20 Episode results for "Vice-Chair"

NEWS: Wellness Retail Initiative Launch #606

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:16 min | 1 year ago

NEWS: Wellness Retail Initiative Launch #606

"Announcing the launch of the wellness retail initiative a bit more news from the Global Wellness Institute this week they've announced the launch of the wellness retail initiative and they've talked about the purpose of this initiative being to do some consumer research into wellness retail to get a bit understanding of what that really means identify some current and future trends. I've talked about also identifying opportunities in both digital and physical retail spaces when it comes to wellness not exactly what that means but I do think this is an initiative with some interesting potential. It's been headed up by Whitney Gray of Dell's and the vice chair is a lady called Francine Miley. I think it is from a company called UNI bail rodamco Westfield which is a major retail construction and management. When company so there's some interesting perspectives coming into this I think I think there's a big opportunity for this to almost become an incubator source for wellness retailer opportunities a spoken about retail being a big potential in the world of wellness in the past? I do think this is an opportunity for any for someone to create a wellness brand that transcends various sectors and I think that's going to be in a retail space so I'll be very interested to interested to see how this plays out. I'm hoping. Wiping though put out some research and some information fairly soon not sure what the plan in the timeframe he's the only downside I guess I would say right now is that everyone on the initially seems to be U._S.. Based but we've gotta start somewhere and I guess the U._S.. Is as the logical place to stop and hopefully that will they will take some perspectives from people on an international scale as well so the wellness retail initiative or put a linked to that initiative in the comments below so you can go and follow along and talk to the folks and see what it's.

Global Wellness Institute Francine Miley vice chair Whitney Gray Westfield Dell
Ep. 61  Insurwave, one year on since launch

Insureblocks

26:13 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 61 Insurwave, one year on since launch

"The. Hello. Hello. Hello. Welcome to insure blocks your podcast to blockchain and smart contracts insurance industry. I'm lead all of your host for this podcast. We'll be discussing insure wave, one year on since launch, and I'm very pleased to have returning to intra blocks. Shawn Crawford co-founder of insulate, and global vice chair industry at E Y, Sean. Thank you for joining us today for our listeners who haven't heard you on. Intra Boggs could you? Please give them credit crooked deduction on yourself. Hi, yes. Thanks. Good. See you again. Money's social crude. I vice chair of industries for why also the chairman of insure wife limited. Excellent. Thank you for that. So, like a last podcast that was in the ninth of July two thousand eighteen nearly a year ago. Could you please explain to our listeners what is blockchain, and how does it work and additionally, I'm very curious to know how much your opinion is change over the last year. Okay, so opinion hasn't changed last year about a technical definition of insure wave of prep snow of focus on the business definition. Because I think what we've learned is what we're using blockchain four, basically, putting a ton of data from very, very sources together that data is just growing and growing exponentially, and we believe next few years with five G and devices. It'll grow even ten times more. So the real change opportunity for blockchain is to, to look at one the relevance of that data the so much Hatler in defied the relevance of the data. How do you ensure the data provenance of the data, so making sure the data is something that you can physically use this clearly off entity of the data important accuracy of the data accountability of data and liability and security of employees. Chain is something that can do and help and support that to me. It's the only technology founder date is they will too, without me going to technical definition. I think I'd ROY. Expand that what really thinking that I read was great interest, the, the article, you, you published on the only ten regarding, you know, five, gene potential, and, and I couple of that is the fact that, you know, next year, there's going to be twenty twenty five billion IOT devices online at, we are going to be in a station where there's a ton and ton of data. But for our listeners who aren't familiar was insure wave. Could you please give them a quick overview a what is insure wave, and what its vision is shoe? We've federally a pipe, but it is sexy pipe, some people use that word fundamentally what it's doing is taking data from an innovation company, for example, accessing the tunnel. Tater funding the relevance that tater feeding through to a broker this fees to reinsure into the retro insures from insurance is bracelet brings capital closer to risk. So sure today's miles away from where the risk is taken. We provide the data the relevant data to the. Cheerier the broker the reinsure to come up with a better factor make much more effective business. Processes result. President, thank you for that. So over the last year it seems that there wasn't a month when insure we've did not win some kind of award. I'm how do you what do you tribute, all this success to since last that we want to woods? Regionalize you one big one position. Sure. Within the US. And hopefully if you will coming up now I think, the, the real reason for the successes, Israel. Yeah. There are a lot of blockchain ideas, there proof of concepts and promises for the future, we have Gooden's limb number succeed. But what we've done is, we've been live year live, the end of June. We'd be twelve months with Merck core functionality. So we'll be enough to prove its worth and build a lot more functionality that since then on top of it, but I think that's what's really so appeal to people is real clients to seeing the real benefit of the system. And when we last met, you know, you had a small team so relatively you had Mirsky one insurer one reinsure and one broker. How has this changed? And what lessons have you gained as your team has evolved and expanded? Yes, carnival and clowns is has been Merced we launched with basic functionality in July last year. We're having full functionality delivered now for the whole whole war machine by this June for the next. Real penalty stance. I july. So as with all these technologies plants the most important thing and making sure we were proper focus on that. So working with them working, then you broken Miller's working with a new reinsurer guard and their retro panel, we will be live for all those, and the retro panel I July. So that's the core priority for us, clearly we've been building, you more nodes in the functionality in releases came up post Christmas, which enables us to, to work with other shippers and other other brokers as well. So in train with other shippers and brokers right now and most I most live than you'll see if you more Nance after that, excellent, excellent, so emission nodes. So you launched an on Neil consorts version of Korda, how have you found the expanse of developing on this platform face very good. I mean cordray is a good software. So obviously knew what we've been doing. This hasn't been done the market before. But, but I think the, the key key to this is not so much technology is. Finding the business process. We're going to work in next. So I'll toughest challenges have been ensuring that we've create new business model before we're not, not digitizing existing processes creating new possess model and then building the technology to support that afterwards. So could has been great. But the hard work has been making sure we have a business process to actually make sure that the benefits can be achieved interesting because I mean, from some of the podcast we've running on a lot of them odd been using either Cordao or hype, alleged fabric and some of that feedback. I've been getting is that whilst platforms are maturing. Fastest possible, sometimes releases are missing some core elements and I guess it's normal of any nation technology. Have you found that working on this platform? You know, you've had to add quite a bit of a your own code, and how do you how do you ensure that as you develop this open source platform that you are able to get all the first future updates as so we've been building a lot of functionality. In front technology as well. So it's not just been run tapley on quarter quarters built most of the back the back office platform, but we've been creating. Other technologies up front so that has been where we've been really generating the hands on user experiences. And that's something we've been using we've been bringing the two together, we've actually managed now through another proof of concept. We've been running swear to actually prove that we can have interim -bility with. Reg approve that we don't theory that was that was a an e y specific specifications that ensure wave. Insure way. It's ensure way with the way and also with them a large another budget sure that we with two. So we've managed to prove that can work. And so we will see more more entropy abilities other systems in the future. We're also disease my partners guy than God. Time have this case ice off where to which Monday to providence when outbuilding functional into that, too. So we will use a lot more of the chaos. I called for complex blockchain solution for data providence, veve very important. When we get the next phase of cargo when we start talking about those thousands of sources of IOT devices are gonna come in. We need we need something fumble robust for that, so that will see quarter with Kasai working together with some of the Fronton technologies. So we will continue to work on that because as being grateful we've been doing. We haven't had any issues with releases. We're making sure that we know it's new long as we build a functionality. Inverse sources we can work together brilliant Brennan. So it lasts you mentioned insure wave can improve cost efficiencies by at least forty percent. Have you been able to valid at number through this year of running ensure wave and can you give us some more details on this? Yeah. So we have definitely validated that there's no question about that. And we can finish it more. It's not just business process. Aficionados is around documentation, it's been roles profiles is round about how we're going to create new business, again the future. So we have proven that point. We want to to, to improve dramatically. We've been lucky in some ways, maybe we chose the right the right area marine house been quite difficult here for making money. The last few years for full parties with sure and breakers, so he's actually being very. Appetite area too. She just dente find pick it up. So it's been very successful. We will see further benefits coming through of functionality, we expect greater functionality benefits with talk in the future. And we will learn from what we've been doing on Jalan war in that space. It's interesting because lily today, we published a post with Patrick schmead from risk dream, which he called his book alliance, and it's about our life. And in that post, you know, he was saying how they're back efficiencies, which you can calculate to some degree using set of sumptious, but the big wins regarding the light in the customer, and these aspects, very difficult to quantify that something you've found also like we're working with Merce can the others that this aspect of delighting the customer in improving the customer experience. One is very difficult to quantify. Well, up see rose the most important area because Lord of the technology hidden behind the scenes and technology departments it and we have challenging. Discussions with technology departments. But the reality is what happens front. They matters where the customer sees. And so it's because you create new business processes, you'd things change all the time. So we had be very flexible. So you can imagine it's harder as more difficult, because so much, try something slightly different. So when we're doing with our first clients Lomo straightforward in some ways, but we've learned a few areas where we can't be more stressful for the class, they come on board, but be your support on that stays, where the, the complexity is we need to focus and thing. Is it is that area, which has been provided benefit? But when you're trying to build a blockchain solution, trying to convince your cease we to provide the funding, they want numbers, and it is always very hard to build our models on customer experience. You're gonna provide you had to face on. Fortunately, that's what we've done so fundamentally wife funded this development today, and that's where the funding is to go forward as well. And it's been that we eat wife, we want them from some great branding. Is really, really improved our brandy in this market that we can build this just talk about it with sixty point. So, so from point of view being with and Europe's. Right. If we were a little fintech and having to raising money from Brussels being lot harder. So we've been able to focus on the, the quality of what the customer experiences about, we've very lucky in that sense, unusual, but I've been pretty from that. So last year, you believed that there wasn't opportunity under solvency to for capital requirements to be more in line to the real true to the true, real time price of risk. Have you had a chance to for the discussion was relevant parties? Yep. So this is the big price. This is the real big prize. Here we started to me compensations regulators, as you know, we, we've had a couple years running live yet. So I think it's important for regulators want they see new, these new technologies evasive ten on coming in. They're to want to see it running, and be more effective. So I think it gives it gives another year. And I think then we'll have the evidence to support the fact that regulators say actually, if we can change some substitute assumptions the great to able capital on the bone sheep because because recognizing the state as much valid leverageable for taking risk. Yeah. Great. So in last podcast, y'all, you had said of set up set of next steps for insure weight back in July two thousand eighteen how far have you made progress on these? For example. We had saying up other shipping, companies developing cargo insurance and evaluating the Asian industry is no paternity. So how much cancer number one pro said is getting Mirsky full operational this summer with the full functionality that that's on the one Protei. We've been running a few proof of concept with others around some other aspects linked to cargo. We have very good straight into kogo in the summer, we're going to put his own a Bill very much. We see VA shin. So of the hulls of our planes is very similar to what we done house ship. So we think that's very quickly leverageable. That's the main priority. And I think be our focus going forward. We are we are talking to other shipping companies overseas and, and in Europe, too, and we will look to converse life. You'll be. Some announcements come through as we as we connect with, with other ships in the world Anka's, stike, presented next point. So recently, you're the world port conferencing, Guangzhou where you sign an agreement with the zoo. Hi, sorry. Mispronouncing it court holding groups company to explore shipping, logistics, and marine insurance solutions in the greater bay area. Could you tell us a little bit about it? Sure. So is one of the biggest ports in. In China, what in the world, I mean, we've been talked to Ningbo in Shenzhen port and port as well, the home court, and they see a great opportunity for this technology to be taking to, to participate within within the within their ports. We're looking in this more of not so much the Hallam war signed for much logistic play much, much more of cog under districts, as you moving from the, the blue water C green to say blue water river to the cloud to the, the gray the gray water. They call it which is the canals in such a Busey's feeds. The great belt road initiative through we've in fakes in the bay area because this is Marta. And there's a lot of interest and the very, very clearly interested in innovation from outside the British could be fair. The foreign Kamath office of been very helpful to us to console. That's how it was set up with. And there's a lot of central trade relationships being pulled forward with the UK and China to the supportive of us. So we're looking to do a kickoff a trial, within very shortly with other shippers and and, and Broncos. The poor to see how we can prove it in Chinese language. Clearly with dates rules, Chinese dates rules, China Ipiros essential. We have to come up with a different model, so we're working with them and gets financing flatly to support that and create a Chinese technology change data, which will connect very much with ensure wave in the vote in the UK. So very interesting because, you know, one, one of the fundamentals for blocks into work, you gotta have this common data standard so high you're gonna you're gonna have to standards effective one in, in China. Chinese data structure in one in eight years. These new standards new. So hopefully we're aiming to evolve those standards for China. Yeah. Then, so help them shape for the way that they want very strict rules of clearly about how state can leave the country before standpoint this progressives. So we look to work with them to develop it long as we make sure the technology resides in the data resides in China, became this work and clearly intro abilities easier between the various systems so we can ships move around the world between imports we can facilitate that. And. So it's going to have an component, which is logistics related this means you're going to be collaborating with straight lines in this dealer is teaming very separate. We will collaborate with holiday parties, potentially including trade lands. But many, we'll be Chinese distributors shipping. Companies insurance tube tickly, right? An issue we work with the Chinese market. Then we'll be looking how they connect international ships will move and trade landscaping example, we haven't discussions yet, but if other things focus on, but potentially yes that may be maybe we could get early. Of course, there's also of course, an element of interminably also was trained lands because they are built on allege fabric. And as you said, is this big open field for people to work with on me before it last time we met, we do not see one or two hundreds of Blockchain's, hundreds of private Blockchain's together, and they'll need to connect. And we would like to make sure we connect with this great, grains as possible anyway. So I just wanted to get a little bit deeper in terms of this agreement. So you have this port and his loading cargo, you know, potentially onto the ship. So is it you know, you mentioned they're having a logistic element to it. But will there be ensuring the cargo from, from the port into the ship means a hollow things because the caucus goes on the ships goes into the port stays in the port risk associated Hussein the port, we will know about other catastrophes flooding trains. Other vehicles is a whole lot of movement, gang round in this perishable goods perishable goods. This can be a range of. T- devices going so we got a whole lot of things to look at. So, and then as you know, there's a lot of work going on, particularly in China and autonomous ports, and we see a lot more move towards that with, again, touch when five G, there'd be a lot, more connective gang on. So we're looking to see how things can be used to ten dollars. You can play a role in the wider ecosystem of how important is going to work. It's going to get more complex and it's not just about the goods to security is people trafficking. All sorts of issues emerging through through national ports, they're going to get worse and worse it challenges. So having a blockchain that can measure, connecting touch and as understanding traceability is going to be very important to us. So this is a this is happening because I'm going to change a little bit on this. Because he said he no ill going onto the portal. Go potentially onto the canals, go deeper and deeper into land. Is there point where you will become the next Markham McLean, who in the nineteen fifties, a help to standardize the cargo containers for, for the, the harbors the ships, the trains, and the trucks? And so, is it Shawn Crawford, the next month McLean, way, you're going to try and spread insure wave wherever the cargo can go if ectively is the ocean just your starting point. Clarin. Okay. I didn't see that. I definitely see us paying a role in the changing of the consistent, and we'd like to play a role in will be a load of other technologies and players coming through which we connect together uncertain. What we've come across some wonderful technologies or ready who have gotten devices and collecting sensitive from range from sources who we want to work with. We're not gonna not gonna rebuild like that functionality. Okay. So last year, you mention the top skills you need our business architects, and at this stage in insurance development has that change. And if yes, what are your new top skills, you need? So I would say same to more complex, the more, we talked about the complex to the ports complexity of kogo data, we're gonna need people who can really understand more, how we can fit the is together the technology can attend on. Jake's petits but the Lord that around ten around. I think the key is. Is defining the architecture of the business models into need, and more people that's going to be the shortest skillset anyone's going to have any, my clients myself. This is the big skill sets going to be needed and the next from that point of view after that it's going to beat the data. Scientists it was going to be people who actually going to be able to leverage the data that will be what we do. And sure way, but we want our clients to have people who can use the data take the data use it for underwriting pricing cetera. And this is new data sources knowns Ramesh before. So it's going to be completely. New skill sets of people who are going to be looking at each logical data with it's going to be other scientific data. It's medical whatever date is going to be, there's going to be people viewpoint. So I think there's going to be a move towards that for the industry, but for us the suck Tech's are gonna be fundamentally. And I completely understand the point about having known the this strict focus about having a relatively small team. But surely, I mean, 'specially with insurance, you're working was an industry, which is doesn't have a great appetite for risk internally for themselves. They're not always the first to embrace new technologies and Dave used a system or their pricing, and that risk based on historical data and you have a system. That's giving them this real time appreciation, res- realtime pricing. Do you find yourself, especially change of insurance partners? Do you find constantly having to educate them more is because he calling how this approach of putting them around the table and taking them on this journey with you? So I think it's really important point too. We wouldn't have to go to a close working with us. And this is going to be the case in the future. We've made to identify really smart, bright people within these businesses who get it. Get it. And, and they're. Are the ones who can make the change happen within those organizations? I count as a consultant under going to do that. I can say something that the people inside gonna make the change and the movie can engage with the bright smart people of the who going to be the future. These ensures he's brokers shippers. They're the ones who are gonna make change Gilliam involved early, and this shaping where we're going, we catalysts may be Skype Sosas but those people driving it, and I see having no skill sets in our clients, who are going to take it forward driving change their business models, as result of the technology, then I think we're gonna win that to me. What is the secret sauce points of our, our project is, how are clients have what with us as part of a joined up team? And I think it's interesting because you've now have GT's precarity who are here to build captives and immerse Gaza history, also building cap is these thing that captors is a quick win to, to prove housings can be done. And then getting the more traditional incumbents to themselves Christian took strategically long-term. I definitely see the captive plays is -nificant play. But in a number of cases, the cat to insurers are not so officiant, they're sort of bolt on us to organiz ation with respect to them. And so they're not where the money they little money flows through them, but not the core business of an oil company, not quote business of pharmaceutical companies center, so they do wrong. Well, but I think that captive insurer could play much stronger over this data and this information they have the data, they have the capital is how they use it risk with insurance, I think, in the future these technologies like insure wave is going to neighbor. Cat to perform efficient far more say in the value. Chain, gang not necessarily, we'll be now but in the future. They will be in oversee. We're working with most captive. There were fundamental conference and they see the benefit and I think that will be the model going forward building. We'll take a bit of time before we see kept his really taking hold of this. Okay. Nine all this work. You're doing. Have you been going to go to place for drawing inspiration in terms of what how you gonna lead insure wave or high you're gonna phase from challenges do Yaser individuals companies that are books even that gives you inspiration in your inspiration. The people especially the younger people on the project. You see these people who've got these ideas may not federally experience, but they got these ideas and the optimism and the excitement in the way they put the house into this now, some fun doing trying things read. That's I guess it gives me inspiration, I suppose, it's like my children, left home now to see what they're doing equipment on the family have, and you see the CD inspiration from then you get you get the energy comes from. So that's where it comes from more than anything and how they how they connect with the younger people from clients who engage in these joint teams. That's where I think the energy sparks nuts, gives me hope. And do you have or will you be having a sandbox area for insure wave where you can invite potentially startups to come and interact was was your platform in developing new features or some kinds? We haven't we haven't at the state have planned the maybe something we get to, let's, let's get through the next cycle. But potential, yes. I mean we definitely see the need to connect with other players another other Intex, etc. So the data propose already having conversations with big data providers, anyway, how they can use the data or her they could provide us with data so quickly. We're not. We're just going to be this pipe, I say, we're not going to win. It'd be regulated body. We're not going to do. We're not going to become a broker. We're not gonna come insure worshiping. So we will be wanting to a lot more with the as we get more mature with sandbox Roma's interesting idea. We will need to think about that thing. Okay. Okay. So what are your plans for eighty two thousand nineteen and what do you expect us to be discussing podcast in twenty twenty? The Knicks the Pocos next year will be around, where we always with the Kaga. Let's say what we've been developing the run international trade agenda, have an king more with the Chinese ports and other ports to that. We're talking to early stages around the world, the activity on international trade, a lot's going to happen international trade. The course next year we've seen the, the US Chinese wars. We've got Brexit issues number things going on. I think I think we this'll be an opportunity for us. And we see I think we talking more about the why trade, global trade debate and technology supporting that next year. I'd hope anyway. Great great. Well, listen, I wanna thank you very much on for all year fascinating insights, and especially to hear how much insure wave has evolved over the last year. So this wraps up this intra blocks podcast initial wave. We hope even joy this episode if you like what you've heard this week. Please don't forget to subscribe to our podcast and live the region. Teens these reviews really make a huge difference. Please share your views and Sean left to catch up with you again in twenty twenty and. Let's see where we are. Thank you.

China blockchain US Shawn Crawford Europe Sean Intra Boggs vice chair UK founder Merck chairman Hatler global vice chair Guangzhou
Beth Comstock: Former Vice Chair of GE and Author of Imagine It Forward   117

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

40:02 min | 1 year ago

Beth Comstock: Former Vice Chair of GE and Author of Imagine It Forward 117

"This is episode. Seventeen of extraordinary women radio welcome to extraordinary women radio. I n your host cami. Gilmer women are being called to lead with voice vitality and bigger each week join me for wisdom field interviews with extraordinary women living out loud and making a difference events in our world their stories uplift inspire and spark your own purpose driven journey. Hello my extraordinary. Women friends few weeks ago. I was listening to ali brown's glam bishen radio one of my favorite podcasts that i listen to when i'm driving around and i heard an interview with beth comstock doc the former vice chair of business innovation at g._e. I loved the interview and what was really cool for me. Was i had followed bets inspiration for many the years dating back to my corporate days over a decade ago so i've been watching bath and following beth for a really long time it was a great interview and at the end of the interview beth mentioned when i asked her what's next beth said i still discovering that and i smiled at that and i shook my head. Yes because i i personally now how important it is to take time to slow down and discover our journey when we make big life changes after all beth had been at g._e. See for nearly three decades so my journey really did my big chef ten years ago and i had time and i had nature and ahead self-discovery all the point me to my next chapter of launching my business. When i wrote my book fired answer your spiral journey till like a passion and purpose i shared my personal story and i laid out a road map to discover that next chapter in i think it's a really magical process that is that that roadmap and it's it's i thought might be useful to best so i reached out to her and i offered to send her a copy of my book fired answer and then i added in a p._s. How would you like to be online. Extraordinary women radio show well. Beth generously offered to buy my book online herself. After all she wanted wanted to support a fellow author she said to me and then she said yes to an interview and i was thrilled and i was honored. <hes> the power of the ask just last week when i interviewed the fabulous sark the author of the secular wild woman. She closed out our interview with the final pearl of wisdom. Do they ask such a perfect example of this. This was an easy as that. I made with big potential and resulted in a yes and so i get to bring beth comstock to you today. Beth mission is to understand what's next to navigate change in help others do the same by cultivating a habit of seeking out new ideas people in places. She built a career path from storyteller to chief marketer to corporate vice chair chair. Beth led efforts to accelerate new growth develop digital and clean energy futures seed new businesses and enhance about brand value. I you as president of integrated media at n._b._c. Universal beth oversaw t._v. ad revenue and new digital efforts including the early development meant of hulu dot com beth as a director at nike a trustee at the national geographic society and former board president of the cooper hewitt hewitt smithsonian national design museum she graduated from the colleague william and mary with a degree in biology her first book imagine it forward part about working and living on the frontlines of change was released in september twenty eighteen. Her stories are fabulous and vulnerable. Today we talk about her journey through g._e. About leading change about stepping into our courage in grant ourselves permission to show up in bigger bolder ways and so much more. Let's meet eight beth comstock. Well welcomed extraordinary women radio best thanks candy. I'm excited to be talking to you well. I'm excited to be talking to you as the former v._p. Of marketing in my former life i have actually really followed your career for a long time. You really been an inspiration to me for so many years and i'm just really excited. How did you hear about this next chapter of your life on what's unfolding for you. Thank you thanks i <hes> i love the path of marketer so you and i have a very similar journey. Thus far we have in fact i was i was as i was reading your book. You had you were a single mom pretty early on in your life and i was as well and that was one of the things that jumped out at me as a similarity that we had and you know there's that whole space of of what we do as single moms to roller sleeves up and we're going to provide for kids. <hes> said that was something that really resonated with me in your story. Yeah i start my business my book with at in probably one of the few business folks it starts with personal divorce and any kind of talking about personal things like picking a path as a single mother but i feel like it was a defining moment for me. They brought out things in me. I had no choice but to make it work. Whatever it was the roadmap roadmap or step one step two process charge. I decided to figure it out and it became. I actually appreciate this. It becomes even more daunting. When you figured not for yourself you've gotta. Mikey's had a young daughter so i that was a very important moment for me for so many reasons but it's one of those moments return to when i'm in the middle of change to say you've been here before you know you could do this. Now i was there. I was was in my twenties when it happened. So it was young. I was young to have experienced with my twenty s as well and i know it definitely forever shaped me and it made me you know really stronger and it made me know that like he said you can get for just anything so <hes> i really appreciate that about your journey journey and now i'm really excited to hear about the story of you leaving g._e. And is really you know as what's his experience ban like now that you've been out <unk> shifted for you internally while a lot i had spent pretty much my <hes> the the bulk of my career at one company now g._e. Has a lot of different businesses businesses. Most of my big chunk of my career was spent at n._b._c. so out of media but having been kind of one place for a while while it was it was it was a grounding for me and then in the twenty seventeen big leadership change change g._e. In the new c._e._o.'s like hey. I don't know what we're gonna. Do if you think you need to go home and i thought i'd be leaving at some point soon. I'd sort of working. I'm on my book but it's quite different when when it actually happens you realize you don't have control of the situation in your eye on the engine maker. You know i i i'm. I like like many people. I think you only change when you feel like you're in control of it and for most of us. That's not unusual changes suez so so i had to get. I spent some time just getting used to that. What was that very first aid at like the next day the next day when you woke up and he said oh gosh i've i'm no longer there well i took. I took a few months to unwind and get out of the company was handed it off but that that morning i think my first habit was to started to start the day like i normally do right. I i had a hard the hardest hardest time giving up my five a._m. Phone calls to the was like i'd wake up and ready to go to those phone calls and it wasn't there to do is attacking you. We have these habits and is this sort of rhythm in ritual of our day founded. I remember i'd been out of g._e. She e about two months and <hes> it was in my home office and my husband walked by and he's like what are you doing. Why do you have the to do list on your desk guy. They have much you have to do and it just made me think like why am i here. I am you know of course. I was like my mike to do to be more artistic creative so it was a very beautiful to do list. I will tell you my markers out. I colored everything in but nonetheless i part of from what i've had to go through in the past year and a half is just if you will kind of trading out rituals trading out one thing for another for example <hes> in the process of working on my a book i started this process basically borrowed from julia cameron's the artist's way regular book right morning papers <hes> good who'd ritual for me to carry four so you get up in the morning and i just right tonight just download my brain and it gives me a good sense of of starting my day and i try to exercise from me. Replacing one kind of routine with another has been helpful being i've also had sir. I'm taking my own advice and try to just leave unstructured time or have no one telling me what to do about anything including myself and that's honestly honestly that was the hardest yes yes and so. How does this feel to you right now. I mean how does the this shift compared to where you you know the the in the old bath at g. e. two best today with imagine forward all your focus. How do you feel different as long as they don't feel different at all. Still me probably me that was fourteen made. It was twenty six. You know me now. It's fifty eight. I <hes> i <hes> to some. I still feel very much the same but i will say <hes> one. The book ended up being an incredible amount of work that i frankly was surprised how much work it it wasn't that the truth then the past four months. I think i'm starting to go okay a new side of me as urging. I need to meet this person and so what is this new side of me. It's much more let it go. Let things happen as they. I will not not the structure. We talked about earlier <hes> much more in pursuit of creativity. I love to read reading a lot but i think probably i think what surprises my family and friends is that i'm much more patience than i was actually used to have a t shirt that reads <unk> impatient like and that that's awesome and so i think i'm i'm much more <hes> just open open and letting things unfold which surprises me and what's putting sparks in your heart right now. I looked to read. I'm not as i'm on this this curiosity and creativity journey <hes> i i've been working on my husband and i bought a rundown farm and so being being <unk> out nature just oh that's fun nature so clearing trees and planting gardens and being in nature come. I gosh that's awesome. Whereas your farm it's a new york state very good so great able to reconnect and literally get my hands dirty and feel a different kind of connection absolutely absolutely i think there's there's something about being in nature and putting our hands in the dirt and it just it. It really grounds us in a all different way it to me. I i grew up. One of my favorite places on earth was they used to go to a camp in virginia called nature camp dumb. I just i studied biology when i was in college and so i think honestly we're kinda. Got me away from that. My husband and i love to go hiking in you know we found we were more <unk> drawn more and more to that but i do think if you're not careful work takes over so part of this time has been to rediscover those things that i knew i love but had sort of putting the back the back burner yeah i grew up on a small farm and colorado and so that was always a core part of who i was i always had horses and animals and all these different things around me and i actually have always had horses in my life even when i was in the corporate world but but when it was actually the horses that helped me for see that i would that i could start something new and move into a whole different pathway that happened the loses loses out here it was i started speaking with a woman who was a coach and she worked with <hes> she was doing personal transformation work with people lever jane horses bringing horses into the work and doing leadership development work with horses and i was just i was like what do you do you can do that and so i was so intrigued with an so. I instantly went out within a month of hearing this story. I was out in northern california. Becoming a certified equine join guided coach and so the horses really took me in a whole different direction. I had always thought that i would go back to the corporate world and all of a sudden on was this is is is probably eleven years ago and <hes> <hes> and i still to this day i do equate guided retreats with my clients <hes> that i'm helping build their businesses in that that sort of thing so it's it's the n nature really speak to my soul and i think what i take from your story is what i've had to reconnect with his just i sort of luck things on full be open to things and take inspiration from things that might surprise you yes and so oh i love that i love the story of the horses taking you to a whole connecting what you're good at professionally with with a passion you have for the broader world out there yeah absolutely absolutely lately so let's talk about imagine it forward. How did the book come to you well. I am i guess i my husband said i was always gonna write a book. I i don't remember being so definitive but <hes> i just started to appreciate in the course of my business. I worked with a lot of people either colleagues or people who were customers. People who come to know we were all struggling to make art make sense of change <hes> actually i would go every month to a new manager training cla- i said a g._e. At our learning center and i got to teach a class every month i love this space won. The the people challenged me. I challenged them but he started started to notice that a lot of would say all you know. I love those ideas. You know we really should innovate more but i can i can't do this is were always always similar. I can't do that because my boss won't let me. I don't have enough budget. We don't have enough people. The ideas are timings wrong and i realize that a lot ah those excuses were true. There was something deeper there. What i realized was that people were afraid they like tearing me the stories either mine line or my colleagues or others that we persevered through that but at the end of the day just sort of struck me that people needed to kinda grant themselves permission needed to be told it was okay katie grant themselves permission and so that was kind of the genesis of while how do i capture this than share some stories through my career where i faced into fear and those moments of of just struggle with changing innovation and i didn't get it right and how can i share some of that with people especially actually mid-career mid part of the company who don't often get those kind of insight so that was really how it was how it was born. I i wanted to use it it as a helpful set of tools replacements variation and a bit of a provocation to people to say you can do this absolutely and it why do do you think it's so important to write this book now well i am. I'm a communicator. I'm storyteller so that was a medium for me <hes> i i hope the book somewhat timeless because i why now is just because i think we are all sort of trying to keep up with the pace of change i i started the book off with one of the lines used as the world will never be slower than it is right now reeling from that <hes> and and we've we gotta learn how to adapt to new things and yet were holding back the fear and <hes> and so for me it was about just how did i as an introverted nada business or engineering kind of person in an engineering company. How did i kind of find my way to discovery to meet change early and so i think for all of us a little bit hard day. A little bit of our work has to be an personal life has to i think applied to discovering what's next and new yeah yeah and i think when i was as i've been reading your book i it's it's so inspiring to see see them the level of change that you lead at g. e. and it takes. I love the fact that you're talking about that. You know you're an introvert hurt and that there something that you did though that that caught people's attention that that helped us step forward with the ideas an and create follow followers right. So what do you think attributed to that uh well. I think it was <hes>. I am a shy person. I'm also introverted introverted which means you know you. You have to conserve your energy. You're not i trust me. No one's ever in my whole life called me. The life of the party afford the natural to step up in pitch an idea or attic trump crazy to tell you that that was not me when i was very curious and an eye in especially well g._e. At n._b._c. g._e. <unk> n._b._c. several times. I started to realize allies that a lot of people spend their time talking to one another inside the company they were great for best practice sharing but there weren't a lot of people who were looking outside the company who were trying to understand trends and see where you know kind of looking to meet people who were ideas that renew an unusual because as i was curious that just seemed to be a natural place to go and <hes> while in rome is looking inside. I started looking outside and i think i became what i call this insider out this outsider inside meaning. I started to just be outside and build a network and make connections actions and try to bring them back inside in in that kind of role. You have to be open enough to see new things but then you have to have a translation ability the to translate it into language. Your colleagues can understand in often. You have to bring them with you so to me. That was really a presentable. I'd say one of my kind of most important projects was taking this industrial energy company of g._e. And getting into cleaned tack at a time when it was not popular was not something industrial company would do but the future was calling us and we had to do something and so <hes> that you know that kind of ability to pick your head up get out in the world seaward going became something i really grabbed hold off than it made made my i pass pass me in my company and it was really storytelling and vision painting that that you know you had to really paint that for the people who who could might not seeing the same things that you were seeing exactly and i think the grew up in my curse star wanted to be a journalist was not very good. It's pretty it clear <unk> t._v. Journalists are got hind the scenes and i got into p._r. And communications before i got into marketing and storytelling his just wha what i what i know so i started to realize that innovation and understanding what snacks was about telling stories it was about <hes> imagining forward a new future and it's not enough just to tell people they have to see it so you go together and you see for example when eko machination the nation which is our clean initiative <unk> clean tech initiative we did dreaming sessions with our customers or appeared out twenty years into the future to a math fifteen to twenty years in the future started to put a story together together right it was must with our customers interesting right kinds of technologies. Can you imagine what happens when win starts to scale energy from the sun will it's happening. When will it get to scale so if you build those stories together and it sounds kind of fluffy and usually a you know this as a marketer. Oftentimes people say marketers work work is just at the end. Just what you do you launch. The product rates right nick. How might we what are the opportunities and you you start to build your story as you build your product as you build your market yes i saw i agree with that. I so agree with and one of the things you wrote in your book was every rechange maker is forced to learn to give herself permission to push outside expectation and limitations and i was no exception you wrote what not one of your biggest stretches and then. How do you give yourself permission well. I'm gonna give you a little one which was big and then a big one which was big but little largest getting my getting over my introversion because i didn't look there's a lot of benefits of being an integrated but also i had to realize i was holding myself back. Uh-huh i wasn't meeting people at advance. I'd go to a networking event in like get go to chapel and then go home and when i did that as well as yourself and just finally got to the point where i was like. I i am holding myself back right. You're playing small all right exactly and so i i had to get over that in myself and i had to give myself permission okay next time. I'm gonna go and i'm going to need someone so i would say hi cammie. You know me you <hes> but i just started to give myself these small challenges and then those those are big things if you're not an introvert you don't know what i'm talking about but it's all minority and energy to introduce myself speak got the meeting. Yes one of the biggest things for me. I mean i talked about being a single mother in divorce that personally but i took the chief marketing officer role at g._e. I hadn't been a marketer. I came out of n._b._c. so i had media and advertising experience but i didn't go to business school. I didn't have my the n._b._a. And i took the c mo role not really knowing really what traditional marketing is or what a c._m._o. Could do bright and about four months into my job. I went to school. I mean i i did everything i called everyone. I knew i had a really robust hundred day plan not just for the job but for myself but about four months into the roll my boss at the time jackson who had promoted needs to the job called me he said i. I don't know what's going on with you but like you've lost your confidence. I put you in this job for a reason and you're not really showing. I need you to speak up. I put you in shock. 'cause as you have ideas yet. You're not near in right and so i think it was i was wavering. I was nervous. I was fearful and um when he called me on it and now i had to make sure that that wasn't gonna hold me back so that was probably one of the biggest structures i can i can point to and how did you step into that a fear once you knew it. Was there one guy saying you've gotta. Change the bright so that's a big push. It was a big bush just sort of got myself. I guess kinda like you're an athlete for a big a big game <hes> just one mental psyching up and then just asking asking for help. I think that was really key. I called up chief marketing officers that i knew for example. Jim stengel at <unk> who at the time was at proctor and gamble was so incredibly grace gracious. I he became my tutor. I like to call the training materials p._g. Used train their marketers. I went to every you know. I i read every marketing textbook. Philip kotler of northwestern iowa eventually called him up and got to know him when we did training with them so they were just on a learning journey and again back to that curiosity. That's how i got over. My fear of not knowing by lack of confidence was just to be curious serious and be a learner right. That's awesome and in you talk about actually writing permission slips so tell us about that too early what i was talking <music> out this kind of mindset shift that we all subscribe to that we're we're. Maybe maybe recently. We look for excuses for why can't do something but really afraid woah. I started to realize when you you know. I say to people like i can. I think i give you permission. You might feel good but really i think you have to give yourself permission permission and that's really what's gonna make a difference and so i used to keep staffer mission slips on my death. Now these are the kind that you may recall from high school. Well where you'd right here in italian out of his ad or chemistry right or your mother's signature will it's the same thing you know i- by beth comstock give myself permission to and i just do this. It's such a simple hack which is writing down. What are you going to give yourself permission to pitch this idea. Ask ask your boss so many times she would. I want this job but i know my boss won't go for. Did you ask her no. I couldn't possibly ask her. What would happen if you you did or startups. You know i really wanna do this but i know my investors won't go go for it or by. Custer's customers will never never wanna do this. Did you ask them so. Give yourself permission to try to get a small group of customers and ask them what they think about this us and it's very liberating and i find it a simple hack that i use repeatedly for myself. It's a beautiful hack and i encourage everyone listening and i'm going to do do it as well. Go right yourself. Some permission slips when you listen to the after you've listened to this and see how that can really help you move forward. I think it's it's fabulous. Yes i love that idea used. Ask people in the class that i taught at g._e. <unk> who who are willing to share with me very i'm not sure how many did but the ones who did it it. It shared it to me. It was such a great exchange. I love one. They were asking for my health. They were holding themselves accountable and actually get such great notes from people like you know even. I thought this was stupid but i did. I just wanna. I remember distinctly women's like i you know i'm i'm. She was in sales and she said you know i can never ever ask for help from anyone the legal or engineering and i decided just gonna give myself permission. I invited them all in with his huge are he'd we had from a client we had never been able to get before. I convened them. All together and you want to know what we won the r._c. That's awesome well that and it was such a a simple little thing but it led her to do something really bold and moneymaking for her company. That's awesome. That's so awesome so you inspired so much inspiration in at g._e. And you were the one who actually led the imagination at work g._e. Initiative that we've all heard many of our listeners are entrepreneurs. Here's what are the five steps to imagining it forward in. How can our entrepreneur and executive listeners apply this to their own professional journeys. Well first of all i to me. I guess i want to start with what's the definition of an entrepreneur for me. An entrepreneur is someone who believes in better. They see there's a problem and they want to to offer a better solution right and you were talking about even within within companies. There's the entrepreneur mindset right exactly and that was that was at the heart of why. I wrote this guy especially trying to get people in established companies but it's anyway. If you were in a library university ginny <hes> your own company you want the ability to move forward with a new idea. You see something better that you have to do so so to it came down five key areas warming talked about give yourself permission to to take a risk to get over that fear the second which i am. I'm very passionate about is what i call. Make room for discovery that ability to harness your curiosity to get to the outside to not just think you know all the the answer to your team knows all the answers but to get out when you sort of use the world is your classroom and when you do you start to see patterns patterns reveal will themselves to where the future's unfolding you get to meet change early. It's not that you're going to stop change but you get much more comfortable with what's next and what's new to me is what i called agitated enquiry which is the ability to ask tough questions and to to engage in and in fact appreciate the role of conflict. This is often the hardest in change in innovation. It's my idea good enough. This is a good idea. <hes> who can i invite a critic yet to beat this idea up and and make it their own idea twin love this idea so much that i'm willing to give it up and let someone else run forward with it who might be better suited to take it to the next level so the question as seeking beating ideas up beating each other up a bit in pursuit of better and i liked it because it's it's it's is opening apt to conversations that wouldn't be happening otherwise and and and not being attached to the outcome but really being okay. We're we're using this as an opportunity to to to work with this idea and make it better to to stretch it to the see things differently so i think that's a really beautiful part of that. Yeah <unk> hard lesson for major appreciates her. I got feedback at one point that i was going it alone. Alone and my colleagues thought i wasn't asking for help and asking for help means opening yourself up to criticism as well and you have to realize that actually ideas better matter 'cause you have everybody contributing not you can't have about pure idea. Other people have to make it their own including your critics. Next piece would be the story craft and we talked about this a bit but the ability to tell a story about where the world is going in. Why why you're gonna make it better and for me. It's about doc your strategy. I i just can't appreciate if you can't tell your strategy is a story that maybe you don't have one story is who who are you. Where'd you bend but most importantly where you go. Where are you going. Why is it relevant to me. And why should i want to join you. Yeah i think storytelling mine is one of the most important things that we can develop ourselves as our own story in our ability to be able to tell it and connect with people with our stories. He's it isn't. It's so hard when you wanna freak someone out but when you next time you need somebody new instead of asking him. What do you do what your story. That's good they what story and have an answer for them. What is your story because it's much more interesting where you came from what in the vulnerabilities behind it are in that it shows that we're not this this perfect person right like nobody has a perfect personnel and we can be vulnerable in our story. People can relate eight with us exactly and then the last piece of the book was what i call you know sort of leaning into operating system but really just a short hand on that that is just getting to action in here. It's a lot about experimentation opening yourself up to be okay to fail all the things we talk about and that entrepreneurs you're supposed to like to do the reality is none of us like to fail. It's an action and we all know. Ideas are rarely the problem boom. It's usually the getting to action and making something of the idea where where the work begins. That's beautiful. That's beautiful so i have a question around. What are you most. What are you most proud of in your life well. I think i'm i'm <hes> just incredibly proud of <hes>. I think being a curious in open person open to difference to collaboration aberration to partnership <hes>. I think that's led me to have a great marriage. Great family great colleagues in the course of my career. I think the teamwork that i was part of g._e. I wouldn't trade that in for anything especially the the marketing and the innovation teams were worked with. We had a bit of impact. We said to each other. We don't know how long we're gonna be working together. Hopefully for a while but we're gonna commit that. We're going to do our best work together. We're gonna fight fight like crazy. We'll fight each other in the process and i left there knowing that happened <hes> and look cheeseheads tough days certainly since i was there while i was there but since i've been there it's a great company. The socks not in a good place companies really great but you can only do so much but i know the teams that we were part of did great work and then other teams have to come along and they do their thing and you have to feel really good about the work and so i can look back backing go. I feel great about the work again. That's that's awesome. That's awesome and what's next for you beth well. I'm in a discovery mode right now. Also wandering wandering bet. I'm using serve what i talk. I'm trying to use my own recipe. Here are kind of giving myself permission to get out and wander. I've been dipping. My toe in academia bit enjoyed going to go back to school too. I wanna teach <hes>. Do i wanna i i don't. I don't know what's next for me except that right now. It's a lot of wandering and discovery and learning always be doing <hes> but i think i will re inter-business in a very different way i've given myself goal of a certain book was about a year and i give myself the goal of trying to take another year just to do do that kind of deep exploration within myself wandering beyond figure out where i wanna put my energies next that's good and so when you say wandering are you you actually. Are you doing traveling with it. Are you are wandering through ideas. It's an it's a little of both. I traveled so much when i was at g._e. Meet on a plane and going anywhere is i've done that so rate. You're wandering in ideas wandering with new people wandering within myself. I mean that's what i i found this. <hes> found this paper when i was fourteen in my autobiography refute fourteen entrust me it was so boring it's awesome though you wanted to know if so and so is gonna ask me to the movies <music> or something but <hes>. I found this one part in it. It said you know busia fourteen. I i'm fourteen. I'm ambitious. Just i want to be fifty different things. When i grow up and then i listed them by a few of which sound interesting but i love that i'm still that what i was at fourteen eighteen yes. I'm ambitious. Ambitious ideas ambitiously curious ambitious to learn and i do want to be a lot of different things now. I have a chance to do that and i will be very very upset with myself if i don't at least explore and urge myself to try to try on something different for while there's so much expansiveness ask before you that you know that you probably don't even see yet because you're still discovering it and going to be fun to see what unfolds for you exactly clinic. There's a part of creativity. You know the sort of void before the idea. I mean any entrepreneur. Who's listening knows this. You know the you work. Thank you work. You work your rica moment. I mean it's the white canvas bernardus. What what am i gonna do and so in some ways. I'm still at that the white canvas space and it's scary and exciting. That's good. That's awesome. That's so awesome. So where can people learn more about you. In your work i think they'll find me on social media linked in and twitter and <hes> my book imagine it forward is available wherever books are sold awesome awesome awesome awesome so the final question that we always close with is what three pros wisdom. Can you lead with our audience today anyone we talked about <hes> be able to answer do this question. What's your story or no where you've come from <unk> had articulate where you come from and most importantly where you're going and how how can people help you that would be the second thing i think lauren to ask for help that was found in the course of both a family family and a career. Is you know i was a perfectionist than i thought i didn't. It was a sign of weakness to ask for help but you realize actually people are flattered. Attorney asks they want to help you. Yes so ask for help and then the last thing would be just to be open to different to discovery indifference find find a little bit weird in your life and what's weird for you and me are very different but make room to discover those things that are different in that. Maybe make you even uncomfortable optical great beautiful. Thank you so much. This has been such an honor to have you join us today and really appreciate your story story. Appreciate your book and appreciate the work that you're bringing into the world. Thanks can be so great talking to you and i really enjoyed the conversation. Thanks for the opportunity editing. You bet have a good day to buy. I help you life this episode of extraordinary women radio. If you did please share this podcast with your own special tribe of women and help spread the love the dreams and the inspiration. Are you ready to raise up your voice your visibility and your business business. I invite you to visit me at cami. Gilmore dot com to find out how you can make heartfelt connections to my full strategies to ignite an abundant vip slow of cash and clients into your business. I'd love to hear from you on any of my social media channels. I'm on facebook and twitter. Tell him next time my france listen to your heart. Follow your dreams and being you.

