19 Burst results for "Vicki Christianson"

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oh, seven. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Newell king. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. We're going to focus in now on the consequences of remarks that President Trump made this week in an ABC news interview anchor George Stephanopoulos, asked the president, if it would be okay in the future. If his if his campaign accepted, dirt on a political rival from a foreign entity let's listen to a bit of that exchange if somebody called from country Norway, we have information on your phone. Oh, I think I'd wanna hear you want that kind of interference in our elections. Not at a defense. They have information. I think I'd take it if I thought there was something wrong. I'd go maybe to the FBI, if I thought there was something wrong, Republican, Senator and close Trump ally. Lindsey Graham had this to say though, performed government comes to you, as a public official offers to help your campaign giving you anything today with the D mighty or information on your opponent. The right answer is no speaker of the house. Nancy Pelosi says the house will take up legislation that would force candidates to report any such effort to federal law enforcement. Congressman John Sarbanes a democrat from Maryland introduced that measure and he is with us on the line. Good morning. Good morning. What exactly is your Bill designed to do? What's pretty straightforward? It basically says that you have a duty to report. If your contacted by a foreign government foreign national, and they want to give you some opposition research, or other campaign related material. You have a duty immediately to report that to us authorities, and that's all designs and make sure that we're fortifying our democracy in our elections against interference. So it's, it's a very simple straightforward proposal. Obviously, it's going in the opposite direction of where the president seems to be going. It's breathtaking that he would articulate the position he did the other day. So just to be clear now it is illegal to accept something of value from foreign power in a campaign, direct financial support. For example. But you're Bill is saying, even if you are just offered it. You have to report it to the FBI, which you currently don't have to do. There is no obligation to do that now. That's correct. It would put an affirmative duty on somebody to report it, which is really a matter of kinda putting our democracy on red alert, which is really what we should be doing based on what happened in two thousand and sixteen. We know our intelligence community is indicated it's two thousand sixteen was just address rehearsal for what they expect to happen in two thousand twenty coming from from the Russians and Bob Muller and his report identified all the different ways that they can attack our democracy. So this is saying that you've got to make a report of that if somebody approaches you I want to ask, how do you draw distinction between information coming from a foreign government and a foreign entity I mean Republicans point to the so-called Steele, dossier were fusion, GPS, and Christopher Steele, who was a former British Intel officer were hired to do opposition research against Donald Trump. Where would that fall under Bill? Yeah. They are kind of pointing in that direction and trying to establish false equivalency here. I mean obviously, you wanna be on the alert for anything coming in from a foreign source, but here, we're talking about the president of the United States saying that he would willingly, accept opposition research, coming from the foreign government, and that could include a hostile power. He talked about Norway, but we're concerned about people like Russia like we saw in two thousand sixteen so we're going to push forward with this legislation in the coming weeks to make it absolutely clear that under American law. You have a duty to report that kind of contact and to protect your democracy. It's a matter of basic patriotism, congressman John Sarbanes of Maryland. Thank you. We appreciate your time this morning. Thank you. Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation from very wet. Winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change how the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at the historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires are the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right evacuations to get the support in how to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable forest. Setting themselves up for potentially worst fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I want to say it's a game changer. I want to say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative that how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on upfront mitigation. But the agency's budget is still mostly status quo. This year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two point five. Five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in a whole before you even start to talk about mitigation rich Fairbanks is a retired federal Firebaugh. So he now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental paintings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold with that budget is allocating experts who study disaster response also say more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behavior. In other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe. Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a fuels.

president Bill selene Congressman John Sarbanes Donald Trump NPR FBI Trump Norway Maryland California Vicki christianson United States Rachel Martin Newell king George Stephanopoulos Lindsey Graham Christopher Steele ABC Nancy Pelosi federal government
"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:16 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Newell king. And I'm Rachel Martin. Good morning. We're going to focus in now on the consequences of remarks that President Trump made this week in an ABC news interview anchor George Stephanopoulos, asked the president, if it would be okay in the future. If his if his campaign accepted, dirt on a political rival from a foreign entity let's listen to a bit of that exchange if somebody called from country Norway, we have information on your opponent. Oh, I think I'd wanna hear you want that kind of interference in our elections defeated. They have information I think take it if I thought there was something wrong. I'd go maybe to the FBI, if I thought there was something wrong, Republican, Senator and close Trump ally. Lindsey Graham, had this to say, though, foreign government comes to you, as a public official offers your camping giving you anything today with it be money or information on your opponent. The right answer is no speaker of the house. Nancy Pelosi says the house will take. Up legislation that would force candidates to report any such effort to federal law enforcement. Congressman John Sarbanes democrat from Maryland introduced that measure, and he is with us on the line. Good morning. Good morning, what exactly is your Bill designed to do? Well, it's pretty straightforward. It basically says that you have a duty to report if your contacted by a foreign government for national, and they wanna give you some opposition research, or other campaign related material. You have a duty immediately to report that to thority, and that's all designed to make sure that we're fortifying our democracy in our elections against interference. So it's, it's a very simple straightforward proposal. Obviously is going in the opposite direction where the president seems to be going. It's breathtaking that he would our ticket late the position he did the other day. So just to be clear now it is illegal to accept something of value from foreign power in a campaign direct financial support, for example, but you're. L is saying even if you were just offered it. You have to report it to the FBI, which you currently don't have to do. There is no obligation to do that now. That's correct. It would put an affirmative duty on somebody to report it, which is really a matter of kinda putting our democracy on red alert, which is really what we should be doing based on what happened in two thousand sixteen. We know our intelligence community is indicated two thousand sixteen was just address rehearsal for what they expect to happen in two thousand twenty coming from from the Russians and Bob Muller in his report identified all the different ways that they can attack our democracy. So this is saying that you've got to make a report of that. If somebody approaches you I want to ask, how do you draw distinction between information coming from a foreign government, and a foreign entity I mean Republicans point to the so-called Steele, dossier were fusion, GPS, and Christopher Steele, who is a former British Intel officer were hired to do opposition research against Donald Trump. Where would that fall under Bill? Yeah. They are kind of pointing in that direction and. Trying to establish false equivalency here. I mean obviously you wanna be on the alert for anything coming in from a foreign source. But here we're talking about the president United States saying that he would willingly, accept opposition research, coming from a foreign government, and that could include a hostile power. He talked about Norway, but we're concerned about people like Russia like we saw in two thousand sixteen so we're going to push forward with this legislation in the coming weeks to make it absolutely clear that under American law. You have a duty to report that kind of contact and to protect your democracy. It's a matter of basic patriotism, congressman John Sarbanes of Maryland. Thank you for your time this morning. Thank you. Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation from very wet. Winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change how the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at the historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires are the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right of accusations to get the support and help to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable for. Setting themselves up for potentially worse fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I wanna say it's a game changer. I wanna say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative on how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on upfront mitigation, the agency's budget is still mostly status quo. This year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two point five. Five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred and thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in a whole before you even start to talk about mitigation rich Fairbanks is a retired federal Firebaugh. So he now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental innings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold, what that budget is allocating, experts who study disaster response also say, more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behavior. In other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through a wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a fuels break, I'm just I'm still working on my pint. He's pleased to see folks out clearing pine needles gutters, brush around their houses, but it's not enough, if we've learned anything from the last two years, so we need to be more aggressive with fire prevention and the forest cleanup and Truckee is banning most campfires charcoal barbecues this summer and in a first for the area every real estate transaction has to pass a wildfire defensible space inspection towns like Truckee worried. They could easily be the next paradise, especially this past week as temperatures near the triple digits. Kirk siegler, NPR news. China is growing its population. It's Connie, we've heard this before, which might not know, is that within the next few years, China is predicted to become the largest theme park market on earth ride manufacturers in the US are set to play a big role in that growth. But the US China trade war means tariffs on everything from soybeans to the parts for amusement rides. And some American companies are. Feeling squeezed. KU ers were Becca Ellis reports pretend you're bullet hanging out in the barrel of a gun, the triggers pulled in your hurled into the air at turbo speed. Euro two eighty miles in two seconds. That's what being on a roller coaster made by s worldwide is like these organ jumbling rides have turned the northern Utah company into one of the largest amusement ride manufacturers in the country earlier in mate Preston perks and executive director at who's overseeing roller coasters bound for bar, New Jersey, Pittsburgh, Chicago and China in the center of the factory to massive white steel police part of a sixteen million dollar ride going up in eastern. China's newest military themed amusement park sons. You cultural park soon a truck will these police to Los Angeles. Across the Pacific in an ocean container and arrive at the Shing Tao port south southeast of Beijing. That's Macomer will have to pay a pair of, of a little over twenty five percent hurt says there's going to be some sticker shock. Never would.

