grew in effect the grew in effect or sometimes called grew and transfer. It's that moment when you walk into a store, and the design of the store is so overwhelming and dazzling that you'd be in mindlessly consuming the in. Effect is named after Victor Gruen. So who was growing, he's a complicated complex contradictory guy? Jeff Hardwick wrote the biography of Victor Gruen who was born Victor Gruden bomb. Born in Vienna in nineteen four and he is Jewish in. Vienna. Lease and thirty eight good call groom bomb and makes his way eventually to New York City wants a New York grew and made a name for himself designing shops and retail spaces. And this was a particular challenge during the lean years of the late thirties. People had no money they just wouldn't go into shops at all the good figured out how to lure people inside basically by using amazingly appealing window displays. You would go into these window display areas look at jewelry or handbags or chocolates. And then you'd be tempted lured into the store. I mean, that's the grew in effect. Gruner argued that good design equalled, good profits. And he quits those as one to one if you do more people are going to stay there longer and spend more money ruin started making storefronts all over the country, and he moved from New York to Los Angeles in nineteen forty one grew in was from the beautiful city of the NO, which is lined with shops and greenery places to gather. He saw how most Americans were just riding around in their cars all the time cut off from the city from each other. And he knew this problem was even worse in the suburbs, the suburbs. Locked what sociologist Ray Oldenburg, Cole's third places. Think of home as your primary place work as your second place. And that third place is where you go to build community. A hang out to simply feel connected grew in wanted to give the American suburbs that third place see image of leaving in closer communication. Bizarre. People see image of having supposedly from walk to one place to another that's footage of ruined from the university of Wyoming. She Mitch about TCP thing. Any Baynes outside of your own house has become a desire that we picked Victor Gruen. Imagine designing an environment full of greenery and shops, an indoor plaza a modern forum an island of connection in the middle of the sprawl one that would only be accessible to pedestrians because all man, Victor Gruen hated cars, he rants and raves against cars. Continually logic. Has that? He's saying of say will be to bribe cars Bela as means of mosh bench. What they and. Human life and ten just it's great.