g._e beth comstock beth Beth mission ali brown vice chair national design museum Gilmer sark president nike julia cameron california n._b._c. g._e rome Jim stengel Mikey Philip kotler hulu
Monitor Show 17:00 06-19-2020 17:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Monitor Show 17:00 06-19-2020 17:00

"The markets infocus every Business Day Bloomberg markets podcast with Paul Sweeney in. Some sectors that you want to have more or less exposure to off kneeling global once again. Militants, today's Wall Street actions thought on Apple here from Bloomberg Intelligence Bloomberg opinion and influential news Baker Save Very, very disturbing dynamics at work Berg markets with Paul Sweeney and Gwynn's subscribed today, Bloombergradio, dot, com, the Bloomberg, business half or I to. Joe? Capital of the world twenty four hours a day. Bloomberg Dot Com on the Bloomberg business, and on quick take by Bloomberg. This is Bloomberg radio. From Bloomberg World Headquarters I'm Charlie Pellett avant until Friday a winning week for the US stock market, the Dow the S&P Lower Nasdaq Nasdaq up three points today little changed S. and p. fell seventeen down six tenths of one percent, the dow down two hundred, eight, lower by eight tenths of one percent stocks dropped the most in more than a week amid a renewal of uncertainty over just how quickly states can emerge from lockdowns. Oil rallied for a second day West, Texas intermediate crude up one and a half percent thirty, nine forty. Forty three a barrel gold up one point two percent up twenty one dollars, the ounce at seventeen, forty, three and West Texas, intermediate crude, as I mentioned about one and a half percent, thirty nine forty-three fed vice chair Richard Clarita says the US Central Bank is prepared to take additional steps to support the economy through the damage caused by the coronavirus in an interview on Fox business network. He said quote. We have taken very aggressive proactive action. There is more that we can do, and we will Doug Ramsey chief investment.

Bloomberg Bloomberg World Paul Sweeney US Richard Clarita Doug Ramsey Texas Joe work Berg West Texas vice chair Charlie Pellett Baker Apple Gwynn lockdowns
Creating with Constraints with Python Africa's Marlene Mhangami

Hanselminutes

33:53 min | 3 months ago

Creating with Constraints with Python Africa's Marlene Mhangami

"No one wants to manage databases they can avoid it. That's why Mongo DB made Mongo. DB Atlas a Global Cloud Database Service that runs on AWS GCP and Asia. You can deploy a fully managed Mongo DB database in minutes with just a few clicks or a few API calls. Mongo DB, atlas automates, deployment, automates, updates, handles scaling and more so that you can focus on your application. Instead of taking care of your database, you can get started free at Mongo DB DOT com slash atlas. Now. If you're already managing among Mungo DP, Deployment Atlas has a live migration service. So you can migrate easily with minimal downtime and then get back to what matters stop managing your database start using Mongo DB atlas. Hi this is Scott Hanson this episode Hansel minutes today I'm talking to Marlene Montgomery from Zimbabwe is calling in from Harare. How are you? I'm doing good Scott thanks for having me. So we were setting up just getting ready for the podcast here in clearing out the hard drive and checking the sound levels and stuff like that, and you mentioned that the power had just gone out which. Is kind of inconvenient if you're trying to do a Yes. It is kind of inconvenient. It literally just went out. Just before we were actually supposed to this by fortunately I have a generator generators reading right now but yet definitely yet the power has gotten. So. So we were going to have a conversation about constraints and the kind of the funny dichotomy about how programmers do really well when you can strain by whether you constrain their memory, they're hard drive of their processor power. We we sent people to the moon with a lot of really constrained CPU's and things like that. But on the African continent and in Zimbabwe specifically where you are, there's A. Number of of infrastructure and technical constraints that I would think make it difficult for someone to be a release accessible programmer is that a fair statement? Yeah. I think that would be pretty fair I think compared to other countries is definitely in Barbara and you know in a lot of countries across the continent I think they're things like power, for example, that make it quite difficult to be. A successful developer. I know we talked a bit earlier about the Internet and how. You don't really think about this. You know how many your bandwidth with your Internet I think for me. I have for a while I actually lived in the states for a bit and was just really surprised by how. For example, how cheap the Internet there is an if you come Dr to Zimbabwe, the donate is I don't know how many times more expensive. And it's I mean it's quite it's quite shocking because everywhere almost everywhere you go on the continent of Africa are similar challenges where the price of data is just ridiculous high or if you don't get expensive data you have to. Work with data that's really unreliable and it breaks all the time. So yeah, those are just some of I. Mean they are a lot of constraints for sure. Now are you forgive my forgive my ignorance. I know the answer to some of these questions because for for the audience to know my wife is is also Zimbabwean so I've spent time there. I've lived there although I've lived on the west side in in Bulawayo area in the inability side am curious are you on DSL or fiber? What's the Internet options if I move to your neighborhood? What are my choices for Internet? So, right now I'm on fiber I. Think. where I live. I live in a neighborhood where Zoll has made. So it was always the Internet company that I use in most people use in. Zimbabwe with doing at least in Harare from what I know and Yeah, we have fiber. Fiber aid around the neighborhood and That's mainly what I use I think most people. Most people use that I know some people use why? Bronx and things like that but outside of that I think it's Manley. Fiber especially in my own neighborhood. now in in Zim there's this concept of high-density suburb, high density and low density right? I usually think of that as being like the suburbs. Or the rural areas or maybe the suburbs or mcquay. Sure with the best way to describe how you described the high density areas. Other than that, they are high density I mean the high-density areas. V Very like that. I feel like the Loden areas is more in terms of we talk about you know I think is very much. So divided by class and buy wealth, and so I would say in the low density areas, it's many people who are bit more wealthy. Than in the high density areas, we actually call them Haydn to areas because the house is grouped. So closely together and that is you know people who are not as wealthy sometimes you know live there in proximity. And they're very. I mean the quite they're in very different areas of the city and represent two different classes in in the city. But it's fair to say that they don't have fiber optic going to their apartments though it's probably I don't know actually would not know that but it's it's it's probably. It's probably unlikely that they would have fiber optics. I'm not sure though you know I don't know. I'd have to double check that. Because all as well economic news, the company behind them have tried to Have tried to push. To, have coverage in most areas but generally speaking you know fiber is actually very expensive and so the average than Bob, Leeann you know I don't know if the average Zimbabwean is able to an. Ever Zimbabwe that's living in the high density areas I'm not sure if they would be able to afford fiber little little on Internet. Maybe data mobile data every once in a while but like wi fi or something like that I don't think it's it's something that everyone has been. Yeah. I think that's interesting to juxtapose what's how you're thinking about describing Internet where you are and then you said that you spent some time here in the states, I'm in a what would call it a low density area where it's a suburb about fifty kilometers outside of of Portland. Oregon, I, have fiber optic to the house, but my brother who's about twenty more minutes outside of town. is in the rural areas. In in below and into belly, they would say like, Achaia. And he he does not have fire because they simply they can't bring it to him right? So he used his cell phone data. And and this is a really interesting juxtaposition because this is in America who you where if you ask the average person Oh, you have all the date on your Gift Gift Cable Modems and all the fast. Internet. They have three phones in their house three android phones with five gigs each. And then they take turns each week of the month. Using each phone and then they tether it in. That's the Internet for that week wow right. At the a thing, you would expect that you've heard things like that before like, okay. We're I'm I'm a programmer and I'm tethering my laptop to my cell phone and I have I've gigs and when I'm done I'm done. Wow. Yeah I mean. I think for me. It's not a concept that I'm used to in terms of thinking about the United States like thinking that they are people who don't live in like one hundred percent concerts with the fastest things. In the United States I, think I have just a picture of it that is you know kind of whitewashed in terms of everyone is a certain in a certain class bracket so I would never think that you know so. We have dial up actually here. If you go deep deep enough into the rural areas, there's still about i. think there's about two million people that use dial up. Wow. There's a lot of satellite. My brother uses these phones he puts them on the on the On the window sill so that they get better signal. If his daughter my my niece says I, WANNA use would you? The. Only have five gigs per phone. They put the phone on the on the window and then they say, okay now you can do your youtube. They do the thing I turn the phone off. Wow. Definitely something bad happens here and they have been times that I have a kid with my phone when I haven't. been able to have access to WIFI before but yacht just very interesting to note that that is happening in the states. But definitely, yes I think Internet in general is something that is not It's not something that is an equal thing that happened that is available for everyone so So you're the, you're the director and vice chair of the Python Software Foundation in. They're also the Cherif Pike on Africa and that was virtual this year because of the pandemic. I'm curious how this problem with. Easy inexpensive and pervasive non-metered Internet would affect a virtual conference your aside if you go and say, Hey, young person you should go on. Checkout Pike on Africa you can see Orlean and all these great Zimba's doing great stuff. You can see people from all over the continent. But. You have to stream on Youtube for two days. Without us all the data on a cell phone pretty quickly and how where would they get that data? Would they go to the university? How would they work through those constraints? I think it's quite difficult. It's something that. we thought a lot about win. We were trying when we were deciding whether or not. We should have pike on Africa because in general I, think across the continent not everyone has access to stable stable Internet Africa I will say Africa is a huge huge continent. Are there so many people on the continent and I will say that I think that most people have access to data a certain amount of data but if it's good streaming level data were they able to access? A conference like Pike on Africa it is very expensive. So you're for us we knew that for streaming the conference and having people attend live there was not going to be. This was not going to be something that's accessible to the entire continent There are some people that are absolutely going to be excluded from being able to stream just because if you're if if you don't have if you have not paid for a certain naval of Internet. You won't be able to stream because at a certain. Price. Point the Internet is not stable. It's not great. It's very expensive. You're not going to have the data to be able to carry something like that. So for is what we have tried to do. Is We made sure that we provided. We made sure that we provided streaming alive for people who are able to attend live, and then we also are recording this session. We recorded all of this Asians and we'll have all of them up on our youtube channel and extensible for everyone for free because I do feel that. In terms of. Data, bundles and things like that. It's easier if you can just download Ah Talk if you have a talk specifically that you'd like to watch downloading, it is much easier than trying to stream it live. And and at least with that option, you'll be able to watch it offline or something like that. But one hundred percent they were. So many constraints, Vavuniya. Had to think through and the only reason I would say that we had. Even a certain amount of people show up for the conference online is because the continent is huge and so you will have a certain bracket of people that are able to attend it live but it's it's an even larger amount of people that will not be able to access that. So yeah. Was Dramatic success though I was very blessed to be to me. Talk and thank you so much. But even then we had a situation where a speaker had their power go out. But ironically, I think they were in the US when their power. My power is about pricing you're. Exactly. It's. Very strange and thank you so much. Scott like you came in and saved the day there we ended up doing. A very last minute joint keynote and It was very fun William who was supposed to speak Williams originated from Wanda and has done a lot of great work with the Python community in East Africa, and in the states he's based out of I think it's Pennsylvania. and they had just some sort of a freak storm or something like that whereas powerlifting. So. Favors I was actually one of two speakers that ended up having their the streaming not work for them because of either power outage or something like that. So yes. Did Not expect that from. That's William. Hockey who's certain Philadelphia and Philadelphia was definitely having storms and the the gentle irony there that he said that he'd been there for years and years and years never had a problem with power and then while doing some. As epic as Pike Ron Africa, his power goes out so Yeah. Really. Yeah. I don't even know how to explain that or I don't know how to feel about that. It's fine. Though, well, the parts of me depart to be proud of is the fact that Pike on Africa went off without a hitch and it was an epic Tau-, it was an epic conference in the are the videos online. Thank you I love the videos on yet online has started. We've already started a finished the editing perseus. I think for some of them, but they should be hopefully there will be online in at least a week from now or in a few days from now most of the talks will be on our ut page YEP. Awesome Hey, friends want to tell you about one of our sponsors techs control. They're not only the creator of the fully feature. Editor Library for dot net angular APPs. But they're libraries also have powerful pedia functionality. She Don't have to program PDF documents. You can make ms word templates and then merge them with data and that'll let you create pixel perfect pdf and pdf slash documents. The best part is Phil laboon form elements like text boxes, check box fields, and dropped down elements. And you can add those easily to your PDF's filling out forms really simple for your users and don't forget TEAC TEX control gives developers a complete solution to handle PDF documents in any business process. So check it out. You can try it free. See the live demos at text control, dot com slash demos, just that easy tex control dot com slash demos. The. Other thing I wanted to ask was your vice chair. You're an officer in the Python Software Foundation was was there it was being on the continent or your proximity, your lack of proximity to Europe, and and America was that difficult or is it because the Internet is the great equalizer getting involved in in community and moving up into such a you know a prestigious organization with any constraints or were there any troubles in the way? While I think that I mean first of all like the bad I had a lot of personal. Toll. Quite a lot about how when I first joined when I I had someone recommend that I run for the board of directors for the PA. I. Absolutely didn't think I was qualified to I. Absolutely. Didn't think I would make it or. Be Able to contribute in I. think that a huge part of that is because so much. In terms of technology world happens in the United States is happening in Europe very little of. You know. It seems sometimes that a little, very little of the technology advancement is happening in Africa and so for me. I had a lot of fear going into the board. In terms of my Gosh. Do I know what I'm talking about? Do I have a rights to say something to these people. And I think that personally I one hundred percent filed that. Foul that sort of imposter syndrome of maybe I should not be maybe I shouldn't be here because Africa's sometimes does lift to the side. We don't I don't know what I was thinking but seeing more and more I think that Africa has a lot to bring to the table and there's so many people on the continent that are overcoming barriers to be able to create things and do things that. I think are phenomenal phenomenal and things that. People in the US are not doing people in Europe are not doing and so for myself I think. Slowly coming to the realization that okay I actually do think I have something to say I think that Africa is a continent has something to say and has something to bring to the table and so I think over time that has helped me feel confident even win they. Are you know things like power cuts are or whatever that are maybe Know bring make me feel a little bit more humble a. Other than that I I will will say that over time I felt more confident about it. What do you? What do you say to to others because it seems to me that there's a huge untapped human. Asset on the continent and it's just simply accessibility to the Internet and visibility. To get more folks doing things like that I mean I would you say to someone who's may be listening to this podcast in there on the continent or they have friends and family on the continent if they feel that sense of impostion, just apply for that position go and volunteer for that you know or run run for that board. What do we tell them? Do Yeah. Absolutely. Scott I think that it. Has To be yeah. I think you have to just be able to do things even if you're terrified to do them. I am I'm usually scared to do things but I think just taking a risk and at the end of the day for a lot of things you don't have anything to lose and. Like you said earlier, the Internet is becoming more and more of a an equalizer for people and more companies I would say are looking to hire from Africa. I'm actually I think I'm allowed to say this juice I. Think I've allowed to say it. But I'm actually my south about to start. An internship with Invidia in on Monday actually I think I'm allowed to say that. Well, after after this one goes live, it will be after Monday's so we. Can't can't. They on me now it's delayed. Great. Though I mean for myself I'm when I was. Talking to the person. The person that was interviewing me and the day actually had reached out to me because they're doing a lot of work with python and and data science with us, and I really wanted to work on this project when I first heard about it but I think initially I was little I don't think I should do this because I didn't feel I don't know I felt like maybe I'm not good enough to do it but at the end of the day I think You have to be able to. To just trust that even if you if it doesn't work out, okay, you're still be okay and so it's just worth it to just take the risk and do it anyway and I think that for me that's something I am trying to teach myself and is something that I would encourage other people specifically if you're from Africa were another underrepresented group to do. I feel like there's two things to parse out there and I'm interested what you think there's One's own personal imposter syndrome which I have which you've expressed that you've had at times that sense of I'm a phony and someone's GonNa figure out that I don't know what I'm talking about. And then there's also am curious what you think about this. For lack of a better word almost a continent wide. Imposter Syndrome that is imposed by you know historical context and and colonialism, and just like personal imposter syndrome, you want to say hey. You can do this like I don't know why you feel that way but you're awesome and you should do that. I'm hearing you say you almost want to say that to everyone on the continent who might feel like colonialism is giving them low self esteem to say listen. Do that. Do that thing with let's do it together. Oh absolutely. That's so well word that's really while worded I think. Yeah. I've I remember having a conversation with some girls a couple of like a year ago or something like that and they. Just, started an internship with. This other company need that an international company and for them, it was their first time actually working with white people on a on a tick project and I think for them. Both of them came back to me with feedback saying that. They one of their their major struggles was working with white people and. Feeling I. Feeling that they couldn't the. Feeding this fear that. I don't know if I should if I can talk to a white person or if I can do the same work as a white person and one hundred percent that one of the. Things that I think contribution to that is, is Imbaba having been colonized and having this. This this this feeling that we aren't as good as white people because of because of how we were conditioned to think when the colonial rule was there you know we were told that we were inferior we were. Sitting this email and I think it's a constant struggle across the continent to fight that off and I think as well for the world around us. I. Think you know treating Africa I think people around us need to make sure to make an effort to treat Africans as equal to see them as human to see us as human beings I like them. I am an African myself and I think it's something we struggle. and. Hopefully. As the world becomes more globalised as black people become more empowered. That won't be an issue anymore hopefully. You have a really great talk that you did in April at Pie con where you talked about leadership and identity in the pan. African? Python Movement. I thought that was really thoughtful that you feel that that was very well received people excited about that talk and were you nervous to give it? I think I was nervous to give it because I think I really enjoyed making the talk and I I talk a lot about philosophy. In. The first half of it and I was intentional about doing that myself because I wanted to I, always find so philosophy something I've I've enjoyed for a while now because my brother have a twin brother and he actually Was a philosophy major in College And I think that. People I don't know if it's just like us I thing but people kind of get surprised by that that I know anything about philosophy at all but are actually some very strong even Africans philosophies that I think the world is just not has just not being introduced to yet, for example, but I think. When I was giving the talk I was a bit nervous about their reaction because I know in America sometimes and in Europe. There is a movement that is not necessarily for diversity is not necessarily for. Globalization as well. And I spoke a lot about unity and how? Through the African Python community through being a leader in that space I have seen that unity is so important and diversity is so important and it is a key ingredient to innovation and I think most people received it. Well I. was kind of I was shocked to see some dislikes on the Hyundai unitive video I just I tried not take it. Personally I'm trying not to take that first couple of dislikes. Fight that's also K. and I don't know what? Yeah I don't know. I. Just, as a random aside because I have bad habit also of like, I'll get like likes one dislike and I'm like who is that person going to your house somebody told me that maybe they're just trying to teach the algorithm that they're not interested in python. You know it might not be that they disliked the content, but they're just saying, don't show me that in my recommended list. Yes. So I use that I use that little tip to keep me from flying to wherever those people are and destroying them. That's. That's a good. I have destroyed many times in my heart. To Heart and soul into talk. Certainly. You don't need that. I. Don't like Down Arrows. I'm more of an aero person. Myself. Fed It's okay. I think it just I don't know. I don't know. I think for the most part the likes outweighed the dislikes and so I very much. The next. Make sure to. Make sure to put links in the show notes because you call out some important things that are are one of the things that you said is that unity isn't diversity and unity isn't Haji you can expand on that per second for me. Right So when I think of unity in one aspect, I think a lot of people. Think they're unified just because they're in a group of people that have the same ideas as them have the same Look the same as them or something like that and I think there's also a misconception about diversity as well that it's it's just people who look different from you whereas for example, in Africa, we can talk about racial diversity as much because I mean everyone knows okay that's not true. They all white Africans and also other Africans as well. But for the most part, you can go into places in Zimbabwe, for example, where almost everyone is black and still you'll have huge amounts of diversity in that place where people look the same. But when we specific when I specifically was talking about the concept of unity I think. It's more than just having people you know agree on. On something or be the same, I think it's about making people feel included included I. said one of my favorite courses at university attack a diversity is about demographics you. Inclusion is about a sense of belonging and I think unity is about making people feel like they belong. So you don't necessarily have to see the world exactly the same I'm GonNa see the world differently from you do Scott because I grew up in a different world from you. Sometimes. We have overlap like, for example, you have lived in Zimbabwe. So. There will be over in how we re perceive certain things but I think that a place where we have unity is a is a place where. I can feel like I can belong in a community I feel that. People are interested in hearing my story interested in in welcoming me and an author sharing their stories with me and I think cultivating kindness at and things like that in our communities, I think that's when you get unity and not just when you have people that look the same or maybe people that are diverse but just hanging out together with. No sense of unity. So and I think that the most important thing that I'm hearing from everyone where we think about bringing new people into the community is to constantly remind them that you are supposed to be here whether it be a board or podcast or twitter or asking a question. There's all these opportunities for for those who are already there. To, remind those who are coming up. Hey I'm happy that you're here and I'm excited that you're hearing you belong here. Exactly. So so true Yeah I think yes reminding people. And going out of your way to do that I think is so great I think I have seen you interacting with people on twitter. Especially people who are just starting out and of you know giving them validation and saying, Hey, you're doing great. Hey, I've been software for I. Don't Know How many years but I stole struggle with this or you know I don't have everything figured out I. think that's a huge way of making people feel like they belong of making people feel like they are included. So. Things like that are super important Yep while I really appreciate you chatting with me today. Thank you. This is really fun. It just out of curiosity and forgive me because when I was in Zim, we were speaking into belly. How do you say thank you in Shaun I've heard white as Rocco and I've heard Indian tender. Yes and dino tanned is what I would say Orey. Yeah that's fine. Even. Thanks. For coming on my podcast so much, I appreciate you. Thank you for having me. I've been talking with Marlene, Montgomery and this has been another episode of Hansel minutes and we'll see you again next week.

Africa Zimbabwe Scott Hanson United States Africa Europe Youtube programmer Harare America Python Software Foundation Zim Marlene Montgomery Asia Mungo DP vice chair Barbara director
Wall Street Breakfast February 11: And Then There Were Three

Wall Street Breakfast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

Wall Street Breakfast February 11: And Then There Were Three

"Welcome to ski health as Wall Street breakfast. Your daily source of market news and analysis. Subscribe to this podcast on Apple. podcasts Gulag casts certified and Stitcher. Good morning today. Is Tuesday February eleventh. And I'm your host. Steve Brown Wall Street breakfast is brought to you. By seeking Alpha premium. Unlock unlock the power of seeking Alpha articles data and advanced tools. Try it today. At seeking out by DOT com slash premium. Our top stories today and then there were three Powell on the hill and stocks advance with virus InFocus leading. Today's Today's news sprint is up more than sixty percent in pre-market trading on reports that its long awaited merger with T. Mobile will finally approved by US District Judge Victor Marrero. That would shut down a challenge by state attorneys general who alleged the tie up would lead to higher cell phone bills despite approval from federal antitrust and telecom officials merging the third and fourth top wireless carriers would result in a company with more than ninety million customers. That would aim the snacks even more subscribers from. At and T. and Verizon T.. Mobile is up nine percent pre-market in other news fed terror Powell is likely to sound upbeat about the. US economic takeout look today when he begins his semiannual testimony before Congress even as he nods to the potential threat from the corona virus in China. The Central Bank lowered interest reeks three times in two thousand nineteen but earlier this month signal to pause and easing unless there was a clear threat of inflation. Moving away from its two percent target fed vice chair. RENDALL QUARRELS MINNEAPOLIS FED president meal cash. Carry and Saint Louis Fed president. James Bullard are all set to comet at separate events later in the session. The S&P five hundred and Nasdaq scored fresh record. Highs yesterday as Chinese workers in factories gradually returned to business while new corona virus statistics. CYSTIC showed signs that the disease was slowing. There were two thousand four hundred. Seventy eight new confirmed cases on the mainland as of Monday down from three thousand sixty two on the the previous day bringing the total of forty two thousand six hundred thirty eight stocks in Shanghai climbed point four percent on the news while. US equity futures suggest a solid open on Wall Street ahead of earnings from under armour Hasbro Hilton and lift more than three hundred. Chinese companies are thinking bank loans totaling totaling at least eight point two billion dollars to help. Soften the impact of the corona virus outbreak. Banks will have the final say on Linden decision sources told Reuters. The interest rates are likely to be on par with those offered to banks top clients among the prospective borrowers are may tongue Dan Paying Jami. DD Choke Shing mcvie technology and Q.. Three sixty seeking to revive sales after seating it smartphone crown to apple. Last quarter under Samsung is expected to launch three variants of Galaxy s today the regular the Plus and the ultra at its unpacked twenty twenty event and San Francisco. Oh the S twenty. Phones won't be Samsung's first five g phones but they're going to be the first five g phones that matter with all four major. US carriers now offering at least as some form of next generation networking. The twenty three. I will be unveiled alongside the Galaxy Z.. Flip a square shaped foldable. Phone rumored to be cheaper the bulky galaxy fold Google's head of human resources. Eileen Mountain will step down later this year amid rising tensions between the companies talk executives and rank and file employees. She's been in the role since two thousand sixteen and led the company through a period of growth at saw its global workforce expand by more more than sixty five percent to one hundred nineteen thousand among the tensions employees anger at handling of sexual harassment claims the firing of workers who organize tonight's protests against the company and the elimination of weakly. All hands meetings as well as staff complaints about secret projects and the lack of diversity U s district Judge Dully has rejected a request by Uber and posts mates to block California's gig worker law which will make it harder to classify workers as independent independent contractors while the companies had proven they could suffer a degree of irreparable harm as a result of the legislation. The potential risks to them were less important than in the public interest in setting a living wage and regulating employment. Investors had been watching the California dispute closely as the rule would require a higher pay and other other benefits like medical insurance. The United States has charged four Chinese military officers with hacking major credit reporting agency. The equifax in two thousand seventeen and making up with sensitive personal data on about one hundred and forty five million Americans the. US government doesn't normally bring criminal charges ages against members of another country's military or intelligence services outside of the US according to US attorney. General William Pibor but there are exceptions in cases of Indiscriminate theft of vast amounts of sensitive personal data of civilians it will take several quarters to return Boeing's worldwide. Seven thirty you. Seven Max Fleet to the skies following grounding that has left about seven hundred planes on the tarmac. We are not going to over Stress System Randy Tin Seth Boeing's Vice President President for marketing said at the Singapore Airshow. The company said last week it had discovered another software problem on the plane but still aims to get the jet flying again by mid two thousand twenty. A deadline previously set includes room for additional flaws as six twenty am today US futures and crude oil or all set to open in the green with gold slightly down on today's economic calendar. REDBOOK chain store. Sales are out at eight fifty five. Am Eastern time. mm-hmm Wall Street breakfast is brought to you. By seeking premium. Unlock the power of seeking Alpha at seeking alpha dot com slash premium. If you enjoyed today's podcast please be sure to rate and review it below. Your feedback is deeply appreciated. That concludes today's Wall Street purpose. Thank you for listening for the best investment analysis. The News on the WEB DOT COM. Subscribe to this podcast on Apple. podcast Google podcasts. spotify stitcher you can sign up for our other podcasts behind the idea. I think the referees let's cannabis investing podcast and marketplace roundtable. Almost five phones as well have a great day.