president China United States congressman John Sarbanes NPR FBI Donald Trump Trump Norway California Maryland Bill selene Kirk siegler Vicki christianson Rachel Martin Newell king George Stephanopoulos Lindsey Graham Nancy Pelosi
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Whether it be money or information your phone at the right answer is no speaker of the house. Nancy Pelosi says the house will take up legislation that would force candidates to report any such effort to federal law enforcement. Congressman John Sarbanes democrat from Maryland introduced that measure, and he is with us on the line. Good morning. Good morning. What exactly is your Bill designed to do? What's pretty straightforward? It basically says that you have a duty to report. If your contacted by a foreign government for national, and they wanna give you some. Opposition research, or other campaign related material. You have a duty immediately to report that to us authorities, and that's all designs and make sure that we're fortifying our democracy and our elections against interference. So it's, it's a very simple straightforward proposal, obviously, going in the opposite direction where the president seems to be going. It's breathtaking that he would take the position. He did the other day. So just to be clear now it is illegal to accept something of value from foreign power in campaign, direct financial support, for example. But you're saying even if you are just offered it. You have to report it to the FBI. Would you currently don't have to? There is no obligation to correct. It would put an affirmative duty on somebody to report it, which is really a matter of kind of putting our democracy on red alert, which is really what we should be doing based on what happened in two thousand sixteen. We know our intelligence community is indicated it's too. Two thousand sixteen was just a dress rehearsal for what they expect to happen in two thousand twenty coming from from the Russians and Bob Muller and his report identified all the different ways that they can attack our democracy. So this is saying that you've gotta make a report of that. If somebody approaches you that I wanna ask, how do you draw distinction between information coming from a foreign government and a foreign entity I mean Republicans point to the so-called Steele, dossier were fusion, GPS, and Christopher Steele, who was a former British Intel officer were hired to do opposition research against Donald Trump. Where would that fall under Bill? They are kind of pointing in that direction and try to establish false equivalency here. I mean obviously you wanna be on the alert for anything coming in from the foreign source. But here we're talking about the president United States saying that he would willingly, accept opposition research, coming from the foreign government, and that could include a hostile power. He talked about Norway, but we're concerned about people like Russia, like we saw in two thousand. And sixteen. So we're going to push forward with this legislation in the coming weeks to make it absolutely clear that under American law. You have a duty to report that kind of contact and to protect your democracy. It's a matter of basic patriotism, congressman John Sarbanes of Maryland. Thank you. Protect your time this morning. Thank you. Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation from very wet. Winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right evacuations to get the support and help to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable for. Setting themselves up for potentially worse fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I wanna say to game changer. I wanna say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative and how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on up front mitigation. The agency's budget is still mostly status quo. This year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two point. Five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred and thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in a whole before you even start to talk about mitigation, rich Fairbanks retired federal fire boss. He now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental innings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold with that budget is allocating experts who studied disaster response also, say more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behavior. In other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe. Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a fuels break, are you? I'm still working on my pioneer. He's pleased to see folks out clearing.

congressman John Sarbanes Bill selene Maryland president Vicki christianson California United States Christopher Steele Nancy Pelosi federal government FBI Donald Trump Lake Tahoe rich Fairbanks
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KCRW

"Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation, from a very wet winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change how the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at the historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires are the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right of accusations to get the support and help to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable. Forests setting themselves up for potentially worse fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I wanna say it's a game changer. I wanna say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative and how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on up front mitigation. The agency's budget is still mostly status quo, this year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two. Two point five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred and thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in whole before you even start to talk about mitigation rich Fairbanks, a retired federal Firebaugh. So he now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental findings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold, what that budget is allocating, experts who study disaster response also say, more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behave. Savior. In other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe. Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through a wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a fuels break, I'm just I'm still working on my pie. He's pleased to see folks out clearing pine needles from gutters. Brush around their houses, but it's not enough, if we've learned anything from the last two years, and so we need to be more aggressive.