Victor Gruen Omaha Steaks Gillette New York City Avery trophy Oracle America Vienna university of Wyoming Kobo US Mitch Baynes Bela producer Ray Oldenburg Gruner Victor Gruden
"victor gruen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"The. Talk listening to tool stories on monocle twenty four brought by the team behind the inist the show will about the cities we live in this week Monaco's executive editor George venit asks what can the mastermind of the much maligned mall teachers about cherishing our high streets here he is. What if I asked you to name the most important architect the twentieth century right now? How about if I told you it was actually someone you'd never heard of I imagine he'd needed little convincing. Yes. The mighty Likud prophet is own brand of chili Swiss modernism, and it made waves and the glitzy guys and gals of the glass and steel brigade think Renzo piano was our Hadid shaped the modern city admirably. But I think the man behind the mall deserves a place in the pantheon to and his work is ripe for reappraisal while we're at it. So let's see if I can convince you and to make my point of building, of course, the Northland mall squat square red brick affair surrounded by car park and packed with shops and places to graze. It's in the city of Southfield Michigan was built in nineteen fifty four. What's more? It was a hit. But this is where opinions on its significance diverge the Bill. Was masterminded by the Austrian emigre Victor grew in. It was a record as an all encompassing out of town affair that act with fountains at finery, plenty of plants that started a paradigm shift which was still seeing today from Dubai to Thailand and Australia move over mom-and-pop shops and forget all about that traipsing from butcher to Baker and back the new customer of the mid nineteen fifties anyway, wanted convenience and consistency and car parking and maybe a haircut while they're at. And boy was victim grew in right? The rest of this tale is told trope moves quickly monopolize the US shopping scene and proliferated for the next forty years. They also made shopping Samy boring and bland, they sucked customers from the traditional high streets and priced out cart full independent retailers. But is the story of the Northland mall? One of a mistake. Or even innovation was the legacy of this prototype. That was demolished in early. Twenty eighteen to understand the importance of the Northland mall will need to know a little bit more about its architect. Victor gruen. Well, victim David Grynbaum. Is he was born entered the world into an affluent Jewish family on a balmy day in the summer of nineteen three the promising young architect worked here before emigrating to America, just the Nazis goostepped into annex Austria in the end of nineteen thirty eight Gruen landed in New York where the future was far from made his own confession. He had an architect's degree eight dollars and knowing after a stint as a draftsman grund sold his. Services particularly panache for window-dressing to an increase in the impressive roster Fifth Avenue department stores. No mean feat the cash-strapped era of the postwar US by nineteen forty one. He was lying up. Another move Tyler this time into marriage across to Los Angeles. After ten years of tinkering grew in founded in the paulhamus studio and soon he was ready to build the first example of that most American of institutions the move. Northland mall was a success story in spawned hundreds of imitators, but gruden's malls at the center of a tragic misunderstanding his creations were supposed to celebrate rub them destroy the high street to bring the joys of communal space to the burbs grew in envisioned. His creation as self contained city centre with offices homes at kindergartens public art of Menti and these were suspicious times bomb shelters to he saw them as spaces that would bring the verve of urban life to the boring, concentrate, suburbs incident thing and ironically, crewmen hated cars. Liking the effect of rubber wheeled vehicles on public health and happiness to that of an open sewer one in a litany of ironies about this much misunderstood maestro. This is where the Austrians helton's tragic, however grew and grew to hate what he created in later life after various master planning projects in which he attempted to save US cities from which he sucked the life with his malls. He returned to be Anna dejected when asked about the malls after his homecoming, he balked that. His original ideas had been busted iced, stating in a lecture that he refused to pay alimony. These Boston developments. But pay he did in reputation and with a growing sense of guilt over how his idealistic malls tug at the threads of in life in his final years. He worked to improve the city the first inspired him all those years before. But estrin izing suedes of the first district of the Austrian capital to safeguard shoppers from those pesky cones it was in Vienna. That he died in nineteen eighty around the time that the first opened up on the fringes of the city, even though grooms creations could tell the high street for a solid half-century his hard-won conclusions genuine remorse for what building such as the Northland move. Did more relevant today than ever Victor grew in the movie maker may not have been the best architect to the twentieth century. But that certainly doesn't mean it wasn't the most important. You've been listening to tall stories a monocle twenty four production. Thanks to Josh Senate. For today's episode. I remember tune in every Thursday for the full thirty minute edition of the Arben est. I imagine talk goodbye. And thank you for listening. Lovers. Explore the original brilliant hardback volume from the writers and editors behind monocle magazine, the monocle guide to cozy homes is available at a very special price exclusively for urban listeners to buy the book at half price just twenty pounds plus postage. Visit monocle dot com slash urban book offer, that's monocle dot com forward slash urban est. Book offer monocle keeping an eye and near on the world.

Northland mall US Victor gruen monocle magazine Renzo piano Northland Monaco executive editor Southfield George venit Michigan Dubai Menti David Grynbaum paulhamus Los Angeles helton
"victor gruen" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

Motley Fool Answers

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"victor gruen" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

"So that's gonna try and get you to go to cover as much a ground in the store as possible they also um put flowers i don't know if you've noticed this when you enter a grocery store they're often be flowers right there um and that so you start associating freshness with the store and produce are thought about let last week we talked about smells yeah because i associate with fresh cut flowers and all that very pleasant memories and a for your that's a good smell who want to enter into yeah yeah maybe not too it's better than putting like french cheese is way ahead like oh my god or the voyager yet i level in a story is a very prima location because as humans apparently were so low we're so lazy we don't want to squat or reach up so if you're going to look at high level that's where the more expensive stuff generics gonna be lower or if you're a kid that's where they're gonna put all the stuff that's going to appeal to kids at their i level so supposedly if you go to a store grocery store and go to the cereal the sugary cereals are going to be kid i level and lower and the adult cereals are going to be at our i level here's another crazy thing that stores do if you have ever been lost or disoriented in a mall or store was on purpose itf it was on purpose of it's called the grew in transfer and it's named after the small architect named victor gruen and basically stores like that are trying to slow you down and make you lost on purpose so that you'll shot more so i don't yeah i think i think he is the best example whenever you walk through a gear your desire.

victor gruen