United States Samsung Powell Google Apple. Steve Brown FED Judge Victor Marrero apple California president Shanghai vice chair Verizon MINNEAPOLIS Vice President President James Bullard cannabis
Vaccine Legislation Update & Banish Brain Fog #1133

One Life Radio Podcast

45:28 min | 1 year ago

Vaccine Legislation Update & Banish Brain Fog #1133

"One Life Radio is brought to you by our sponsors great companies like Sun Warrior plant based protein eighteen. Use The code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas in vira Medica makers of tariff Laura a novel broad spectrum symbiotic formulated with a combination of spore form by addicts and advanced food based Ancient Prebiotics Paleo magazine the Wellbeing Journal the International Society of Sports Nutrition. Be Sure to go to Thorn Research Dispensary on our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. And thank you for listening to one life radio. The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis. This is treatment or cure. Always consult your physician or a health professional with any questions. You may have regarding a medical condition. baby oh my gosh this is Bernadette. Do you WANNA go higher baby. You're listening to one life radio. I've got diamond gray. Okay who controls Jill Lane studio with me now. The Mendoza an audience about a young dose. I love back now. We you know what he's going to be done about this show because it is going to be a ball buster. I'll just tell you that it really is and Yeah Yeah for a lot of different reasons. We've got Mary Holland coming up. She serves as General Counsel and Vice Chair of the Board of Children's health defense. She has also on several other health and educational boards. We're talking about the upcoming vaccine legislation. she is incredible. She's a former. NYU A law. Professor graduated needed at Columbia and Harvard. So she's a smart cookie and I can't wait to hear what she has to say. And you're a smart cookie to Jill Lane. Well I mean yeah. I can't hold a candle. The herself her. You have your agrees but well. You've got your own degree of smarts over there as a pro athlete health and nutrition coach and founder of fuelling champions By the way as someone asked me to ask you what should they eat thanksgiving morning. So they don't ruin the meal but overeat because they're they they're just starving to death by the time. The meal is strategy. Yeah my favorite thing is I have a protein shake. Choose whatever pressing that you want. You know whether it's plan based or not put a lot of fiber in it puts them Omega fats through its fish oil oil or through some flax seeds. Keep you full. Keep you satiated you know. Keep your metabolism and check right and should you eat a pro. So I'm thinking you know Thanksgiving Day where you know you just go for it as far as food. Is there something Yami that you can eat. That's a little bad on Thanksgiving morning. You know that Like a cinnamon roll or something doughnut. Or something a deal. I mean people I the you choose you choose what you WANNA they do. That's the basic thing you know. I'm not gonNA tell people you can't do this or you can't do that. You choose but fully aware that you're choosing to have bacon then cinnamon roll with your family or to have a protein shake or to have donuts. Choose it but then no yourself and your body to know what that means for for some people they just go through the whole all day. They're cool. Nothing's going to happen for others. That might make them crash and burn and get cranky two hours later and ruin their Thanksgiving experience with their family and friends so choose it but choose it fully knowing Wing how that may make you feel physically and mentally within the next one to three hours. Well I like Good old fashioned scrambled eggs pasteurized eggs and just bagel with cream cheese. That's like a cheat again Bagel. That's it that's how I say it. How how do you say Bagel Google Bagel makes me think of a funny story bagels scenes? Okay years ago. I don't think they're in business anymore. But so bagels teens back in the day when I moved here was like the most popular Jewish Deli in town and everybody went there to get their bagels and they get their tuna fish in their pickles. And all the stuff that you find good egg salad at a at a at a Deli and went in there I mean this was like nineteen ninety or something and one in there to have lunch and Mr Bagwell Stein. Whatever his name was the they were they were they were? There was a line out the door so when to get them bagels. After we had eaten lunch you know to take or to bring home And he was going out and it was super funny because I kind of noticed it was like one on the register one in the box one one. I probably shouldn't have said that. But you know you a little skimming in the early days that was almost had to to do that to survive Really to pay the bills but anyway I believe I saw that but anyway so someone. The phone was ringing back when there was actually actually phones on the wall that rang. You know the rectangular one I think it might even been blue or something but he picks up the phone. He goes bag stains. We're busy and he slams. Every time I think I think about Gustin yelp reveal these review these days right. Oh my gosh. Probably not but I they used to be in Richardson. You know finding yeah so but I bet there's Still some places around town that operate in that yeah. Similar found open a Vegan in Delhi. You should go for it. Yeah yeah pickles Vegan US instead of the smoked salmon. How would you do the long like how would you know this cream? Cheese substitutes. Yeah you can even have gluten free bagels. If you wanted to but the I think if I was to do it I I would have my own chickens in the back where they were pasture ray so then if someone did want to egg because you know I'm not one hundred percent hardcore vegan right. You know I still like once in a while like a pasture-raised egg and there is a different so don't go for all that cage free stuff that is B. S.. It's just a it's a gray area and they're not treated well so just you know. In pasture raised raced. Eggs are a little more money. But they're also so much more nutrient dense You can tell just by cracking. Open the egg looking at the color of the yoke. The yoke of a well raised chicken. Egg is like an orangey Hue la super loaded with like Beta carotene it looks more nutrient dense. No it's not led to. This faded away yellow Jack Bright Orange or it is. It's like a sunset orange. Yeah for sure. Yeah that's a good question. Isn't it like a sunset orange in it is because the rays of the sun the chickens are getting what they need vitamin D sunshine all those minerals from the grass and they're happy and you know Like autumn worn commonly said. She's one hundred percent Vegan like hardcore Vegan. Well I guess not hardcore because when the when the chickens that she had would leave a stray egg she'd bring it in the house and scrambling up up. You know so. I found the locks replacement. You could use carrots. Yeah Ice Marinade. Some carrots will you know soon. This is a good time for me to give a little special shout out out to no evil foods one of our one of our sponsors. Because that's what I'm having for Thanksgiving dinner I typically will have a talion food on On thanksgiving and then Mexican food on Christmas Yummy and so and I'm actually going to a class to learn how to make Caribbean Vegan. Food like four days before Christmas. So maybe I'll be having a Caribbean Ian Christmas. Alicia that But no evil foods makes that a lot of those me replacement and that really good organic ingredients simple ingredients not all the fake stuffed aren't so many alternate meat alternatives. And I'M GONNA fly up my Italian stallion sausages however yeah. I'm not sure if I could go for carrots instead of smoked salmon. Maybe the Avi each chef can really perfect that and yeah me on it well component. There's this and maybe well. Oh He's in the restaurant business. Maybe we'll do a deal together. Maybe we'll open a restaurant together. Seriously I am a chomping at the bit to happen for a habit for awhile unlike. Die Into Cook for people people. I think you can't. I just can't pick what you'll serve you added. A lot of things could be a place that could be a pizzeria. Could Be Italian. Could the You know a a plant based place so many things she with a new concept like every other day the I know I can't help. I'm GONNA do this. I'm going to do that. We're they're all grey. It is right and I don't have any time for any of them really gives you. You can't do if you're GonNa do something really well. which is what you should do for success Focus yes you got to focus on the one thing but when you have a really creative mind and you love feeding people. It's very difficult and used to be in the restaurant business. It's not it's in my blood. I mean I grew up in a pizzeria theriault with my dad and upstate New York and my mom. My mom was in at the pizzeria that much because she was a nurse she was working. You know how much time the restaurant industry takes. So you gotTa know you know. There's a lot of people who don't get that. They think is just super easy here. Oh my goodness I didn't say that. No no that's what somebody said there's no use to come into the first pizza but drone and he would always come like on a Friday night. When what's your busiest easiest night you know when you're killing it and we would say you got yourself a little gold mine here don't Cha? I was thinking of the time she got pulled over and was talking to the COP. Yeah I don't know that story. Oh that was just a couple of months ago. It's an highland park honest mockingbird yeah I think they have this setup and I'm telling you so they do they have this setup where they'll they'll put two cops on it and so you if you turn off the tollway and you go onto mockingbird there's a light there's lying but only after there's if it's a school zone to assess school zones. Don't you start to slow down and then you slow down. Yes you're twenty or below and then you And then there's a light red light so if you get caught at the light you stop and then you start you know. Oh you know thinking about other things just jacking around. You're not play radio light rain. You forget that you're under flooring we'll have but but you know I got up to like I think it was twenty three and I was like Oh zone and then they already nailed me me come on two hundred and fifty bucks yup in the them out as fast as they can and I said to him you guys got yourself a little gold mine here. Don't you and he's like I don't know what you mean Ma'am anyway. I'm in. We're for him today. I am ready. Oh my gosh but I love doing voices but we've got a fantastic show coming up and I WANNA talk to you in your segment Jill about immunity right now because so many kids are sick along with five ways to train your brain because so many people are getting sick right now so we really need to talk about what they can do to prevent it but to start Washington six people. Wash your hands. You know when you sneeze sneeze into. There's something not out into the air. Whatever we'll talk all about it? We've got Mary Holland coming up. I am so excited. She is an incredibly brilliant woman. We are talking about upcoming vaccine gene legislation. You're not gonNA WANNA miss it. Stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one life radio Welcome back to one life radio. Everyone this is Bernadette with Diamond Gray Jill lanes lanes in studio with me. I'll be on about Antos Navy Mendoza and I have Mary Holland on the line. She serves as General Counsel and Vice Chair of the board at Children's durins health defense. She also serves on several other health and educational boards. She recently left the Faculty of The New York University School of law where she surfers seventeen in years most recently directing graduate loitering program. Mary received her masters of Arts and her juris doctor degrees from Columbia University the an undergraduate degree from Harvard University Mary Holland has worked in international public and private law. She is the CO author of vaccine epidemic and the HPV SHP vaccine on trial seeking justice for a generation. Betrayed always an honor. How're you doing today? I WanNa say Dr Holland because of your incredible education but how are you doing today Ryan thank you well. It's always a pleasure. So what is the latest update regarding vaccine legislation in New New York and California so New York and California are ahead of the curve but other states maybe not far behind so both both New York and California have no non medical exemptions in New York the legislature without a single hearing in June took away the right right to a religious exemption in California In Twenty fifteen. They took away the personal belief exemption but both states this year have severely eerily restricted medical exemptions so in California they just passed. SP Two seven six that allows the doctor to give only five medical exemptions a year sure and they basically go to investigate doctors who give them. Doctors are already being prosecuted in California and New York Department of Health is now reviewing doctors medical coexist and they're refusing to accept some of them so sadly children who have had adverse reactions so families who have religious convictions cannot ah cannot ex- exercise those religious convictions in New York and California. Although we've been fighting this in the courts so far we have not one so families are either having to homeschool home school their children or they're having a family they're moving out of state or they're sending their children across state lines to go to school which is just crazy only only have religious refugees In Twenty nineteen in New York from New York and California and kids who suffered significant adverse events from vaccine. I've seen like headaches convulsions. Like Caesar's like temporary paralysis. Those kids can now not get medical exemptions because doctors won't write right them and they're afraid for their licenses or the Department of Health when accept them so we're in a very very Very serious and wrongheaded extremist place as white now when it comes to vaccines well you know the question here what everyone is thinking. Why is this happening? Why is this happening? Mary I hate to. This is not a partisan partisan issue children's health is not a partisan issue but the reality is that New York and California both have been a democratic Trifecta They've had had a governor and both houses that had democratic have democratic elected officials and they have when that happened in New York. That happened and last January for whatever reason. The Democratic Party is very closely allied with this public health idea that all vaccines are good for all children. That's it just simply not true as a scientific matter but that is the mindset. It's visit zealous. Mindset of every child must be protected because all vaccines under safe and effective. It's just wrong. It's based on misinformation. But this is now the law in New York and California and they are going. So this is really the impetus latest behind. This is really the pharmaceutical lobby. And they've now really trained their sights on red flags purple states and so we know that taxes is a very high priority for the pharmaceutical lobby. And we know that Washington Oregon and Michigan according to Dr Peter Hotels who just as spokesperson person for the industry who just spoke at a conference. Here this past weekend we know that those are the states that are really under the gun and we know that Washington and Oregon in particular fought back very various actively last this past year twenty nineteen but we know that the legislative system sessions are coming up in twenty twenty and we know it. He's going to be a all hands on deck right your parents who care about this issue for their children. They need to get involved in their states. They need to get involved involved with the medical freedom the vaccine choice groups so that they can stand up and be counted. And you know what legislators count votes. They don't really care necessarily about issues. They may even believe you know whatever the party tells them or what. Doctors are telling them but votes count for legislators and if they see that they're gonNA lose the next election because the constituents constituents don't want it they sit up and take notice. Wow we'll you know Gosh I. There's so many things that I that I wanna I wanna ask right now And I WANNA I. This is something saying that. One of my books that I've that I've read for years Mary by Robert S.. Mandelson I know you know who that is. He's a medical doctor who was one of America's leading pediatricians who who had his own Radio Show and television show twenty five years ago? Wrote the book about how to reach a healthy child in spite of your doctor in Chapter Nineteen in that book It says immunization Shen against disease a medical time Bob question mark asking the question. Is it a medical time. Bomb says the greatest threat of of childhood diseases lies in the dangerous. This and ineffectual efforts made to prevent them through mass immunization. When I read stuff like that I think this was twenty five years ago? How did we get where we are now? Now you know. There's so many fabulous books were He. He was a hero Harris Coulter wrote a book about the assault on the American brains vaccination Russian criminality in the assault on the American brain. You know literally the movement to say there are serious problems with vaccines it goes back to when Edward Jenner for started started using it in the UK in the late seventeen. Hundreds there have always been parents who stood up there were parents who went to jail about riots about vaccines vaccines. Things are not safe for every person they may be safe for some people for some vaccines over some period of time but there are really you know long conversation. The main thing is this is medical medical tyranny. We've seen this before. Doctors were deeply involved in and you know in medical atrocities particularly in Nazi Germany but there have been other medical article atrocities. What's happening now is the doctors are not aligning themselves with their patients to first do no harm and to only treat that patient they are becoming agents of the state and this is very very dangerous and we can't imagine that this is only going to be children because guess what you can't just vaccinate children Colin and expect that there's never gonNA measles mumps or pertussis? What's happening out there? So as soon as I believe they really kind of like crap down on on the kids which they're well on their way to doing don't mandates around the corner and already putting in place adult mandates for for teachers who work in the school if they're already already putting in place mandates for healthcare workers and it's really a question of time and so we really need people to sort of wake up and smell the coffee that this is coming for you. This did you not gonNA stop with preschoolers or people until they turn eighteen. It's really a matter of years before they say up. You know what this hasn't prevented all the outbreaks. It now has to be everybody. Well and I've I've heard a lot of talk if you will about censoring of of people like Dr Moore Cola and his girlfriend on health. Not News Use Aaron Elizabeth along with people that I know personally that speak out about it on facebook that their facebook pages are being monitored and censored and a a lot of censorship out there so so set Congressman Adam Schiff of California. Overtly wrote to the head of facebook. The head of twitter ahead of Amazon onto say you must sensor these people You know the World Health Organization has declared quote unquote vaccine hesitancy as one of the ten top threats to global the health The government is very explicit. The leaders of the pro vaccine collision are very clear that they want to see us as people criticizing the safety of vaccines they want us off the Internet. They want to deprive us of any kind of Opportunity to communicate our message and we know from facebook talknet groups that have otherwise would be reaching. You know things would be going viral. They're not going viral. Because they're being censored well. Okay so what should parents do you marry if they are in a state without exemptions. Well we're now five states without any Non Medical exemptions and the medical exemptions don't really exist so get active we need. Do we really need you if you care about this issue. We need to connect with your state level health choice vaccine choice choice medical freedom group look around on the Internet look around on facebook. You'll find it. Every state has won at this point every state has a medical freedom grew. Get active you a half to start going to meet with your local Legislators you have to meet with your assembly in your Senate person you have to find out who you've got in the federal government. I work with children's Health Defense Robert. F Kennedy Jr. Organization. It's a great place to you know. Sign up for a monthly contribution. You'll get or even decide up as a lifetime member it's ten dollars and then and you'll get like information sent to every week about what's going on We need people to be active. We had an amazing demonstration on the mall in Washington Tin Week. Before last it was last called the vaccine injury event. We had thousands of people there. We had fantastic speakers. I was proud to be one of the speakers there and we were looking at the capitol. And you know looking at Congress We need to be visible. We really need to let people know. There's no more important issue for a parent apparent than protecting their child's health. There is no more important issue and we will not people whose children have been injured as mine. Was You vaccinate your child. You will do whatever you have have to do. You will not knowingly submit your child to injury and that's essentially now in New York and California what you're being forced to do Mhm It's really scary. It is parent. I have to tell you. And so many of my friends They're just so afraid they really are. They don't know what to do. And this is a big big fight that we have in our hands as parents fight but you know take hearts. I mean people are Waking Up. I just came back yesterday. From the first in four International National Informed Consent Conference in Little Italy and there were activists there from Europe. There were people from Israel. There were people from the United States. There were over a thousand people at the meeting leading. It was live streamed on the on the high wire the informed Consent Action Network website Take Heart I mean. There's thousands the media the mainstream stream media isn't covering it but there are thousands of people tens of thousands of people who are working on this issue around the world and the law is really the norms terms. The the agreed upon international norms for medicine are on our side the precautionary principle the hippocratic oath. First do no harm informed consent. That means you have to have prior free and informed consent for all medical interventions. So what they're doing is distorting the norms that we all agreed on out of World War Two to protect human rights. They are the ones who are distorting what we have agreed on is what is necessary for ethical medicine not US yeah. Well what's coming up in twenty twenty. Isn't there an initiative. Well Twenty twenty. I think what we see. Is that in many in all of these states. They're going to be real assault also on the right to choose and there's GonNa be assault on religious and philosophical right so if your listeners care about this issue get involved now because starting in January in twenty twenty we are going to see bills to restrict the right to say no to vaccines. Well you know you wrote the book the HP vaccine on trial. You've I've been on the show a couple of times talking about that. You know so many people will ask me so what what about the HP vaccine. So I'm GonNa ask you Mary to educate our listeners. What about the HP TV vaccine? What do you want them to know? What I want to know is that it's never been proven to prevent a single case of cancer? Ever okay. It's being sold as preventing cancer. It's never ever ever been proven what what's been proven is it reduces in the near term the lesions that might lead to cancer what we know is that PAP screening cervical cancer screening works. It's reduced cervical cancer. Seventy five to eighty percent in the developed world. You still. You'll have to get a PAP test if you're going to get an HPD's vaccine there is absolutely no reason for the HPD's vaccine what we see is enormous reports of injuries injury after the HP vaccine including deaths there have been over five hundred ten reported deaths in the United States from the HP vaccine. And we know that that what is a wildly and undercount. This is an unsafe inadequately tested vaccine. And I would you know. I'm not a physician but people should do their own homework before they make a decision on that vaccine and what we see now Bernadette. Is there in New York state. where I live? They're trying to mandate this vaccine for all children and this is a vaccine that has no place in a school context. Children are not having sex in school to the best of my knowledge and yet this is a this is a vaccine doc. Seen against a sexually transmissible disease it's unacceptable. I agree well. The manufacturer of it is Merck. If I'm not mistaken and last year you're there. Worldwide sales were forty two point three billion dollars. That's a lot of cash. They have a lot of money. And this is the end. The end game remember Emmer. Vaccines are a really special bizarre product. They have the manufacturers and the healthcare providers have liability protection and they can be mandated mandated by states. So this is just pure money. This is just you know you get this recommended. And then you get mandated and then you sit back in the money rolls in your ability. Yeah I'm going to read from Dr Mendelsohn again in his book. He says there is no convincing. Scientific evidence that mass inoculations can can be credited with eliminating any childhood disease. What do you say to that? I say he's right. We still have measles outbreaks. We still have outbreaks. We have pertussis this outbreaks. We know that we know that people who have had the measles vaccine are transmitting it. We know that people with protest had the protests vaccine are the primary people both who are who are spreading protest we know that the mumps component of the Mr Vaccine didn't work and that's why we're seeing outbreaks in lots of colleges. It is in the military it just you know at a minimum people must have a choice. There are obvious risks associated with these medical intervention. There's no question question about that. And where there's risk there must be a choice. This is a fundamental human right. This is about the right to life. Vaccines can kill certain people. There's just no question there's no screening greening is if you have no choice. This is really you know. Interfering with your right to life I love your passion And and it's just incredible information in that we're putting out today. I wanted to say this. You know if you look at other countries in the world we were talking about earlier. Japan has has taking has taken the. Mr Ska ah off of their required schedule. There's a reason for that. That's right. They also took away their recommendation from the HP vaccine they saw widespread injuries and a short period of time and they took it off of the recommended schedule. Japan has been far more cautious than the United States. Sadly will do. How can we fight this what I say? I think people have to get good information. So Children's health defense is a great source of Information National Vaccine Scene Information Centres. A great source of information informed Consent Action Network. Those would be my top three picks get involved with one of those places look around on the Internet for for who your organization is at your state level and get involved. Those are the things that you you need to do. First and in terms of like your own children He we know you need to be vigilant. You need if they give vaccines in some states. Kids are allowed to consent on their own Bernadette. You need to tell your kids you do you. You know if some doctor or nurse comes to you and says Oh gee do you want to be protected from cancer. Your kid needs to know or some clinic setting they are not to say yes to that they you you know your kids need to know mom or dad has to be involved in these medical decisions. those are those are some of the things I would say. Well you know I just have to thank you you for speaking up for our children here in America and and and all of us are at risk now because as you said this has gotten It's it's gotten bigger than life No Pun intended attended. It's just out of control the amount of immunizations that are trying to force us to administer to ourselves and our children so As a leader I thank you so much for leading this fight and all the work that you've done. Thank you so much. Thank you Bernadette. Take Care you too. And that is Mary Holland as I said she is the General Council Vice Chair of the Board of Children's health defense she's also the author of vaccine epidemic and the HP vaccine on trial l.. Both excellent books if you want to educate yourself on this subject stay tuned everyone Joe Lane coming up. You're listening to one life radio Jackson Browne to soothe the soul Welcome back to one life radio. Everyone this is Bernadette with diamond. Gray Viane Nevi Mendoza. A- and Jill Lane yes Joe Lane is in studio with us today. I think you're probably one of our most popular guests on the show when people when people know that you're on they always want to call in and ask questions and they do very popular so if someone does want to call in and ask a question it's two one four seven eight seven eleven ninety. Of course that doesn't apply in California because when you get this show we'll be off the air here in Dallas but you can email us at info. ooh One life radio DOT Clara. Go Post something on social media. If you have any questions for Jill so jill you know before we get into your five ways to train your brain gene Banish brain fog. And Sharpen your thinking which we're going to talk about this thorn Article You're a huge proponent of thorn research and their wonderful products. And you know I'm right there with you I'm right there with you and so But before we get to that I WANNA talk about everybody I I know right now is kind of sick either with you know something. That's you know in their in their intestinal track or they've got a cold or flu virus and they're suffering. What's what's your best advice for someone out there who wants to just heal naturally? Oh Man I mean we joked about it earlier but I think I can't tell people enough including my own kids which wash your hands the wash your hands wash your hands. Wash your hands and I'm not talking about using hand sanitizer and the data shows us that the more you wash your hands. The chances of you getting sick go down and and I think you know I work with a lot of student. Athletes and I am in the gym a lot and as you are too and everybody in studio and on of people I see come and go from the gym without washing their hands before for they leave makes me go. Oh my gosh like it goes back to just talking about being fruits and vegetables which around my next thing but it's like the basics like let's not forget about the basics. Keep your hands washed yet like more so now than ever not out of paranoia but because people are just coming and going in there sneezing into their hands like you were saying instead of seizing into a tissue who are your your eyes or whatever your elbow or whenever we WANNA do turning your head away and not seizing all over the shopping cart and then you know viruses and bacteria can live on certain surfaces surfaces for a while so you just have to be wash your hands. Don't get crazy with the hand sanitizer and all that stuff But I take some natural quote unquote hand sanitizing wipes wipes when I fly on the plane and I wipe things down because who wants to arrived a vacation sex. I think you can do a good job with that But that's the first thing the second is. There's IT's definitely more sugar around this time. Halloween and it used to end at new years but now goes all the way to Valentine's Day. It's like this extended party and we know no that that can reduce immune function and so be mindful like we were talking about earlier. If you WANNA have cinnamon rolls Thanksgiving morning. Great but be mindful to how that makes you feel. We'll be mindful to your sugar intake that and your kids and it doesn't mean you don't have any treats or you'd feel the step probation but match that with your plant based intake lots of vegetables. Oh some high fiber fruits keep your blood sugar balance because that keeps your immunity and check. It's also good for your gut health with most of our immune system lying in our got. We have to take care of our gutten. Lots of plants. And if you do get a gut sickness or you already have some sort of gut health issue you know aim for things like bone broth bone broth based soups. Yeah get some Collagen and and minerals down to the to help strengthen it yeah and take care of your pull. I oughta bionics Yup and Vitamin D. Vitamin D. Three K.. To Adorn makes a great product. It's like twenty. I gave diamond some earlier today because we had some in the studio but somebody They had a dot battle. So I bought another one but yeah so so important because you're not getting out into the sunshine and you're eating a lot of sugar it all those combinations just people not being as well in the Sun Kil so many bacteria viruses assist. Naturally you know things if you put things in the sun it at kills them right. I mean it could but I think to your point we know that having an optimize optimize vitamin D levels was good for immune system amongst like so many other things. So if you don't know your vitamin D. level or that of your kids get it checked. I was speaking with a client of mine earlier today and and she was like well. The doctor said they don't check vitamin D kids. I'm like you tell them. You want the vitamin D checked and your kid insurance. You'RE GONNA pay for it. We'll pay for again back to the doctors mindset like. Let's think outside the box most of mine vitamin D ratings. I seen the youth that I work with you. Know between ten and fifteen years old are lower than the adults because they're not eating vitamin D.. which salmon even these athletes that are playing out in the sun? All the time have low vitamin D levels and so- Vitamin D is Great. It's it's easy to supplement. You can get it in liquid or a very tiny capsule the reason why I like thorns so much because most vitamin DS that are in a capsule that are powdered. Vitamin D is is a fat soluble. Vitamins very concentrated so to put it in a powder has to be Deluded and the ones that are often used in the manufacturing side vitamin D is lactose have issues with dairy and they don't have to put it on the label and so you can be trying to avoid dairy trying to heal your God and be taking and consuming lactose without knowing and wondering why you're not getting well yeah. Dairy doesn't it. Produce Mucus in the mucus membranes. which which makes it like sticky like glue so if you do pick up a virus the Irish more likely to hold onto? It's probably my number one recommendation. If I have someone come into my office. WHO has general sinus trouble throughout the year and they are talking it up to seasonal allergies which it very well L. could be? We struggle a lot with that in north Texas. I say less and less. Just go off dairy temporarily. Make sure we're getting your calcium from other food sources. Let's get you on a good probiotic and over seventy five percent of the time it clears up on its own. I just remembered something. It's t Tuesday so don't eat any dairy today. help the cows house something new every time that though yes in the works for that right I thought of it. I listing. Go Tuesday better than me. Yeah good to go. So we'll we'll get some shirts made one. We'll we'll come up with the design together but you know so. Many people out there to have Have trouble focusing. They do at work or at school. Today are subject with Joe Lane who is a pro athlete. Health nutrition coach and founder of fuelling champions which is the three steps? Sports performance and Athletic Nutrition Program Bill to maximize the potential of student athletes and the parents that support them. You can find Jill on Instagram at team. Fuelling champions champions or her website fuelling champions Dot Org our topic. Today is five ways to train your brain is I said banish brain fog and sharpen your thinking from Thorne article which which is a great company. that Jill is associated with as well okay. So let's talk about this five ways to train your brain. What do you do if you have trouble focusing at work or school? Why think again? It's back to the washing of the hands. Make sure you're getting the basics. Okay it's like making sure your car has gas and oil. You need to make sure that you're you as the vehicle. Your body has the nutrition it needs so that your brain can run again. We think of the brain of some disconnected object from our body because you in this capsule absol- On our shoulders and we think they're not connected but it couldn't be farther than farther than the truth. In fact there I just read an article that was actually published a year ago. But it had to do with some very early preliminary findings at the brain might have its own microbiome. Wow I mean that is literally game that ends up being true and so they have a lot of follow up research but we know that the gut and the brain are intimately connected through. Something called Vegas nerve in fact you've had a doctor Chris Wonga organon neurologist and she's the one who taught me this that in Utero the brain and the gutter actually formed from the same tissue and they stay connected through the vagus nerve as we e as they separate and become two different quote unquote organs but they intimately connected through our whole life and we need to start addressing the brain as if it's not the one just master and charged with the stuff in the body. The brain went to do well. Yeah I mean they I remember the first time I read I think it was a doctor Natasha what is her name McBride. Who came up with the gaps diet and the made the connection? And I talk about this all the time on the air because You know I grew up with a brother that was schizophrenic. Ev Ev indeed. It was part and part from I think a lot of different things contributed to it but in part of the food in his gut microbiome being off and maybe maybe Schizophrenia got worse and worse because of that when you hear stuff like that when you know that somebody is suffering such a severe mental disorder and it could be something associated with their gut. This is important information that everyone needs to know. Absolutely I mean the in this article. We're talking about they quote Some data from the enhance study. which is is one of the biggest studies outside? Probably the nurses health study ever done over a period of time on people that talks about the fact that we just need to eat more plants and I need to study to say say that but it's proven and if we do that let's is better off. Let's talk more about that. I WanNa talk about that. That's interesting stay tuned. Everyone more coming up with Joe Lane. you're listening to one life. Radio Mole Ah Jill welcome back everyone one to one life radio. This is Bernadette. I'm in studio with Jill Lane and I love this woman. We're going to be talking about five ways to train your brain. I quickly want to let you know that that you can go to our website. One life radio DOT COM to download and listen to our podcast or subscribe to our newsletter. You can also listen to our podcast on apple podcast. Google podcast stitcher. Sure or spotify or you can go right to Iheartmedia dot com to listen live or download the free iheartradio APP. Listen to us from anywhere in the world. A big shout out to our sponsors great companies like Sun Warrior. Use The code. Oh Alar for twenty percent off your order. In fact I just had Adriana ordering me some more of their silver immune shield old because this is a great product and you just put it in your juice or your whatever. It doesn't have any flavor it's got all every- essential mineral you could possibly want. It's even it's even even got a full vic complex plus goal anyway. I'm out of it so I ordered a couple of bottles of that. Check it out at Sun Warrior Dot Com and use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off your order and in Fiber Medica Tariff Laura. I'm not reading these just pulling it out of my rear end. I love it today. It's Oh yeah that's right so they have a sale on there and I've tried this product. It's really good It's at magnesium lotion. A A complex with Melatonin Melatonin in it. And you I rubbed it into my knees and like my upper thighs not to get too personal here. But that's kind of the biggest part hard on my body instead of my belly or my rear end but it worked really well check it out at ENVIRO MEDICA DOT COM and of course no foods. I mentioned them earlier. I've having having their Italian stallion sausage for Thanksgiving instead of Turkey and crazy water. Call US crazy. We don't mind because we love crazy waters all natural mineral water. That's been making people feel good inside and out since eighteen eighty one. Try Crazy water. If you haven't already they also have a crazy phys water. That's like a San Pellegrino now except here local here in Texas. So you don't have to go. Yeah Yeah No. It's really good very very good. And it's and it's all sparkling mineral water so check it out all right right Joe Lane. I want to have as much time with his possible. So we're talking about five ways to train your brain and banish brain fog and sharpen your thinking. What do people need to know on this this topic? Well the fact that you can actually train your brain. We used to think that the brain couldn't change that it was just like this fixed thing but now we know the term is called as neuro plastic plastic. So weird can you think of plastic. You don't think flexibility but that it can change over time that we can change the structure we can create new neurons and speaking of training. Probably one of the best things you can do for your brain is exercise variety of different reasons. One helps with blood flow blood flow to the brain. which is really important but to it actually helps raise as something called B. d. n. f. which basically is kind of like miracle grow for the brain's neurons and there's lots of other things that can help raise beady enough but exercise is is really amazing in that vein and so get moving where you know? If it's a holiday season one of the biggest things I I teach people to just maintain their weight are used to and I worked more. In in the weight-loss realm of health was to not skip exercise. We get so busy and we punt exercise to the sideline and is the biggest thing that that will help. Maintain your weight and your mental stress. I haven't been holidays for a lot of people. I had this discussion with someone earlier today about using exercise to fight depression Russian. They're better thing to fight depression than to get up even handle it like you mean at right. And Science proven science proven proven. Yes actually size Can lift the effects of depression now. It doesn't mean you might not need might not need any other Supportive measures but at minimum. You should be exercising. What about meditation? Yes I think so I mean again. There's data show. The meditation helps with stress helps with brain. Health helps with focus not everybody. Some people are very intimidated by the thought of meditation. Because I think there's this miss the some notion that to meditate effectively you have to completely shut your brain off. Well that's totally impossible. You can't quiet your brain. We really can't control what's happening in our brain and and so there's an amazing woman that runs a company called Ziva. Meditation Taught Me Listen. Gold Meditation is not your brain. It's just let your brain go through a process of kind of like downloading things and letting it go. Let it go so quiet. Time prayer meditation. Wherever you want to call it is really good for your immune system to? Oh Yeah it is. It's so important to steal chillier. Mind and and your body to to rest but what about real quick best tips for a better sleep. Exercise decompressed turn off the Electronics Onyx. One or two hours before. Keep your blood sugar balance by not going too crazy on the sugar and just keep lots of fiber healthy fat and protein in your meals. All Right Jill Lane always great. I love that woman This woman you can find her team fuelling champions or her website fuelling champions Dot Org everyone you get one body you get one mind mind and you get one life get out there today and be contagious -ly positive.

Mary Holland Jill Lane Bernadette California New York United States Joe Lane General Counsel and Vice Chair Texas Washington assault pertussis founder Board of Children facebook
Global demand for U.S. military assistance grows

Climate Connections

01:30 min | 4 months ago

Global demand for U.S. military assistance grows

"I'm Dr Anthony Leuser wits and this is climate connections. When a natural disaster or humanitarian crisis strikes, the US military often helps provide critical aid and whether it becomes more extreme. The need for that assistance is growing the demand for American military resources to help out humanitarian disasters is increasing ear by ear league gun is a retired Navy Vice Admiral and vice chair of the CNA. Military. Advisory Board, which assesses potential security threats. He says. Storms are not the only threat slow moving disasters can also lead to major crises in southeast. Asia, warming oceans are affecting fish habitats, making fishing more difficult and rising seas are pushing more saltwater inland, which can disrupt rice agriculture gun says, these impacts threaten the region's economy and food security. These stresses are going to lead far more often to humanitarian disasters and that could become a. For the US military because we care about the people around the world and we care about the stability that we're able to provide that facilitates international trade and commerce and these thriving communities everywhere. Climate connections is produced by the Center for environmental, communication to hear more stories like this visit climate action's Dot Org.

US Navy Vice Admiral Dr Anthony Leuser vice chair Center for environmental Advisory Board Asia
The Next Generation of Global Business: Raymond McGuire, Citigroup vice chair

Yahoo Finance Presents

15:29 min | 1 year ago

The Next Generation of Global Business: Raymond McGuire, Citigroup vice chair

"This podcast is brought to you by Kiro Price at T. Rowe price are experts go beyond the numbers to examine investment opportunities firsthand the numbers tell only half the story strategic investing and covers the full story for more than eighty years millions of people have trusted T. Rowe price to help trusted T. Rowe price to help them achieve their long term financial goals T. Rowe price invest with confidence my career started in September of Nineteen Eighty-four I was recruited to Wall Street is a top executive at Citi Group and I can't be more specific than that because he's changed jobs a little bit recently and he has a new title Brown I feel good that's good my title is Vice Chairman of Citigroup and chairman of our banking capital markets said vitamin business. Okay and you've been at the bank for a number of years can you talk a little bit about your career there where you started when you started Joe Perella and Bruce Wasserstein and what was then the First Boston Corporation which is now Credit Suisse and then this is the hallmark summit podcast from Yahoo Finance Committee Yucky finances editor in chief Andy Serwer and city grew vice chair capital markets business we created a group of called Bankin capital markets advisory which is run by two of my colleagues or superior to what they do and I taming wire good morning everyone again it's great to be back and I'm delighted to be with our next guest Ray McGuire who is I be corporate investment banking and I became a global head of that business and I served in that capacity for thirteen years which I think makes me the longest city in July of two thousand and five and I came to city from Morgan Stanley were Co hitter the mergers acquisitions group I transition to Merrill Lynch and then for Merrill Lynch I I went I got recruited for the third time to Morgan Stanley and in two thousand and three was asked to and and how you got where you are today I there are a lot of questions included there let let me tell you first that city I started period and my perception that will continue to change for the better it'll be that much more inclusive which means we're going to get sorry I got a call from city and I spoke to city every day for ten weeks and I was recruited city by Michael Klein and standing head of of an investment in the history of Wall Street and I now when we combine the the banking business and when we created the we did what we'd advertise for a number of years and that is we combine the Corporate Bank Investment Bank in which we call others and I've been at city ever since I started at city of the Co head of what was in the investment banking business and Dan so I'll let you talk about what you do now Raymond thank you for having me. I invoke the Great Lhasa for of the Twentieth Century James We've started well let me be clear they started I was a bag carrier then they started Wasserstein Perella in February of nineteen eighty eight and I was there I had launched by myself often if I were looking to have somebody who represented diversity so it's changed fundamentally over that time sophomore level at college to make certainly have our outreach to be more expansive we on Wall Street after additionally recruited from I would say the the best minds that that reflect the mosaic the rich mosaic of our demographics from quite encouraged that so we've come a long way have you done work in that area to try to make banking more diverse and more inclusive yourself I do that every single been pretty different that was a frontier right what's been the difference the biggest difference to you over the years there are there are numerous with them out and I also help at the panel which is the title Vice Chairman of Citigroup banking over a lot of years right it's a lot of banking over our young people today love that phrase millennials are they different from when you were coming up are they okay how every single day by by attempting to make certain that we monitor the progress of those who are different the answer is they are more aware they are more conscious the global mergers and acquisitions bitter supporting Stanley and two thousand five when changes began to occur at Morgan Stanley pain the best and the brightest and that's that's the mission we can only this was a talent business and the best of our assets go up and down the elevator I can tell you one though what I convened a group of folks who look like me for launch there weren't a lot of people on the other side so expand that to make sure that the net that we cast a wide net can sure that we have identified recruited and in that that transition today is different the demands that our workforce today are are actually quite constructive they're demanding that be more socially conscious and so while they're there clearly is the imperative up generating shareholder value there's the imperative which is fundamental to creating social value and be socially conscious and so they are quite focused on that and they're quite focused on engaging assistant on our platform and by making certain that we identify the up and comers we have a program called early. Id where we have gone down to the here's a little bit ray what's going on at at Citi Group and Hausa Bank doing I mean the financial crisis is a long way in the rear view mirror but that did hit your institution very hard it hit it hit our institution hard that's well known we have recovered in say that we rules that would be recognized as some of the schools that are more oriented towards financial we've expanded that and that's important and we continued there the meals that they've ordered but they they may not leave for a little while we're sent to that as well trying to strike someone of work life balance sure every day with except if they have a big deal or big capital markets deal they they may not make down the elevator at least home they can make it down to get there sales years and a few deals deals on the way so when you started in first boss at First Boston in the Nineteen Eighties Things Colin the dot com era where for the the incoming workforce we had to create fruit stands and we had to have concierge services and there's probably an understatement we today are the most global financial institution on the Planet Full Stop we operate and so as you think about capital flows and trade flows and payment flows we are centrally organized to make sure that the trust the public trust if you will of a financial services firm and so I think you'll find adequate regulation in some instances plated underregulated what's your take over or under I would say that the regulators attempt to reasonably regulate the Russian that exist anywhere what about the regulatory environment and changes that you've seen there do you think the banking industry is overrated and how do you manage a unregulated forces that will have impact on consumers careers and financial services and I would say across the landscape of careers making sure that their employers have their social conscious shifting ninety eight countries we transact in any given day across our system for two five trillion dollars is it is it's word should be another instances it probably can deserve some transition I love that phrase yeah strategy that we have going forward to serve the world's most sophisticated multinationals we are as well if not better position than any financial enter and as we make that transition we have to be mindful of all of the factors come into play and how those factors get regulated cybersecurity as an example and so the regulators have to be mindful of that and as we're the caretakers of our clients both investor clients corporate client like that I like that respond well what does that mean transitioned yet we're transitioning now from an analog digital world inch and and consumer clients we have to be mindful how we go about doing that and as you see technology they're more socially conscious resulted which is that the and this is this is different to the cycles that we've gone through we went through innovation and technical innovation infiltrating that regulators and we have to be mindful of that right what is your take on mindful of that we need to be mindful that notwithstanding the the lesson four percent unemployment rate others have yet to be able to recover and that gets played out Austin landscape of for example affordable housing loan moderate income Lebanon million renters Levin we facilitate that across the east and the West and the north and the south are capital basis as strong as ever been and if you think about if you come if you think about my hometown which was Dayton Ohio and I look at the landscape there relative to the landscape at exist in other areas six billion dollars of investment and so you have to be mindful notwithstanding the headlines are others out there who have been who who have recovered less well we that'd be mindful of those ask about politics everyone's favorite subject of Politics Yeah you've got president trump maybe on the so as we think about that we as a firm about that we were able to facilitate the building of thirty six thousand units hand and here New York City Alexandria Casio Cortez on the other side with maybe Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders where do you see are there has been a recovery from the great recession the recovery has been not as balances what what we hope for it to be and so we need to be that's thirty years of the lowest unemployment rate in the Pico the industrial from industrial terrain service base our workforce is mindful of income inequality as an example of reference what's taking place with with affordable housing health on the shipping industry so the polarization has stalled us in the debate and we need to make certain that we can Israel the polarization that describe is not addressing that and so how do we do that we in two thousand fourteen committed one hundred dollars to this we are the US economy right now and markets particularly the equity markets I would say that the US economy we need to move forward with a coalition we need to move forward more collaboratively there's some fundamental issues which I referenced that them achieve their long term financial goals T. Rowe price invest with confidence unity's firsthand numbers tell only half the story strategic investing uncovers the full story for more than eighty years millions of people have in industrial service professional based economy the challenge we have in that is wages of yet to catch up wages of stubborn to finance that and so we're mindful of it do we have all the answers no but are we aggressively inactivity with a sense of urgency addressing them absolutely we've identified them one of the signatories to the US obtainable development goals we given our shipping exposure continue to address the debate of health and wellness and wellbeing. I'll give you another infrastructure if you look at the American side of engineers one and a half trillion dollars of infrastructure sure needs and how do we address that so we put up twenty five to thirty billion dollars in infrastructure last year N. we're coming up with creative ways to address it and with the millennial workforce they're motivated enough to even that much more aggressive could he in wellness and wealth let's talk about health health is the health of our climate and if I think about the health of our climate and climate change was this podcast is brought to you by T. Rowe price at T.. Rowe price are experts go beyond the numbers to examine investment being strong fundamentally strong we need to probe that out a bit more we are at the lowest unemployment rate sense December of one thousand nine hundred sixty nine in our shipping business we were one of the early signatures to the Poseidon Principles which puts a limit on the carbon emissions coming for me which peaked and kind

T. Rowe Morgan Stanley Citi Group Wasserstein Perella Kiro Price T. Rowe Vice Chairman of Citigroup Corporate Bank Investment Bank Vice Chairman of Citigroup ban Merrill Lynch Rowe First Boston Corporation Bruce Wasserstein vice chair Merrill Lynch Yahoo global head Bankin
Monitor Show 11:00 09-23-2020 11:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Monitor Show 11:00 09-23-2020 11:00

"Well capital of the world twenty-four hours a day and bloomberg.com on the Bloomberg business app and and Bloomberg quick-take is Bloomberg Radio. No worries in the world market and Paul Sweeney. How do you kind of view the volatility in the marketplace hear your heart of downtown for American workers in history companies across-the-board across Industries off trying to show up their balance sheets very very disturbing Dynamics at work working more good news from Bloomberg expert so much that you can beat up vaccine development because of all the dislocations. There's always relative value traits that you could be doing. This could be a U-shaped professional than a Visa a professional certainty. I think that is really cooking everyone these Bloomberg markets where the Vonnie Quinn and Paul Sweeney off on Bloomberg Radio coming up or going to take a look at Tesla and a battery day yesterday a little bit disappointing for investors. Also some news about Tesla crossing the Bloomberg terminal Tesla Seuss way to block Trump tariffs on trade with China will dig into that plus Kate krader food editor Bloomberg Pursuits on labor Nadine being New York's first three star dining room to reopen look at the take a look at the future of the restaurant Pig. With Cate, but first let's go to Gregg Jarrett Bloomberg news for a Bloomberg business slash right back stretching a bit further into the red ball this after vice-chair of the FED Richard clarida reiterated that often for Bankers take additional fiscal support will likely be needed to bolster. The recovery basically dropped led by energy intact Nashville drag down the nasdaq-100. I purchase battery Day event fell short of expectations more of that coming up with Bonnie and bald. Meanwhile, I'll give you the latest on what's going on the stock market the S&P five numbers down for 10% down 14 Advanced down a tenth of

Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Gregg Jarrett Bloomberg Bloomberg Pursuits Paul Sweeney Tesla Tesla Seuss Bonnie Nashville FED Richard clarida Kate krader Vonnie Quinn Cate Nadine New York food editor China vice-chair
Jaime Harrison

Two Broads Talking Politics

22:21 min | 1 year ago

Jaime Harrison

"Hi, I'm Bethany, and I'll Campo Texas, and you're listening to Jamie Harrison onto broad talking politics. Are you listening? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. And I'm on today with Jamie Harrison who has formed an exploratory committee to run for US Senate in South Carolina. Hi, Jamie, Kelly. How are you? I'm great. How are things in South Carolina. Great, though, the weather's perfect. And they're ready original. All right. So I wondered if maybe we could start with just if you could give me a little bit of background about you for people who don't know as much about you. And while you're thinking about running for US Senate. Yeah. So it currently Kelly. I am the associate chair and counselor of the Democratic National Committee. I was the former chair I American chair the South Carolina Democratic Party. I served as cheer for four years of vice chair for two years before that I grew up here in South Carolina, my grandparents to take care of me, and partly because my mom was the challenge. He had sixteen years old. She dropped out of high school, and my grandparents who didn't have much education to care me. My grandmother was you know in the text, but she finished peak green. And my grandfather was in the construction feel finish about four creed. But they were two of their to the hardest. Working people have been my life, and sort of of it's important do for your brother and your sister. It it's important to fight for everybody, regardless of where they are ten. So, you know, I sort of who up with it that whole sense. And so I always wanted to gain public service. Always love politics. You know, started there really when I was in high school volunteer on campaign. I bounce him. The Clinton Gore campaign, then intern with by center for its Hollins and intern with congressman Clyburn. And then eventually went to Capitol Hill and actually worked in congressman Clarins office. I was when he became the chair the House Democratic caucus. I was the executive director of the first African American ever the executive director, so House Democrats and history of the congress, and then when he became with Iran the whip operation for him and anti Pelosi. And so I I've been very very bliss Kelly with a remarkable experience working in politics, even recently wrote a book about it. It's called crime in the hill. How to build a career in politics and make a difference which is catalog some of my stories about working on Capitol Hill. But it's it's been a Greek greet time. And the most important part of all of it is is that I've had agreed time making a difference really helping to do things that improve the lives of the people in this in this nation and for that. And you know, I am internally Greek for. The opportunity had to do it here in South Carolina. And South Carolina hasn't voted for a democrat for statewide office for a while now, but but you've been talking to lots of people, what are the kinds of things are hearing, do you? Do you think that south Carolinians is that the word south Carolinians are? Are ready to vote for Democrats are the kinds of things that they're really concerned about right now. Well, why did it things the constant refrain that here is what happens Lindsey Graham. A so many people ask me that, you know, Lindsey was one of these people that many of us, and and I raised my hand because he had said wing to that a lease even disagreed with him on ninety five percent of everything. I felt that he was at least someone who was a states someone who could step above the political fray at times in order to do what? Right. Do the right thing. But what he is demonstrated is a commune as George Wilson's of political wind sock basically, doing whatever he needs to do or bake himself relevant and to keep himself in power. And so the thing that I think is resonating with a lot of south Carolinians is that they somebody in Washington DC who will. Just fight and represent now focus on whether or not you get a tee time with the president or you know, whether you vited to this special reception or whether you get hit time on Fox News. But just as focus on the issues that they are dealing with on the day to day basis. And so, you know, I've been going around the state and talking to people 'bout some of those real issues like the student loan debt crisis. You know, graduated from law school with one hundred sixty thousand dollars a debt now when I talked to young people that my dad pales in comparison to the that some of them are taking, and that's not sustainable, it is really not sustainable, and we gotta figure figure something out to deal with it. We have issues in terms of environmental issues eared, South Carolina, water quality, some of our rule communities of business. There's one community the community of Denmark, South Carolina, where they've been putting a chemical in the water for. For years. And now, we're thinking leading some health problems, and and and health crisis, you know, their communities in South Carolina, where there's no Floride in Florida in in some of the water offer some of these kids, and so it's impacting their gentle hill. So, you know, that's a huge issue in South Carolina infrastructure, another big issue. The fact that we have roads and bridges that are falling apart. And then some are rural communities don't have any broadband. So you're asking kids are growing up in those communities to compete against kids that have so many other opportunities, I it's just not fair, and it's not equal. And then that started in the same starting. So we need to dress all of those things, and then most importantly sulk here here in South Carolina. We're state where Medicaid was not expanded for rule hospitals have close as a result of and that impacted the quality of life. For so many of our south Carolinians. And so that's something that needs to be addressed and change the average age of US senators is add on something like sixty and your believe forty three just a couple years older than me. And you know, I know you've taught high school in you've worked with with students who are looking at going to college. What are you hearing from sort of the the young people in South Carolina? What is the youth energy? Look like there are people looking to to have people who are younger and more Representative of things that they're going through. Yeah. Well, you know that right now the millennial age is the largest voting block in the country. Now that doesn't say that the vote, and that's something that we we need to dress and work on. But right now in terms of sheer numbers, the largest voting block in the country, many of them want someone who can relate to them in the pressures that they're dealing with. You know, my first forum. Was on the student loan debt crisis as someone who's struggling dead and understand, you know, and you know, and they're a woman who also has her own student loan. So combine, you know, we had two hundred fifty thousand dollars student loan debt that has a real impact on decisions that we make in our life. And that's something that young people are struggling with some of them are instead of buying homes or getting married or siding to stay at home for a little while decided not to buy a home but renting and renting with friends or deciding on impacting their career choices. I understand that. Because I've lived I I really do believe that you know. And if you look at the averages of our representation here in South Carolina in Washington DC, we need someone who could bring younger perspective, a different perspective to Washington DC. So that we're gonna dress some of those issues, you know, one of the things that have just realized the other days, you know. God willing my sons will live to see twenty one hundred right? So we need to send it that. Can that can work on building a South Carolina for the twenty second century, but sad to say here in South Carolina. We're still fighting the war of the of the nineteenth and the twentieth centers. And I believe that I can be that rich the bridge between the older generation and the younger generation abridged to move us forward. So that we can prepare for South Carolina's success in the twenty first and in the twenty second century, he has the following up on that you mentioned your kids. I have little kids myself. I have a seven year old and four year old son. And you know, there aren't that many members of the Senate, certainly, but even the the house who have little kids I in a wit, what kind of perspective does that bring as you're thinking about you know, being. In office as you're thinking about the important things that the Senate does. And so a lot of perspective. I mean, you take one one issue that impacts is all I'm sure has impact us just childcare and the impact that that has on decisions that you make in the careers crews that you engage in it's such a huge issue and it's so expensive so expensive. And we we need to figure out what ways can the federal government step in in order to help work and deal with very expensive necessity. You can't if you don't have some type of care system for your kids, you can't work, and if you can't work, then what happens to you and your family. I think Cam in perspective having that perspective of understanding student loans and the impact that has your life. Being able to to understand technology and the importance why why rod ban is so important to hand certain communities because of the necessity for for various careers, and and just being plugged in. I think you know, having that sort of youthful, you know, youthful energy by tally inexperience. We'll be a good thing for the United States Senate. I think the needed goose I believe outside of maybe Tom cotton. And I would be the one of the youngest people in the United States Senate. If I if I were when I'm elected as my wife test. Not yet. You've said that you have an exploratory committee. What what does that sort of mean practically what's the difference between having an exploratory committee for Senate and running for Senate? Well, in my mind, Kelly, I am pretty much the we are the exploration done. And so at this point, it's it's somewhat semantics, but initially what I why I launched as sport or knitting was partly my wife, and I just had we have a newborn he just turned four weeks yesterday. And so, you know, going into this and you wanted to to do this race. And I knew I needed to do this race. So one I wanted to talk to the people in South Carolina, but too I also wanted to be able to spend some time with my wife and my newborn, and our son theory, you know, in these early early weeks, and so he's growing bigger and stronger, and my wife is doing well. And so very soon we'll make an announcement in moving transitioning this gaming excellent. I'm happy to hear that. So, you know, I think when people think about Lindsey Graham, the current Senator, you know, the there's a lot of focus on sort of the the national politics, and you know, what's going on with with Trump and the Muller report in those sorts of things in it doesn't seem like there's a lot of focus at all on sort of on the ground politics for for real people. I you know, what what is the balanced, you think for a US Senator sort of focusing on these these big issues these big important issues, but also focusing on serving the people back home. It is so keen Kelly. It is so you know, I just recently told stories somebody about so South Carolina are are for as long as I remember two centers for trips Hollins and just recently passed away in strong government. Again, the politics were very different the hit their histories were very different as early so many issues like race. But the thing that was not different between the twin towers was the focus on constituent service, focus on helping people address the issues that they were they're dealing with day-to-day basis. So is that told you, you know, my mom was very young when she had me. So when she was about eighteen or nineteen years old she's trying to find a job and wanted to in order to take care knee, and she wants to buy home and all so she wrote to both of her senators, and they both responded, and and she said, I need your help. I'm young mom. Tom. I have a young baby boy home, and I need help to find a job 'cause I just can't find one and so both senators speech doubter with their constituent liaisons. And in the end, it was strong thermos office actually helped my mom found a job to she could take care. And that's something my mom never forgot. But that's what our senators used to be. They used to be servants of the public. It's not just about having fancy speeches on the floor of the Senate. It's not just about committee. Here's it's about tackling issues that people were faced with on the day-to-day basis. So what I'm gonna do? I'm gonna go school on my on my campaign. And when I'm in the United States Senate, I'm gonna go back to being a public serving helping people deal with the many issues that they're they're struggled from housing to employment. To just getting their social security and their disability those. That's what people South Carolina really need help on. And then at the same time for this on the things that are impacting these people as I mentioned Denmark, South Carolina's a place where they found out that the water quality has been bad for a number of years because of them in in. Inserting chemicals into into the water systems. You know, instead of Lindsey Graham writing to the EPA in demanding that the EP ministry to come down and help address the issue. You know wins to focus on his ti- towns with President Trump. That's not what we need. He's focused on his hip times on Fox News. That's not what we need. We need. A US Senator will just focus on the people every morning every midday every night. And that's what I will commit to do when I'm elected Senator south on. So you have some experience with the DNC end being in South Carolina. I'm sure there's lots of presidential candidates coming through there right now. What do you see as sort of the national? You know, what where Democrats at feels like a lot of sort of important decisions that Democrats need to be making now about kind of where? To focus energy. And what kinds of candidates were looking for? What is your sense of sort of the the overall picture of the the Democratic Party right now? You know, I'm very very proud of the Democrats that we have particular. I can't churning for presents one in twenty eighteen we were able to change something many people thought could was not possible in terms of taking back the house. I think in twenty twenty we need to make sure that we're focused on our retaining average authority in the house picking up the majority in the Senate and winning back White House and right now we have a field what it's twenty or twenty one. I can't remember probably be twenty two. But we have a large feel a very accomplished amazing candidates. Everyone of them is is a champion in in in a themselves. And so I'm very proud of them. But. You know, I just talked with a reporter the other day. And they said what what is it that the how're people going to choose from such a large field, and and part of it. I believe you know, on the policies we're talking about shades of grey right in terms of the differences between these candidates. They're all insane. Same ballpark as relates to do. They all believe that there should be health care for all, you know, how that hill care is to Spurs. You know, that's where the differences are. They all believe in terms of a living wage and making sure that people can take care of their families. They all believe in the port of education, this -cation system systems. They they are all really in the same area ballpark as Lisa poxy in the end of the day. I think what is going to. What is going to be is that folks are gonna search there as essay when people go to vote the now, they not only use their heads. But they also use their heart and their guts in an essence, they're going to search your heart. And they're gutting find out which at canons that they really relate to that really inspires them. Motivates them to go out and do that extra bit of call time to to knock on a few extra doors that into Senate another five or ten dollars to help out. We need to find Democrats win when we have candidates that are hopeful that are aspirational, and that could motivate us to to be better than than what we believe we can be. And I think in the year they we will find that candidate. And that candidate will be Donald Trump in the twenty twenty alleged if our listeners would like to help out your campaign for Senate. How can they do that go to my website, Jamie Harrison? Dot com and Jamie spell like Hymie. So it's j I m e eight or I S O N dot com. Feel free to to go and sign up there. There are a lot of options. And you know, you can even send me your personal Email Senate, Jaime J irony at Jamie Harrison dot com would love to to read messages from your listeners. If you have any thoughts or suggestions, also going website and donate, which you know, we're going against a guy who already has four million cash on hand who Donald Trump has pledged to come and campaign for and with. And so, you know, we're going to be the David versus a Goliath, but I think it can happen. And I knew what can happen with his only we can get people all people not only folks here in South Carolina, but across the country focused on on taking down Lindsey Graham, it's time to send them home. All right. Is there anything else? You wanna make sure we talk about no carry. I think that's it. I mean, we hear this campaign is going to be. Very interesting. We're going to go out. We're gonna do service projects we're going to be in the community. We're gonna try to take an unconventional approach to demonstrate that we need to go back to have public servant servants in the United States. Senate people were focused on the people and helping those people deal with the issues that they're in challenges that they're facing face with them day-to-day basis. All right. I look forward to hearing. What you think about the next couple episodes of game of thrones as well. All yeah. Yeah. You know, I got one message from somebody like lateral bigger candidate needs to talk about game of thrones. I'm a very real person. So if that's something that's on my I'm doing tweet. I mean, and it is I I loved him. It's been a very interesting series. I read the books and just was in Amer and so I'm going to say this series in. Well, I agree with your take by the way. I also think Santa ends up on the throne. Go. All right. Well, jamie. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me today. I'm sure you're very busy, especially with a newborn at home of. But I I'm just really excited about your campaign. And I'm excited to take down Lindsey Graham. Thank you jelly. I really appreciate it. Thanks to reach out to me to. I really really appreciate that. And give Besse Sophie. All right will do. Thanks for listening to to broads talking politics. Are theme song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, EMU Newry, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork. Is by Matthew Wesleyan and was created for use by this podcast?

South Carolina United States Senate Lindsey Graham Jamie Harrison US Kelly President Trump South Carolina Democratic Part south Carolinians Senator Fox News Washington Democratic National Committee Tom cotton Denmark House Democratic caucus vice chair associate chair chair I American Hollins
Rep. Katherine Clark Talks Priorities For Emergency Pandemic Aid Measures

Radio Boston

12:46 min | 6 months ago

Rep. Katherine Clark Talks Priorities For Emergency Pandemic Aid Measures

"Congresswoman? Katherine Clark joins US Today as we continue to examine the implications of a set of executive actions that president trump took over the weekend to bypass Congress and deliver additional Pandemic Aid Congresswoman Clark Represents Massachusetts Fifth District She's also the vice chair of the House Democratic Caucus and had a front row seat at the negotiations between the White House and Congress that preceded those executive actions by the. President. Welcome back to Radio Boston congresswoman. Clark. Good to be with you cheesy, ANA So there's been a lot of criticism over the president's executive actions a combination of orders memoranda from your perspective what is the impact of them for the residents of Massachusetts and for the country It's frankly devastating. We passed the Heroes Act with comprehensive relief to meet the challenges and the dire needs of the American people over three months ago and all the Senate and the White House has hit pause. Three and a half million more Americans have become infected and we had seventy five thousand more people die from co bit nineteen and what we have the president are hollow proposals. you know he announces from a golf course these four never random or executive orders. That are an illusion and sleight of hand is not going to save lives, and what we need to do is go back to what the House did in May. And make sure that we are investing in testing and tracing in supporting local budget and helping our schools reopened safely supporting an office. I want to get to the May legislation in just a minute, but I want to backtrack a second because you refer to the executive order in the memoranda devastating, they can potentially provide four hundred dollars a week and unemployment aid to people who make earn unemployment of over one hundred dollars a week. Now, there is a postponement of the payroll tax. So the term devastating seems to miss the potential financial relief that is there doesn't it? It doesn't because we will never get back to a healthy economy without healthy people and what is missing from these executive orders is any investment in testing and tracing how are we going to stop this pandemic? HOW ARE WE GONNA? Save lives with suspending payroll tax deduction for several months? How are we going to help reopen our schools and protect our teachers if we're not investing in including the emergency funding for schools that they need and giving state and local budgets, the support that we gave in the heroes at. All of this is answering a you know this pandemic and the loss of life and the economic hit. The American families are suffering through and see this Mrs that have been around for generations close. With false answers, this is not a shell game. These are hollow proposals and why it is going to be so devastating and cost lives is because the president is still refusing to grapple with the severity of this pandemic and the economic fallout and understand that without investments in the health and wellbeing families meeting the needs of them. Now, we are going to continue to see this pandemic grow and have loss of life and livelihood. So. Those are harsh words for the president and I know you know that the president in turn has blamed Democrats in Congress for stalling the latest stimulus relief package negotiations. For. Wanting to push through measures that didn't have to do with helping people impacted by the virus can you give us an insider view of the negotiations and for the Democrats? What was on the table for you and your colleagues and what were you willing to give up to get a legislative package as opposed to these memoranda and orders from the President? You know what is more of a compromise then meeting the partier negotiating with which in this case was the White House. Then meeting them halfway at. That is exactly what the Democrats said. You're at a trillion dollars where three trillion lets me that. And that was rejected. Let me give you one example that I think speaks volumes about where this administration and the Senate Republicans values are. We have proposed sixty billion dollars in food benefits as I I know that my colleagues across the country are getting the same calls that I am that food pantries are over run they cannot keep the food on the shelves to meet the increased demand. And what did the Senate propose? Two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to meet national food benefits. But they were willing to fund at five, hundred, million dollars half a billion dollars to expand and double a deduction for business lunches if you won't be hungry children but you WANNA feed hungry executives, your values and priorities are dangerously wrong for this time. So you're highlighting some really clear philosophical and differences in approach between the Senate and the house between Republicans and Democrats here across the board in the analysis since this weekend I've heard people say it's going to continue to be important for Congress to act and and pass some legislation if you're that far apart how you're going to get it done. Here are going to keep showing up, keep offering to negotiate, keep extending our hand. I can tell you that the bills that I have passed have been. You know overwhelmingly bipartisan and that one is better at coming to bipartisan and deals and compromises then Nancy Pelosi but we have to agree on some basic. Values and some basic principles. The most basic is that we have to get a hold of this pandemic we have to have expanded and tracing. We have to have those supports for feeding hungry people. We have to support childcare and our schools. We have to make sure that we have a functioning post office so. It is it is really hard to describe the indifference that we are being met with. This is not arguing over you know pet projects or a few A. Few areas. This is fundamentally the Republicans shrugging their shoulders at the pain that Americans are feeling and the loss of life that we are experiencing every day every hour in this country. I want to shift gears from it because the other set of issues that have come up as a result of the executive actions this weekend or are questions about the legality of those actions inappropriate pushback there's been questions about. Whether or not a lawsuit makes sense speculation that these actions will end up in court I WANNA play Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin from Fox News on Sunday saying that he thinks challenging this in court is going to be bad for Democrats here he is I would say if the Democrats want to challenge us in court and hold up unemployment benefits to those hardworking Americans that are out of a job because of cove it, they're going to have a lot of explaining to do. And at the same time, we spoke with w our legal analyst and retired federal judge Nancy Gertner about this who said that there could be consequences if there isn't a lawsuit from Democrats. Here's that I think that there will be because there's a principle involved. So you have an order which is not going to accomplish what the president wants to accomplish and at the same time raise other more serious issues. So, what about a lawsuit is it's something the Democrats are considering in are you in favor of it? You know what we are in favour of number one is making sure that we continue to press negotiations and get the relief that is needed. But also at the same time, we do have a responsibility. It is the role of Congress under the Constitution to fund these programs and make decisions on spending. This administration doesn't care much what the what the constitution says and a cares even less about what is happening with Americans during this time. So we're GONNA continue on both fronts but continue to have oversight we will press and if necessary into the courts to make sure that the constitution is upheld. But we are also going to continue to press this administration and my Senate colleagues in the Republican Party to see the pain of Americans and to take action, we have offered compromises we are willing to negotiate, but we won't compromise on is American lives. We're talking with Congresswoman Katherine. Clark of the Fifth District I want to widen the aperture on the pandemic congresswoman and talk about childcare, which has been a big sticking point for you. You've been advocating for legislation that would provide substantial investment in childcare at this really critical time. What would that investment look like an given? How much trouble we're? Getting funding, past four these other needs we've already been talking about, how do you balance all of that? You know we're GONNA keep pressing for what we know is essential for reopening our economy essential for women and parents in the workforce. And essential for childcare providers, and that is fifty billion dollars to stabilize the childcare industry we have seen over three, hundred, twenty, five, thousand, childcare provider jobs lost since February we are fearful that forty to fifty percent of all child care could be lost permanently. If we don't make these investments, this is what parents need to get back to work to be able to be fulltime employees again or even part time employees again, and this is what childcare providers need to be able to reopen safely. You know this is fundamental infrastructure to our economy and I was delighted to see that the house not only recognize this in past it but that we did in it bipartisan way because then not. A letter Blue Issue We've got about thirty seconds left. So before I let you go I just want to ask you what is your message right now to the residents of Massachusetts during this just. Unprecedented time. My message to the residents Massachusetts. Is that we see. We. See what working you're going through. We understand the pain of the last few months. And that the Democrats in the house are committed to fighting for the science for the testing and tracing that we need to control this pandemic and for the investments in you to protect your life, the safety of your family and your livelihood, we can rebuild this economy, but we have to make sure we are following the science and the data and that we are making investments. So people can keep boot on the table and a roof over their head, and we will not stop until you've that relief. That's Congresswoman Katherine Clark thanks so much for joining us. Thank you.

Democrats President Katherine Clark executive Congress Senate Massachusetts White House House Democratic Caucus Boston Senate Republicans Massachusetts Fifth District White House Nancy Pelosi US Today vice chair trump Nancy Gertner Fox News
April 6, 2020

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

03:17 min | 10 months ago

April 6, 2020

"Today's politico playbook audio breathing is presented by Morgan Stanley. Good Monday morning Anna Palmer and welcome to your politico. Playbook audio briefing. Jake Sherman some news this morning for the better part of the last week Chuck Schumer has been publicly urging Donald trump to appoint a military leader to oversee the production distribution of medical supplies and equipment for the corona virus. Last Night Schumer spoke to mark meadows on the phone to plead his case. Schumer asked meadows trump fully invoked the defense production act and appointed czar to oversee every aspect of making distributing equipment. Schumer went as far is to give meadows a list of names Air Force General Pulse. Salva the former vice chair of the joint chiefs both Barack Obama and trump admiral. Sandy Winfield Navy veteran. Who was also the vice chair of the joint chiefs and ran the US Northern Command which deals with domestic disasters and vice. Admiral Marc Hardin check. Who ran the Defense Logistics Agency? The presence retort has generally bend. He has invoked the GPA. But only done so in a limited manner he has also said that he has a military man running supply chain but the criticism is. He has not been empowered to run the entire process meadows. Now has the names in his pocket and as we saw last week. Schumer's relationship with trump himself is unlikely to be productive for the moment. So this is a smart play by the New York Democrat. Jonathan Swan had a great scoop and axios last night about a tiff involving Peter. Navarro Anthony Fao. She about the usefulness of hydroxy chloroquine. The story got US thinking. We have a president who has no medical background to speak of offering his views of medicine. He even said what do I know? I'm not a doctor Peter. Navarro the Trade Representative is toting research about medicine into White House meetings. The Washington Post as a terrific story this morning which describes Rudy Giuliani as quote personal science advisor to trump tower knowledge. Giuliani has as much experience with medicine and drugs as we have flying. Military air tankers. Which is to say none Jared Kushner? Whose background is running a family. Real estate business has taken a role quarterback in the government's response to the crisis offering his views on things like emergency preparedness and how many ventilators needs by the way when a reporter asked fouts. You Bet hydroxy chloroquine Sunday night. Trump stepped in and said you know how many times he's answered this question. Fifteen Times you don't have to ask The New York Times Ben Smith's media quesion column today as a Talker. It's about CNN. And the relationship between Chris and Andrew Cuomo. The Wall Street Journal is reporting the global markets rose Monday following news that lockdowns in the US and Europe. Working colleague. Kyle Cheney has the latest on Michael Atkinson the intelligence community inspector general putting out a statement. Sunday that he believes the president fired him because he handled the whistleblower complaint properly and David CIDERS and neither have a look. Democrats new rallying cry that trump taint the economy while allie scoops that the House majority PAC which is aligned with speaker. Nancy Pelosi has booked fifty one million dollars in fall ads with massive funds slotted for Minnesota Pennsylvania Michigan in Texas as Democrats look to defend their majority. Here's his on tap for trump's Monday. The president will have lunch with Mike Pence at twelve. Thirty in the corona virus. Task Force Wall debriefing at five subscribed to playbook at politico dot com slash playbook.

Donald trump Chuck Schumer vice chair Navarro Anthony Fao Rudy Giuliani president Playbook US Peter chloroquine Admiral Marc Hardin mark meadows Anna Palmer Morgan Stanley Defense Logistics Agency Jake Sherman New York Jared Kushner Barack Obama Sandy Winfield
Monitor Show 07:00 09-23-2020 07:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Monitor Show 07:00 09-23-2020 07:00

"Jayhawk it's a funny name with serious promise. Every time we save a life beat a buzzer or built a community. We add a little more to what it really means join us and become a Jayhawk at apply. Edu say that there was potential for 151 the market which has ignored all incoming bad news. What bothers me is that we still are going into this week with so many people still unemployed the rules. Of course in the number is very very limited monetary policy the way we grew up with it. It doesn't work anymore monetary policy will do its part. It's not though the the primary driver of this recovery right now. This is Bloomberg surveillance with Tom Keene Jonathan Ferrell and Lisa abramowitz from New York and London for audience worldwide Thursday morning. Good morning. This is Blue Book surveillance live on Bloomberg TV and radio alongside Tom Kean at least Rabinowitz. I'm Jonathan Pharaoh. Can I get down to the opening bell with Equity Futures positive five tenths of 1% and off? Absolutely. No idea why we have a rally in Europe. Either Tom. One thing I do know is that in 1 hour time? We will be catching up with the vice chair of the Federal Reserve well to me, it's the interview of the quarter. If not the Year this speech you gave August 31st was exceptionally important John. I spoke to the vice chairman yesterday and he's really enthused about expanding on a lot of this monetary mumbo-jumbo warning. It's going to be a little technical upfront but John it's an important speech but the backdrop John and you nailed this weeks ago is this massive case build up in the United Kingdom that the Prime Minister wage talked about yesterday. I'm sorry John the landscape changed yesterday when he went out to March of 2020.

John Edu Tom vice chairman Tom Kean Tom Keene Jonathan Pharaoh Bloomberg Bloomberg TV vice chair Equity Futures Federal Reserve Europe United Kingdom Lisa abramowitz Jonathan Ferrell Prime Minister New York Rabinowitz
BPR Full Show 6/29/20: The About-Face of Amazon