Vicki christianson California US Bill selene rich Fairbanks NPR Kirk siegler Truckee Lake Tahoe Trump federal government Oregon National Mall Alice hill President Obama advisor two years five billion dollars
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the. Nineteenth century widely investors rewrote the rule. So they could buy up farm, south of San Francisco, and it was all about water. A lot of times, they would enlist the aid of the courts and might have the lands condemned a ten cents on a dollar. I'm Brian watt. My colleague, Rachel, myrow tells us this not so crystal clean story today on morning edition. Hear that story at six twenty two and eight twenty two on morning edition on K. Q E D. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm no Wilkin. Good morning. The White House is losing another high profile staffer this time, it's press secretary, Sarah Sanders. She talked for a short time at an event with President Trump yesterday. It's one of the greatest jobs, I could ever have. I've loved every minute even the hard minutes. NPR White House. Correspondent Tom Keith is on the line. Good morning, Tom. Good morning. So Sarah Sanders is one of the original members of President Trump's team, and this is the White House. That's really struggled with high staff turnover. How did she manage to last so long, but fee came from the campaign, in fact, and she was both super loyal, and came to accept that President Trump was the real press secretary of this administration, she publicly avoided contradicting him, even if that meant contradicting the truth? And there's one glaring example of that. From shortly after then FBI director James Comey was fired. Well, I can speak my own personal experience. I've heard from countless numbers of the FBI that are grateful and thankful for the president's decision. And even in that moment, reporters pushed back, that she insisted really real. On between like Email. Text message is absolutely, yes. Sixty seven anyway, look, we're not gonna get into a numbers game. I, I mean, I've heard from a large number of individuals that work at the FBI that said that they're very happy with the president's decision. So what we know now from the Muller report is that simply wasn't true. She made up the countless numbers. She says it was a slip of the tongue and another comment was just in the heat of the moment as a result of all that, she lost a lot of credibility with the press. How would you describe how she did the job of press secretary? We'll see completely changed the job of press secretary the press secretary to come out into the White House press briefing room on a nearly daily basis and speak for the president of the United States, and by extension for the US government to the world, essentially, not just to the White House press corps. Now that's President Trump. Whether by tweet or by standing on the south lawn with a helicopter behind him. Sarah Sanders has killed. The daily White House press briefing. It went from being daily to being monthly and it's been ninety five days since there was a press briefing, ninety five days. Wow. Yes. So she's taken into the driveway, I, she goes, she does FOX hits. She walks away from those cameras, and she is greeted by a throng of members of the White House press corps, hungry for information that they just aren't getting Tim is worth running through a list here. You've got an acting chief of staff a vacant communications director position. You've got no press secretary, and the top economic adviser is leaving so who is running White House, fewer and fewer people. And there are fewer people that are close to the president or are sort of originals that he trusts names that you have left are as Stephen Miller, and Kellyanne Conway and Dansk. You know, the social media director who helps the president with his tweets and his family, Jared Kushner, the son-in-law and his daughter, Ivanka Trump NS for Sarah Sanders. Any idea who might replace her? No, no idea. I asked yesterday and did not get an answer on that. But one thing that we can be certain of the daily press briefing as it was known through multiple administrations is over at least for now. NPR's White House correspondent Tim, or tempting so much. You're welcome. Wildfires are starting to light up, California and other parts of the west again vegetation from very wet. Winter is drying out. And so the chief of the US forest service is warning of another catastrophic fire season. And she's pushing to change how the country gets ready for and fights wildfires. NPR's Kirk siegler has the story at the historic forest service headquarters off the National Mall, chief Vicki christianson is deploying resources for another long summer of firefighting, while also trying to keep an eye on a future of deadly mega-fires, and she says, fires are the only disaster, we actively go out and try to stop as they're happening. We don't do this with floods or hurricanes, and fires shouldn't be much different. We asked the public safety of officials to prepare the communities to order, the right of accusations to get the support and help to work on mitigation to work on resiliency in the west cities continue to expand into flammable. Forests setting themselves up for potentially worse fires. These woods are stressed from climate change and overgrown from a century of suppressing wildfires in the last two years. California has seen its most destructive fires on record, including the deadly campfire that decimated. Most of the foothills town of paradise I wanna say it's a game changer. I wanna say it's the call to action to implement what we know we need to do about doing business differently. So after the campfire, the Trump administration order, the forest service to prioritize restoration projects, including thinning and brush, clearing and forests controlled burns and logging. It's how we work before the fire starts that is most imperative and how we change our paradigm, christianson is not the first forest chief to try to change this paradigm, and spend more money on upfront mitigation. But the agency's budget is still mostly status quo, this year, they're forecasting to spend upwards of two. Point five billion dollars to fight fires compared to only four hundred and thirty million on that pre-disaster work like tree, thinning or controlled burns. This is a hard thing to try and turn around getting hotter. There's more fires. And you sort of in a whole before you even start to talk about mitigation rich Fairbanks is a retired federal Firebaugh. See now runs a forestry company in southern Oregon. It's great that they're talking about scaling up, what until now have been sort of experimental burns and experimental findings and so forth. But he says the need is tenfold, what that budget is allocating experts who studied disaster response also, say more of that work, and the costs of firefighting should be borne by local communities in these high risk forests Alice hill was a climate advisor to President Obama, there needs to be focused on where and how we build and the federal government has levers available to it to encourage better behave. You're in other words, if local governments had to shoulder more of the firefighting costs. They might start restricting new development or enforcing tougher building codes in the west summer preparing for this possible. New reality near Lake Tahoe. Truckee fire chief Bill selene is walking through a wooded neighborhood. Whereas department is thinning forests to create a.

press secretary president President Trump White House Sarah Sanders White House press corps NPR FBI NPR White House Tom Keith United States Rachel Martin director California Vicki christianson Brian watt San Francisco White House correspondent Tim
U.S. Forest Service aims to speed up logging, infrastructure projects

Fresh Air

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. Forest Service aims to speed up logging, infrastructure projects

"The US forest service is proposing a sweeping overhaul of a landmark environmental law in order to fast-track forest management projects, including logging and wildfire mitigation on public lands embarrass Kirk siegler as more on the proposed changes to the national environmental Policy Act. These rule changes would give forest managers more discretion to bypass full blown environmental reviews on certain forest management projects, if they demonstrate there won't be severe impacts to the land US forest service chief. Vicki christianson says it's taking some critical projects years to be approved due to lengthy and applicable reviews, where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental assessment and stewardship on the land. Not short, cutting and fact enhancing where we can public involvement, the rule changes are subject to a sixty day

United States Kirk Siegler Vicki Christianson Service Chief Sixty Day
"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Week, southern Baptist convention leaders are gathered for their annual meeting a meeting that this year is dominated by one issue, how to address sexual abuse churches earlier this year reports emerged that nearly four hundred male southern Baptist church leaders have been accused of sexual abuse over the last two decades, yesterday, SBC pastors voted to change. It's constitution making it easier to kick out churches that do not take us claim seriously. And ESPN has launched new guidelines for leaders wrestling with the issue among those who have helped shape those guidelines is Rachel Denhellender. She's a lawyer and author and a survivor of sexual abuse. You may remember her name from the Larry Nassar case, he's the former head doctor of the US women's Olympic gymnastics team. He was sentenced last year to. Two hundred seventy five years in prison for sexual misconduct and Rachel Denhellender was the first to come forward and file a criminal complaint against him. She joins me now Rachel. Good to speak with you again. It's great to be here. Let me start with your reaction to this big vote in Birmingham this week to change the constitution of the southern Baptist convention. What do you think? I'm encouraged by the step. It makes it easier to deal with judges that have abled or covered up sexual abuse that being said it is a framework, only a framework, only what do you mean? Well, it creates a new committee by which these claims can be vetted. What we don't know yet is, who is going to be on that committee. What questions the committee will be asking as they consider, whether or not churches are in violation of ESP standards on sexual abuse. And so it really remains to be seen. What is built on that framework touch me about the culture? I'm thinking of some reporting that our religion correspondent Tom gelatin has been doing this week. He's been interviewing southern Baptist women, and they describe a culture that is resistant to change has that been your experiences. You've interacted with church leaders know the truth is, I think there's a quite significant divide. Many of the leaders that I've interacted with our very committed to change. They recognize understand the damage of. Sexual abuse. They are broken over, what is taking place that being said, there are certainly a faction within the SPCA that remains resistant to change, and that Mr. importantly, does not really understand some of the electrical misinterpretations that so often lead church leaders, mishandle, abuse misunderstanding concepts of forgiveness and grace and dealing with abuse in the church instead of relying on outside experts to handle birth the investigation in the counseling dynamics what made you take the sun. You know there are there are a lot of reasons the issue of abuses, obviously, something that is very personal to me. I have I have lived the damage I have seen the damage. In addition to that, I do come from a Christian perspective, faith perspective. And so, in many ways, this is part of my community, and you are most able to make change in the communities that you hold closest to you. You reminded me of something you told me last year I interviewed you from the court as Larry Nassar was being sentenced, and you started talking about your kids. And you told me you want your son to grow into a man who is a protector and defender, and you want your daughters to grow into warriors. Yeah. And I remember being struck by how this fight with something it felt like you needed to do for you, but also for the next generation to fill those steaks, as you work with, with the southern Baptist convention on this, I think, by large, that's the motivation for all the survivor community to protect the next generation to do what we can to ensure that this does not happen to another child, and that if it does the help and support is there for them in ways that it wasn't for us. It was you coming forward that helped open the floodgates in that case with Larry Nassar, do you believe there are other abuse cases in the southern Baptist church that have yet to come to light? Absolutely survivors live in silence for so long in one of the reasons that they do the main reason they do is because they watch how society talks about abuse, and they watch our culture, treats abuse victims. And that's one of the primary things we need to change. We have to let them know that they're safe when they come forward before they're going to be able to speak up, our cultural and societal response to those providers who have spoken up is really going to set the tone for whether or not others, feel free to come forward. And may I ask is someone who's prominently working on this within the church while obviously, wanting to respect the anonymity of people coming forward to women come to you and tell you their stories. They do all the time. And oftentimes I am the first disclosure. And I consider that an absolute privilege to be trusted with their stories. It's not something ever take for granted. Attorney and advocate. Rachel Denhellender talking there about the southern Baptist convention and her work to put in place. New guidelines for how the church handles sexual abuse, rituals, and Honda. Thank you. Thank you. Federal land managers are proposing rule changes to a landmark environmental law. They wanna fast track forest management projects like thinning and prescribed burning that they say are critical to reducing wildfire risks. Environmentalists are calling it a back door move to increase logging, which they say will do little to reduce the risk and bureau's Kirk siegler reports after last fall's deadly campfire. The Trump administration has been trying to speed up forced management projects in the name of preventing these big mega-fires now the forest service is proposing revisions to its national environmental Policy, Act, or Nita regulations for the first time in more than a decade, the change could limit reviews and public input on everything from forest thinning projects infrastructure upgrades to commercial logging. In an interview forest service chief Vicki christianson, said, most of these projects have broad support, and there needlessly stalling out. We do more in Alice's than we'd take more. Time than we made and we slow down important work to protect communities and the resources the proposed rule changes would expand so called categorical. Exclusions, it's a one key sounding term for something that's hugely controversial. That's because these exclusions allow land managers to bypass full blown environmental studies. If they've already shown, there wouldn't be a severe impact to forests John Gale's with the conservation group back country hunters and anglers. He says if applied carefully and narrowly to certain projects the exclusions could help lower the wildfire risk, but he's skeptical because the administration recently rolled back protections for clean water and wildlife habitat. We also don't want to see this become a Trojan horse for unchecked resource extraction. The forest service insists this is not about ramping up commercial logging in public forests, chief Christians pointed out that it took five hundred thirty days just to approve a project. And over grown forests near Lake Tahoe, if the rules are changed she predicts planning time for work like that could be cut in half. Where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental assessment and stewardship on the land. Not short cutting in fact, enhancing where we can public involvement federal agencies complain of analysis paralysis, in politicians, have long blasted what they call frivolous lawsuits that stall forest work, but another culprit, slowing down the workout on the land is budget..

southern Baptist convention Rachel Denhellender Larry Nassar southern Baptist church US ESPN Birmingham Lake Tahoe Tom gelatin John Gale Honda Kirk siegler service chief Attorney Alice Vicki christianson Two hundred seventy five years five hundred thirty days
"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're not allowed to talk. About whether or not somebody's a citizen or not that doesn't sound so good to me. Can you imagine you send out a census and you're not allowed to say whether or not a person American citizen in Poland? They say they're either polish of nuts. Right. Trump addressing reporters as he was hosting the president of Poland, at the White House. Well, House Democrats are investigating Trump after the special counsel's office. Neither accused nor cleared the president of allegations that he tried to obstruct the investigation into Russia's twenty sixteen election. The US force service is proposing sweeping overhaul of landmark environmental law in order to fast-track force management projects, including logging and wildfire mitigation on public lands. NPR's Kirk siegler has more on the proposed changes to the national environmental Policy Act. These rule changes would give forest managers more discretion to bypass full blown environmental reviews on certain forest management projects, if they demonstrate there won't be severe impacts to the land US force service chief Vicki christianson says it's. Making some critical projects years to be approved to lengthy, and duplicate of reviews, where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental assessment and stewardship on the land. Not short cutting in fact enhancing where we can public involvement. The rule changes are subject to a sixty day comment period. Kirk siegler, NPR news. Officials from Uganda in the World, Health Organization are on high alert after a five year old boy died of a bowl and two of his family members are being treated for the disease. More from NPR's Jason Bobi, and Uganda has been preparing for months for the possibility that the massive outbreak in the DRC might spill across its western border. And it finally has the five year old boy who died cross from the Congo into Uganda earlier this week with his family, one of his siblings and his grandmother, had also tested positive for the deadly virus. They're being cared for in a bullet treatment unit in Uganda, according to the Ghanaian health ministry. That's NPR's. Jason bogeying. This is NPR and you're listening to WNYC in New York. I'm Jamie Floyd. Lawmakers in Albany have reached a sweeping deal that would tip rent regulations heavily.

NPR Uganda Trump Kirk siegler Poland US president Jason bogeying Jamie Floyd Jason Bobi Vicki christianson White House Ghanaian health ministry Russia special counsel DRC Congo Albany
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They say very the polisher. They're not right. Trump addressing reporters as he was hosting the president of Poland, at the White House will House Democrats are investigating Trump after the special counsel's office. Neither accused nor cleared the president of allegations, that he tried to obstruct the investigation into Russia's two thousand sixteen election. The US for service is proposing a sweeping overhaul of landmark environmental law in order to fast-track force management projects, including logging and wildfire mitigation on public lands. NPR's Kirk siegler has more on the proposed changes to the national environmental Policy Act. These rule changes would give forest managers more discretion to bypass full blown environmental reviews on certain forest management projects, if they demonstrate there won't be severe impacts to the land, US forest service chief Vicki christianson says it's taking some critical projects years to be approved due to lengthy and applicable reviews, where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental. Excellent and stewardship on the land. Not short cutting in fact enhancing where we can public involvement. The rule changes are subject to a sixty day comment period. Kirk siegler, NPR news. Officials from Uganda, and the World Health Organization are on high alert after a five year old boy died of a bowl and two of his family members are being treated for the disease. More from NPR's Jason Bobi, Uganda has been preparing for months for the possibility that the massive Abol outbreak in the DRC might spill across its western border. And it finally has the five year old boy who died cross from the Congo into Uganda earlier this week with his family, one of his siblings and his grandmother have also tested positive for the deadly virus. They're being cared for in a bullet treatment unit in Uganda. According to the health ministry, that's NPR's. Jason bobbie-ann. This is NPR from K, Q, E, D news. I'm Brian watt. The East Bay municipal utility districts board of directors has approved a plan to increase rates for their one point four million customers throughout the bay area. The plan will increase rates by a little more than six percent, this, July and six and a half percent, next to lie by this time next year. Average water users would see their bills. Go up by about six dollars according to spokeswoman Andrea pope. The additional money collected would go to infrastructure improvements, including pipeline, replacement as our system is aging. We realized that we need to increase our rate of renewal in order to prevent those types from breaking we really want to catch them before they break. Poke says the hike is part of the agency's. Typical reassessment that happens every two years. Shell oil plans to sell its Martinez refinery for a billion dollars to PBF energy, an independent refining company, based in New Jersey PBF announced yesterday that it expects to complete a purchase of the one hundred sixty thousand barrel, a day facility by the end of the year. The company CEO Tom nimbly said in a conference call with analysts that the more than seven hundred workers at the Martinez site should be able to keep their jobs. Martinez also as a well trained and professional workforce. And is a highly respected member of the community. We look forward to welcoming Martinez employees to the PBS family, the Federal Trade Commission and.