Boston Public Radio Podcast

2:46:48 hr | 7 months ago

BPR Full Show 6/29/20: The About-Face of Amazon

"Support for Boston public radio comes from the Massachusetts. General Hospital Cancer Center. Early detection is key to catching intriguing many cancers. You can learn more about innovative programs at mass general dot, Org Slash Cancer Mass General Cancer Center every day, amazing. Ahead on Boston public radio, the first wave of the corona virus has turned into a Su- NAMI now. Some states across the country of grappling with nightmarish increase in case counts. That's forced the governor's. California Florida and Texas to walk back. Some of the reopening plans even in a state like ours training in the right direction, the viruses still present, and since we're in face to what should we? We be prepared for a few minutes away Dr. Catherine Gergen Barnett when she's here to answer our questions and yours in the wake of George Floyd's murder corporate America spoke up and said black lives matter for they truly willing to put their money where their mouth is despite diversity problems on the upper echelon of America's most powerful corporations. In recent weeks, several companies have committed to right the. Of racial injustice will learn more about this from Boston, Globe business columnist Shirley young up ahead on Boston, public radio, eighty nine seven W. G. B. H.. Rowdy merger. You're listening to Boston public radio eight nine seven WG PH good morning, Jim Is Prized by the Supreme Court, decision. I. I am a little bit surprised because I didn't know what John Roberts is going to do about this. He's normally much more concerned about this. He didn't really. Vote on the issues about this being unnecessary. Claim about caring about women's health. I mean that's ridiculous. Because longer, you wait to get an abortion, the more perilous your health becomes, this is what it would do is hold up women and make it longer before the again abortions, but he did say. That the case need to be treated the same as Texas case, which was also bogus, claiming that they were concerned about women's health. I don't believe that for a second. Your we should've I. Just want to one more minute on this before we get to the topic at hand, the argument was in this case and the Texas thing that requiring the doctors who perform abortions have admitting privileges at a hospital was as you suggest for important for the health of the woman. In cases, the problem with the abortion. Read you one. This is in the New York Times from the lower court judges. I can't pronounce his name. The Federal District Court judge in Baton Rouge, who struck down the law in twenty seventeen? Listen US and the last twenty three years Hope Clinic Freeport, which serves in excess of three thousand patients per year, had only four patients who required transferred to a hospital for treatment in each instance in each instance, regardless of whether the physician had admitting privileges. The patient received appropriate. So, there's no. There's no. There's no factual basis or a the law, which obviously was a back door attempt to make abortion virtually impossible to left with one abortion doctor in the state of Louisiana so. Good, for Roberts, which also I get once again. The plus of this is I think it puts centerstage something you and I have been talking about for twenty years on the air. One of the most important decisions you make every four years in November is who's supreme. Court justices who served for life and any case. On Friday was Friday during the White House Krona buyers taskforce briefing Vice President Pence that is best to put a positive spin on how the US's managing the outbreak. We have made a truly remarkable progress in moving our nation forward. We've all seen the encouraging news as we open up America again. More than three million jobs created in the last jobs report retail sales are rolling. And, of course, the extraordinary progress in New York New Jersey Connecticut and New Orleans areas that. Just a matter of Of a month ago, we're struggling under the weight. Of this pandemic now, unfortunately, we are still struggling under the way to this pandemic, the United States is surpasses. You probably know two point. Five million confirmed cases as a new wave of infections, churns through the south and west making, Texas Arizona, and Florida the nation's epicenters of grown virus given the nature of this infection disease. What does this resurgence in the south? South mean for New England. Join US line for take on this Dr. Catherine Gergen Barnett. She's the vice chair of primary care, innovation and transformation and residency director in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston, Medical Center and be medical school. She will also take any of your questions on Covid nineteen and your calls Katherine Gergen Burnett could talk again. Thanks Colon in. Thanks so much for having me again. Very much of for for joining us, so let's start with where we are. In the United States what kind of shape or win? So you know it's, it's always interesting to hear briefings where there's so much reassurance given I think the beginning of reassurance at pence gave was very much about the financial uptick with reopening, but as as you mentioned earlier in the beginning of the hour on your show, we know that thirty states around the country right now are seeing a massive uptick in the number of cases, and as Jim, also just meant mentioned Texas. Texas Florida or Arizona and pretty deep water right now not only with the number rising of cases, but the acuity of the cases and the number of ICU beds that are being occupied so while we have seen very reassuring numbers in Massachusetts as late which we are very grateful for, and there's more to discuss about that for sure I would say that if you look at a map of the United States. A lot of the majority of the states are sort of. Red. Which means there's increased number of cases, and and not a decrease unfortunately. I'm not one hundred percent. Sure this is exact lines. Massachusetts police believe whenever governor. Baker doctors asked a press conference about what we do. Should we bar someone from Florida Texas or Arizona from coming into the state I think he raises what he considered to be constitutional. Concern, but regardless of what his argument is. What do we do I mean? We are trending in the right direction here for the most part states where the actual numbers are going down, we learned over the weekend or Connecticut and Rhode Island, but things are trending in the right direction here. This is A. Place that a lot of people like to come like New York. What do we do when people WANNA come from the? Texas's in the Arizona's the Florida's where we do about that. Think, you're asking exactly the right question I was actually just asking this question of my friend. yesterday works as a Massachusetts Department of Public Health and and you know New York and Connecticut has put quarantine measures on people coming from out of state and And I actually is a physician and and somebody very concerned about public health I. You know would very much encourage us to look at Massachusetts at look at a similar model very well aware that many places in Massachusetts including places like Cape Cod depend on visitors from out of state for financial security in years to come. But I also I think many of us feel very protective protective of the work that we've done to date to get our number so low and and I will tell you you know. It's come April twentieth of this past year when we were really at the height we didn't know when and if and how we get to this such a good place. Right now and I think that we all need to be thinking long and hard about a you know who we encourage to come into town, so thinking about family members or or others And and be how we can be working with the state and policy makers about ways that we can protect our state if we're not GONNA mandate quarantine. Then what can we do? Can we insist that somebody's had a negative test? You know twenty four to forty eight hours before entry and what are what are other ways that we can protect our borders because unfortunately as we all know, many of us kind of believe and I'm a firm believer that we what we really need is a national response. obviously, and because we're fifty states, and most of the states are contiguous, and the borders are. Very porous, but without that every state is having to make their own decisions. and New England a lot of new ones. States have made a decision together to Corentin visitors and Massachusetts is not so I think we need to think long and hard about that. Jim Tease me about giving the annual the daily South Boston Update Report on mask wearing and I just happened to have been there on Friday. Full of young people. We now know that young people are thought these outbreaks in the South and west to. Going to bars and stuff they were outside, but it was I would say maybe fifteen percent of people that I saw were wearing masks down on the beach. Maybe it's five up at one five or five. One five one five. Walking all on the boardwalk there. Almost, nobody and I thought. Wow should should should. COPS, come by and say put on a mask or should somebody be paying paying? You feel like you have to walk out of the street fifteen feet away from somebody. WHO's walking. And it had to restrain myself from being like mother superior and give somebody a speech where the heck is your mask, but you know what I mean it's not. Everybody's with the program. Look I. Mean I I think that people lots of people have grown very weary. WE C-. We continued to see very positive statistics coming out of Massachusetts I think it's alive. Many people to sort of have their guard down. With summer weather, people also feel like just you know wanting more freedom and I think that you know I. Think Baker has done a good job of continuing to communicate. You know you need to wear your math. You need to socially distance. For the most part I actually think Massachusetts. Citizens have been doing a fabulous job on that I will also say though that young people. Have, gotten a lot of messages of a can't get sick right I mean I think the a symptomatic spread among young people is pretty new data, not everybody maybe reading the newspaper thinking about it, and so people think they're immune and and then they also think Oh, well I'm outside you know the problem is not only are they putting themselves at risk with symtomatic spread and everybody else. and I also hate to sound like mother superior, but I worry about some of these habits, and how they're going to transform the landscape of the positive. Positive uptick once we come back indoors 'cause yeah, the cat. The cat is a little bit out of the bag. Perhaps and it's GonNa be hard really hard to go back for people I'm going to get back to mass later so many issues around it but I. I just have one more thing before we get to the calls, and then we'll have a few more things for you to We're only I. Guess this almost July. Yes, two months away from school reopening and I say that in quotes whatever that means Jeff Riley. The Education Commissioner. Look talked about these multiple scenarios if things don't change dramatically from where they currently are I, know that's a big, if but just that's all we have is what we where we currently are in Massachusetts, for example or New Hampshire and Rhode Island, where things are going relatively well, they're listening today. To what do you say to a parent who's worried about sending his or her twelve year old back to a classroom, an indoor classroom come late August early September Dr. Yeah! Look I'm also the mother of three children. I think about this a lot. have a sixteen year old, a twelve year old and a seven year old, perfect, okay, great main. So so you know as a as a professional and personal I think you know first of all. Obviously, we'll be tracking the numbers very carefully There's I think the released kind of suggestions from last week I. We're really well thought out I am concerned about this question of how far apart the deaths are, so there's a question of three feet apart or six feet apart, you know and and everybody over second grade and needing to wear mask You know I can only imagine that. If. They're three feet apart. You know it's very hard to imagine somebody in second grade wanting to keep their mask on all day and so that's close so worried about that but I. On the flip side of it is, we need to be thinking about the mental health consequences and the educational consequences of our kids not going back to some. Hybrid learning and you know the disparity again. We've seen disparity in every single domain around corona virus, and frankly around you know health care delivery in our country And and and those who have access to good computers or ability to do distance learning, and those who don't and those who are in homes where they may be suffering at the hands of an abuser, even more being at home, or having greater anxiety or depression or trauma, and not having access to a therapist or good meals, or you know all the things that we know that schools can provide for Families I. think that's the flip side, so I think we need to be carefully thinking about both the public health part in the medical part, and if we're at where we are now, you know I i. feel confident. The schools can do things in in a semi Safeway. We talked to to Catherine. Gergen Barnett vice-chair. Primary Care Innovation Transportation at transportation transformation. At Bu in Boston Medical Center let's go to Kate and Concord. Thank you for calling Kate Kate. Thank you so much I'm a sixty seven year old. Can you hear me? I'm I'm a sixty seven year old, reasonably healthy mom Taipei blood. I haven't seen my twenty eight year old daughter lives in. Chicago since February. She's planning on coming home. Just let her time between her dad and me in a week She did go to Vancouver in Seattle right when the Co Bids Spike started. And she's been tested positive for antibodies out there in Chicago. So should I house her and her four month old golden retriever for a week. Kate that's such a good question, and I know. Listeners that you're certainly not alone So the antibody testing is interesting, I think it's It's wonderful. She was able to get it. I don't think that we don't know for certain what that means. in terms of weather she is likely to had it in the past and likely she to get it again, I am very pleased that you're healthy and you're six sixty seven and you know if she had more time, I might suggest that she kinda quarantines two weeks before seeing you. It sounds like that's not possible. and my only hope is that maybe you could do a little bit of mitigation of risk where she could be in a separate quarters from you could be eating totally separate kind of pots where you're making your meals, and eating far enough apart that you're not spreading germs and being hyper vigilant If she is to come visit, you you know, but generally I think if people have a chance again in terms of traveling that. That they're actually having some time to kind of self quarantine, even for from five to fourteen days before they see a loved one, but it sounds like if you can make some sort of mitigation, strategy I'm hopeful you'll be able to see her in a safe way to good luck. You know you mentioned air travel a second ago. Dr I'm sure you read over the weekend. American Airlines is I. Don't know what the date is I think. It may be July I no longer an empty seat between passengers. They're going to fill it up. You may request if they have one in alternative flight to your destination and again if it's available, the give it to you. Is there any. Any defense other than the bottom line for that decision by the airline now now. Know I I'm not gonNA. Say that they don't have to defend their bottom line, but there's nothing that thinking about the safety of passengers in in putting that back that middle seat, I any of us who've done any airline travel over the last ten years knows about two inches between our faces. You know in those middle seats. and you know that's the same. With the NBA and many other things where people have to think about sort of getting back to service and bottom line, and saying Oh, well, we just can't control how many people are are on and how close they are but but I'm very hopeful that people will be able to find or less people be flying and hopefully less people booking in the middle seat, but no I don't i. don't think there's any public health way to defend that decision. Here's a question from Joel from Newton via email. He says given that we have so many colleges and universities in Boston on many opening up in August and September. How worried should we be about students from southern and Western states coming back to Boston? Joe I think that's a great question. and again I. I'm hopeful that colleges will be able to make some sort of decisions around this again. The State is not making mandated quarantine but I might suggest that colleges have people who are coming from out of state. Come a week early in quarantine before going into dorms, and you know having. negative test as well before they're. They're going into dorms, but you know even though that feels right around the corner, I think we still have about four to six weeks to make some of those policies, but I think colleges need to be thinking now about what they're requesting from the hot hot spots, and where people are coming from you know before we get back to the phones, a doctor, the color, and by the way our numbers, eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine seventy lines are full, but when somebody hangs up, feel free. You mentioned. We're talking about American Airlines. Yeah, there's the tea as well. So what do you say to somebody who has no choice but to ride the T to get the work? And A. We've heard the head of the t say that will not be a capacity limit as such. But! They restored the full service so hopefully with fewer people riding it. But. What do you say to someone who says I don't want to do it, but I have no choice. How do I minimize the safety risks? Yeah, it was actually just talking to a patient of mine about this the other day as well so he uses the T at extremely off hours and so you know if there's an opportunity to use it when you know that there, you can kind of self-regulate. The number of people who are going to be in the T- that is definitely the preferable thing to do, and obviously kind of sanitizing your hands before and after the tea and wearing a mask And just you know keeping yourself kind of as safe as you can while you're the in. That you know then Bta's also doing the best that they can to make sure that they keep their trains in their buses, clean and do kind of more regular Senate position. Those of those areas so i. know that they are also working hard on their end, but I think probably shifting hours. If possible, go to Heidi newburyport, your Doctor Catherine Gergen Burnett, I. Hey. How are you guys? Taking my call I have a little report. Marjorie like you from the north. There like with math It's driving me absolutely crazy because we live on the border. And we have so many people who come from different places and At first when we first started to open up, there was a lot of compliance now. It's like out of the window you go to the beaches. People are all over each other. I counted like eleven, kids just like. Piling on top of each other whatever and then downtown around town. It's it's. It's not being required. And if you go to the supermarket, it's like the mask burlesque less show. People put him up. They put him down. Put him halfway across. To. Dr. y'All. Because I? But. So my question is at what point does the governor say? Okay, guys, you know I've made the suggestion, but we're seeing our numbers ticking up. Is there a point where he says? Okay? Your ticket to ride to be able to have our our economy functioning. You have to wear a mask in public full stop unless you're eating or drinking. That's it. I don't understand how how this is a problem. Because people, he leaves that leeway like unless you can. Social distance will. People not socially distancing and I'm afraid. Our our little neck of the woods is going to blow up. So your question is. Should we have a state wide mandate? Well and at what point do we go from? Suggestion to requirement is there. Is there a rubrics but it from the medical community? That says okay. You've tipped too far. About a doctor. Yeah thank you Heidi so you know I? There actually is a mandate. You know their their We in Massachusetts on like You know what we're hearing nationally. We are being asked to wear a mask so I think you know. Clear Dr Task. But not required correct. Okay, so that is that is correct, and there's and two point there's nobody going around ticketing. People are finding people and and again I think because our numbers are so much in the positive directions it can keep that sense of complacency at bay. I would hate to have it be a massive spike in cases that gets it up again. I I will say that. Unfortunately you know we can We can talk to our families. We can talk to our kids. We can talk to our community members We can make sure that we're wearing our mask. and I would love for there to be a what you know to to very clarifying mandate on it, and again I think there's this jen. TOLD DANCE BETWEEN WATER, people expecting in terms of their own rights as citizens, and where you know how they feel infringed upon, versus how much can we absolutely mandate for public health perspective and that's just you know I think what every state unfortunately is having to make those their own decisions on that again because there's not an national mandate on this, and you know pence for the first time war, a mask on Sunday, and talked about the importance of wearing masks, and obviously that was a shot out of left field as a national response. Response, so so I I I wish I had a better answer for answer for you I. Can tell you as a physician somebody deeply cares about public health I or you and everyone you love to be continuing to wear masks and as much as we can just continue the public education piece and I would say testing testing testing testing, so our testing has gone down in Massachusetts mostly because it's driven by people who want to get tested and less people are getting tested because the numbers are down, and because the cases are down, but we know that as symptomatic spread is a real thing as we talked about earlier in the show, and so the north, end the. South Boston areas. There's a lot of young people who could be spreading a symptomatically. So how do we do what hotspots like Florida are doing now where they're just saying we're GONNA go into young communities and just test people, and not make it driven by people coming to us, but actually go out into the community and start testing well we actually to. Do to the states credit a week ago, Wednesday and Thursday. We did those pop up and thank you, Heidi. Those pop up things for protesters like Marjorie actually had a test, even though she couldn't figure out what a results were so putting it not at the moment. Have the virus, can I? Be Tested on Monday and have it on Tuesday. Doctor before we take a brief break I am obsessed with pences. Sycophantic behavior on this mass thing, and while you were right that when he went to the Church in Dallas, he wore a mask. He got up I. I, the only amendment. I WanNa make to your comment. There is e chose to go to a church where the twenty four hundred people in a church, the seats three thousand. He chose to go to a church where one hundred beautiful chorus singers took off their mass, and are singing at the top of their lungs, and we've all learned how singing and shouting is super spreader to the extreme choir chorus. You remember in Washington State. What fifty two people ended up testing? Positive people died so. You are you are right that for once because he was two thousand miles away from the man, he's scared of the present United States, he had the courage to where mass for brief period of time. He's still shouldn't have been there I mean I. Know That's not you're creating. More than and the choir thing May so sad and upset You know they all put their choir members all their mass rating back on. They were done singing, but obviously that doesn't help. so yeah. No I think there's again. It's all the mixed messages, and now we wonder why young people just go you know they just want to go off. WHATEVER THEY WANNA do. There's no clear messages. Catherine by about all things coronavirus. She's with Boston Medical Center and be used medical school. The competition continues after three three break and eighty nine seven. W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston public. Radio Jim, Rowdy and Modrica? If you're tuned in for this whole hour, we are joined by Dr. Catherine Gergen Barnette. She's the vice chair of primary care, innovation and transformation and residency director in the Department of Family Medicine a Boston Medical Center Imbue Medical School, taking our questions and your calls to the noon hour at eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine seventy. Dodger we have a bunch of questions about similar things number one. Do we know? What it means to be a symptomatic besides that you don't have symptoms it. Does this mean you may get symptoms later, or we just don't know and I fall for the question by antibodies, but what's the? DEAL! so I mean a as symptomatic is. Means very literally without symptoms but what we're seeing from a lot of the data. Is that this as symptomatic is not it is. It is Kinda pre-symptoms for some. Of the initial kind of cases, they came out were somebody? Got! Sick when. A. Colleague was visiting from China and the colleague left in two days later started feeling quite. so we know that that the spread of Iris happens then, and then the other thing that can happen is that were considered a symptomatic. If you say you have a tickle in your throat, or maybe you're a little bit more tired, and you never would've attributed those symptoms to having Cova D- so people would say oh I never even had any symptoms, so it's kind of a broad category or turn that used either for before symptoms. Start or that you have very light symptoms. Okay and the second que- related question to that is what does it mean to have antibodies and should people even bother getting the test since you're reading whether we whether you know ten twenty thirty forty percent of the time, they're accurate tests fifty now. Yeah, so. Yeah. You know I think the jury's really still out on this of of what it means you know. The the good news is for the initial data on on a having anti bodies positive antibodies meaning. You've gotten it. You know you've been exposed and you have antibodies. Is that were seeing that? Those people are not likely to get symptoms again, and that's what is very hopeful again about the vaccine because you WanNa make sure that we can develop antibodies for vaccine to work. That's the whole premise of vaccine so we're. We're seeing positive signs about getting antibody testing in it, meaning that you will likely not get cove again or if. If you get it. You'll get very mild symptoms and shorter duration but it, but we don't quite have enough data on exactly what that means, so if you have access to it, and and I know a lot of colleagues who are in healthcare who are wondering about it for their own sake, where their family's sake or just works, sake are getting these tests That I. Don't I wouldn't dissuade people from getting it, but I also wouldn't you know? Put your entire hinge hinge everything on having positive or negative antibody test for your calls very quickly. Are you in the? School of Vaccine prognostication meaning. He's cautiously optimistic by the beginning of twenty twenty one. I'm cautiously optimistic by nature and I think Saudi has really been steadfast in his pursuit of all the data that's come out, and and similarly when I look at what has come out. I'm I'm I'm hopeful that you know. Initially we heard four to five years, which sort of his jaw, dropping but that they're. They're making very good progress on it and and it seems that potentially in the beginning of twenty twenty one we. We may got be to. Not Maybe, not a final solution, but at least a initial setup vaccines fingers crossed on. Let's go to Michael from Westford on Boston public, Radio Dr Catherine Gergen Burnett. Hey there Michael. Good Morning. Can you hear me we can? Great great so first of all first time long time. Thanks, guys, great thanks! Dr! I'm sixty three years old and I work right now. I'm in a barn throwing Hay Bales, down. However the. Softball League that I belong to is going to start operating in about. A Week And I'm wondering. Should I take? The risks were supposed to wear masks. When we're swinging the Bat, maintain social distancing. But I still I'm not sure about you know. Now that we're beginning to reopen will experience. A surge might just risking too much. thank you so much for your call Michael and terrific that you're in such great shape for thrown down Hay bales. So that's great. You know for cardiac perspective. I can tell you're very healthy but but I will say you know. I think throwing a ball, so wearing masks is great, but your unless all of your softball teammates are you know wearing a love and and I'm just trying to think about how the ball works And and I think you have a right to be a little speculative about you know, your chances of being exposed and and you know unless they have. More guidelines in just a mask, and thinking really about how you're actually kind of keeping the ball Antiseptic. In between and and other kind of safety measures might think about out the season and again very hopeful. As we just discussed that we might be closer to a vaccine and will know a lot more by next softball season. So it. I I would get more data before you say. Yes, Michael, why don't you just invite some mates over in throw some Hay Bales or whatever the hell? They are that you're? The. What's up, Michael? We'll be huffing and puffing. I bet you sound pretty good. Know that there's. Pardon me. I. Do want to say they are planning on wiping down the equipment in between I. Don't know how often between need fits. I don't know if that'll happen, but there are provisions. Instinct is. Not to do it. I hate it. Yeah, I think we should go with her Michael Yeah. Yeah? Thank you good luck. Thank you very much. Here's an interesting question from Judy. She was no, if it's an ethical, if you are asymptomatic and not essential worker to get a test. is she putting a strain on the healthcare system of if she just wants to get a test for her social life? thanks Judy. No, you're not. I mean you were our. Our healthcare system is here to protect people and give access to people who need a test or one a test you know not. It is not as easy to get a test in Massachusetts as it is in other states, I will tell you know. It's not secondhand. Experience and and Margarita heard that you know that you went and got tested after protests and and I know that that was a big opportunity for some people but. People have an option to get a test. They should get tested. We are not hitting where we need to protesting and we have a lot more capacity to test than we are. Doctor. I'm sorry. I just wonder why people are not. Are they having difficulty, are they? Being refused the tests or they just not. I think probably some of the initial data that came out showing how difficult it was how slow we were to get tests online probably scared some people off. and I think some people are like the last. You know person who called in who said look, you know. I feel bad like it's similar to this idea of what we initially had. Iran masks right like. Like where people don't wear a mask, just keep masks for health care workers but now we're saying no really everybody should wear a mask and similarly we really Everyone should be taking care of their house and and If they are able to get a test, you know whether be through a local clinic or a CVs or drive through then then please get it. You know before we go ahead last week. I had on television. I had honor. Presley with me who? I guess about a month ago. Head question. The reopening timetable of the governor's saying it was too soon. Particularly for vulnerable communities, people of Color Low income people, and obviously you work. At Boston, Medical Center Wonderful Institution that serves mostly vulnerable people. She said she still had some concerns as recently as last week. What has the impact of the multi-phase Baker plan been on the community that you serve Dr. Yeah I I agree with Ana Presley You know I think that In the reopening plan I think that Baker's had really good people at the table, but I don't think there have been enough people from the community, and people of Color people who are sort of in the front line positions such as you know kind of essential workers that have been able to inform this reopening policy as much as needs to be I think they're still not enough protections for certain people who are going to essential jobs you know they may be? Their employers may say Oh. Yeah, we know we have protection for you, but they may not actually have enough protection. people are afraid to be taking time from work if they get sick even though they are meant to get covered. Not Everybody does so I think that the reopening plan is really thoughtful I still think there needs to be more diverse voices, shaping it and informing it and you know. Know there was a there's now a covert health equity group that came out with a set of policies and recommendations on June. Eighteenth, that looked at you know really important data and other things that need to come out around the health equity piece, and working with community based organizations, but it doesn't as far as I could. See doesn't fully address the reopening plan, and and what needs to be done to protect workers in the reopening. GO TO MARGARET FRAMINGHAM! You're on with Dr Catherine Gergen Burnett Hi Margaret. Hi Hi. I'm sorry I. It's markets from a marcus on sorry. That's okay. That's okay. just have a quick question so My father in law who? He's about in closer his seventies. His been experiencing fever for the past. Three or four days and Just trying to figure out, how do we? How do we provide care for him? He's taking tylenol, but shoot. You know when we go check in on him. He'll. Do. We leave provision outside the we go in with a mask. Check Kennel him checking on his environment. How how do you know? How do we provide the scared to someone without their lives by himself, but it is a little bit of help during this time. Marcus thank you so much for calling and at sounds very stressful. I just want to try and understand if your father in law. Weather Anybody's gotten in touch with his primary care physician, and and the primary care physician knows about this, and whether you all could actually go take him to get tested so that you have the data you need. Because you know sometimes older people are sick, and it's not bid so we need to kind of further understand what it is is going on with your father in law C-. Best Take care of him. Hasn't been contact Marcus with the primary care physician. Yes yes, so my understanding is! We're literally just waiting for the results He contacted his doctor You know we're just waiting on the result in the meantime I'm thinking well okay, and finally just taking tylenol and the fever is breaking So you know it all sounds like it's moving towards the right direction, but I'm thinking okay well. Somebody needs to physically go into house. You know. Make sure that he has you know food. Provisions of the House is clean and clear in that he is in the environment for healing. Yeah! Yeah, of course, so it sounds like you're waiting on the results. and I'm so pleased that he got tested. I think you know. The good news is about where we are right now as a state that when somebody as soon as we get, the results, really becomes a public health. If he is positive, it really becomes a public health response. Response and the primary care provider will also be checking in on him frequently, and there's a whole kind of protocol about doing that in order to you know, make sure that he is safe and stable, and is not getting worse obviously it is wonderful that you're bringing him food. I think I would definitely not recommend going inside of the. The House, if at all possible but if you need to, you, know obviously glove and mast, and just sort of bring it right to the front of the door, and not entering, and then that being said you know for anybody who's loved one gets tested positive. We all need to get tested so your father in law if he is positive The Department of Public Health will do something called contact tracing so everybody who your father in law has been in touch with including I'm assuming yourself will be asked to be tested but but so he's very lucky to have you and I'm GonNa. Just continue to be thinking about you guys, Marcus. Good luck with you and father. You mentioned contact tracing Dr. Paul Farmers has been with us a couple of times. Most recently baby a month ago and obviously partners in health is. Based coordinating with the state. The contact raised any idea how that's going because you re reports somewhere around the country. that it is wildly unsuccessful. Dr. Farmer sounded pretty positive about the early days here do you know? Look I mean if anyone's going to do a good job? Partners in health would be among the top folks to do it and was really happy to see that they have done in no Alati. Young people signed up to to do that work as well I think we need to think really clearly about trust and distrust in communities when we're thinking about contact tracing so there are a lot of people who will absolutely not Wanna give names of loved ones out for very good reason you know whether it has to do with immigration, status, or you know fear of government or just fear of medical kind of communities, and so I know that there has been I actually read it in the New York Times about Massachusetts that that a number of positive cases. When they went to go, do contact tracing people didn't answer their phones and so I think it's a mixed bag and again this is this is about health equity and social justice, and how we really think about making sure that we're. We're continuing to build communities trust, so you know. Can there be leaders in communities that are from the community of the community that are saying. Hey, this is really important. Let's all get together and give names It's safe and it's the right thing to do. and I think there just needs to be some of that under girding as well. You know a dodger speaking with Dr Catherine. Barnett. Several people have email and say that they are having trouble getting tests either. They're told they're. They don't have any symptoms that they don't meet the criteria which we heard a lot at the beginning. Someone else's nervous and wants to get tested every month. I mean every week rather. What are we supposed to do? About. A test on Monday should know and be and then. Negative, and then be positive on Tuesday right. Right, right That's true so. I can understand the person who wants to get tested. Every week may not be able to get that I'm very hopeful. Look again like I said earlier in the show, the ASEM to spread. Is It's new and old There was some people as we are now reading and knowing and understanding, scientists amazing scientists who knew about a symptomatic sped, but we're sort of shutdown thing. They're in good And now we're knowing that that is actually a real thing, so I'm very hopeful that that will continue to drive up the number of tests that people can get again. We come back to the protests and I think it was a fabulous thing. that Baker you know, open up these pop up tests nights for those two days for for anybody who protested and that was again for a symptomatic people So. I'm hopeful that the recent data will drive access to increase tests I think anybody who wants to get a test to get in touch with their primary care. Physician I and their their health insurance also has ideas about where they can go and their stuff online where you can find out where there are places near you who are offering us, and some people may not need to pay out of pocket, so that's I know not ideal, but the reality of where we are right now. Dan just emailed said his wife is coming home from Florida after three months. He is high risk. He says what's the husband to do. You get tested when she gets here probably should get tested before she gets here. I don't know Dan asked the. Doctor Think. Well so Yes, before and after so. You know yeah and. It's we come back to this question of what should Massachusetts do right should really be an entire. You know huge plane full. Three hundred people coming from mass from Florida fly in Massachusetts. So that's question number one, but on a personal note for this individual you know definitely. His wife should get tested before she comes and then. Before Dante Quarantine I would have her quarantine before they see each other, so she needs to be in a separate part of the house or separate part of something. you know for minimum of five days we ideally say you know fourteen before they can act, and and and hopefully even test When she gets to Massachusetts. Don't let her new your damndest. For. One in for the Doctor Susan from the North Shore, you're on with Dr Catherine Gergen net hi Susan. Hi there well. You guys have partly answered this already with respect to access to testing I when I've. Been in a group like Marjorie and decided I should probably get a test and went on the CBS site and was told basically after answering all the questions I didn't qualify. I have to have symptoms if I want to get it through my primary care, the local you know Quick Clinic Re requires visit with a physician and it. It just seems like there are so many barriers and I'm not sure where else I can turn to try and get tested. So Susan you can always say you were at a protest. but but but no I mean I again and There are again. There are places that you can go to drive through the you can pat a pocket you know I would I would actually get your PCP on the phone and kind of spend time with him or her going through some options and I'm I'm really hopeful that this is you know kind of in our rear view mirror soon. I know that we. We have the capacity of Massachusetts offer a lot. More tests so I think expanding the criteria that people I think that was really part of the interesting part for me. Is that Governor Baker had talked about access through CBS, but on their site one of the the question about whether you'd been at a protest or large gathering or whatever? It wasn't even one of the questions. They need to clearly update. Their their their form but you know again I hear everything you're saying and I think it needs to be part of a continued work. We do with policymakers about the importance of offering. These tests to everybody Susan thanks for the call. We only forty five seconds Dr Very quickly these at home tests. I heard something on the radio in the middle of the night last night. They close to being reliable available. What's the status that? I think we're getting closer. I haven't heard any kind of more recent data on there. What we call specis specificity and sensitivity in terms of how good they are telling you whether or not you have covid but you know look I think there are a lot of medical devices that have been made for really good testing at home and We have every incentive to start to do this for at home. Kobe tests so again I'm I'm cautiously optimistic. Dr We. Really appreciate giving us so much time yet again. You're great. Thank you very much, thank you. I have so much fun with you all. Thank you for every yeah. Very common dodger. Thank you. Are. Well constant panic about everything Jim. Dodger Catherine Greg Barnett. Is the vice chair of the primary care innovation and transformation and residency director in the Department of Family Medicine at Boston Medical Center at Boston as well as Boston University medical, center. Thanks again to Dr Catherine Gergen Barnett coming up. We're open the lines and asking you about whole foods. Sending its employees home for wearing black lives matter masks what to do about whole foods this eighty nine seven w. g. b., H. Boston, public radio. Ahead on Boston public radio when president trump re tweeted video, one of his supporters yelling white power, the White House said he really might not have known what he was doing. Well, how about when he claimed the protesters fighting racial injustice also wanted to tear down statues of Jesus. Even if the president is not racist, he has a pension for stoking racial tensions, but in the wake of massive protests against systemic racism has America finally had enough in a few minutes away? The Reverend's in Monroe and And EMMETT price when they're here for all, read up after five years, John. Stewart is back and he's trying to figure out the current political moment bearded, an older Stewart is taking his comedy, the screen and stepping behind the camera for his newest film that he wrote Directed Irresistible, movie tells the story of local politics are polarized era concert. Rekindle the magic of the daily show later. WE'LL ASK OUR TV man Bob Thompson. He's ahead on Boston public radio eighty nine seven W. G.. B. H.. And I am mercury and you're listening to public radio eighty nine seven W. G. B. H. Logan Logan. Marjorie, so whole foods is resisting the resistance, even though their homepage declares quote, racism has no place here. A turns out being vocal about racism has no place at whole foods wholefoods across the country including right here in Cambridge including my go whole foods on river. Street by the arm. Is, sending workers home, who were sporting black lives matter masks, and we're opening lines. Ask you if they should eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy, if whole foods publicly denounces racism, should their workers also allowed individually reinforced company policy? Are you deliberately going to do? To businesses that are displaying their support for black lives, matter should employees have their convictions keeping to themselves, or should they not have to eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, nine, seventy I think I know! We are on this, but we're already Marjorie. Well, I think the question for us. Jim is how deep rock convictions here. We going to stop going to hold. WHO's, but I think? To me because of the moment or in time we're in. This is an exception generally speaking I. Don't I do think you can say you can't do political statements. You can't do other kinds of things on your. T shirts and stuff like that, but I would make an exception for this because of the moment, and it's not really a political statement I think it's A. State that black lives have not mattered for centuries United States of America it's time to. Assert that they do and you know as Yvonne. Everyone writes writing a piece. I mean Jeff Bezos is positioning himself as a big a great person on race relations, not getting that much money because she's got but he's not consistent. You know he's not worried about white supremacist paraphernalia on his platform. Amazon is not. Should get rid of facial technology facial recognition Technology Cetera, but you know something with this really comes down to is thinking about how we've seen the enemy, and it's US you know most of us that are whole foods. CUSTOMERS NOT GONNA. Stop going just like most of us. Who Know Amazon's US terrorists things are still buying things from Amazon and most of us who now at apple and other computer manufacturers other big. Big Tech companies to awful things like facebook, and we're still participating so water corporations or no longer doing ads on facebook at least for the nine. But how many how many people do you know spent half their lives, showing pictures of their children's graduations, and or or what passed for graduations now on Facebook, so we are not somebody that great line at the beginning of this whole pandemic thing that said. The greatest generation was act, asked late on their life for their country, and were asked to sit in our couch for covid nineteen. I don't know that Americans. Are include myself 'cause I'm buying still from Amazon. Live Apple Foreign, etc. we're not very willing to stand up for principles. Even when the sacrifices of us, not that big. I would argue I totally agree with that and I think I was the king of that theory until the tens and hundreds of thousands of people took to the street day after day after day after day. And you know we're GonNa talk to Shirley the young in about twenty minutes about the fact that buying from Amazon. We're GONNA. Talk to Shirley Young in about twenty minutes about how? People like her. And Jack Connors and Larry. MOLTER and some pretty power Joe Kennedy, powerful people in town said they're not going to go to the four seasons to the Bristol Lounge after they screwed some of their longtime workers out of layoff benefits and they retreated so. It seems to me by the way what you said is totally right before I. Don't know if you've I didn't read vons column yet but I. I think you said she said there, but the commenters are saying to. This is not on the original stories. That Katie Johnson. And Shirley Roach young road. Not surely a Katie Johnson I, guess is this is not a political statement. This is a factual. They've been some one of the commenters I was looking said well. What if it turns out? Jesus loves. You was a statement well, that's not the company policy right now. You can't have it. Both ways is a very different time, and by the way at your Amazon your point, remember. When he gave ten billion dollars, or whatever the hell he gave to climate change at the same time that he had just fired. Two of his workers who were criticizing the climate change policies of Amazon is a fraud. You buy good public relations so I would argue it's a different time. It's company policy. I have seen Pekar wearing red sox at at that very same store. And Patriots out during the so this and the last thing I'll say. Is this great line from a young? I think he's nineteen years old, a young black man who works there who who in one of the stories in the globe makes the point that most of the managers are white people and most of the staff, or at least a lot of the staff are black people and. They gotta get with the program that. This isn't the last thing you're going to say. Just want to be clear. Your boycotting! We're not going to see you. In the river street whole foods since this or other, there are other whole foods gyms. What's? I'm sorry. We're other whole foods I. I have not been to the rivers trees. Whole foods now in all seriousness I am shopping painful. Paul at the moment. Only another. Coming into nobody in all seriousness I am not going to happen. We were like Oh, I am not pure, but I've shopped a hell of a lot less. They're a hell of a lot less in the last handful days. I usually go. Either at the end of the day or the beginning of the day when the crowds are fairly small, a lot less, they're going elsewhere. I mean this is this is really. Again if it, I might have some sympathy for the decision the employer made if Jeff, Bezos and Amazon and pardon me and foods were not trumpeting their support for this movement, but since they are. You got to walk the walk as well so I. my attitude is a let him do it, and in fact I would argue they should encourage him to be one last thing here. Do you know the NBA? Which I assume? We're worried about using conservative fans. Who Don't what by the way even if you're a conservative, you should endorse black lives matter those who don't like the whole concept of black lives matter people like. Like Mike Pence who said on TV over the weekend that it troublesome because all lives matter whatever insane thing he had to say, I don't know if those were exact words whatever it was pathetic. Want you say black lives? Matter came up with some convoluted answer. The NBA is contemplating allowing the players take their names off the back of the jerseys, and put a political slogans, supporting social and racial justice on their. The NBA could do it. I would assume a supermarket, and by the way this is in Cambridge, not that they shouldn't do it system why this? In Cambridge Massachusetts and courage of their convictions convictions, it is pathetic. Okay Iran from Bill. Ricca what do you think ron around? Good morning, guys, you're all good. I think is this has been a longstanding company policy on. This is the time to change it. What's GONNA be next? You know if it's going to be. Their employees wonder where pro white. Superiority slogans or we're GONNA. Tell Him. No. Where do we draw the line? Well, tell you where we draw the line. Run. Run the company policy and Jeff. bezos policy is not a white supremacist policy. If it turns out, they were saying only white lives matter whatever the your pointers ear. That might be a different kettle officials. This is one of the most important. Movements that we've seen in decades. And by the way if You Do. Much I agree with you I think it's been the company's policy all along, and they keep going and I'm going to give up my time for somebody else, so we can get more points of view. Thank you for the great job you. Thank you very much Call, let's go to Yona in Salisbury Hi Fiona, pay. Hi Good, Hi, I love your show I. Always Listen maybe makes my travel time a lot shorter. Thank you like to say I think it's wonderful that people are standing up for black lives matter. I used to live down south and I seem discrimination. I've worked in restaurants I've heard comments. The white girls ways, and this is back in the nineties. The white girls waste on tables, two black girls in the kitchen. But I also don't agree with wearing. Watcher beliefs are on your work uniform to a job I think that opens up the doors for the confederate flag that for the Nazis you know, not people that are have other beliefs that I just think I. Don't think it's a good thing to do in the workplace. But feel once again. This is company this is this is company policy. All these workers are doing is wearing a mass that on it is written what the company says it embraces. It isn't like there outliers. They're advancing the company's policy. On their. Face masks on their face coverings. Were I worked for a large delivery company, and we are not allowed to wear among colored socks, so you not allowed where anything the advertising on the trucks on our uniforms. It's just it's a company policy. people I mean I want to go in the grocery store. That's love someone wearing a confederate flag at trump sweater I just to me, but that would be offensive. I'm not a supporter. Go I. Just go to work. You wear uniform and leave it at that and you. You can put your black lives, matter and mascot you leave. That is essentially Amazon's policy I mean what to whole foods policy is Fiona. Thank you for sharing your perspective. We appreciate. I assumed they must be doing. This whole was because they're worried about losing business. Correct, I, don't think I don't know about other parts of the country I would say let me the most recent Globe Suffolk W. G. B. H. Poll. Eighty plus percent of white support. A black lives matter so if eighty. percent of white support black lives matter Massachusetts I would say roughly ninety nine point nine nine percent of the people who shop at river. Street probably wouldn't support black lives. Matter I think it's an anal adherence to a management rule book with absolutely no thinking you know I again. I know we're GONNA. Talk about this Shirley's I. Don't mean to preempt it. You think of the people at Four Seasons thought for a minute a high end hotel. That's got a ton of dough that they should try to screw their laid off workers out of some money think they thought about it for a minute. They might have said this pie bad idea and not going to be worth it. In terms of the negative publicity we got. I thought they could get away with it and didn't obviously anticipate the negative publicity that they get, and if not for the much-maligned media, we wouldn't even know about it right. Out The story. I I. Don't know I mean theoretically you're the dress code says you're not supposed to be wearing anything with logos or whatever, but as I said I, say this to you on the air off air. The Kid has super bowl patriots. Won Super, Bowl time they always have patriots stuff on from head to toe, frankly world series time, or at least the opening of the season when the seasons used open, they had a red sox paraphernalia. I'm not saying it's political statement, but that's technically in violation of the dress code to again by the way I would feel far less strongly about this head. Bazo and Amazon not taken the position and. And again you read this quote from the original. Globe Story Jeff bezos Marie, posted a letter and social media from a customer attacking the company's Sport for black lives. Matter replying quote. You're the kind of customer. I'm happy to lose well. If you're not worried about the customer, you're worried about principle, then what? The Hell is the concern about a worker at your store? Wearing a black lives matter facemask. You know you could one. Here's a good one. This is from Robert, I shop at my local Arlington whole foods at least three times. The company has no problem asking me to donate a buck or two for some such 'cause every time I go in there, so they could turn around and present some giant check to some organization making themselves look good yet. When their employees tried to get behind the 'cause, it caused zero. They're silent. That is a good point. They're always asking you to donate to something a whole foods, aren't they? That's voluntary at the kind of thing, I I. By, the way congratulations to these mostly very young employees were putting themselves at risk. The woman who started this thing kinser remember first name. I think she just started in. April is now by the way I should continue in say the vast majority. I didn't read all the comments. One of our co workers and a lot of them the vast majority of comment or seem to be saying. That one while they support the black lives matter movement. They support Amazon's decision sort of like the first couple of callers or less color. Being able to enforce a a down the line even-handed dress code. Andrew things we should buy at. We should do the reverse of what public did. During the market basket revolt years a few years ago shop at market, basket Hannaford Shaw's stop and shop. Whenever tape your receipts to the door of your local food store. Let's go. Let's go to Laurie. Lynn you're on Boston public radio with Marjorie Enemy Jim Bradley. Hi thank you so much for accepting my call. I. Agree with you. One hundred percent I think that if it's company policy, it's a statement their publicly making and in for example for in linked in I, think they should be one hundred percent allowing their employees to wear pins tour bask-. I think what we have seen the past couple of weeks as a lot of companies coming out with their fancy statements that they believe in it, and I think this is when they truly walk the talk and I think it just highlights how much! how full of it whole foods could be to be honest I think get child lights, just like the the basis earth find like it. Really offsetting anything is there is. Is it really helping the environment when you consider how wealthy this this man is, and how how what corners were cost to create the wealth that this man has? Think that his statements are catering to us to consumers because I am a whole foods consumer, but to be honest. If I had access to a local organic shop that was owned by a mom and pop. Oh, believe me. I will never I would've never. I would never support a whole foods, but because here in Massachusetts we don't have that option. It's kind of like our only option that we have to support brands that I that we believe in that you know are produced in an ethical way that are producing a sustainable way, so I think. It I. think that the whole foods that exists today is not the whole thing with because it's A. Couple years ago and I think. It's super. Thanks. Under way back when it was bread and circus will only some of it was yeah in Cambridge. I guess you don't martyr. You know I don't like to Brag, but you know one of the ways I solve. The problem that Laura from Lynn broached is I grow my own food. Is You know which? Is Well Jim. I think the question was. The hot bar were still operating a whole. Would you still be boycotting I I suspect you you wouldn't be boycotting. Not There's another features. There is not a time. I have been in a whole foods since this all started pointing where I don't look at it and. Practically weep, I mean the hot bar. Especially, if you're going out on a Saturday morning to get some stuff for breakfast, and you know usually if you have company whatever they had the whole youtube that of cooked bacon. You know you don't even have to bother to cook at home and just Cook Bacon is expensive, but there it is you know you can come home with this entire matter like forty pieces of Bacon. Do you know what Dr Co Worker? Who Works with me on television? Show every Friday. We were never at the station anymore in Friday. Because Library which we hopefully will do again soon every Friday she would fill up literally like a suitcase with Bacon from the hot. Whole Foods and bring in for people in the newsroom denied. Marjorie where you wanna go from Robin. Laura, thank you for calling welcome. Hi Hi. Can I? Oh, yeah? I just wanted to say I I don't support black. Lives matter. number one outright. I that is a political statement i. well I understand the sentiment. it's a political statement. I think it's completely appropriate for any company to say you know. We only have political messages. You know in the workplace I think that's completely completely appropriate. Can we get back to the first part? Sorry, don't you? Why don't you support black? Lives Matter Rob. I support the notion that black lives matter I don't support the organization and people are not making a distinction. I'm a black person, and I don't support the nation. The idea that all lives matter because we're all human beings were all Americans. That's what I support. I don't support the okay you know. The the problem here is that people think that. People are accepting the narrative that police are killing black men, though they're not most of the people who are doing black men or young glass met. That's the truth like ninety eight ninety six percent of it somewhere like that cops, very few men, and actually kill more white men and the men. That's the truth. Look it up, rob F. I may respectfully make a three word comment. Are you kidding me Oh? That's forward forward. Comment is by the way when you say well all lives matter, but all lives matter most of our lives. Arteries and mine have always mattered. Black lives have never mattered, and it's a focus for those of us who want to try to make up for what this country is left behind and punished for. So many years and secondly. Do You have. You watched the videos of what some police officers have done. To your fellow young I've seen Wadi Ios and. Everybody's talking about Lloyd George Floyd. Nobody's talking about Tony Tempa the white man that this happened to in in Dallas I believe. In two thousand, and what is it? I don't know who that is, but let's assume that's true. What the Hell was that? Excuse me Rob I. Let you finish sentence. You'll let me finish sends even if that's true. How in any way does that take away from the execution of George Floyd at the hand of former officer, shaven and his three colleagues. What does that do with it? How does that in any way minimize the horror of what we saw rob? I'm not trying to minimize the Horse Sir I think you're I think? Let me. Actually you're right. s fine minimize before. I in saying that that horror extends to white men as well. That is I'm saying and if you would look at the data. You would find that to be true, and if more people understood that we could look at this as a police training, problem and more people of different races could come together about it because that's the truth of what's happening. Rob Braces are coming together in unprecedented fashion. Behind a a movement that would respectfully you think is the wrong one, but I think I know. Most of America thinks is the right one particularly for this time, but rob you for sharing your thoughts. We appreciate it. Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, thousand, nine, hundred seventy. Let's go to Sarah in West Roxbury High Sarah. Hi Hi Jim and Marjorie thanks for taking my call love your eyes and thanks. You've You are absolutely right. Eat in your earlier point about as US basically buying cheap publicity, but maybe not standing up behind. The statement that company made with respect to black lives matter I think if he were really um sincere about this being company-wide support and policy, he should've issued some sort of button or uniform or something for the whole foods employees to wear. Stating Black Lives matter in stating their support. You know doing something like that. I heard a lot of callers saying well. Where does it end? Why can't wait the premises? I proclaim their message then on their whole foods uniform. If the company was sincere about it, they should back it up in a very visible way, and not just the press release. Sarah thank you for your call. It is one of the beauties of being jeff as US position. As you can take all positions in your work, you can do one thing, and then you hold a press conference. Put out a release and donate a significant amount of money, and you can take another, and he's done that art think so i. think that's kind of what this moment is about, isn't it? I mean von Abraham has no common the globe that. there. ARE OF BANKERS WRINGING THEIR HANDS OVER THE RACISM that black workers have been subjected to. She writes. They have to consider the decades of redlining and predatory lending practices that they've been doing is banks. In academics after you know, all these colleges and stuff are bringing their hands. This is terrible and you have all these stories about black students and black professors being. Enduring these horrible racist insults is teachers, so it's kind of like a moment where you have to think about. Where we are, and that's what I think makes us different You just can't just can't say well I'm not a racist and then not do anything. You had to do something. It gets back. I referenced this woman. Of course I can never remember name which is totally disrespectful. The woman is with. For from Drake I believe in Iowa. Who is saying you know we? We've pretended for years that being non-racist user term was adequate, and if you're not affirmatively and aggressively anti-racist, you're. Full of it which many of us have been for far too long, so we gotta take a break Marjorie, thank you for your calls. We appreciate your coming up going to talk to the globe Shirley, the youngest. How corporate! America is responding to racial inequality. She is Nixon. Eighty nine seven WGC. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim Brodie and margery. EAGAN is protests and rallies against racial injustice. Continue the business. World is having a reckoning. Boston means looking at how much money you cities investing in minority businesses and for Corporate America. It means pledging multimillions the fight racism join US line and talk about this. A major reversal of misfortune for laid off for season employs which we reference minutes ago and other business headlines, surely young. Shirley as a business columnist. She is the business. Calm the Boston, Globe and A. Contributor Hi Shirley. Hi, Hey. Can we mentioned which. Texas! We love to say that on the air. Go ahead Jim. Summer camp for my kids. Asked stop. How's that going? How much trepidation is there? How much anxiety? There is alone I I feel like I'm living dangerously that his DECAF today. I mean I? I was driving them to basketball camps today, just a day camp. They're gone for you. Know five or six hours out of the how they have not been out of the house. Without a parent you know you know five or six hours a day since mid March and and so they have not really I mean. 