NPR Uganda Trump Kirk siegler Martinez US president Russia White House PBF Brian watt Jason bobbie-ann Vicki christianson Jason Bobi special counsel Federal Trade Commission East Bay
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KCRW

"Talk about whether. Or not somebody's a citizen or not. That doesn't sound so good to can you imagine you send out a census and you're not allowed to say, whether or not a person in American citizen in Poland. They say they're either polish of their nuts. Right. Trump addressing reporters as he was hosting the president of Poland, at the White House will House Democrats are investigating Trump after the special counsel's office. Neither accused nor cleared the president of allegations that he tried to obstruct the investigation into Russia's twenty sixteen election. The US force service is proposing a sweeping overhaul of landmark environmental law in order to fast-track force management projects, including logging, wildfire mitigation on public lands. NPR's Kirk siegler has more on the proposed changes to the national environmental Policy Act. These rule changes would give forest managers more discretion to bypass full blown environmental reviews on certain force management projects. If they demonstrate there won't be severe impacts to the land US force service chief Vicki christianson says it's taking some. Critical projects years to be approved at a lengthy and applicable reviews, where proposing more efficiency, not short, cutting any of our responsibilities for good environmental assessment and stewardship on the land. Not short, cutting and fact enhancing where we can public involvement, the rule changes are subject to a sixty day comment period. Kirk siegler, NPR news. Officials from Uganda in the World, Health Organization are on high alert after a five year old boy died of a bowl and to his family members are being treated for the disease. More from NPR's Jason Bobi, and Uganda has been preparing for months for the possibility that the massive outbreak in the DRC might spill across its western border. And it finally has the five year old boy who died cross from the Congo into Uganda earlier this week with his family, one of his siblings and his grandmother, also tested positive for the deadly virus. They're being cared for in a bullet treatment unit in Uganda, according to Uganda, and health ministry. That's NPR's. Jason bobbie-ann. This is NPR..

NPR Uganda Kirk siegler Trump Poland US president Jason bobbie-ann Jason Bobi Vicki christianson White House Russia DRC Congo special counsel service chief five year sixty day
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

"From our state wants to make sure this tech is employ deployed as soon as possible. Now, he's better than later democratic Senator Maria Cantwell who's just giving the bad news about the upcoming fire season. We are projected to be above normal Senate hearing Cantwell grills US forest service chief Vicki christianson on technical advances, including hyper spectral cameras and thermal sensors that promised to revolutionize the way wildfires are detected and suppress the technology that. We were able to pass in the wildland firefighting Bill to do thermal awareness on fire starts, I just want to understand from you what we can do to use that now. So that we can have quicker response if we are going to see this risk in western Washington Richardson, tells the Senator only that she would be pleased to discuss it further can't well and Republican Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado have spearheaded congressional efforts to secure money. For modern firefighting tech Corwin Hake. Komo news. Congress is looking into the skyrocketing costs of insulin and other drugs. The university of Washington says a month supply costs about four hundred and fifty dollars in the US while the same amount is about thirty five bucks in Canada. This is Dr Earl Hersh, and when I see these people surviving are barely surviving because they can't get insulin. It really hurts me at the gut level the house oversight and investigations subcommittee holding a hearing on the issue tomorrow figures, I just got my flu shot a week ago. And now the worst of the flu season. We hear may have ended. Come owes. Eric Heintz reports according to the State Department of health two hundred ninety six influenza related deaths were reported across Washington last year compared to two hundred seventy eight and twenty seventeen as March thirtieth of this year. There have been one hundred sixty and this year's total is still the third highest over the last nine years. Fortunately, last week, local clinics, emergency rooms and hospitals. Saw a marked drop and flu activity. Flu cases at the Everett clinic P three weeks ago when they were around eight hundred positive test in the week leading into March seventeenth the Everett herald reports last week that number dipped to around two hundred Eric Heintz, KOMO news. Perhaps not a surprise. But bowling revealed today, how the grounding of the seven thirty seven max cut into its delivery schedule. More from komo's Gregg Hersholt in the first quarter of two thousand eighteen Boeing delivered one hundred thirty two of its most popular models this year that number tumbled to eighty nine. News version of the seven thirty seven remains grounded around the world following two deadly crashes. Boeing did not. Disclose today. How many of the seven thirty sevens were the max version it continues producing an earlier model, but the max is expected to account for a very high percentage of seven thirty seven deliveries this year separately today. American Airlines cut a key revenue estimate after Kathleen twelve hundred flights in the first quarter due to the grounding of its twenty four max jets and Boeing his acknowledged than at each of those two crashes, a faulty sensor triggered anti-stalking system. When it wasn't needed pushing the plane's nose down. Gregg Hersholt, KOMO news. If you fly a lot, maybe you've thought about getting global entry to get through airport. Security faster comes into factor has a warning from the Better Business Bureau. If you hop online and search for the government website to get global entries gamers are able to post advertisements search to make it look like it's the real government service website, David Quinlan with the BBB says when you click on the link to the fake site. They're told that this service. This third party vendor will do all the heavy lifting. All you need to do submit your personal information, and.

flu Komo Senator Maria Cantwell Boeing Eric Heintz Gregg Hersholt Dr Earl Hersh Senator Cory Gardner Better Business Bureau komo Senate Corwin Hake Vicki christianson Everett herald Senator Congress US forest service chief Washington Richardson US
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