'cause we haven't really gone anywhere is from working from home all the time and He Jimmy Adak seem excited I. Didn't they were a little nervous. I think even more nervous about going Joan all an all day basketball camps. That actually about the virus, but you know they were masked up. You know I had signed covert waivers. hand sanitizer waivers. There's no water fountains to you have to pack knows water for the day so I mean luckily you know for my nine year old. He misses his friends and so he has some friends who are going to the camp. So that's nice. What kind of feel they're in school yet and So but I I. I'll give you a full report. Your back. Dangerously who thought? You're on the edge. One Hand I. Want them to have a somewhat normal summer, but on on the other hand. We have done this in four months right I. Done this let them how the House and out of our sprite and and you know they'll be You know the as I understand the adults. This council have backs, but not the kids you know, and and The kids can get won't have math social distancing while they played basketball. Not sure how that works, but It seems like. Love. I hope I i. told my kids when they come home today. They have to strip in their underwear like in the basement strip to the underwear straight to get a shower. You know that that will be the role and the deals a seven-year-old. Do I have to keep my underwear on when I'm in showers. I'm. Glad you clarified that for the kid. Talking to Shirley Leong Camp Weather extraordinaire. So surely young. You had a great column about the Four Seasons. Hotel I tell us what you discovered there and the reaction. Yeah this was this Co. this actually started with my colleague Katie Johnston. She wrote a story about You Know A. Couple of hundred nearly a couple of hundred four season, workers who got laid off and of course, a lot of hotels are stuck. Bring their closed because of the chemic- and the restrictions on travel and and. She wrote that it so her story was about these workers coming together and trying to get better. They were laid off, but they didn't get their full severance, and what happened was at the four seasons has a clause in the nonunion a hotel and they have a clause saying that ended event of a national emergency we are, we do not have to pay your full severance, and so what happened? Happened was that some of these workers they have worked there for twenty years, or you know many many years and they. They didn't get their full severance. They only got part of their severance, and so they came together, and they you know worked with the Labor Union to try to you know get the four seasons to reverse their decision. And then they went to. The Globe might initially with my. Colleague, Katie, Johnston, and then I wrote a fall up. in my fall was talking to the patrons of the four, and in particular in the business community, everybody including I've learned you. You and Marjorie Jim in merger. You both of us, you go to You also go to the Bristol, lounge, which is the very nice restaurant. That's right in Boston. On Boylston Street and and it's a WHO's who are. You know I I've been there, you know, i. go there with you, you. Have one hundred co or a lunch with a breakfast with the CEO you you run into members of Congress. It's the WHO's who their is a story. A phone sort of Katie saying would you? Would you continue? Would you go back to the Bristol knowing how they treated their employees? Will you say something and I? A lot of them say I'm not going back until they do the right thing until they treat. Treat these were the workers right? And one of the things one of the reasons why story resonated with a lot of readers and customers is that the four seasons is nothing without the people, the people yeah, and a lot of them Foia Bristol. Lounge had worked there for many years I. Mean I think we quoted one of serving? We'd been there since nineteen and he's forty now. He's spent as you know. Has Life at the four seasons, and and for them to treat them that way they they just felt like they didn't understand what the four seasons all about, and and this story rose. You know the Four Seasons in Boston. There's this story to the highest levels of the four seasons to the CEO and within a week they changed. They reversed their decision they decided to grant the hundred ninety. Ninety two employees that they laid off their severance, and and also I think they. They might You know maybe they're they. They still want to keep talking. Some of these employees don't want to keep talking to the four seasons. They they WANNA know. How can we get our jobs back eventually? When the business comes back and so but but this this got the attention of of Senator More who met with some workers Congressman Kennedy also made a few calls on their behalf, and so that the workers would get their get treated right, and hopefully they'll get their job. Back eventually. What does one one lists not well? It's great that under pressure for seasons did what they should have done to begin with when I was reading the final piece. I can't remember if you wrote it or who wrote it that that? They have to reapply for their jobs and the employer says they'll have a priority. Why should they have a priority? Why shouldn't they get their jobs back if it turns out that the company rehires? Shouldn't they rehire automatically the people who they laid off who worked there for years and the only reason they would ever do that and I think the union indicates this is the reason and the piece is because they one hundred people who are cheaper who haven't dedicated their lives to the place for decades to so I have to say well. This is great progress. Even though shouldn't add fight have had to been had. Until. They say they automatically get. The jobs win. The jobs are reposted. I don't I think they are still getting away with murder here, so it's a good first step, but it's not enough that's my. Two cents. We're talking to Shirley Young. Surely Young. Colleagues. Two of them Zoe Greenberg into Morgan about a SONAM E of fictions. They focus in on this one woman any Gordon. WHO's older? She's on a fixed income. She's lived in an apartment complex for forty four years, and now she's researching how to enter a homeless shelter. And the quote from this guy from corporate corcoran management. Hey after the moratorium is typical business as usual. He doesn't say that. Hey, that's me quote after moratorium. It's typical business as usual. I haven't heard anything so heartless at least in twenty four hours. Who are these Corcoran? was was. there. I wish is for people like this poor woman. Right I mean I. Don't know if you read our stories last week about eastern standard, in and yes Easter restaurant who come. and. They're also in a fight with their landlord. They're trying to get some regularly. For at least some new negotiate a better rent. situation given that The restaurant businesses is not back normal. We'll be back drummer for awhile. And and and you get the sense of the land doors. Landlords in general are are are taking a tough stance and they you know I? Don't know what's going on the back end of it. Real estate industrial companies or I guess landlords 'cause you know sometimes they might owned the property they they might have a big mortgage on themselves, and they need these renters to be paying, but it's it's. It's a tough situation. All around and I think what's really interesting that perhaps. you know the Eastern Standard Story You, know revealed that I think landlords all. Maybe the landlords are are. Hanging tough because they also want to bail out to is my impression, they they say no. There's a lot of government money floating out there and I think everybody's tried to take a tough stance and who you know, I, think I think our story. In the last stories, a East there was a case of brinksmanship who can blink first, and that's where I think it's. A happening with these tenants and these landlords. It's a real. It's a real standoff and they're just saying you know who who can outlast the other, and luckily or the the tennis right now there were there is a moratorium addictions but only 'til mid August, isn't it yeah, August eighteenth? I guess the thing is to me. It's one thing if you're a small landlord. You gotta worry about your mortgage, but there's a moratorium on that a to. You're worried about getting by yourself. Usually big management, big real estate management companies. Are Not that close to the vest I mean. They have a lot of money usually, don't they? They do and they also tend to be the ones. There's because they're so What do you call it there so distant or they're so they? They're not on the ground, so they might not have the same. you know they might not have much sympathy or empathy for their tenants and so. But, but there's gotta be I. Mean This is a really I think our. Our story talked about sue NAMI victims that could be coming, and this is going to be huge problem once the moratoriums are gone and We have some time to figure it out the hopefully we'll fix it in on. By the way, just people so people know there's a bill pending filed by Connolly from Cambridge and Kevin Honan from Allston, which extend the moratorium for Year and provide some relief. Mortgage deferral for small landlords and. That's pending. If people WANNA, weigh in on whatever their position is with legislators in terms of the federal government. My recollection is the house bill that is going nowhere in the Senate has a ton of dough in for a reason who are on the edge and. If, you care about that, you should probably talk to well. Of course, the two centers here probably supported is can't get over this story forty four years in this apartment and now she's looking for a homeless shelter. She wants to hundred for a home is it's really type banking well feel free to call Cochran management to maybe if and tell them what your position is in terms of this woman forty four years. There is just it's. It's unbelievable. A you wrote a story and I'm looking. For some clarification, you're the person to get it from. Nineteen business leaders put together. An organization called the new committee on Racial Equity and social justice fodder some. Fun Sorry. They're hoping to raise one hundred million bucks in the thing I. Don't quite understand is on television last week. I spoke to two people from the Black Economic Council I believe it's of Massachusetts. Who are trying to raise a million dollars The mayor's with us on Friday. He was talking about the mayor's Racial Equity Fund where they're trying to raise a ton of money. What's the difference? What's the overlap and? Much more importantly, what's the goal? What's the game plan here? Well in terms of Ma. They two things. They're looking to raise money to kind of to strengthen their organization so They're they're. They're hoping to become a bigger player, and but they need more resources Beckmann also Paul. Put our call out you know the business community to create a billion dollar fund right over the next decade, and so they just to to kind of to to close the racial wealth gap and That's more open ended there. They're not raising the money. They're putting out the challenge to the business community. We are raising a million themselves because the guy was on. Donated one hundred thousand to this first million. They're trying arrays. Yeah, that's a million dollars for their own organization. The billion dollars. They're not raising the bill and they. They're challenging the business community to create a fund, so you could see what the city is doing. City of Boston's doing, and what these now nineteen black and brown business leaders and doing they're raising money and the and that will go in. Those will fund organizations that do Rachel, justice social work or racial equity work. you don't talk to a shouldn't from BECCA. BECCA and he's sorting out You know he's eager to work with the black and Brown business leaders to look at what they're doing. Maybe there's a waiter merged their efforts or or combined their apples I mean they all say they're collaborate collaborating on one level and but when I look at the when I look at what the city is doing and I look at what the The the New Commonwealth is doing. The new that the these their carved out a very different hat in terms of raising money they weren't. They have twenty million dollars in hand They're looking to raise one hundred million dollars and their. Their whole kind of take on philanthropy and corporate giving. Is that we? We want to raise one and we have black and brown business leaders. We've been doing this kind of work for a long long time. You know a lot of them are did individually to racial equity and Social Justice A. Nonprofit organizations and causes They say that. They want to raise their own money, and they WANNA be able to direct the money you know, raise their own money from, but also from their respective corporation and and and they also want to prioritize giving the money to black and brown red nonprofits doing this work. One of the things I had not heard of I had never heard of the term you, you've heard of the term redline as it relates to banking, but there is. Still traffic bed, mining where there's, it's always reminded me more of the plight of black start at like lack founders of companies and women's founders companies where they can't get these money. It's very how to raise money. Because the the VC world is predominantly, white is pre dominantly male, and it sounds like the same thing is happening in philanthropy very hard as a black or brown red nonprofits to raise money from per drama with community of funders. And you know someone's listening. You know they they look at in. The studies have shown that there are. They're chronically underfunded, black and Brown nonprofits, and they don't have the money as many assets as their white legged house. And so this is black and Brown group the new communist they they want to level the playing field. They want it, they. They think the some of the real. The work that will drive systemic change it's happening at the grass, roots and happening athletes underfunded groups, and so they want to empower them, and also it was really interesting. Talking to this group is that there's been a philosophy in given that focuses on almost a savior, a white savior complex, and they said that they wanted to give money in a way that. changes that relationship is less. Your immoral about being A. In in driving change and I thought that was a really like I. Never Thought of it. That way and I was thinking. They're blank and also if you think about it. There's been a lot of money given to. Closing the racial wealth gap, and you know rights social justice. It hasn't moved the needle far enough or fast enough. So what happens with what? What if we take crap at? Why don't we take? Those of us with these live experiences, why don't and with the network? Why don't we give us a chance? And and I think that's what's so powerful about this group and you know some of them, you know. From you know in a lot of them are are CEO's and presidents. Who sells you know you know the eastern bank President Quincy Miller of Corey Thomas. The rapid seven is part of this group. Gizmo Colin, who is the president at a General Electric overseeing the court book fairs So is the real who's who of the of the Black and Brown community in Boston coming together. You know what Steve and coming together like this. I don't think I've ever seen them. Come together light, say Shirley. One quick question, though about this little short on time is. They're not going to be behind the scenes. Competition between some of the more traditional foundations in town that are overwhelmingly white run. WHO BELIEVE Doing important work. Whether that's true or not in communities of color and this new. Hundred. Million Dollar Goal Organization. Do you know what I mean? I mean there's only a finite amount of money. I assume it's GONNA. Come down to at some point of leaders of this new group. Saying your money's better spent here, no. I think the real issue is whether or not they'll be. Having, the over just competing for smaller Pie I think what they'll say is new ones grows upon and I. do think there is a a moment where you know I wrote a story earlier saying that there are a lot of companies you know pledging hundred million dollars. For a racial for racial equity and social justice at including Bain topple is pledging one hundred million over the next decade, so there's a lot of money out there and so I think they're trying to. Hopefully. You, know this country and and you know we'll see that. While while people and companies have been giving money to to right to fix you know race relations, it's not it's not nearly enough, and so I think there is. This is a moment where the party will throw hope so. We're talking. We're surely young from the Boston Globe. Shirl. You had another terrific piece about. How Boston is not spending as much giving contracts to minority women owned businesses is other cities across the country seven percent here in Boston last year versus nineteen percent in New York. Twenty nine percent Chicago thirty one percent in Philadelphia. We are really behind was since what's the story? This is something that the Walsh Ministration mayor. Walsh's and trying to tackle since two thousand sixteen. I think we couldn't. If you look earlier, I think city councillor I on a Presley. She was she was doing this work even before to the you know before she's been for years, and now she's a congressman but she's been talking for years about the need for The city stepped up at contracting with minority owned businesses and women owned businesses. you know? You know. He Mayor Walsh's. I think he's done to executive orders now. But when you talk to businesses, we talk to city councillors like Michelle Woo or President Congenial. We just feel that the city hasn't been aggressive enough in terms of trying to fix their contracting the permit process it needs to be even more transparent one issues. Perhaps they're issuing too many big contracts if they broke them off than small businesses minority, small businesses, which tend to be minority and women owned to go after them and so And when you talk to groups like Beca, you know they said if you really WanNa close the racial staff. This is the one of the things. This is one of the levers city. Which is to? Give out tens of millions or hundreds of millions of dollars though I should say a car truck and work to minority owned and women owned businesses I should say the city is made some progress I think. When the numbers were first reported last year they were one percent and four and a half percent, and then five five, and you know just under five and a half percent the now they're. They're on track to do about seven percent, so it's going in the right direction, but as you said earlier, Marjorie you checked off you know they're still. The single digits compared to double digits in other cities, and so I think that's a another. Thing that I wanted for more. But why are the other cities so far ahead? What are they doing? Basketball isn't. Shirley thanks. Good luck with the day came how? I hope everything goes well day Camp Shirley. Week, Alps Dangerously Leong. Sin Club business columnist. SCRATCHY show. Thank you. Coming up. Is it time to stop whitewashing Jesus there? Ever I am rowing Emma. Price Donors for that more up next for this week's edition of all revved up. Eighty nine seven W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. Mike Boston Public Radio Marge. Regan Jim Brady Jonasson line take on the urgent moral dilemmas of the day or Reverend's I remain row amateur price, the third Irene is a syndicated religion columnist, Boston voice for detours. African, American heritage trail and a visiting researcher in the religion and Conflict Transformation Program at Bu School of Theology Emmett's professor and executive director, the ensued for the study of the Black Christian experience at Gordon Conwell theological seminary there the host of the podcast. Hello Irene Hello Emmett. Was Back Hey great to talk to you. So the president was complaining last week about people taking down. Confederate statues here of the confederacy such as Heroes in quotes. He also talked about taking down statues of Jesus Christ. By the way we have sound Oh. Okay, let's go present he this is what he's telling. Reporters that activists is martyrs said want to take down statues of Jesus currently among others. Now. They're looking at Jesus Christ. They're looking at. George Washington. They're looking at Abraham Lincoln. Thomas Jefferson. Going to happen, not going to happen not as long as I'm here. I wanted. Something I miss something where there people circling around Jesus Christ statue missed I. Think, so they date. Okay. Okay so okay so I guess as far as we know that Jesus Christ statues are safe. Okay, we've established that now. Let's move on to this very fascinating question of how Jesus Christ it kind of more. From a guy who was almost certainly very dark skin and dark haired, and Brown eyed to a blue, eyed blond. HOW THIS APO? You WANNA go ahead. Well, I was going to say it happened very easily by the notion of anti-semitism I. Mean we historical lot? Steve Circle is Jesus. And what I mean by this is that we christianized him and not recognize that he was a Jew during you know when when when he was living during a Roman station time that crucified him. I think that what's really very interesting here is that nobody's going into churches whether you have a white Jesus or Brown Jesus I think what what we have to understand about. One of the pillars of white supremacy is religion I mean the whole. Whole idea of slavery was not to make us the lack folks better Christians. But actually you know better slave, so the whole idea of of now we looking at Jesus I'm hoping that while we may make him browns. We will also understand that he was also Jew. Because you know Reverend, William Barbara at the to two thousand sixteen DNC DNC, said this that that Jesus was a brown skin Palestinian Jew. Now deal with that. Was One hell of a speech by Barbara? I should say the Democratic National Convention a few years ago to. And you want to weigh in on this. Absolutely. You know what's interesting about the notion of the white Jesus is that this goes back to the renaissance You know the you know the fourteenth. Fifteenth Sixteen centuries where you had you know you know phenomenal painters Davinci and Michelangelo and Rafael, and so many others who who decided. To imprint Jesus in a white, Eurocentric normative you know presentation all the long before that all of the ancient iconography, all of the the the the various representations of Jesus had him not just as a Jewish person is Irene talking about, but as somebody with a darker skin that we're clearly represent where he came from, and so so this is a tension, but but I think what's interesting is the the the nineteen forty one image of Jesus. A Water Salman which is which is the version I grew up with you know you know a fetal typically white Jesus. You know and I grew up in the Black Baptist Church in Los. Angeles and we had that picture that same pictures on the fans in the church As a as a picture at the back of the church, and there's some of our black home. Some of my family members had a picture of Jesus right next to a picture of a black Martin Luther Junior in the dining room, so this is. Image. Yeah the Trinity. If you remember in Emmett growing up, the trinity wasn't so much, the father, the son and the Holy Ghost, but it was mlk JFK. and Jesus but I think what we have to remember a couple of things. We're still looking for the historical Jesus so I. think that in people making images making Jesus in their own image. I'm okay with that. The reason why okay with that is because Jesus symbolically symbolizes. You know they're press the damn the distance you know the dispossessing disrespected. When he's on the Cross represents black men who are being lynched. We you know Jesus. Represents Matthew Shepard who is you know be was killed and left on a kind of a crucifix. He becomes the pilgrims who are trying to land here because you know religious persecution or immigrants that are coming here so if he is indeed the face of the dispossessed symbolically then he can change into these various different. You know images. My problem is what what images describing. The hegemony of the White Blonde Blue Eyes Scandinavian. non-jewish Jesus coming from a dark continent. A, obviously, the state, the obvious, and then some I mean the cultural impact of this. Would have been huge. Through the years and is this time where there's going to be i? Mean we've had this discussion I. think either with you to or without you to in different contexts for years but. But is this going to be a focus? Of this movement that is all around us to make Janse. Look like what he actually looked like. Well I'm not so about making Jesus to look like what he actually look like. Because none of us were there, and if we were then, we have a whole nother issue to deal with, but I think. Is Releasing. Its route is really about sure that we don't Jim and Jane Crow Jesus Sleep see the confederate statues and confederate memorials, and all these things didn't come up during slavery they they came way out. They came up during Jim and Jane Crow, and so the notion of this white Jesus again. This is nineteen forty one. This has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that this is a sense of persecution that any Christian in the United States of America, perhaps you know just the united, states and beyond has to bow down to a white male has to Seattle. Subordinate themselves to Christianity that. Espouses, supremacy and white nationality in this sense, and that's yes, but with with this white, but don't you think it goes? We'll go ahead is or I. DO I definitely do I. think that if we going to correct history than lift correct history. Different. And Right, that's my point, my point is. Is that what we got to get at the root of being Christian? is how we either it's just it works the same way with would white. You know white white privilege. Okay? There's a kind of Christian privileged that we gotta deal with the fact that the man we honor was a Jew, and and while we don't have actual image of him, we certainly can have him look Jewish. It's as if we said he was African and we certainly can say he's coming from this region. This is the probability of what he looked looked like so my point is that if we're going to correct history, let's also throw. Throw in anti-semitism. Particularly, those of us who are Christian Malcolm X. was trying to. During the you know. During his era in the sixty. move us from genuflecting to white. Christian I mean a white Jesus, it was the nation of Islam's that gave us that image of a black Jesus in a black God and then James, cone who was my professor at Union, theological, Seminary then becomes the The godfather of black theology, but he understood the malleability of it that whoever suffers is the face of Jesus and that times, but if we're going, but what we need to do is go back to the history and say that that last supper was a seder. But you know I'm curious because you guys are both Reverend's I mean if you're a Christian I get, you could paint Jewish or Christ not to look Jewish. But the whole New Testament is full of you know he's preaching in the temple. He's at the tempo. They're going to pass over I. Mean the Judaism is everywhere so how they get around that if they're trying to pretend not Jewish. But you don't or is that? That's a challenge that we have in Christianity. Irene is right on the money I'm not disagreeing with her, but not all Christians are are are against Judaism. I mean you know the the first. The first Christians were Jewish in. Origin and culture, and and they decided to do something different, and so I think the challenge is you don't have to pin people in these two four boxes and suggests that you're either this or you're that I think that's that's the piece about it and I. Don't know entity just be. Judy is. What I disagree with that? That's the same kind of argument we have that when we say white folks will say well I'm not racist I mean I support black lives matter, but don't see. It's Assembly how it manifests itself. We gotta understand that the hegemony of Christianity is systemic, so if unless we are preaching from our pulpits, and we are insistent that the Jesus that we love. It was a Jew who suffered under a Roman occupation. We are complicit in our silence. You know so my. This is what I I grew. Grew up with not that all you know. I grew up with people who will love Jesus, but hey, jude. What's wrong with that picture? That picture is because we had we have the stork allies, the suffering servant, and the problem with this notion of the suffering serve, it is that we say that Jesus died for our sins, as opposed that he actually died because of sin, and so the anti-semitism that we see and America as as well across borders. The whole idea that you know that the Jews killed kill Jesus. When actually it would get Roman Empire. That killed Jesus so I. If the moment of reckoning, that's all I'm saying that my job as a Christian minister is that while I am also fighting homophobia and racism I need to also be fighting anti-semitism and speak up against every time I. See it within the text within a sermon and an among my Christian colleague. Okay! We're talking the REVEREND'S PRICE Iron Munro so. I suppose you can't be surprised that much anymore. The president does. But as everyone knows, he promoted this video on twitter yesterday showing this guy in a golf cart. In one of the weirdest. Performances in general I've seen in quite some time at this place called the villages. Is Retirement community anyway? The Guy was shouting white power. You heard it several times. They claim at the White House that he didn't really get that part. I assume either view buying that claim. I. I you know what I'm still you had to forgive me Marjory I'm still stuck on the fact that. let me be kind. That president trump said a couple of weeks ago. He's done more for Christianity Jesus Christ himself. I. Go, there. Yeah. Well. It was a weird Paret I mean the people. These golf cars screaming and yelling at each other. It was just bizarre. The issue is we understand that trump traffics and racial tropes yeah. We saw this with the central park five, but then. Today that he was rolling down the escalator and he talked about mess Mexican. Somewhat racist you know, but but some are good, and let's remember when Obama was running for office. He started the birth of a conspiracy I. Think what I think what my big issue is is that we know this? This is nothing new about about trump. I JUST WANNA know. Who are we as a people to be complicit with this kind? Kind of action. I mean we're talking about trying to I, know the political divide, but I think Republicans and Democrats should unite against this and rebuked this type of language It encourages racist behavior you know among a certain segment of the population in a in a classic example is I'll see Bernstein. This was a young eighteen year old, little sister, biracial sister, who was at an intersection in four white men just randomly. Burn. And so it bothers me that they they do what they don't understand is that Kinda races language when it's not rebukes? People who have a tendency to to act out to do so on innocent people, and so here's this sister with you know out second and third degree burns, which will reveal, but but this will. This will never leave her. So that's what we got to see. The residual of the kind of damage that trump does I mean. It's not surprising that we've seen an uptick among you know a hate crimes again lgbtq Mexican anybody that is other, so that's the kind of stuff that we gotta. Say! Who are we as a people to stay silent because my question is as we roll into November for an election. Are we going to be a United States of America? Are we going? Are we gonNA continue to be polarized as we are, and I don't think we can survive that. But. This is not pure polarization. I say you know. The the the line is Mardi said that his being spun by the White House is that he didn't hear this and for those who have not watched the video, occasionally a comment like this. You have to really listen carefully. Listen carefully here at all you have to do is listen for. Ten seconds and you hear it said twice. Clearly and loudly. and. If What the defenders in the White House from mcenaney? This guy, dear, who's an assistant PR person there several. He took it down when he was alerted to the fact. If you WANNA buy that which I assume most sane people do not. He didn't take it down and say it is wrong and I condemn people who say things like this. He just took it down because you got all you wanted. It's SORTA like I robbed the bank. Here's your money back and you achieved your purpose. He achieved his purpose. He did this dog whistle thing and all of his. Those of his supporters who are racists. Applauded and loved every minute of it and probably laugh through it just like those disgusting young people laughed when he did come flu last week. Reverie was in Arizona. And, so he he achieved his goal. And you know you gotta step back for a second. In the last twenty four hours. We only have this white power thing. We have credible reports that play Putin has put a bounty on US soldiers in Afghanistan, and it's sort of like. Let's move onto the next trump issue these two stories in two days. It is really on blue and the fact. The fact that there is not universal condemnation of. The tweet the posting of this tweet by members of his own party who can go and say a love, his other policies I love x and Y, and the fact is not universal condemnation of this credible report about. His good friend Vladimir, Putin putting bounty on the lives of American soldiers. It shows that divide is nowhere near being healed whether he's defeated November not Irene Monroe. What I think what's really interesting, I think clearly. Trump has picked his side. And I think it's not about putting up the tweet. It's the thinking of putting it i. mean taking down the tweet is it's the thinking of putting it up there and what what I think that we have to understand when we when we talk about fascism or or just cruel leaders, it's not just he's assemble but we gotta understand the people who support it so. So we gotTA, look at it, Mitch. A You know Mitch. McConnell we gotta look at the people who are complicit in his behavior in this type of behavior. He served a certain purpose, and while they understand that he is a wild card They can look besides that because when we look at these evangelical. Mean you you. You question what what Bible they reading reading? The Bible but one of the things that we've seen that went pro-trump even Joko. They typically attack anti trump evils. In certain ways they will lay label them as less leaning that they're pro-choice nothing and it's and it's so far from the truth, so my point is is that this is a battle in which the courage of the folks who are in power have to decide what kind of nation this is going to be come the day after the election. You know when you you said one of the lines that stuck in my head and I don't know why this one more than any other. When you mentioned Bible. Their Irene I assume all three of you heard the question. When the photo op was done at Saint, John's across from the White House any held up the Bible of course without reading from it. He held up a Bible, a woman reporter yelled out. Is that Your Bible? Pause for a split, second. It's a Bible. Is what he Claim. It was his. Black in real time, desktop I would say so. What's your takeaway on this This re tweeting from down trump. Well I. I agree with Irene that this is about the people. This is about we the people and we're we. Will Rise up and become we the people are we going to further entrench ourselves in enclaves in terms of supporting demagogues, idols and platforms position. This has nothing to do with Democrat Republican. There's really has nothing to do to be honest with you about Donald trump other than the fact that he's a catalyst for these conversations. This is really about we the people what are we going to stand for? Who are we going to become? And what are we going to say about ourselves? in real time. I think that's why this is really about. Yeah and it also hit that if we don't come together I, it also suggests this that if we don't come together, we have really failed that this experiment of democracy that it's multicultural and it's and allow and participatory of all people. On that note K to speak to you. Both of you appreciate it. Thank. Thank you yeah, okay. The Romans Monroe and Emmett Price, join us every week for all revved up revenue, I, remember is a syndicated religion calmest. The Boston voice for detours African American heritage trail. Researcher in the religion and Conflict Transformation Program at Bu School of Theology and prices third as a professor and Executive Director of the Institute for the Study of the Black Christian experience at Gordon Conwell theological seminary there. The host of the all revved up podcast to learn more about it. Go to all read up dot org. Coming up. Just as read it, you read this. Jim Religious. Band, the Donald One of its most DUB. Biggest platforms because of its Race's mantis stellar. Put more pressure at yeah. Before. Pressure on on facebook and other social media sites anyway. We're GONNA. Talk about what we just talked about with Irene. The president in is he empowering wight power that conversation Nexen. Eighty nine seven w. g. b. h. while some public radio. Back to Boston, Public Radio Jim. Rowdy and Marjorie relation grapples with racism president. Trump appears the grapple with white supremacism. As we said yesterday, re then deleted a video in which one of the supporters shouts white power. White power, the video shows residents of a Florida seniors community I guess known as the villages driving golf carts decked out with signs. It's a trump twenty twenty. America, I, it was his video that trump shows the share with his eighty two million twitter twitter followers along his words, which were thank you to the great people of the villages. If trump thinks someone who chance white powers great. What does it say and we're taking your calls asking you? If you're refusing to wear face masks is putting people at risk. How dangerous is is supporting blatant racism? What happens when the power the White House meets up with white power, or are you buying the explanation of his people? His press people that he had no idea he was trying to show his support for what his press person Kelly mcenaney said was a demonized were demonized supporters. It had no idea. The white power line was in their eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eighty, nine, seventy about once a week I said you Marjorie. This is so disgusting. That I cannot believe it, and it's sort of like some of the other things that are not, and I don't know why some strike me more than others this. Does anybody really believe that he re tweeted a video that considering he's on twitter and watching television essentially all day every day that he had no idea that this white power thing was in there so obvious as I said. said to the revs is he decided to get the benefit of both things have it up there to show support for the racists who support him, and then pull it down, and you know no harm, no foul kind of I, think the notion that a president of the United States in the middle of what whatever, but in the middle of what we going through at this moment. Has the audacity to re tweet this thing and then have his spokespeople say hey. I didn't know what I was doing. I didn't know that the central theme of the video was the central theme of the video is so appalling to me I can't. Even. Whatever. It is we've so normalized this aspirant racist behavior in this country it is. This is not some shmoe state REP from Indiana. This is the president of United States. tweeting a slight power video again I don't. I'm always amazed that you're surprised by this. He has he has demonstrated? You know as we all know he was elected. You know touting this birther thing about Barack Obama that he only admitted grudgingly because he was forced to. He never conceded that as everybody knows. He ran these as full-page as the New York Times and other media outlets in New, York to basically execute the central park, five killers and rapists rather than they weren't rapist law that was a disastrous a Bosch case and even after they were. Deemed to have been caught up in this case, he wouldn't admit it. I mean He. He's been giving these rallies. No mention of systemic racism, no mention of police brutality much of any of this stuff, but he just spent fifteen minutes explaining at that rally that nobody showed up at the six thousand people as opposed to a million people that. You, know why he was slipping as he walked down the. Ramp of West Point because he had slippery leather shoes or something so I mean I again I think you know. We saw John Bolton everywhere this last few weeks, and I'm no fan of John Bolton but. When you hear John Bolton talk about. The dangerousness, Donald Trump, and the dangerousness of totally unleash Donald trump the next term when he has nothing to worry about in terms of reelection. It's really frightening. I mean he's unhinged and. Deranged and I you know I. Don't think there's any question about his racism at this stage of the game is. Not Well I. Think this speaks for itself. Eight, seven, seven, three, zero, one, eight, thousand, nine seventy. What's your reaction? It's Marjorie thinks. She I guess weekly is incredulous that I'm incredulous about the behavior of the president of United States. What's your that the Maya Angelou line? You know when people show you who they are, believe them. He's been showing us for for forty years who he is. I don't want to say. My Angela was outdone but I've quoted the former Democratic candidate for governor only about three thousand times in Florida when he was asked to the debate I did this. Week here. Do you think Donald? Trump's racist see says I. Don't know but I know that racist think he's a racist. which is one of the clever? That was a great lowest. Gillam was. At that? That was a great line. Yeah, okay! Six one seven hoops number eight, seven, seven hundred. Seventy. That's right Oh. Yes, right eight, seven, three, hundred, eighty, nine, seventy. The emails be PR W. G. B. H.. Dot Org. Let's start with Mattie and watertown. Thank you for calling hi. Hi How are you good good? So I watched the video. Did you watch the whole video i? Think it did my. Yes, yes. yeah I mean you couldn't miss it, but it was remarkable because it was a bunch of senior citizens, yelling at each other and elated, like grabbing by the grabbed him by the, and then they almost want her over and I'm just like kind of villages. I mean I have friends that live in Florida, but I never thought anything I mean we went to yard sales with my? Aunt's mother in the eighties. You? Know those huge outdoor events I never in my I don't know. Yeah, he cleaned. You know the other great story. Villages which some people have disputed sense. There was rampant STD's down there that these senior citizens were wild in the streets down there at the villages, but other people have disputed that and it was an urban legend in overblown. Based on the, Why I think I think the jury's jury's out. The jury's out on. What's really going to do? Thank you for the. Many many you should watch video. If you think that there's some hyperbole here, go watch the of it first of all, it is strange to begin with as matty suggests, and I think one of the anti-trump people is yelling races at trump people, which again I sort of a believer in civility, but I would argue that. Yelling that someone is a racist is not even the same ballpark as white power being chanted twice by this older man in A. Gulf War, that is what makes it so weird. You're right was the point you just made her? Mattie just made the whole weirdness of the whole thing is. Some tense standoff. Urban Setting in America. What we have to look forward to chip Reid around. Screaming about the BINGO Games. You know this is where we're headed I don't know and people are just really fit to be tied I. Mean there was a woman who how this banner that said trump a racist, bigger or something? She's doing battle with the people coming by telling her to drop dead. I mean it was really really something. A lot of people have very lot of energy. In there on the waiting. For the STD's or for the for the for the, Mark in Dorchester for calling hi mark. It's longtime listener first caller. Thank you. Just want to say no, but I. TRY TO KEEP A. As level, had as I possibly can, but today I this morning I finally lost it with my best friend of forty five years over. trump and she was trying to defend him and I. I just really. I just really fell apart around this around something else their. Weight around this one. Over. was over this and it was over her comment that CBS. NBC ABC Were Wrong Fox. News is correct and I. Just you know Typical Party line, and you know I? Don't I've tried very very hard. including with some trump supported family members in the south or very hard to just kind of keep the politics out of this. to preserve the peace, but you know I'm just. This latest thing has just pushed me completely over the edge. Can you really hear it in your voice by the way Mark I? Mean you really can really. Hear in your voice and sort of how I feel I mean when Marjorie is saying. Jim I can't believe. You don't get it. I. That's how I felt about this latest installment of trumpism were. You are market. Just I just couldn't believe it so. Yeah mark but. Michael? Moore headed correct for the very beginning what he say we know it's going to be I, said you know we know what's going to be bad, but we have absolutely no concept of really how bad it's GonNa be. Lifting Mark Thank you for the call you leave by the way speaking. Marcus mentioned Fox News, did you the article I sent you? I thought you were going to be dancing all over the Cape over the weekend. Study was done, which concluded. This is not opinion that. Viewers of Fox News were put at greater risk for Covid nineteen because of what they heard on the station than non viewers of Fox News not just your opinion or one's opinion when they. Viewed and believe the crap that they saw their about being exaggerated, there was a hoax, etc. they didn't take much care and they suffered as a result is pretty dramatic. Well, I mean I'm I'm. I'm not surprised I think they lie with great regularity to people, and it's really kind of horrible especially when you think about this, and that people are putting their lives at risk Fran from Newport. Thank you for calling hi friend. I think. My call listen from a long line of Republicans just. I remember Willie Horton. An what we have going on. You know by the way I hate to disabuse you Willie Horton. The conventional wisdom is this was a Bush inspired thing. Do you know who actually I brought up Willie Horton? Al Gore. Gore Gore. was elevated to an art form, horrible art form by Bush against the Dukakis, but it was originally in the primary brought up by Candidate Al Gore So. But you know the Republicans have great this kind of thing. You know I know it's not just him. It's Republicans Republicans. So, get out there and vote for Joe. We get people registered to vote. Everywhere. Thank you? Thank you for your call ups, loops arm. Sorry, seven, eight, seven, seven, three, hundred, eighty, nine, seventy, is the number BP art. hoops I wasn't paying close attention to the. Okay was running running all. We are running out of time. Thank you, Jim for pointed out to me. Before we leave, we don't but let me just be clear. So, you're not you're not suggesting to me. I WANNA be comfortable here that. This is not horrible. You're just saying. Why are you shocked by? It's horrible, Nece your basic point is to me. Yeah, I guess at this point. We've seen enough to make a judgement I mean as John Bolton character matters, and he has none, and that's the problem. I think president. United States power video. It's it's horrible, but I'm not surprised. I mean not only does he live with the people around him lie? Get up there and bowl. It mean this guy is not blue purple. And they say it with a straight face. It's really incredible. I mean just we heard Kellyanne conway who was outraged about the conflict. Martin you weeks ago may mention that her children apart Filipino. And then she says you didn't say it. I mean we all saw him. Say it. It's so it's it's. It's like another world that they've created and I think it's unfortunate that people are gullible, an offer to buy into it, but apparently millions of us are. Anyway, we're done with this coming. We're talking to our TV Guy Bob Thompson which is absolutely wonderful, a little relief from all this. He's going to be up to tell us about a lot of great stuff. You can watch on TV. Maybe one not so great thing that we were all hoping there's going to be great and he kind of bird that Balloon Art TV expert Bob Thomas Nixon eighty nine seven W. G. B. H. Boston public radio. Welcome back to Boston Public Radio Jim Brady Margery EAGAN as host of the daily show, Jon Stewart turned his nightly political commentary into an artful, but can stewart deliver the same caliber of comedy when he's not responding real time politics, but satirizing entrenched political systems instead Bob Thompson joins US online for his take on Stewart's new film, the political comedy irresistible among other TV news. He's the founder and director of the BLEIER CENTER FOR TV in popular culture. That's Bob Not Jon. Stewart and it trustee professor of television and popular culture, the Newhouse School of public communications at Syracuse Hi there. Too How are you? We're good. Hello we're very good, so what you are. Well it hurts me to give Jon Stewart's irresistible. We go. And not not be this, isn't it? By any means a terrible film. This is John Stewart political comedy? We expect it to be something much more than it was and by the way, if you wanted to watch this you either at a find a theater that was open and playing it, or you can see it on all kinds of different places Amazon, prime apple plus Google play direct TV, but it was nineteen dollars ninety nine cents, which is a pretty steep price tag. Well let me just say I. Watch it yesterday and I said well. Let's play a little sound. I is actually not from the body of the film, but is the credits are rolling tears. Jon. Stewart S Trevor Powder, the former chair I think of the FCC about the role of money in politics. Here's just the taste. The money continues to pour in and corrupt. Not just where they spend their time, and how they spend their time, but on the types of legislation that they would even bring to the fore. And the one group that would be charged with regulating. This spigot. Doesn't meet because there aren't enough. Yes. I realized that's not helpful to you, but it is very helpful. Thank you. May been the best part of the film. Let me tell you. You said it wasn't I. Thought it was. So sophomoric, and so and by the way we should be very clear I thought. Chris Cooper who is a local guy who loved was great I, thought Rose Byrne always go. She's in it for about thirty seconds great I thought Steve, Terrell was atrocious and I thought. I thought he was and I thought the whole plot was so childish and simple minded, and so I mean one of Stewart's great things. I thought John was how. Bob was how I'm Jonathan Stewart I'm so upset about this thing was how you know sort of. Subtle, but so sophisticated his his his thinking was i. just thought this was so simple I thought it was. It was also demeaning to virtually everybody including people. He didn't mean to Demean I. It's one of those things and I'll show. Promise well particularly mid Westerners treats them like morons I mean total moron rural types, but you know I've said this to you. Bob In the past about other things. That I thought should have been great. That were horrible. Is it's amazing to me when you finish work like this that you don't step back and the Jon Stewart's of the world. Don't say you know. This really doesn't live up. To who I am and my abilities. You know what I mean I mean. How just? Whatever. I'm not sure he okay for a bunch of things. First of all, you're right. He tries to kind of in some ways in noble. This Wisconsin town shot in Georgia by the way you're right. They're little digs. for example, this this character who's supposed to be the the noble character goes to the bathroom and doesn't wash hands after he comes out, which I suppose is even more jarring In now after this thing has been made, but there are little bits like that, but the other thing I faulted for is it's just not very funny. That's great forgotten. And and not get a single left out of now for those of you. who heard that clip shouldn't mistake that Jon Stewart is in this. He's not even in that clip at the very end, though like a sop or some other you know. Fable is He felt the need to put a moral at the end of the story, so after a little bit of the credits play. We just see the shot of that former election guy in Jon Stewart's voice. Kind of getting us. In case we didn't get it. Here's what this movie was actually. That's a great point. In case, you didn't get it, yeah! I guess you've saved her. At one twenty bucks between the view I think that's the case. Let's be more uplifting here. What's what's your best? I'm sorry. I'M GONNA. Give it to American masters again. I know I'm sounding good like a broken record, but. Yeah Tony Morrison the pieces I am two straight hours a good chunk of it Tony Morrison from various interviews that she's done and I have no problem spending two hours listening to Tony Morrison. This was finished just a little bit before she died. So it say it takes the story just about to the end. Dealer Shelter Maury. Yes we do have a clip sheet right here. Let's hear Oprah Winfrey talking about. Tony Morrison in American masters would just speaking about with Bob. One of the characters says at the end of Song of Solomon. And she. was loved. and. She was loved. That is the anthem for any life. You can come to the planet and do whatever you do. Accomplish whatever you accomplish awards. No awards degrees. No degrees successes, no successes. I think captured the essence of what it means to be human to be alive. And to. Have done well here on Earth And, we can say the same thing for her. And she is law was then a Beautiful Sal oh. My God I love probe. She just does it over and over again, but anyway we're not talking about open. We're talking about Toni. Morrison's the great thing about this. This show was that Oprah including that poetic allergies that she just we just heard Oprah is by no means the best part of this show it's it's Tony. Mor Morrison herself. WHO and I learned a lot of things I didn't know she makes a really good carrot cake. She can get people to. Take us. She started when she was at Howard as a Queen Elizabeth in Richard. The third and apparently really delivered and something else I was very pleased to hear She started her career as an editor here in Syracuse New, York came here for two years to work at a place that was a kind of a textbook operation was then bought out by Random House. Random House brought to new. York and the rest is history. We left out. I would argue one of the most important things Joe Bob of John John. Stewart is on my mind, Bob if I may is the Tony Morrison thing cost nineteen dollars ninety nine cents less than irresistible. See Okay. Okay so so go. The wind appears to be back after being. Gone what what is going on with the movie from the thirties wind, I think Hbo Max Today a wonderful job of fixing this. They brought it back and if you put in gone with the wind in the search bring up the movie and it'll bring up a little documentary. Would it brings up the movie? There's a nice is very short, but probably that was needed. Needed to get people to actually watch it by Jacqueline. Stewart University of Chicago Film. Studies, person who puts it very quickly into perspective, and then the movie plays the other square that comes up is a documentary in our long discussion essentially made by Turner Classic Movies when they had a film festival. with it featured, and that's got Molly Haskell who's written for many many years on women's. Issues and movies Jacqueline Stewart Again Stephanie. Allain a producer and hosted by Donald BOGGLES WHO'S A. Scholar of T- TV and film especially African American TV and film, and that our long is really really worth watching. If we could do this to all the old movies and TV shows with problematic content would be a wonderful course. Well you know I. I I was a little upset by the fact that you can skip this for four minute. Whatever it is intro segment like you skip ads, so I wonder how effective it's going to be. How many people going through that? Why didn't I didn't know you could skip it? When I pushed gone with the wind, she came up and. started doing the introduction but I. Suppose I wasn't trying to skip it because I wasn't. GonNa Watch the movie I just wanted to. Be They could be incorrect, but they said you can skip this for four minute. Introduction and then this hour long panel discussions a separate thing that you need to watch separately, but I get an. I mean. Anything it's on video. What on video that you're watching or on demand? Can you take? Price is one of the things that whenever we talk about I think we did this. When we discuss the problem with gone with the wind couple of weeks ago with you, the first movie that always comes to mind that is wildly popular. That's got real problems as Dumbo and I'm reading store. Maybe the same piece and Disney, plus also puts a warning, not warning and caution, and it says May, the word may contain outdated cultural depictions May. Have to me. That's worse than saying. Nothing is just. It is ridiculous. I mean if you're GONNA do it. Do it and I think they SORTA? Jerry they do something to. Yeah. Yeah, this explicit warnings cartoon with no may quote to pick some of the ethnic and racial prejudices that accomplished American society. It's. Jerry is also dangerous. I nearly killed my brother ones by. Eight. I saw on Tom and Jerry no kidding. We're talking about. The thinking is and it makes sense. You don't want a totally censor. American films or American history, but you to have the appropriate. Caveat. I mean. Right. Yeah Okay Okay so. Tell us about disclosure. Disclosure network documentary film just a one one time film debuted this Friday so fresh off. The net flicks constantly. More material and It was so actually it was not this past Friday. It was probably the nineteenth. That's a week week and a few days old, really really good. It's a documentary film about Hollywood's depiction of transpeople, and that includes all kinds of Hollywood depictions of mostly men dressed as women, but sometimes the other way around among the executive producers. Of this is from Orange is the new. Black made the cover of Time magazine Laverne Cox, and she's in this a lot and I did not realize how many. Images of making fun of people dressed as women and making fun of transpeople. Go back way down to the to the silent era ace, Ventura pet detective a Jim carrey movie I thought was Hilarious I watched. It has got some really really really problematic stuff in it anyway, not a really long movie less than two hours long, but filled with information. Here's a little sound from the documentary disclosure, and this is actor. Lebron excuse me Cox talking about what it meant for to see transpeople as the butt of the joke on so many TV shows like the Jeffersons. went to church every Sunday and who is a stray student and I one talent shows with the tap and jazz dance numbers I choreographed myself. So that was like who I was, and my mom wanted me to be successful and I was being groomed to be successful, and then I turn on the television and I see. These images that don't seem to comport with like the person that I knew I was. And, so everything was trans about me and made me just hate. You know a couple of things. I had her on last year on Greater Boston, during A. An Anti Trans Initiative here and she was so effective is an advocate. It was incredible, but a couple of things I learned from. Re I. Haven't seen disclosure yet, but I've read about it. Apparently, there's a servant poll that says eighty four percent of Americans say they don't know somebody's trans. The the writer of this piece makes the point, so we are much more dependent upon media to form our opinions about people. People whom we don't know which makes these negative stereotypes even more dangerous than they were. Some I'm really glad they did this and I'm dying suit. That's right. Many people. The only trans people I know are those they saw. On TV sure Jefferson's episode was actually, and it had the typical burlesque kind of approach, but that was a show that was very much attempting to be a positive presentation, a Trans Person So. I'm not sure if anyway, but that's. Who knows how people read it. There's also moments in that documentary that I thought was interesting. One guy almost broke into tears. talking about when he saw a an episode of Jerry Springer dealing with trans characters, and he said he found it so empowering Yes, it was Jerry Springer, and it was all the crazy circus that they do, but the very fact that he saw. Representations there He. He found very empowering so I. I think different people depending on where they are in their lives, see these depictions sometimes very very different ways. So we're talking to Bob Thomson TV. Critic. netflix's appears to be swarming. Rating Airwaves. What's going on? Yeah, this is July we've been. Things have been out of production for the longest time and this July netflix's pudding almost sixty fifty nine brand new things. This is A. Content. Forget the all the new licensed movies and everything that they've got. That is so far past Disney plus or new, Hbo Max or Hulu Or. Prime or apple, TV, or any of them and it, it keeps just They just keep plugging away of course because they drop things all at once. They've gotta have stuff done ahead of time. Which is why they've got a lot of this stuff, but their inventory never seems to stop. You don't want to understand that I'm sure your answer is going to prove that. I am adoped for not realizing this. The there was a piece I read that while there's roughly almost sixty new projects coming online there in July. They're dumping or ending the runs of sixty other major things. Why do they end runs? What's the thinking behind the okay? The I mean they canceled production, but they end things that they've got licensed deals with so they only paid the license deal. Area and a lot of those are movies, right? There's fifty nine new things series. Whatever's original, but there are always cycling out, so you better watch your star Solo wars story soon or sex in the city. To in case you missed that one. That's leaving the three back to the futures will be gone in July, Willy. Wonka and the chocolate factory, but anyway that's all licensed stuff that they had the license for awhile and then those places renegotiate for example. Friends in the office were great favorites on wings. Those got picked up by other places. So, what are we watching Bob this week? This one's easy July third fifty. Hamilton for people who wanted to see it, and this isn't just some goofy movie adaptation. This was shot with the original cast. Richard Rodgers Theatre in two thousand sixteen over three days to live performances and one performance without an audience, so it's back when Hamilton was really at its at its peak, this wasn't supposed to debuted for about another year and a half, but they pushed it forward based on the virus, and all of that kind of and the George Floyd stuff so July third amilton find somebody who gets to Disney plus do you. Do you see it? Bob On stage I never kid. Sorry to say you know. It's one of these things. Where can we say how we got tickets? We can I think it's fine? Right Marjorie. Yeah from. Steve Carrigan friend of ours whose guest ranch lieutenant. Governor had a when he worked for Barack Obama, his intern or one of his interns turned out play George Washington in the in the. In the Massachusetts productions live impressive interns and he got. Another we should people to judge was intern. Sheets had a pretty good run of interact. With Ted Kennedy actually but any. Play George. Washington But he got US tickets like two hundred bucks, which sounds like a lot in it is, but it's nothing next to whatever, but when you see this and I am so excited about this. I can't see straight by the way. To See it, you know the the play shot as opposed to. Perform! It is the play is when you go there and I think Margaret this same experience Bob and I think people will tv when you hear, rave reviews about something. Every single person says it's the greatest thing I've ever seen. You're sitting there wearing for the first five minutes. What if I'm disappointed and after about literally two minutes? You explode in a way that is just it is indescribable. How great thing is staying? I've ever seen. Seen everything on Broadway but I did see the book of Mormon, which is good, but this is a million times. And so versatile. It goes from the from the rap songs to these kind of you know love songs of despair. I mean the range of this guy's time is just incredible. Yeah, everyone in the cast is so good. You could also hear the lyrics which I think is unusual to do you notice that how well you can hear everything people say anyway I thought that's amazing. The Broadway show you can actually hear lyrics. So. You can't so, Bob. You're usually giving US advice. Trust us from, but you'RE GONNA. Love this like you cannot imagine actually maybe next week after you've seen it, we should get your Review of one of the great can't wait. Apparently they had you know there's a few lyrics and things that they took out. I suspect because of language so we'll. We'll see out they don't. Oh Gosh. Why did I think that that's amazing? But any case we're all going to be watching. We'll talk about Bob. Thanks so much for your time. Appreciate you. Hey Bob, thank you to. This before your. July third is Friday night right. Yeah, but you're love to watch again, Marjorie. To tape it. It's not a one shot kind of thing that appears on okay. I can watch it over and over. Okay, thank you very much. Disney plus job Disney plus well I will. I will. Okay Bob. Thompson joins US every week. He's the founder and director of the Center for TV. In popular, culture, and trustee professor of TV in popular culture at the Newhouse School of public communications at Syracuse University Thanks again, Bob, Thomsen, we're done. Thank you very much for listening to another edition of Boston public. Radio tomorrow, we're going to be joined by Tourney Rachel Rawlins and I'm really excited about this so much to ask her obvious. She's GonNa. Take your questions and causes well you WanNa, thank our crew Chelsea Murs Arjun Singh, so matthews and you believe in Conley. Engineer is John the. Claw Parker offsite engineers are miles, Smith and Dave Goldstein. Jim Brady, what's the tube? I'm going to be joined by the former chair. The New Hampshire. Republican Party is executive director. Is something called the Lincoln Project? She's gone right Jennifer born, and that's the bunch of very prominent Republicans who were leading the charge against Donald Trump and I have to say if you've not seen. Around this whole issue of Putin. Paying to have our troops killed. It is one of the most powerful toughest things. Then be joined by the two people who won the Nobel, prize for economics from Mit and twenty nineteen, talking about the economic slump, hearing around the world, and the way out of it here and around the. And then we've got a package on UV machine. Being tested foodbank, the could ultimately be used in supermarkets warehouses. That kind of thing. That's all tonight at seven o'clock on Greater Boston. I think it will. I'm Rodri- on brother. Yep, you watch him. Brad thanks for tuning in eastern again tomorrow the Great Dane.

Massachusetts Boston US Dr. Catherine Gergen Barnett Marjorie Florida Jim Dr Catherine Texas Governor Baker Michael Yeah vice chair New England Department of Family Medicine Boston Medical Center residency director America New York Times John Roberts
Democracy Now! 2019-10-25 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-10-25 Friday

"From New York this is democracy now so you won't take down lies fields reversing his earlier abrupt decision to withdraw ground forces from Syria that's according to reports by CNN and Fox News which Hanako the United Nations is sending a team to Chile to investigate allegations of human rights abuses against anti-government protestors following weeks of mass political revenge he said President Trump's planning to send hundreds of US troops and tanks to eastern Syria to protect oil demonstrations nationwide over inequality crippling wages and the rising cost of healthcare and education at least eighteen people have been killed since protests erupted October nineteen the midst mounting reports of brutality and torture by Chilean authorities in Ecuador indigenous rights activists say they've halted negotiations with politicians to lie and political ads we'll play highlights from more than five hour hearing where he was blasted by members of the House financial services the power to subpoena witnesses and to convene grand juries and to file criminal charges Congress member Jerrold Nadler who chairs the House Judiciary Committee tweet didn't respond Mr and if it was a fire it wasn't earthquake the response to be so quick but this is an economic disaster this is a hurt number of Americans out on the street we go to Ground Zero of the Homelessness Crisis Oakland California this is a disaster the Russia investigation and the latest move by the White House to discredit the work of special counsel Robert Muller the move by Attorney General Bill Bar will give the Justice Department cultural disaster this is the housing disaster but they're not treating it like all the other natural disasters NEC we'll bring you special democracy now report from eighty among those related to leave and Alexandra Cossio Cortes then is rising inequality and staggering housing insecurity leva rated the deployment now appears likely the move appears aimed at protecting a gas plant near the city of Deir ez-zor operated by the US fossil fuel giant is these reports if true raise profound concerns that the Department of Justice Underage Bar has lost its independence and become a vehicle for president trump's uh-huh and the poor is just being decimated at every turn all that and more coming up ads are whole politicians to its usual content standards the social media giant CEO Mark Zuckerberg is grilled by lawmakers over its policy allowing brawling encampment one hundred people in East Oakland that the city just crackdown on this week on house people there say the city's fell welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org the warranties report Goodman the Justice Department's opened a criminal investigation into the origins city they they they seem like they don't they don't care all they wanna do is acquire land to build properties for the rich to make more money off Odin will be held in five regions next month due to irregularities in the ballot but said the outcome won't be enough to prevent a runoff election in December official figures show sint anti-austerity protests in Ecuador the massive anti-government protests were ongoing for two weeks since ceased after President Marino indigenous leader struck a deal to see it is inconsistent with your privacy principles that American people are tired of this apocryphal as facebook says it will not fact trek political east African nation Thursday opposing a proposed constitutional change that would let the sitting president run for a third term in office the protests were heavily policed but peace Morella of holding onto power illegally in Guinea tens of thousands of protesters flooded the streets of the capital Conakry and other cities around the for a fourth presidential term prompting a new round of protests from opponents who claimed Sunday's presidential election was rigged election officials said a new round took forty seven percent of the vote in nine candidate field just over ten points more than his nearest opponent Carlos Mesa who condemned the vote count as a gigantic fraud and sentenced two dozen opposition politicians civil society leaders to jail terms of up to one year in Washington DC thousands of mourners honored the late the president Lyndon Merano over the government's persecution of indigenous leader Hi Vargas Vargas as the head of the indigenous nationalities Ecuador Kaanai the organization that led it to represent Baltimore district in the House of Representatives Thirteen Times Cummings will be laid to rest today after a funeral in Baltimore former presidents leave the honor he spent decades championing the rights of African Americans and the poor I is a civil rights activists later as Maryland State legislator before being elected Congressman Elijah Cummings Thursday his body lay in state in the US Capitol Cummings who passed away last week at the age of sixty eight was the first African American lawmaker Tours Bill Clinton and Barack Obama will be among those speaking former vice president in two thousand twenty Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden Thursday reverse to play her and former Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein who was spotted in the audience one of the evening's performers comedian Kelly Bachmann who's a rape survivor this Thursday as they blocked downtown traffic and a sit in protest demanding all residents be eligible to receive driver's licenses including undocumented immigrants this is one of the protesters for them and he's made clear to fossil fuel and pharmaceutical donors that he will be their ally unquote in Newark New Jersey police arrested over a dozen actively bring your own maze and rape whistle to actors our now Bernie Sanders campaign which opposes SUPERPAC Slam Biden's move saying quote Joe Biden has spent his campaign promising elite donors that nothing will fundamentally changed thirteen U. S. states plus Puerto Rico in Washington. DC issued driver's licenses regardless of a person's immigration status in New York City a woman comedian was boo well unlike smaller demonstrations last week that saw police open fire with live rounds killing at least nine people and sending scores to the hospital after those protests authorities fan so I know sturdy package push by the International Monetary Fund Libyan President Evo Morales declared victory Thursday in his campaign you'd to attendees were kicked out of an event for young performers and Manhattan's lower east side Wednesday night after they protested the presence of accused Sexual Predator edge not to accept the help of Super Pacs Abidin campaign spokesperson said the move is necessary to counter a barrage of attack ads from President Trump a spokesperson trial in Manhattan court in January in sports news the Houston Astros fired assistant general manager Brandon Taubman Thursday after he yelled eighteen million people are under red flag warnings across southern California as the tick fire north of Los Angeles exploded to consume over three thousand acres in a matter of hours sports illustrated reporter Stephanie APP Stein and two other female reporters quote thank God we got us sooner I'm so glad we gotta soon he said forcing thousands of residents to flee their homes in northern California Pacific Gas and electric said broken jumper cable and transmission tower was spotted near the source a high winds and bone dry conditions fueled an explosion of new wildfires overnight with at least nine active major fires now raging across the state room do we know it's not a Freddy Kruger there didn't know speaking of she joined the peaceful blockade intersection because the team years drivers fronting Harvey Weinstein Nobody's empires just ahead of game two of the world series Wednesday night Drake tweeted quote we'll be buying an ar fifteen tomorrow because if you impeach my president students who were granted relief from the federal government after Carinthian colleges collapsed in two thousand fourteen amidst government scrutiny of its fraud and predatory lending under Thursdays the way you will have another civil war Maga- twenty twenty drake since deleted his twitter account and apologized in California any five years behind bars the American Civil Liberties Union welcomed Thursday settlement agreement calling the law and unconstitutional attempt to silence protesters of the keystone exit so the ten thousand Acre kincaid fire in Sonoma's county in South Dakota environmentalist or declaring victory after the state's Republican governor and Attorney General agreed not to enforce coulter the C Word Rollo's also rape survivor Harvey Weinstein's pleaded not guilty to multiple charges of rape sexual assault and predatory sexual assault he faces they go amber rouleau who is also a comedian confronted Weinstein and whisked out as well after member of Weinstein's entourage motivations or from mounting a quote necessity defense saying they're lawbreaking was necessary to prevent the far greater crime of a nuclear war this is bill quick nuclear weapons submarines that are at Kings Bay have thirty eight hundred times as much destructive power as the weapons that were used cold out Weinstein during her act on stage and it's our job to name the elephant in the blading in order to stop collecting student debt for people who were defrauded by the for profit chain Carinthian colleges the court ruled devos ignored the rights of more than sixty thousand former glee attorney for the Kings Bay plow share seven speaking just after Thursday's guilty verdict as the jury was not allowed to hear the submarines Kashima enough power to destroy life on earth as we know it and so they After two years of Prayer Peace Activists Guilty on three felony counts and a misdemeanor charge for breaking into the Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base April Fourth Two Thousand Eighteen the fiftieth stain was wearing a purple domestic violence awareness spray slow at the time of the incident meanwhile Major League Baseball is reviewing the status of Bob Drake one of its senior they face more than twenty years in prison this ploughshares activists Martha Hennessy the weapons are still there the treaties are being knocked down one Wayne Johnson says he'll promote a plan that would forgive up to fifty thousand dollars for anyone with federal student loans worth about nine hundred twenty five billion dollars he told the wall laws allowing draconian fines and prison terms for protesters opposing oil and gas pipelines under the so-called riot boosting act protest organizers faced up to launch a crypto currency called libra that would reshape the world's financial system members of the House Financial Services Committee many of them women blasted him with questions for more history of Dr Martin Luther King Junior's assassination the activists known as the Kings Bay Plow share seven entered the base armed with hammers crime scene tape baby bottles containing their own blood emptive court ruling devos will face no jail time and our education department will be fined one hundred thousand dollars in Georgia federal grand jury Thursday found seven Catholic Street Journal quote we run through the process of putting this debt burden on somebody but rides on their credit files it rides on their back for decades the time has come I'm I end and stop the Insanity Johnson said his high profile resignation came as a federal judge Thursday held Education Secretary Betsy Devos in contempt of court for violent Mr Zuckerberg what year and month did you personally I become aware of Cambridge analytica not you of all people can appreciate using person's past behavior in order to determine predict or make decisions about future behavior and in and action and practice and that they came together and took action to go onto kings bay and preach the word preach the word an indictment charging the US government crimes against peace the base is home to at least six nuclear ballistic missile submarines each of which carries twenty trident through the next but we are called to keep trying and we will do this together we have no other choice a pipeline the ACLU tweeted let this be a lesson to other states. If you criminalize protest we will Su- they said the trump administration's top student loan no nuclear weapons the activists said they were following the Prophet Isaiah's commend to beat swords into plowshares at this week's trial the defendants were barred from citing their religious fresh make decisions about Lebron I think we need to kind of dig into your past behavior and facebook's past behavior with respect to our democracy Mr as well as many of the plowshare seven you can go to our website at democracy now dot org and those are some of the headlines Assist Democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren piece reports it's still be survivors know their attendee actors Zoe stuckless was kicked out of the event after sure of the exact time but it was probably around the time when it became public I think it was around March of two thousand eighteen I could be wrong advertise them the incorrect election date no congresswoman you couldn't we we have even for these policies around the news thank you so much Martha Hennessy is the granddaughter of Dorothy Day the founder of the Catholic worker movement to see our recent interview with Legendary Peace Activists Liz mcallen show said Thursday he'll resign his position as the education department and will work for the cancellation of nearly one trillion dollars in federally administered student loan debt eight far I can push this in the next year onto your policy you know using census data as well could I pay target predominantly black zip codes anyone including a politician as saying things that can cause that is calling for violence or could risk imminent physical harm or voter run ads targeting Republicans in primaries saying that they voted for the green new deal sorry can you repeat that would I be Zuckerberg was grilled by lawmakers for its policy of allowing politicians to lie in political ADS Zuckerberg was called to Capitol Hill Wednesday to testify about vase works plans I mean he goodman as facebook said this week it will not fact check political answer how politicians to its usual content standards the social media giant CEO marks it alive that would be bad that's different from it being from from our position the right thing to do to prevent you don't know congresswoman share we discuss it after it after we were aware of what happened you announced recently one on your leadership team know about Cambridge Politica prior to the initial report by The Guardian on December eleventh two thousand fifteen congresswoman I official policy of facebook now allows politicians to pay to spread disinformation in two thousand twenty elections and in the future so I just WanNa know how I believe so and that some folks were were trucking it internally and I'm actually as you're asking this I I do think I love preach preach the word of peace and they're paying a huge price for that as you all know the activists will be sentenced within the next ninety days of Cambridge Analytica as an entity earlier I just I don't know if I was tracking how they were using facebook specifically when was the issue discussed with your board member Peter Thiel why you've named the daily caller a publication white a well documented with ties to white supremacists as an official fact checker for facebook congresswoman shirt uh-huh when did facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg become aware of Cambridge Analytica. I don't know if you don't know and did any route two to serve as a fact checker so you would say that white supremacist tied publications meat than five hours today we bring you highlights of the hearing which was chaired by California Congressman maxine waters in a minute you'll hear from Ohio Congressman Bridge Speedy who asked worthiness of content that politicians say the general principle that I believe that but you said you're not going to fact check might add we have if versity and inclusion thank you chairwoman waters Mr Zuckerberg I want to get through a number of questions diverse asset management fear maker standard for fact checking thank you congresswoman. I would say that we're not the one assessing that we actually don't appoint the independent fact checkers go through an independent organization called the independent fact checking network that has a rigorous standard for who they housing issues diversity inclusion in privacy insecurity diversity inclusion is very important to me it's personal for me had been here before or with facebook about the lack of diversity and inclusion discuss this repeatedly with your company over the past years and vice chair of the congrats fact checks political advertisements is that what you're telling me congresswoman yes in for specific things like that where there's imminent risk of harm more than forty six billion dollars on record in cash or cash equivalents and marketable securities are any of these funds managed congresswoman. I don't I don't know that this was the largest data scandal with respect to your company that had catastrophic impacts on the two thousand sixteen election you don't into asset management certainly a large industry as we know something like a seventy trillion dollar industry facebook has as with far right figures who advanced the conspiracy theory that white supremacy as a hoax did you discuss so called Social Media Bias Against Conservatives and do you believe run advertisements on facebook targeting Republicans in primaries saying that they voted for the green new deal. I mean if you're not fact checking political advertisements central trying to understand the bow congresswoman it depends on the context that it shows up organic post ads the question we're question in your ongoing dinner party it's simple yesterday now congresswoman in spin I'm talking about actual yes to democracy I believe that people should be able to see Burg about facebook's record on civil rights but we begin with New Year Congress member Alexandra Custody Cortes questioning Mark Zuckerberg skit to see Mr Zuckerberg I think your constituents or people in an election from seeing that you had lied so we can so you won't take down lies or you will take down lies I think it's just a for themselves what politicians that they may or may not vote for you won't take themselves so you won't you may flag that it's wrong but you won't take it down did you see a potential problem here with a complete lack of fact checking on political advertisements well congresswoman I think lying is bad and I think if you were to run an ad and suppression when we roll out the census suppression policy we will take that content so so so you will there is some threshold where you will you should have known better and maybe if you had real diversity or inclusion on your team somebody in that room would have said what standard the international fact checking network is the one who is setting that standard the gentlewoman from Ohio Business Badie is also the chair for the subcommittee on if there is a bias congresswoman remember everything that was in the Senate in the I'll move on can you explain saying love food again shoe for violations so let me ask you this do you know what redlining is yes okay then there is a consultant in opening statement you talked a lot about civil rights I think we should probably phrase it a little differently that you work with Chennault Black Caucus in the congressional black caucus for the record has had multiple meetings with your company and here we are again let let me get in I don't know how could you not know when you have employed the most historical the largest civil rights comp farm a big law firms that work on your legal cases around the country how many diverse owned or women on law firms are contract by facebook and right now the major nine that about this great study her work have you read it do you know what the recommendations where do you know when she issued the report yes or no we're doing when you looked at what you were doing in the house thing how you were red lining or using ZIP codes and to eliminate eight people from getting information now have you read the report that Laura Murphy sent to you you've talked a lot about diversity and you introduced discriminated against the percentage of African Americans are on facebook in comparison to majority folks do you know what the percentage is doc people using the facebook yes do you know what the percentage is are African Americans I don't because we don't collect the racist number just give me a number or range congresswoman I dunno I take that is that don't know how many women or minority partners work on these cases ends here what's fair I I don't know the answer to that off the top of my head I think I'll be able to do that I have a lot of questions I'm going to send to you that I'm not gonna be able to get through and I would like an answer 'cause this is appalling and disgusting to me who's on the Civil Rights Taskforce Cheryl Sandberg is the person who who's what civil rights okay we know shows not really civil rights so I'm trying to help came out in a report in the Pew Research Center that was sent to you so maybe you just don't read a lot of things that deal with civil rights or African Americans Rolling facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg by lawmakers and Capitol Hill Wednesday before members of the House Financial Services Committee many of them women who blasted Zuckerberg over facebook's policy of allowing gene about what was included today in diverse asset management was in it did you read that or congresswoman piece of legislation that I'm working on it was in the rights work is because as a result of the number of lawsuits that you pay an N. double ACP even Secretary Ben Carson Fouled Affair House mm-hmm me deal with issues that are major and this is what's so frustrating to me it's almost like you think this is a joke when you have ruined the lives of many people news emigrants and the Lgbtq community and you claim you're very serious about addressing and two thousand eighteen even before Congress you stated I quote we do not let me go to something you introduced you introduce Laura Murphy so you know who Laura Murphy is because she said her name right yes okay so you hired that is raising two Muslim boys and is pretty dark time in our world as I ask questions as well for years advocacy organizations as you assume the report okay tell me what the top three things work because I have it right here what were the top three things in our report somebody thought about lying in this committee politicians to lie in political advertisements California Congresswoman maxine waters chaired the proceedings in a minute we'll hear from California Congressman Katie Porter but this is Michigan Congressman Tim date or exclude or silence others is isn't going to be allowed on facebook I want to refer to a photo up on the monitor right now showing a man holding a rifle outside it's an internal task for you know who the do you know who the firm that you employ for civil rights is congressman. You get the happy deleting nobody's looking for here she's always theo and I don't think there's anything and I know so well about civil rights in her background so come better than that for me if we're GONNA talk civil rights the mosque intimidating fellow Americans Mr Zuckerberg yes or no does this meet your community standards congresswoman congresswoman this isn't about helping the politicians this is about making sure that people can see for themselves politician standards Mr Zuckerberg why should the very politicians who lead our country be held to a lower standard for truthfulness indecency than the average American so Mr Zuckerberg yes or no is it still your policy demand hate groups might have sending is yes face groups community standards natural I'm in a position right now to evaluate any given posts against all different standards that we have so white supremacist hate groups still regularly use the events pages to organize threatening protests in front of mosques and these protesters are often armed the hateful rallying this picture member Rasheeda to leave the thank you so much for being here I know this is going to be really hard in this setting but try to see me beyond just a congresswoman but also as a mother now have been pleading with you and your team to prohibit hate groups from using be events page which fuel violence against African Americans Muslims packet did you and your team review it I mean everybody's talked about your scholarly resume did you review the packet that was sent to you from this committee obviously no me sexiest oh hate groups on facebook if there's a group that their primary purpose or a large part of what they are doing is spreading hate we will ban them from the platform overall right now as it reads says quote we are committed to making facebook a safe place very good expression that threatens people has the potential to I'm only I'm only thinking well one of them was around housing ads which we've talked about the other was around setting up a civil rights task force and you go by the Chilean singer Victor Hotta this is democracy now I'm Amy Goodman as we continue with highlights from the more than five hour was planned on a facebook event page recently facebook has taking the step further by permitting politicians to violate the community and facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg being grilled by Congress member Choice Beatty New York Congressman Alex Sandra Cortez when we come back Congress members were to leave and bad diverse owned companies now guess are now congresswoman yes or no I I I don't I don't take that as a no you have a stable congresswoman I don't know the answer to shop jewelry packet let my time did you review the packet that went out in notification to you and your team reporter question in thirty seconds a kid who has are you will take down live so pretty simple yes or now it is hate speech it is hate and it's leading to violence and death threats in my office and I understand that folks are working on it right on your team but if it's leading to actual real violence so it is hate speech it is hate than an it's leading to violence and death threats in my office it's untruthful about fifteen thousand contractors watching murders stabbings suicides other gruesome disgusting videos for content moderation correct eight any injury in other words no harm no foul facebook messed up but it doesn't matter is that your position cleaning and never again plead that there is no liability and facebook when data breaches occur congresswoman facebook terms of service which release facebook from liability for users contract and common law claims congresswoman. I'm not familiar new unquote do you remember making that statement Congresswoman yes and facebook's privacy principles say one we give you control privacy to you own can delete your information and three we are accountable today can you affirm that base data privacy lawsuit in which your own warriors admit that users information was stolen that they the plaintiffs failed to articulate deep because of their work for your company is that correct congresswoman my understanding is we pay everyone including the contractors shortcut you have said quote we have a responsibility to protect our data and if we can't that we don't deserve to serve you different issue facebook's known as a great place to work free Food Ping Pong tables great employee benefits but facebook doesn't use its employees for the hardest jobs in the company silence the lady from California Ms Porter is recognized for five minutes Mr Zuckerberg as you know facebook can be sometimes an unkind place both toward my personal appearance and today apparently towards your haircut as a mother of teenage boy I just want to say thanks for modeling cares about user privacy and still holds itself to the standards in articulates in its public policies comes from we certainly care about certainly right that I'm CEO and I'm responsible for everything that happens in the company all them saying is that imagine that there are more pages this document doing facebook and federal court that consumers can't hold you liable for any of these promises because quote as plaintiffs admit they in every facebook user are bound by congressman a yes I believe that that's correct you pay many of those workers under thirty thousand dollars a year and you've cut them off from mental healthcare when they leave the company even if they have mend asleep proportional shareholder of facebook responsible for the legal arguments that your company makes you hire these lawyers will you commit to withdrawing this argument and nine minutes of supervised wellness time per day that means nine minutes to cry in the Stairwell while somebody watches them would you be ten months and I have already lost count of how many people have sat on exactly that chair and said one thing to me and to this Congress and then another thing in federal court I wanNA turn associated with the company at least fifteen dollars minimum wage and and markets and cities where there's a high cost of living that's a twenty dollar minimum wage we go out of Z. incredibly important to people and and super if that's true that you care about privacy and your hewing to these principles why are you with that specific legal argument well it's on it's on it's like therefore you you are arguing in federal court that the consumer the same benefits available to your workers congresswoman we work hard to make sure that we give good benefits to all the folks who are doing going to commit to spending one hour a day for the next year watching these videos and acting as a content monitor and only `accessing accessing I and I'm going to take that as a no for right now but I would like you to consider it I think you're pleading is inconsistent with your privacy principles and I think American people are tired of the sepulchre see I've been in Congress a congresswoman I'm not familiar with all the context here so it's not a lawyer so it's a little bit hard for me to weigh in on the on the as CEO and the willing facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Wednesday this is democracy now when we come back the crisis of homelessness in America we go to Oakland Robertson wait can I take your word of claiming my time according to one report I have and this is straight out of an episode of Black Mirror these workers get nine burke ruining my time I would appreciate yes or no would you be willing to act as a content monitor have that life experience I'm not sure that would best many major cities California's become the poster child for this economic and humanitarian disaster with growing encampments in Los Angeles and the bay area's more people are forced into the homelessness crisis threatening to destroy encampments increase police enforcement even jail homeless people but advocates California's already doing that criminal treats the state is home to twelve percent of the US population but half the country's unsheltered people as the crisis deepened so as the criminalization of homelessness one of these crackdowns is currently unfolding a massive Oakland encampment that democracy now visited just a few weeks ago just outside the Home Depot in East Oakland between busy by masterpass steady mob and crooked is is now homeless and Oakland this is democracy now I'm Amy Goodman we turn now to the crisis of homelessness in the United States which is on the rise candice elder founder of the Community Organizing Advocacy group the East Oakland collective we are in a huge lot that is privately owned that on house the sixty five dozen lobbyists and I wanted to ask about the timing of your announcement this week to invest one billion dollars into housing charity on the day before senator no congressman that's not what I'm so then you're saying you're not willing to do it. How many lobbyists are you on your payroll congressman? I don't know the close the encampment by the New Year but the people living there say the city is not offered them viable Housing Alternatives homelessness and Oakland has grown by nearly fifty percent in the past increasing efforts by city and state officials to crack down on in house people occupying Public Space President Donald Trump made headlines this month for tacking California's politicians over the residents have moved onto and they are vs trailers there are cars there are people living in their vans Serve our community for me to spend that much time is spent a long time and Mr Zuckerberg are you saying you're not qualified to be content two years we'll democracy now visited the East Oakland encampment earlier this month to speak to people that live there and their advocates about the housing crisis in the bay area we began with Elisa homelessness from laws against shelter people sitting on sidewalks to frequent sweeps of the encampments that have popped up on thoroughfares under freeways across the state cities testimony before this committee you may respondent writing my time has expired California Congress member Katie Porter and Michigan Congress member she to lead assures and tiny houses it's one of the largest and most visible encampments of at least ninety in Oakland but Tuesday city workers descended on the sprawling encampment click eared part of the site unhealthy people were forced to leave the area for the sweep which took two days the other part of the encampments expected to be cleared next week the city of Oakland has vowed to permanently goal mothers here we have senior citizens we have a large Latino and immigrant population here a lot of Spanish speaker -Fornia San Francisco Oakland so recent news has said that California has the most on house popular on talk about who lives here so it's a very multiracial encampment a lot of African American residents we have some area you will find the most concentrated numbers of our on house residents in California the bay area is experiencing a huge huge Oakland and Mosul between San Francisco Bay area particularly Oakland Berkeley in San Francisco in between La county particularly in the skin role we're still here but the community has grown significantly it is huge how many an housed people are there in Keller I in a good mix between men and women yeah so this community has been open for four to five years now the some of the original residents in Oakland which is a forty seven percent increase for us since the last point in time count humi advocates in other data from health street and just a short period of time really early in the morning produce numbers that there are about five to six thousand on sheltered people care organizations actually showed that there are more than nine thousand on House people in Oakland that is more of a realistic number because that counts vehicles the we are that's why we use the term on house because it covers the whole gamut of people facing housing insecurity so those numbers are high and we need used homeless unsheltered talk about the choice of words description do think it matters it definitely matters you know how we talk about the problems ears also listening Kampman suffers from other legal dumping so they are experiencing some issues but you know either the city will come pick it up or sometimes the Asian in the country which why we're seeing a lot of attention also note thinks that trump's rhetoric on cleanup California streets but between Jabu so much to point where we're probably about nick and nick with L. A. County since the latest point the city the city government to be realistic about those numbers so they gained applied the proper budget and resources these words on how streets inside of the freeway some one hundred Hon House people have been living for months sometimes years the people living in the canton that make their shelter and cars tents makeshift strike Taylor's accounts people living in there are these trailers is counts people who are couch surfing there are even if you have college students now who are writing how we talk about people matters so what I have learned from folks who are living the experience they do not like to term homeless must stay high trying to hide my stress because if people of the world trying to put me look West last night I had a talk more momma she died in as guy did she serve perfectly before she folks are pushed out onto the street so it really speaks to these discriminatory practices and policies in housing Angel Momma back from the grain we ain't got too much love because we live in Linden last days crime pays going could get you gotta strap these days all the time rapid transportation in part they are riding the bus you know at night in order just to have some type of shelter so doubled tripled in some cases people afford to live here anymore we need more renter protection we eviction defense a lot of people have been more about the racial disparities when it comes to people who are not housed so in the bay area particularly Oakland over seventy percents on the house here so we have a high rate of of living which includes very high rents so the the high rents wish have is being pushed out from certain neighborhoods you know in this influx you know of of the stem you know in these really high and there are some self built structures syllabi and then there's also people Zeno commuting cars and there's also animal's name what you see time count the top the counter happens every every year year and a half that counts the number of on House people on the so we have to fix the economic social in housing barriers in order to be able to address the homelessness crisis can you talk very low numbers as far as Thailand is a quarter African American but three quarters of the inhouse population yes yes in the the numbers of like such as winter protections such as a decades old history of red lining you know pushing black folks not being able to get you know housing loans agents will put it all into piles but so and then you see people here they're they're cooking gene they're they're burning their trash so even though it's early in the morning there's a lot going on relation is African American so in what is the population overall overall Oakland we are twenty eight percent so we're the baby got my drink g any game Litas house was donated to me from the Oakland School of arts has made a difference yes it has is actually a real house that was actually formed by some kids you know they actually put it together they brought it out put it back up so it it made a big difference Russian here in Oakland your name Marcus Bikes so do you live here at the encampment is you built this house or someone did for us in how many people live inside me and my daughter you talked about having animals so you can be safe what do you face in terms of safety convicted if you know from from the apartment they didn't have the proper legal resources are representation to even to fight it

facebook New York City congressman California Mr Zuckerberg maxine waters Ohio vice chair theo forty seven percent nine minutes five years five hour two years nine hundred twenty five billi one hundred thousand dollars forty six billion dollars
1A Across America: Ten Democrats Debate