"Twenty four seven news center. A thirty nine year old man is in custody in Pierce county as a person of interest after an ATM exploded this morning and Tacoma, KOMO sue Romero tells us the incident may be linked to other ATM explosions in the south Puget Sound area and explosion at a Wells Fargo ATM on Pacific avenue in Tacoma, kicked off a series of events involving a suspicious vehicle. Multiple police agencies in a high speed chase with Lacey and Tom water police. Sighting of the vehicle. Reported that it wasn't on. I five in the tomato. Harry the lights out doing about one hundred miles an hour. Lieutenant Tim read law with the Thurston county sheriff's office says it ended when the driver got out of the car ran through a swamp and was finally caught by police dog men had to be treated for a dog bite. Police are looking into whether several ATM explosions in Pearson. Thurston county's are related including one that happened in Lacey last week, C Romero, KOMO news. Wildfires creeping into western Washington are US Senator Maria Cantwell's main concern as you questions the Trump administration's forced service budget. More from komo's Corwin Hake. Already wildfire season is projected to be worse than normal in Washington. Now can't is grilling US forest service chief Vicki christianson on money earmarked for fire prevention, including the removal of forest floor combustibles that intensify wildfires. Cantwell says in the recent past money for fuel reduction has been eaten up by actual firefighting efforts. Can you basically assure? Me that you're going to spend fuel reduction money than Congress's given you or are we just going to keep setting into side as we previously have. And just wait to spend it on the fires themselves. Christians is quick to respond Senator we are not going to wait, and I can assure you we are going to invest those funds in the most critical places with the highest risk. The Trump administration's budget directs two point six billion dollars to wildfire suppression. Corwin hake. Komo news. Seattle's on a national list that we don't want to be on the top cities with the most d- is had them Johnson with insurance comparison website quote wizard looked at the top twenty five drunk driving cities in America. But we found top twenty five cities in the country. Seattle came in at number seventeen for the highest rate of DUI's. He says cities that have higher incidence of DUI's could affect your insurance rates, even if you've never had a DUI because insurance companies evaluate not only your risk, but the risk of drivers.

Senator Maria Cantwell komo KOMO Corwin Hake Thurston county Trump administration Lacey Tacoma Washington Seattle Pierce county sue Romero south Puget Sound Wells Fargo Lieutenant Tim Senator C Romero Vicki christianson
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"On the insurance industry, particularly the US insurance industry to actually step up and lead in this way that we know the ear inn European insurance companies some of them have taken some steps already to stop underwriting coal projects. Some of them have committed to stop investing. The projects and the insurance industry is is not done any of that AXA Generali and 'alliance three of the largest insurance companies in Europe have divested from ensuring and financing fossil fuel the California insurance Commissioner Dave Jones wants insurance companies in the state to voluntarily divest from coal investments. KPFA's attempt to reach the national. Insurance. Commissioners association for comments were unsuccessful activists say they'll continue their campaign till American insurers take action to divest from fossil fuels. There was a packed house at an Ohio Senate committee hearing this week on a Bill that could silence of former free speech when it comes to protests of fossil fuels Mary. Sherman reports Bill to fifty would tighten estates laws regarding trespassing and property damage involving oil and gas pipelines and other industrial infrastructure, the legislation similar to many bills and other states in response to the two thousand sixteen protests over the Dakota Access pipeline guy. Jones the native American from Dayton who testified in opposition. He contends SP two fifty and tends to impede on the rights of citizens the right together in two zero Pinon and opposition to the things that are happening in our backyards in our communities regards to the threat against mother nature against the land the water the air. Supporters say the measure which strengthen protections for critical infrastructure and discouraged demonstrations, but upon its counter that the bill's language is vague and could result in the criminalization, a peaceful protests through felonies and excessive fines Jerry Daniels with the ACLU of Ohio also testified and explains SP two fifty specifically mentions actions that impede hit it that is is operations or its construction terms which could be broadly interpreted, and he believes the Senate Judiciary committee was surprised by the testimony. I don't think they realized that the Bill was so expensive that it had such potential impact on free speech. It's fair to say, and I suspect there's a general agreement that this Bill goes too, far typical first degree misdemeanor charge of criminal. Mischief would become a first degree felony supporters. Argue would project citizens by safeguarding utilities and industries communities? Rely on the Jones contends, it's all about corporate interests, the rights of corporate America, far exceed the rights. Citizens. You know, that's the way I seen it, and you have corporate America who wants to basically put together put in place, a means for them to continue to make money to committee heard written and in-person testimony from twenty one opponents on Wednesday. I'm Mary Sherman reporting for public news service. This story was produced in association with media and the public interest in funded in part by the George foundation lawmakers in the house oversight committee heard testimony from victims of sexual harassment and assault in the US forest service today, like Shannon Reed and air quality specialists who says she was harassed and assaulted then fired after she reported the abuse at the national forest service in Alabama. I was tripped push down and kicked. Co worker threatened to me over and spank me another told me in order to go to a fire assignment. I had to suck his. Another co worker told me that I would have to wear knee pads at a conference because I would be sucking so much. Another coworker told me that only the only reason I was allowed to go to meetings was because I thought my supervisors. I was called little girl of which whore slut and on multiple occasions prior to working for the forest service. Read says she worked for the National Park Service where she was also experienced bullying, harassment and assault. She says one of the men who assaulted her at the forest service later received a promotion. The agency's new chief Vicki christianson tells lawmakers she will do everything in her power to stop harassment at the forest service. And then she lists reforms her administration has implemented whenever we receive allegations of sexual assault or harassment. We initiate appropriate criminal investigations. It is our priority to address these allegations, particularly if physical assault is alleged another initiative that we undertook in the last two years was we wanted to learn more from the forest service workforce themselves as to what the perceptions were about conditions in their workplace christianson says they've also launched a call center to handle harassment and abuse allegations formed a new employee advisory group hired case managers and is requiring all twenty-five thousand permanent for service employees to attend listen and learn sessions to discuss workplace. Conduct. But Reed says Christian since reforms don't go nearly far enough recalling an instance where she was forced to attend a listening session with her harassers at the same time in a Senate confirmation hearing today president Donald Trump's nominee to lead the park service, which is also under fire for it's handling of sexual harassment and assault claims face bipartisan scorn, lawmakers demanded David villa confront what park employees describe as rampant sexual abuse at national parks. Alaska, Republican and chairwoman of the Senate energy and natural resources committee voiced concern over what Lisa Murkowski calls a long term pattern of sexual harassment and hostile work environment. At the park service, quote, this is really a dark cloud over our national parks, unquote. You're listening to the evening news, KPFA, Berkeley, KPFK, Los Angeles, KFC, Fresno, online, KPFA dot.

harassment assault Dave Jones KPFA Mary Sherman US Ohio Senate Shannon Reed National Park Service Senate Judiciary committee Senate AXA Generali California Vicki christianson America Bill Pinon Commissioner
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Stimulate the economy. All these things are extremely important right now to a population that is not on the brink of catastrophe. It is a. Castrophe? You talk about the need to end this war. That's a political question. Of course, that leads to talks UN sponsored talks on one side Saudi led coalition, the other Hootie rebels in part, perhaps sponsored at least the US says by Iran is there the political will on all the sides to actually bring this war to a close. Well, you know, if there's not political will in this war. I can't imagine a great catastrophe in my lifetime. Children are dying literally every single day from starvation. People are dying people have lost their jobs. There's no jobs. There's no money in the economy. I don't know where they're going to go. If we don't end this war, it must in people must understand these aren't just numbers, these a little girls and little boys. He's our children with name flight Muhammad and war in amid there'd be like our little children. We've got to fight for them. And they need. They need are standing up for them right now for the Americans listening to this hearing what you're saying that they need help. What can normal Americans? Do if anything I think the average American first and foremost, pray for the children and families in Yemen. Number two. Call your political leaders and say, let's bring this war to an in. I think that's critical. But at the same time until that war does in please make certain that we like the World Food Program have the support financial that we need to scale up and ramp up. Let let me give an example, we are spending right now feeding over eight million people about one hundred million dollars per month. We are going to have to ramp up to one hundred and fifty million dollars per month. If in fact, when we see the new numbers in that shows that the numbers have gone from eight million to twelve to fourteen million people on the brink of starvation. So if the American people would speak out and say support, the people that are starving to death in Yemen because of this War, I think hopefully that'll wake up the political leadership to do. What's good do us? Right. First and foremost support the humanitarian needs and then number two, and that I think that's the most important thing. Bring this war to an in David Beasley of the World Food Program. Just back from Yemen. Thank you very much. Earlier this year, we air to story about sexual harassment and assault within the US forest service. After speaking with dozens of women, the news hours reporting team revealed a culture of abuse and retaliation within the service women who spoke up about their mistreatment where then punished for doing. So the forest service has vowed to change and William name is here with an update William you were part of the original reporting on all this. So today congress held an oversight hearing the new head of the forest service. Was there to talk about how maybe some changes are happening? What did you hear? That's right. This was Vicki christianson knew her first hearing as the new chief. Remember, she took over this job because the prior chief amend named Tony took step down just days after we reported that he too was also under investigation for sexual impropriety in the workplace. He steps down. Vicki christianson takes over. Amidst all of these. Allegations of a terrible sort of culture of abuse within the forest service. She vowed today to the house members that were present to make some changes. Here's what she said. We must do more like you we want. I want lasting results progress will take longer than any of us wants. But I'm determined to lead permanent change in the forest service. We will not rest until this agency provides the safe respectful workplace, our employees deserve. So she acknowledges that there are problems. Schick knowledge is that this is a culture wide change that needs to occur. They said they've instituted some substantive changes that they have changed. How harassment claims get reported how those claims get investigated. They now use private investigators rather than people within the forest service themselves. They've instituted forest service wide anti harassment training, lots of individual changes there. Making. But as we've seen already still a work in progress, and what is your sense from your reporting of how all this is being received by the rank and file who work at the forest service on some level. People are very very happy. We've heard from a lot of people we set up a tip line. If you remember after our first series just tip line at NewsHour dot org, and many people wrote in saying we are so glad that this is finally being talked about. But at the same time. There are a lot of people who believe that these changes don't go far enough that they're simply covering over band-aid is a term. We heard mentioned sixty different women signed an open letter these were former and current forest service employees sent this letter to the chief saying that this culture still exists. The problems have not been addressed in one witness today, really echoed this point her name is Shannon Reed. She was a forest service employees from New Mexico, and she was fired recently, and she alleged a whole pattern of mistreatment towards her. Here's a little bit of what she had to say. And I should just worn out. Viewers at this some very graphic language here. But this is what she said in an open house hearing today. Learn coke worker threatened to bend me over and spank me another told me in order to go to a fire assignment. I had to suck his. Another co worker told me that I would have to wear knee pads at a conference because I would be sucking so much. Obviously, Shannon Reed story is just awful. The reforms that took place have started to happen while she was still there. She said one of those required her to tell the story of her abuse in a room where her alleged abuser was actually present. She was also someone who said she was sexually harassed by. Tony took the former chief while he was still in office. She was fired. She says when she complained about that so needless to say her testimony, especially in comparison to the reforms that Vicki christianson said were underway really set some members of congress off how in the hell could you have the perpetrator in the room with the victim? How does that happen? What steps could be taken to make sure that doesn't I just think you're you're going to slow you really feel the people in the agency don't realize behaviors wildly wrong. In addition to the hostile work environment that has been occurring there for decades, the culture of lion and misrepresenting not only to members of congress. But to your employees and co workers and other departments is also incredibly troubling and ongoing. So clearly, there's still a great deal of anger out there and a great deal of questions as to whether the forest service, and how quickly they can actually change what they admit is this very troubling culture such a gap between what we heard in that testimony. And what's ahead? The new head of the forest service. Right saying, well, a lot of questions, and I know you aren't gonna continue to report on this. Thank you William. You're welcome. In dozens.

Vicki christianson Yemen harassment congress William US Shannon Reed Tony UN David Beasley hostile work environment New Mexico Schick Iran assault one hundred million dollars fifty million dollars
The stock market’s nightmare may be far from over

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 2 years ago

The stock market’s nightmare may be far from over

"Has tapped interim chief, Vicki christianson to lead the agency. Vicki christianson is overseen state forests in Washington in Arizona and has spent the past seven years in Washington DC with the federal forest service. She's also been a wildland firefighter and has worked extensively in fire management. That's one of the biggest and most important roles of the modern day forest service. This is a highly scrutinized position. She'll oversee one hundred fifty, four national forests and twenty national grasslands. Christians and also takes over the agency at a time of turmoil. Her predecessor resigned earlier this year. Amid sexual harassment investigation. The agency is still grappling with numerous complaints and lawsuits, many in California over alleged sexual misconduct by supervisor's, Kirk siegler, NPR news. The US energy administration says it will cost more to heat homes this winter. That's because fuel prices are going up, not because it's colder homes that use heating oil will pay on average twenty percent more about seventy dollars about half of US household use natural gas, and those prices are expected to increase about five percent more this winter or about thirty dollars. It's NPR.

Vicki Christianson United States NPR Washington Kirk Siegler Arizona Harassment California Supervisor Seventy Dollars Thirty Dollars Twenty Percent Five Percent Seven Years
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Moments then later tonight, at eight o'clock. We'll be presenting America abroad massive document leaks. Have led to the fall of world leaders and two new anti-corruption laws but some lakes put, lives in danger so is there a limited the public's right to know and when is. Leaking documents revealing secrets worth the potential security risks all of that will be, explored on America abroad we invite you to, join us for that program, tonight. From eight. Till. Nine o'clock with another airing tomorrow morning, at. Two, here on public radio whether wise cloudy day, at, the coast once again with mostly sunny skies inland. We'll have highs ranging from the mid sixties to the upper seventies. With west to southwesterly winds, from ten to. Twenty miles per hour the time is five fifty one This is the California report good, morning I'm Danielle Vinton we begin today with the news that the state is set to end its cash bail system governor Jerry Brown. Signed a sweeping reform Bill yesterday Cake politics reporter MAURICE logos has more Brown said he was signing Senate Bill ten. So that rich and poor alike are treated fairly under the Bill Californians arrested and charged with a crime won't be given the option of putting up money or borrowing it from a bail bond agent instead county course will use risk. Assessment tools to determine if a defendant poses a low, medium or high risk of putting the, public endanger if they're released and judges will get. To decide who can return, home while they await trial some groups including the ACLU oppose the final Bill arguing it. Gives too much power to judges but Lenore Anderson who's, advocacy group Californians for safety. Injustice supports the change says it's a huge set forward should be sure there's. A lot of. Work ahead of us we've got to begin building a fair. Effective pretrial, system and we're. Far from it the new system will start in October of next year for the California report I'm Marie salacious so every year a bunch of Government agencies get together and work to remove illegal marijuana grows on public lands it's called operation forest watch and yesterday in Sacramento County California. Attorney general heavier bizarre another's gathered to announce the results as Michelle Wiley tells us the operation which is a coordinated effort involving federal state county and local law enforcement agencies reclaimed one hundred and sixty sites around the state and got. Rid of more than six hundred thirty thousand marijuana plants, according to officials all eighteen national force, in the state from LA to the Oregon border. Heaven damaged by legal marijuana, grows they trash the place divert water lines and use highly dangerous pesticides like Carver fearing. Which sent four forest service operators to the hospital after, being exposed Vicki christianson with. The US forest service says California has long been the epicenter of legal marijuana. Cultivation highly toxic. Chemicals used to, grow the marijuana Are. Killing and endangering our wildlife there are diverting and. Contaminating our water supply and. Endangering the public operation forest watch resulted in seventy seven, illegal marijuana growers being arrested and charged in federal court finish. California report I'm Michelle Wiley.

marijuana California America Michelle Wiley Lenore Anderson Jerry Brown Bill ACLU Danielle Vinton Vicki christianson US Sacramento County reporter Oregon Senate MAURICE logos Attorney
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KGO 810

"State and federal authorities say they are having success ridden public forest lands in California of illegal marijuana, grows but, they're still fighting powerful and potentially lethal pesticides at nine of. Every ten illegal marijuana farms that's a big jump from last year Vicki christianson with the US, forest, service is. The chemicals are a major threat highly, toxic chemicals used to grow the marijuana are killing and endangering our wildlife there diverting and contaminating our water supply and. Endangering, the public US attorney McGregor Scott, says, Mexican, cartels are behind most of the grows and the enforcement effort is, costing them money the crackdown aided by, two and a half, million dollars, in federal money let's. More than ninety five investigations and the removal of more than one. Hundred tons of fertilizer pesticides and chemicals One of John McCain's closest friends in the Senate. Is paying tribute to him on the chamber floor here's correspondent, Bob Costantini and emotional Senator Lindsey Graham who'd grown close to John McCain in recent years their support for the military but also a willingness. To buck. Their party including President Trump don't look. To me to replace this look to me to remember what he was all about, and try to follow in his footsteps joined the March if you want to help the country. Be more like John McCain several GOP. Senators including fellow Arizonan Jeff flake who are at times like McCain in taking, on the president and party line thinking have decided to retire in fact the primary to replace flake is today Bob Costantini Washington California lawmakers passed a Bill. Aimed at preventing students suicide the second leading cause of death among ten to twenty four year olds, the measure, would require schools to review their suicide prevention policies at least. Every five years students say one in one study that the first person they would turn to, for, help for Front who might be suicidal. His teacher this news report sponsored by shell triple extra protection, for optimal engine performance with shell v power nitro plus premium gasoline I'm Nikki medoro now back to Dr drew.

John McCain marijuana Trump McGregor Scott California Jeff flake Bob Costantini president US Vicki christianson US attorney Senator Lindsey Graham Nikki medoro Senate GOP Front twenty four year million dollars Hundred tons
"vicki christianson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Done. The ball Manafort thank you President Donald Trump on the south lawn of the White House today as he mentioned he's heading to New York for roundtable discussion with supporters and then. To New Jersey to his golf club in Bedminster. On Bruce or which he talked about Associated. Press reports that or is come under Republicans scrutiny for. His context Glenn Simpson co founder of fusion GPS the opposition, research firm hired former British spy Christopher Steele during the two. Thousand sixteen presidential campaign to compile the dossier on Donald Trump's ties. To Russia Coming up at two pm eastern on c. span radio live coverage of the discussion on US Saudi Arabia relations it's being hosted by the. Center, for the, sub topic of the. Program is political religious and social dynamics and the speaker will be a former editor in chief of Arab news and that's live at two pm eastern Next agriculture secretary Sonny Perdue joined by senators Lisa, Murkowski Ron Wyden Maria Cantwell and Steve Daines yesterday announcing. A new strategy for improving America's forest lands they also took questions this runs forty, minutes, good afternoon and, welcome I'm Vicki christianson I'm the interim chief of the US forest service I really appreciate your attendance here today We're here today to. Join US Secretary Purdue, USDA department of agriculture. Secretary as he. Announces a new strategy that delivers on USDA's vision. For sound stewardship for America's for us Our forests have urgent challenges with the severe wildfires that are playing out across the west western United States right now The current force, conditions demand our attention treatments to reduce fire severity had been conducted for years yet catastrophic wildfires have continued. To grow although locally successful these treatments have rarely succeeded at, the, scaled needed for the. Lasting impacts across the landscapes severe wildfires and poor forest conditions continue, to threaten forest. Resources communities recreational opportunities and jobs. These forests need active management to be resilient and to be productive secretary and Purdue and. I have some significant experience each of us working at the state level where we know we can get things done Business as usual at the USDA forest service will no longer work for us anymore So today we will share USDA's plan for making a difference in our forests with the support of so many of you and. The like to do quick introductions, joining, us today, for this historic announcement is honorable Lisa Murkowski the honorable Maria Cantwell honorable Steve Daines an honorable Ron Wyden Representatives from the.

US Donald Trump secretary USDA Steve Daines Lisa Murkowski New Jersey Bedminster Ron Wyden Maria Cantwell White House Glenn Simpson Purdue Maria Cantwell Manafort New York Russia America Sonny Perdue editor in chief
"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"vicki christianson" Discussed on KOMO

"The ranking democrat on the senate energy and natural resources committee and they heard from the interim forest service chief vicki christianson yesterday who said they don't really talk anymore about wildfire seasons now they're dealing with what they call wildfire years insta homeless county rescue teams pulled the body of a hiker from pool below a waterfall hikers watched the effort near the trail headed wall louis falls state park near gold bar trying day for rescue teams who race past hikers search for a woman reportedly drifting in the wallace river we saw a emergency cargo up flashing lights the team soon spotted her in one of the lower pools fishy went over at least one side of the falls rescuers used ropes to scale down the sides and recover the body she was still fully dressed but by then the backpack witnesses saw strapped to her body that floated away you don't wanna take chances the rocks are slippery you don't wanna take chances with the river investigators say it appears the woman was hiking alone and so far no one has reported missing joel moreno says that popular hiking destination has seen a number of tragedies in the past year last summer to hikers died at wallace falls a third had to be rescued each of those incidents happened near these skykomish valley overlook that's above the main viewpoint a man who's accused of a murder in port orchard in this past week made his first appearance in front of a judge yesterday absolutely it's mindblowing gina can't believe the charges her son sean hamlin is now accused of after the death of a forty nine year old man just outside puerto archer court records reveal him and went to david petraeus home on friday to do some work on a car detective say the two got into a fight came one hit with a pistol on the left side of his face and the gun went off hitting pedic in the head i mean the guy punched him and he didn't even know what had happened deputies say a friend found pettit unconscious saying bill and the amount of.

vicki christianson wallace river joel moreno murder port orchard sean hamlin pettit senate service chief louis falls state park wallace falls skykomish valley puerto archer court david petraeus forty nine year