1A

35:07 min | 1 year ago

1A Across America: Ten Democrats Debate

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message come from better help online counseling by licensed professional counselors specializing in issues including depression, stress and anxiety. Visit better help dot com slash one eight to learn more and get ten percent off your first month. This is one A. I'm Kimberly Adams in Washington, sitting in for Joshua Johnson. It's officially debate time. One, New Jersey Senator Corey Booker former housing secretary Leon Castro New York City mayor Bill de Blasio. Former Maryland congressman John Delaney. Hawaii congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard Washington. Governor Jay Inslee. Minnesota Senator Amy clover show. Former Texas congressman Beddoe Aurora. Ohio congressman Tim Ryan, and Massachusetts, Senator, Elizabeth Warren and of the more than twenty candidates running for the democratic presidential nomination took the stage in Miami to talk about a lot of topics and quickly tonight. We'll hear from ten more hosted by NBC news, MSNBC, and Telemundo, last night's debate was many voters introduction to some of these candidates. How did they do? Did they make a name for themselves or just get lost in the noise here in the studio to help us answer? Those and other questions is Jessica Taylor a political reporter for NPR and. A senior political reporter for the cook political report. Jessica welcome back to one A. Thanks kimberly. We also want to know did the candidates, talk about the things voters actually care about we've heard from a lot of people so far as part of one as across America project. It's a collaboration with six public radio member stations across the country to make sure we are exploring what your communities are thinking about this. Election cycle today. We'll check in with voters of round the country to hear what they think one of those people is Brandon Johnson. He's a Wichita city council member and the vice chair of the Kansas Democratic Party, and he joins us now from our across America partner station. Kate M U W in Wichita, Kansas, Brandon. Welcome. Thank you for having me, so pleasure, being on. Let's start with you, Brandon. You're at a watch party for last night's debate in Wichita what did you think of the candidates, I thought the candidates did a great job? You know, we saw the first ten go on. And you know, the Katie p. Hosted a watch party in two cities here in Kansas. I thought the candidates got really straight to the issues gave some really good ideas and things to talk about for today. And what did you think of the debate overall in terms of the actual content I thought the content was good. You know everyone had their talking points but through some of the back and forth banter, we really got to hear some ideas and some challenges to it and ways to get to some of those solutions. Can you give us a little bit of a visual of what your watch party was like? And what the vibe was in the room throughout the evening. Well, yeah, it was great. It was at a venue called the pump house here in Wichita outdoor venue, the weather was great. And we had probably fifty or so Democrats, they're watching folks were excited. I think Elizabeth Warren won the night with the turn out there, every time she spoke or made a point. You know, it was a lot of cheering going on. But it was it was a great event. That's interesting. So even in this very crowded debate format somebody stood out Elizabeth Warren to your crowd did any other candidates take you by surprise, you know, I hadn't. Heard a lot from Cory Booker. I'd seen him speak before. I'm sorry. Senator Booker he did a really good job. Hooley secretary Castro had some really good points as well. I think those three not only in my opinion, but seemed to get most of the cheers at the event, the other candidates kind of stayed around the same. I'd say Tulsi Gabbard had some really good points in regard to the war, but I don't think she rose to the level of those other three, a lot of you sent us your thoughts about how the debate was set up Stephen told us he wasn't watching last night. He tweeted with NBC controlling the production and distribution. It will be a joke five to seven minutes for each candidate is not adequate. No fact checking or challenging, and another listener who did watch called us to tell us what she thought. Listen. Hi, this is artists from Sherborne, and I wonder fresh, my disappointment in a way that the debate for moderated and designed. I felt that I wanted to know more about the candidates on either end who have pulled not as high and I don't know as much about them. But instead, most of the focus was given to the five in the middle. And I think that, that tells me that the media is going to define for me, who my candidate going to be, and I'm not happy with that. We've only heard from the first ten we've got ten more and I already feel like I'm being led down a path. So I thought candidate showed very well. And I was very excited about the presentation of their information, but I wish I knew more about Chelsea. I wish I knew more about the branch of people at their Jessica. Tell us about the structure of this debate. There were ten people on stage with a lot of rules in place. What were the standards set by NBC and how well do you think that worked out? So the standard set by NBC is there were no opening statements which is sort of an odd way to do it. And the candidates weren't even really introduced the eldest came out. For a picture. They went up and just went straight to their podiums. So they were asked you at sixty seconds to respond to a question in for a follow up, you would have thirty seconds and then there were closing statements though. And I mean it you saw candidates as they tend to do during debates. They pushed their time, you know, moderators would try to cut them off. They tried to get in there with something or interrupt or something. I mean, the fact is this is ten candidates, this is, you know, and of course, we have ten more tonight. I mean, it's just a huge, he'll is difficult to Mont to, to corral with that many people, you know, I saw some people on Twitter saying, you know, maybe a better idea would have been, you know, five for the first hour five for the next hour or something, it's just hard to try to get in there. And really, you know, we NPR did we looked at how much time? Each candidate got Cory Booker had the most time speaking time of the night with almost eleven minutes, followed by beta aerobic with just over ten Elizabeth Warren nine minutes. Twenty seconds. I mean and it goes on. Down. Jay Ensley actually had the least amount of speaking time with about five minutes. So this overall is not a lot of time for for any candidate. But you can you can see. I mean, I think that's why you know, we got some I think more policy steps substance from, you know, as Brandon said, I think, Elizabeth Warren. I mean, she was at the center of the stage. She is she was the front runner of this night, and it's sort of in the top tier of polling candidates. I do think, you know who Ian Castro. I think had a really good night. He was able to talk, I think, especially on immigration. He has some very detailed proposals there. And he actually got into it a bit with bit or work last night over immigration. We would not detain any family fleeing violence. In fact, fleeing the deadliest countries on the face of the planet today, we would implement a family case management program, so they could be cared for in the community at a fraction of the cost, and then we would rewrite our immigration laws in our own image, free dreamers forever from any fear of deportation by making them. US citizens here. In this country invest in solutions in Central America work with regional stakeholders. So there's no reason to make two thousand mile journey till secretary thirty seconds be very clear, the reason that they're separating these little children from their families. Is that they're using section thirteen twenty five of that act which criminalizes coming across the border to incarcerate the Pri the parents, and then separate them some of us on this stage have called to end that section to terminate it some congressman aerobic have not? And I want to challenge all of the candidates. I just think it's a mistake, I think it's a mistake, and I think that, that if you truly want to change the system that we got a repeal that section if not, thank you, then it might as well, say speaking on immigration and beta Rourke and Hawaii on Castro Jose tweeted, I found the use of Spanish in a debate as reflecting of the changing demographics of not only the Democratic Party, but also of the nation as a whole, Jessica. What did you think of that? It just sort of surprise me you had, I think it was better that came out there very first and one of his answers, which was actually about tax rates. And he started answering in Spanish attorney it into into there and actually didn't answer the question about seventy percent marginal tax rates. And then you saw Cory Booker use it and who in Castro a little bit. I think it does reflect the more and more people are in this country are bilingual or Spanish, their native language, and to have to communicate to those people, and to make them feel as though. They're a part of it. And I mean this debate, of course, was co sponsored by Telemundo, as well. You know, I heard some people say no they wish there had been subtitles or something, you know, maybe maybe debate moderators. They weren't ready for this or something. So he could see that tonight. I mean, you know, people to judge she speaks Norwegian and a bunch of other languages. So who knows what he could break out into. Brandin speaking of issues, what were the big issues that you didn't hear last night that you felt should have been a part of the debate I wanted to hear a lot about criminal Justice reform. There is a little bit said, I think by Senator Booker regarding the first step back, but I wanted to hear more details about what can we do work in with states like Kansas, you know, we've been talking about, but what can we do to go further than we have the first step back was a again. It was a good first up, but had not strong enough. And when you look at the majority population of those in prison, it's people of color. So to me, it's something really important that we need to discuss and get to the bottom of comments on our Facebook page, it felt like a three ring circus at times with many moderators and candidates. But I was glad to hear from each of the candidates because I'm searching for the one who will be the less best lead Houlihan Castro was the biggest surprise to me. He did very well and exceeded my expectations whereas aerobic Booker and Warren met expectations where. Speaking with Jessica Taylor NPR reporter and Brandon Johnson, vice chair of the Kansas Democratic Party. I'm Kimberly Adams of marketplace in for Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one A from W AMU, and NPR. Support for NPR and the following message come from carmax for more than twenty five years carmax has made it easy to sell your car. They provide free appraisals and offers on the spot carmax will buy your car even if you don't buy, there's in fact carmax has bought more than eight million vehicles. To learn more and schedule your free appraisal. Visit carmax dot com. This week, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the stonewall uprising a turning point in the movement for LGBTQ rights. So in this week's episode of the story or podcast from NPR will, revisit the very first documented, our founder, Dave, I say, made back in nineteen Eighty-nine called remembering stonewall. Listen in subscribe now. This is one A. I'm Kimberly Adams in for Joshua Johnson. I want to add two more voices to the conversation that we've met as part of our across America project. Joining us from WB H M in Birmingham, Alabama is page Horace of vice president for the Alabama young Democrats page. Welcome to one A. Thanks for having me on. And we also have Kate knock as well is who's in a studio at Michigan radio, one of our across America partners. Kate is a senior at the university of Michigan Kate. Glad to have you with us. It's a pleasure to be here. So Kate, let's start with you. First of all. How would you define yourself as a voter? And what did you think of what you saw last night? So I would consider myself a moderate, Republican, actually, was the former vice chair of the college Republicans here at the university of Michigan last year. But with everything I've seen with Trump since twenty sixteen I've been really disappointed in his lack of basic morals and integrity. So i'm. Definitely considering voting democrat in twenty twenty I just hope to see someone who's a bit more moderate. I think that Senator Amy klobuchar of last night really stood out to me as more moderate, and electable candidate. However, I saw general shift to be more radically liberal, from people like Warren Castroneves Booker, as well as surprisingly Tim Ryan, and beta who I thought would be a little bit more centrist than they were on their policies. So I just hope that tonight we see a bit more moderates that could compel me to vote democrat, I don't agree with things like, you know, free college for all universal healthcare, Medicaid for all. So I just want someone who can appeal to me as more of a moderate, and also I feel has integrity as a human being page. How would you identify yourself as a voter, and what was your assessment of last night? I'm actually a person I kind of really does look at the heart of the candidate. And then how the are going to work amongst the people, and with congress as well. So I try to says the candidate is a hole in look at which rates in positive traits that they can provide. And that kind of helps me start looking more at them in detail as to what their policies in what issues they're trying to focus on. So for me, the person that was just kind of looking at a little bit more in this debate was Elizabeth Warren. And she stood out last night, she came out with an opening statement that was really strong and she worked at and she's my candidate from last night. Page, you were at the Alabama young Democrats watch party last night. What did you hear from other people in the room? Everybody was actually cheering on Elizabeth Warren. I mean, we did watch a lot of facial expressions throughout this, that night, but overall, we were hearing a lot of tears in reference to. Women's rights, because that's a big issue going on within our state, the health care as well as looking at, you know, we want to hear more about criminal Justice reform. We didn't necessarily hear a lot of that. But yet and still we heard some of it. So we heard a lot of applauses with those, but those were the issues that I heard the most on the first question last night, did go to Massachusetts, Senator Elizabeth Warren about how her proposed policies might impact the economy which most people democrat and Republican agree is doing well white right now. Here's what she said. I think of it this way, who is this, a Konami really working for? It's doing great for thinner Infinity slice atop human. Great. So giant drug companies this is not doing great for people who are trying to get a prescription filled. It's a great for people who want to invest in private prisons, just not fifty the African Americans, Latin vaccine, families are torn. Pardons. Lives are destroyed and whose communities are ruined. It's still in great for giant oil companies that want to drill everywhere. Just not for the rest of us who are watching climate change bear down upon us, Brandon. Let's bring you back into the conversation. What do you think about the debate starting with questions about the economy? I think it was good because I was one of the things that Republicans continue to talk about as a strength right now. So talking about the strength was good, and Senator Warren, you know, rightly highlighted how it's not really strong for everyone else. I mean you're moderate lower income, folks aren't seeing the benefits of this economy that we continue to hear has been so strong is the economy. A big primary issue for you in particular, it is in a sense of doing more for the middle and lower classes. I mean, we continue to help those who are wealthy with with the tax cuts that we've seen. I mean they've gained so much, but your folks who are and not former speakers middle. Class four hundred thousand your folks who make a hundred thousand fifty thousand or less, what benefit or they get an we're not seeing that the only thing that we really seen as a child tax credit extension, and President Obama, actually did that prior. So again, where are we going to help them? And I'm really interested to hear what the proposals are to help those folks Kate last night. We asked our text club, the one, a text club what they wanted to hear disgust at the debate, and they overwhelmingly said climate change, but it took nearly an hour and a half to get to that in the debate. Did you have any thoughts on the placement of climate change as a discussion in the debate? Yeah. I mean I was surprised it was so late. But I do think that they had a pretty extensive discussion about it, especially we saw Jay Inslee governor of Washington, bring it up pretty much every single time. He had the floor. So I do think and Bego work as well. So I do think that it's an issue at the top of their minds but at the same time I thought that it was more extensively covered than any other big issues including taxes, free trade as people have said, criminal Justice. So I was I thought it was enough time. But I was surprised it took so long to get there to anything else surprise you about being missing in the debates. Yeah. Like I said, free trade was a big one for me. One of the biggest reasons I have been disappointed with Trump is because he says he believes in fair trade, not free trade. And that's just not something I can subscribe to. So I was hoping to see some more commentary on that and stronger positions. But there was ten candidates in a lot of things to cover. So I'm not surprised. It didn't come up. Jessica, what did you think about the topics the economy I feel like it's always sort of the base issue? So I think it made sense today started with that, and then immigration of courses in the minds of people with the horrendous conditions that are happening with the detention centers. And then, of course photograph, the we have seen of the, the man and his daughter trying to cross the river. And so I think that those sort of were maybe more pressing in the minds as several people have said, it's just you can't get to all of the questions temp. Ohio Representative Tim Ryan actually did speak to this just a tad bit. Maybe not on the free trade issue. But you know, he's from Ohio, he's a moderate. He's, you know, said the Democratic Party has moved too far to the left, and he actually did sort of speech that manufacturing base, and that's so important there and his his area there. I mean he wanted district that he he's in a district that President Trump had one and so. It's so you're looking at just the issues. There are very important has congressional districts, I think he was sort of trying to the steer the debate, they're a little bit. He made one of the few attacks directly on Trump in the debate criticizing the president for according to him, causing his area to lose jobs manufacturing jobs. Right. Right. And when you look at the numbers, I mean, Democrats have strong argument, they're there to make because some of these companies that Trump will tout have continued with layoffs and things too. And so, I think it will probably come up, more more tonight. But again, it was just a lot of issues to crown to try to cover even into ours. I was surprised by how fast it felt like it went by page what did that stage look like to you? And how do you think that affected the way that it played out? I mean that stage to me, represented the future. I mean you didn't just have women, you did have a black man at there as well. You know, it's just a ever changing demographic, and is starting to represent America from even the Hispanic community, you did have representatives. And so for me it was actually just touched my heart. You know, to actually see that much diversity and to also, you know, kinda pull younger people and more, because this is what your future is starting to look like is not looking like just white women, or just white men is looking at everybody and, you know, in compassi, what America was founded on in who we are, who we are going to be in a future. And so it was a great feeling to see everyone of their Kate was that appealing to you. Yeah. Yeah. I agree with that. It was it was refreshing to hear from diverse group of people at the same time, though I'm much more of the policy, not the person. So I wanted to hear what they had to say instead of just looking at, you know, their gender their, their color. Obviously, it's a factor, but I don't know. I just don't think it's as big of a, an inclination for me to vote for someone and Brandon, what were your thoughts on sort of the people who were up on the stage as you sort of walked away last night, was beautiful women and men of color up. There was great our party continues to, to show that we have folks involved in area, and while policies important representation matters. So when people see folks up there who look like now, who possibly could be president, you know, it makes a big impact for folks and probably will increase turnout because people see that, you know, they actually could be up down that stage. I'd like to correct. One thing I just said. Her second said, they Clinton that Trump one Tim Ryan's congressional district Clinton wanted, but Trump did much better than than previous by about ten points than previous Republicans have their right in Ryan made the point that Trump had promised to bring more manufacturing jobs in another Lorraine wrote us a different Lorraine from before as an independent who looking for an alternative to Trump. I was impressed by congressman Delaney. He seems like someone who can get things done and has a good understanding of economics. I was disappointed that he got. So little speaking time as compared to the other candidates, if Democrats are going to win they're going to need to win over independent voters, and this sort of gets at a one of the challenges of this debate, which is that it was the moment for some of these lesser known candidates Jessica to sort of try to brand themselves to voters who might not know them. Who did that successfully? I think Castro definitely, I think that, you know, despite being a former Obama administration official, not a lot of people know a lot about him. And you know. Title is someone. I mean, we talked earlier about sort of that tiff between him and Bego, they came in sort of this highly touted candidate has had this meteoric rise, almost flip Texas in the Senate and sort of a wonder kin and his star has really faded. I don't think beta really helped himself last night. Castro came off with a lot of policy proposals, and, like Elizabeth Warren. He has put out a lot of policy proposed on his website from the beginning. And I think that came across that he was very prepared. I also think that I mean to Blasios entered the race the latest if anyone. And so he came out, you know, with very progressive stances. Of course, he and Elizabeth Warren were the only ones that raise their hands, which I think Republicans are definitely going to seize on as not just implimented Medicare for all, but to do away with all private insurance employer plans, Ashley tweeted, I hope the Democrats can keep their eye on the prize. And remember that if they want to be Trump. They need to find someone that can make both existing Democrats happy and win over. Disinfect. Which is Republicans. But there's been only one round of debate so far. What might be in store tonight when the second group of candidates take the stage in Miami? We'll ask our panel of voters in a moment. Stay close. Support also comes from the platinum card from American Express conversations and civil debate in our society push us forward and connect us with the rest of the world with the platinum card, earn membership rewards points on virtually all your purchases, which can be turned into anything from nights out to flights away. That's the powerful backing American Express. Don't live life without it. Visit American Express dot com slash explore platinum terms apply. Hey, it's Peter Sagan. So you're listening to this NPR podcast because you want to be informed, you want to learn something. But what if you need a little break? Well, then you want to check out wait, wait. Don't tell me the NPR news quiz. It's the show that let's your lizard, brain enjoy itself for once you can be serious again later. Listen to wait, wait, don't tell me on NPR one or wherever you get your podcast today as part of our across America project. We're hearing from voters around the country about what they thought. Of the candidates performance at last night's democratic debates and what they hope to see tonight in round two. A bit of last night was about the candidates making an impression on voters with their stories. Sometimes for the first time, here's what Senator Cory Booker shared when he answered a question related to gun control, both even worse, as I hear gunshots in my neighborhood. I think I'm the only one I hope I'm the only one on this panel here that had seven people shot in their neighborhood. Just last week, someone I knew Shahad Smith was killed with an assault rifle at the top of my block last year for millions of Americans. This is not a policy issue. This is an urgency. And for those of not been directly affected their tired of living in a country where their kids go to school to learn about reading writing, and arithmetic and how to deal with an active shooter in their school. Jessica Senator book Booker referenced his neighborhood several times during the debate. What do you think about these attempts almost like branding, by the candidates? In the first debate, I think you want to humanize yourself. You want to tell your story and for him. I mean Newark is a major part of historian, even before he was elected to the Senate. He was becoming a national figure for his work there. You know, in a major city, just outside of New York City. I also thought that de Blasios answer on this was was very interesting because he pointed out, he's the only he was the only person up there with a black sun. His, his wife is black his son, Dante is by racial and talking about how he would talk to him about if you have an encounter with the police what to do. So I think that's sort of brought a very humanizing aspect to it too. And then club ajar somewhere in the middle. I mean, she's from Minnesota and gun rights, or a very big issue there. So, you know, she talked about, you know, wanting to find some sort of solution that could appeal to, to both sides in a way. But, you know, the people, you know if with valid reasons still could keep their keep their guns as well. So I mean, I think that overall I overall in this. Bait? We saw a lot of the we saw how far the party had moved left, you know there were some instances there with the club sometimes and Ryan pointing toward more moderate solutions, but I mean I think especially on gun control the party as a whole definitely has moved left. And you saw some of those stories telling sort of why why they reach those conclusions. Kate. What did you think of that gun control conversation? Yeah. As a big supporter of the second amendment rights. That's a big. I guess, consolation I might have to make twenty twenty you know, I'm going to be settling either way. So that's one issue where I just do not. See, I did I with almost every single one of these candidates if not every single one. So was there. Anyone whose message was the least offensive to you. Not particularly about gun control. But as I previously said, Senator Kohl, char seemed, the most moderate in the seemed like the person that a moderate person could vote for because at the end in her closing statements, you know, you, you previously talked about humanizing yourselves as candidates, and when she started talking about how she wouldn't make, you know, the big blanket promises that a lot of her colleagues were making on the stage. She just said that she would try to lead with integrity and be leader that could be respected on the international stage, and, and that really resonated with me as a person who's considering, you know, the integrity of the person as well as their policies page last night, the moderators asked each of the candidates, what they considered to be the greatest geopolitical threat to the US, most of the candidates, listed China nuclear weapons and or climate change. New york. Mayor Bill de Blasio said Russia, Washington governor, Jay Inslee said President Trump. How would you have answered that? Question. And, and what do you think of the answers that you heard? Everyone to me covered the basis because all of those things are actually important to me. But I mean we do have a lot of big threats going on right now. We do see a lot of problems with climate change. And what are we doing about that, when, you know, is affecting our citizens as well, as you know, our problems with Russia and past couple of years, you know, we're having some problems with how they impact elections and impede on us in a manner. So they all touch their bases. But the most important one to me was actually Donald Trump. I'm that hit the nail on ahead because I was like we do have a big problem and we're actually kind of having these problems because of him I'm not necessarily climate change. But, you know, just kind of like different things, and how he's actually impacting how we function how we rent run our country. And also, how our citizens live on a day-to-day basis, the decisions that he's making is affecting us as a whole, and I think that's just the big problem Benjamin emailed. If you picked out most. Quotes from the primary the average person, probably couldn't tell you who said which, quote the candidates need to distinguish themselves and not all run on the same platitudes. So as we get a little bit overwhelmed. Let's move on and talk about tonight's debate Jessica, who's on the stage tonight. And what should we expect? So this is, you know, when when they were dividing up these debates, they didn't want to have an undercard for the lower polling candidates like Republicans had to do in two thousand sixteen so NBC randomly, drew names. But by the luck of the draw more of the higher polling candidates are in tonight's debate. And so, I think this is the one that more people may be interested in, and that we could get, you know, sort of separation from some of these people on so right at the center of the stage is going to be former vice president, Joe Biden, along with mayor Buddha. Judge if south bend, Indiana Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont Senator Kamla Harris of California, entrepreneur, Andrew Yang Senator Kirsten gillibrand of New York. Former governor John Hickenlooper of Colorado, Colorado, Senator, Michael Bennet, self help author, Marianne Williamson, and congressman, California. Congressman men, Eric swallow, well. Now. Kate, I know you wanted to jump back in a on the issue of Trump being sort of the, the greatest challenge for the country. What are your thoughts on hearing that last night? Yeah. I just want to disagree with what was said before I kind of appreciated that they didn't talk about Trump as much as I thought that they were going to, because I think that it's just something that's a little bit stale in the minds of people who you know, we consider ourselves Republicans, or former Republicans are sick of hearing. Oh, you know, Trump is bad Trump is bad Trump, as bad, like we wanna hear specific policy ideas that they have for the future and hear about them as candidates. I think it's kind of a cheap shot at this point. Say oh, you know, we need to we need to stop Trump. You know everyone agrees with that, if they're gonna vote democrat. So I'd rather hear about the actual, you know, facts and policy, and the, the bottom line of the candidate. Dates instead of just, you know, I think trying to score political points in cheap way, Rachel wrote on our Facebook page. If Bernie Sanders cannot commit to being a registered democrat. Why should any registered democrat commit to him? I'm open to listening to any democrat at the Democratic Party debates to fair to paraphrase Sohn's a stark uncle Bernie, please sit. That's a pretty good clapback. No, I mean, I think this is something that, you know, Hillary Clinton supporters and other people were very pointing out in two thousand sixteen was that, you know, he is an independent and sort of what was you know, what is his loyalty to the party? So I think that I don't know if that particularly will come up in tonight's debate, but I wouldn't be surprised if we see other candidates continuing to make that I'm also interested tonight to see they did it last night. Of course with, you know, having the candidates, raise their hands of where they are on, on Medicare for all, and abolishing private health insurance plans. I'm sure that will be asked again tonight. We know that Bernie Sanders will raise his hand who else will join him in that because that's something that I mean, Republicans that I saw on Twitter or got emails from last night, that is something that, that they really think that is dividing issue for them, because we have seen in polling, that, while people may be open to the idea of Medicare for. For all when you take away the private health insurance that drops by about twenty points page very quickly. Who will you be watching closely tonight? Definitely, comma Harris, but also, I'm going to be looking at Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, I kinda do agree with everyone the angle he's going to be going tonight. But you know, I mean I don't know what else to expect an area but I just wanted to kind of hear what those to do have to say tonight. Thank you page Horace is a vice president for the Alabama young Democrats. Thanks for being with us page. Thank you. Jessica Taylor is an NPR political reporter and senior reporter for the cook political report. Thanks, jessica. Thank you. Kate, knock Hazel is a senior at the university of Michigan. Glad you could join us Kate. Thanks much. And Brandon Johnson is the vice chair of the Kansas Democratic Party. Thanks, brandon. Thank you. This show was produced by Amanda Williams and edited by Miranda. Full more special, thanks to across America partners. Michigan radio KM UW in Wichita. WBZ h him in Birmingham, one, a across America is funded in part by the corporation for public broadcasting. To learn more about the collaboration. Visit the one A dot org slash across America. This program comes to you from W AMU part of American University in Washington distributed by NPR. I'm Kimberly Adams of marketplace filling in for Joshua Johnson. Thank you so much for listening. And I'll see you again tomorrow for the Friday news roundup, this is one A.

Senator Elizabeth Warren Kate Senator Cory Booker President Trump Brandon Johnson America NPR Jessica Houlihan Castro Trump congressman Kansas Democratic Party Jessica Taylor Joshua Johnson Democratic Party Senator Bernie Sanders Governor Jay Inslee Kimberly Adams Wichita vice chair
Sea Level Rise, Ocean Warming Is Accelerating According To U.N. Report

Environment: NPR

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Sea Level Rise, Ocean Warming Is Accelerating According To U.N. Report

"The United Nations has released a sweeping new report on the state of the world's oceans and ice. The oceans are getting hotter. They're doing so faster. Ice Is melting driving arriving accelerated sea level rise and man made climate change is causing it. NPR's Rebecca Hersher has more the new report wraps up with scientists of the world know about climate changes affect on oceans and ice co Barnett is the vice chair of the panel that produced the report and flanked by top climate scientists. She announced its contents to to a packed room in Monaco this morning. I find this report to be unprecedented in the sense that it provides the complete picture of changes to water on the planet. That picture is sobering for one thing. The oceans are changing faster than they used to. sea-surface temperatures have been steadily rising since nineteen seventy but the rate of warming has doubled since the nineteen nineties. That's because the ocean has absorbed more than ninety percent of the extra heat. That's trapped in our atmosphere by greenhouse gases as the ocean has been acting like a sponge absorbing carbon dioxide and heat regulate the temperature but it can't keep uh glaciers and ice sheets are also melting faster and faster as the earth gets hotter that means less reliable sources of drinking water and faster sea level rise and in a first first this report analyzes studies that link individual weather events climate change such studies are relatively new and have connected extreme rainfall from hurricanes to abnormal warm warm ocean water and then there are the animals as humans pump greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and the oceans are getting more acidic at about two hotter water and it's threatening being fish that millions of people rely on. Tommy Moore is the oceanographer for the northwest Indian Fisheries Commission which supports tribes in Washington State. He says in recent years repeated heatwaves off the coast. There have damaged salmon and crabs stocks. I know it is a concern because it's tough to maintain a fishery when making your way of life life when it becomes increasingly uncertain a way of life because in addition to economic benefits many native communities are culturally tied to specific marine animals worldwide wide indigenous communities are disproportionately affected by climate change more says a side effect of intimately involved in the ocean is that tribes have a lot of knowledge to to offer scientists and policymakers the fishermen. Are you know they've been out there working. These areas for generations and they see changes that scientist just wouldn't see today's report stresses the importance of that knowledge is countries adapt to warming oceans because while eliminating greenhouse gas emissions immediately would would help lessen the impacts on the oceans in the long term. There's no way out in the short term. The oceans will keep getting hotter and higher and it will require dramatic matic sometimes painful changes to how people live along the world's coasts Rebecca Hersher. NPR news this message comes from NPR sponsor. COMCAST IS BUSINESS GIG fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

scientist Rebecca Hersher COMCAST NPR Tommy Moore NPR United Nations vice chair Monaco Washington State Indian Fisheries Commission ninety percent
Bill Veach January 18 2020 Interview

Beach Talk Radio

24:32 min | 1 year ago

Bill Veach January 18 2020 Interview

"So who is Bill Beach. Tell the people that are watching and listening who built Aegis okay in a nutshell I was born. I was raised in Colorado and I lived in in Colorado and Utah and New Zealand and and Wyoming before moving here. We moved from sixty three hundred feet elevation to six bit of a change. I've I've got degrees in electrical engineering technology and computer science started business. Built it up start in my garage solve it we move to. I only to be close to my mom when she was ill and then when she passed away we can go anywhere and we had come down here to look at foreclosed property and didn't really like Florida before he We found Fort Myers beach. And just love for Myers. Beach loved the little neighborhood. We're in and and the neighbors and so. How long have you been here now? Ten years and years. And when did you start getting involved in the local politics but like any good husband Susan. My wife suggested I get out and volunteer in something so it was was like Maybe a year or two okay. So you've been involved for eight or nine years. Yeah I think I've been the chair of Research Task Force for probably six seven years and you're on other. You're on other committees as well. I was vice chair of the public safety all your local political experience so I started out with resources task force and I wanted to volunteer. So I I really wanted to get on the community. Resource Advisory Board back when Murphy was a chair and was totally was full and then I asked Michelle Mayor. What do they need people? And she said the Marine Resources Task Force so I volunteered for the marine resources task force I was appointed and then like in the second meeting in a bunch of people who were on the Committee Committee of leaving and I was appointed chair. Okay and then I was also the The vice chair of the Public Safety Committee. I served with Bruce Butcher on that. He was a chair and was the chair on the community. Resource Advisory Board And now I'm the vice chair of the committee. Resource Advisory Board and the chair of Marine Resources Task Force. Okay okay. So why did you decide to run for town council. You know it seemed like a good time being involved two committees especially for a while. I was chairing. Both Committee's was quite a bit of work and I just feel it'd be more effective. Maybe being unaccountable even though the councils have been very very open to the presentation that we've done for our committee we try not to waste their time is still having a vote is important and being closer means. You can get more done because if you come. I'm from private industry. You find that working in government is painfully slow and so I think maybe being in chamber will help get some things done quicker. The other thing is there's a lot of. There's a lot of things that we've been involved with both marine resources task for us and the Community Resources Advisory Board which are going to happen here over the next few years. Part of that is they're gonNa Redo this time square a and then you know you worked on here. This is your office. It's a it's a great area and you know but it could use a little dressing up. There's there's also the The Bayfront Plaza down there which is really underutilized and can become quite a gym and now we own the entrance to to bay oaks down there which can has a a lot of potential. So I'd like to be a part of seeing those be done in a in a creative not monotonous boring kind of way. Okay so you brought a bay okay. I'm going to skip ahead a little a bit. What is the future of folks? What what what is your Plan or proposal or what do you support for for Bay oaks buildings From what I understand. It's Kinda fallen apart. Needs work You can't get to it Or you can't get to it. But the the marketings been poor not a ton of people use it. So what's the plan for Bay Oaks. You know that is a really good question And you know tell the truth. I don't know now I go to quite often. I go there for classes is and hit the gym. And and it's it's a ways off and people come here for the beach trying to attract anybody from off the island to come here to go off. The beach is Hartselle because they don't have to wait in traffic to go somewhere inland. There's a lot of potential there the late as a little weird because you have to walk down a ways to get to the to get to the main building There are some other things that could be done there. But I'm just not sure everything can work up because like okay. The Anchorage Committee really wants facility more facilities to do their thing bay. Oh 'cause they propose to do that but you're all bound in by the Matanzas pass preserve so there's really no way to get access to the dinghies easily to use bay oaks. I've seen them wanting to add a few things and make it a little more interesting or even rearrange things but honestly I'm I'm not sure what the future obey Oaks I. I would like to sit down and talk with. Were cab talk to the people who are really involved to get their ideas and seen some of the drawings but honestly it's a wide open book. Okay do you think that Bay oaks. the beach needs bay oaks or could area be put to better use. Yeah well you know it's important for some aspects because it is a bit of a community gathering spot. I mean if you like. My Dad lives in a You know it's not a gated community. Missile Golf Community and they have all these public facilities so they have places where you can go and David woodworking shop. They have tennis courts they have picked all they have a golf course. They have tennis courts and all those things are important for their sense of community to get together and do things when I do go to bay oaks particularly in the season. There's used the same guys at they're playing softball. They're out there playing botchy ball. All you know may not be a large number for the people who do use it. It's a very important part of our community. The lights the lights situation on Hysteria Boulevard. What's cheers solution that again? That's one of an engineer by training and that is a type of problem that really make engineers wake up in the morning because the white lights that they're proposing and this is not like there's some kind of federal program where they get free lights from some grant or something this is just what F- PNN L. is offering and EFI now will save money because they're more efficient to us. They don't need it as much maintenance. Our lights are older all different colors. They're all different different types but these lights proposing does. They're like A. The one thing was going to work for everybody light like a menu with one item and the lights are proposing are four to five thousand degrees Kelvin. which is the same between moonlight and sunlight? So they're the worst color temperature temperature for turtles for sea turtles now. We are a nesting area. For Sea Turtles. We are legally obligated to to not cause them harm and these lights. I would do that glow this process to moonlight. I've been out onto releases and a dark night. It's difficult even under ideal conditions to get the turtles to go the correct way if you had a moonlight glow from the opposite side. It's going to be a problem now. The other problem is if you go with the with the light of the turtles can see. They don't throw grow as far so you need a lot more lights. We just F. P. and L. offers is like a ridiculous idea that seven million dollars because they want to charge fifteen thousand dollars for every new light for every poll the put it in and then then a higher monthly costs so as a very difficult problem. I think the solution lies in some kind of compromise. I think that putting the white lights down the you have to turn off creates blindness because your is your pupils constrict when you have the white lights. It's as soon as you leave the white lights and go to a dark area. It takes a while for them to adapt and you'll have blind spots so we can be more dangerous having intermittent white lights than Ken having no lights at all so it is an interesting problem. I don't think that all of the options in been pursued jumping onto the white light thing though. I understand that it is an opportunity to do something now but I don't think there's no right time to do the wrong thing that I think they're doing the white lights simple solution but I think it will be a headache in in the long run so it sounds like we're in a situation now between humans and turtles. That's where that's where we're stuck because the cost to to protect the turtles is Sky Sky High and the cost to protect humans is lower. But you can't protect turtles for that price it is. It's a trade off the three points there's really a trade off a young life competitor. I know but you have you have the turtles and we have an legal obligation to the shirttails. You have humans and you have money. Those are the three things but there are other things we can do. I think to mitigate some of the risks that have not been done and one thing is. Focus your lights on a congested areas on crosswalks. And you know those-those Were you push a button lights flash to let you know. Someone's in the cross where I think those are very effective so you can do some things besides lights to really augments atheists not all about lights and again you have to turn if there's a light that's visible even from it doesn't have to be directly visible even the globe because I live on the beach my lights have to be turtle turtle friendly wavelength and they have to be shielded. It isn't one or the other and so. If you have to turn off lights you are going to diminish safety for six months of the year so even the white light is is not an ideal solution for humans because you just can't keep them on all year round next topic. Do you think Fort Myers beach needs to be rebranded. And would you have voted for the sixty five thousand dollar contract for our. May you know it seems kind of excessive. I guess the proof will be in the pudding and to see what they come up. I know that branding is one of these things that has been holding up a lot of things like something. I'm really terrible about things like colors logos if you're going underdo a lot of investment. It's something you have to build on kind of base and the Brandon comes down from that we are a real tough thing to brand. And what is branding. Four right branding. Ending is really for visitors. I think people on the beach know who they are. They know what we are. But it's a marketing tool to get away to find who you are so people want to come here and visit and come here spend their money so it's really a very pro business thing. Sixty five thousand dollars. I don't know where that money goes to. What's really involved? But if it if it really works for marketing they know right pay for itself for the town businesses. Well the lines to get on the beach now can go all the way back to the fire station. And if no further if the rebranding is about bringing more people to the beach How many more people can you put on the beach? I mean what it's Fort Myers beach. You think I mean. Obviously there are people out there. That thank at Fort Myers is confused with Fort Myers Beach. I I didn't hear that until I heard local politicians titians talking about it. I'd never heard that before. People know that the beach where the sand is they know which way the beaches. I don't understand what you're going back to brandon to unless it's a gigantically bigger picture than just figuring out how to get more people to the beach. Well I have to disagree with them one point because I do travel and I was just I was just out in Arizona for my dad's eighty fifth birthday and I was in an Utah to do some skiing with a nephew and I met people who have a connection with Fort Myers. And you and I'll tell them from Fort Myers beach and I've been to Fort Myers and I said well so have I. But I'm from Fort Myers Beach. We're quite a different town in Fort Myers and I get the confusion all the time but I don't think they're talking about changing the name. I think this is really about you. Know I've also gone and I've played guitar like open mics and I have a song about Fort Myers beach and single little and I I should I bring my guitar sometimes but anyway you know it just talks about young people what they come to former speech even about traffic and end here and I sung that it's kind of an upbeat sign. A guy he told me you know. Boy You've never been to Fort Myers beach. Fort Myers Beach is about drugs and college kids getting drunk and falling out of balconies. So that's the image. Do we have with a lot of people. Well there's only one place on the beach that's familiar that that that that gives us that reputation and I'm sure you know who I'm talking about. I can guess okay. There's Fort Myers beach needed a Peo. Yup what does that mean public information officer for a show that they're going to hire you know. There is a bit of a hole the town does and we don't really have much of a social media or A web presence. There's a website that community resource advisory board have come up with the the mock APP and the APP. Does things like tells you where the nearest bathroom is. Because there's really no for visited. There's no way to know where public bathroom is So you know. I think there's probably a need and I think that that job right now is being done by other people but probably the town would probably benefit from that. So so what is your plan for the foot of the bridge. You're talking about the traffic right here right on a bunch of things on the table to get that Fixed I guess changed so that it runs smoother. What do you support? Well you know I think when you're talking about traffic and been around for a little while you realize traffic is probably worse during the weekdays we days here because of all the construction all the people that are working on the island and I don't think there's any way that you are going to alleviate the travis situation entirely. I think that people blame this stoplight. Here for traffic. But when I get past the stoplight. I'm crawling all the way through past the Atlanta area. Because that's where a lot of the congestion's that's where you get the pedestrian traffic Conflicts I think that would be they can dig a certainly dress up the the interest of the island they can make a divided make a little safer to cross. I don't see it being a real solution traffic. You can't put around about there. They said there's not room I think the only way to really help with traffic is to come up with a dedicated trolley line. Because I think the only way you're going to get people out of their cars is that they're sitting there for forty five minutes watching trolleys go by in lane other than that. There's really not much you can do because you can't unless you go through an imminent domain. The you know the heck out. Ah The downtown area and make this into a you know a boulevard for traffic instead of what makes in great people Then I think that we're gonNA stuck where we are and they're putting up a second traffic Afric light down there on a cerro not too far from the Lani Kai before the end of the beach right you're Crescent Crescent Street right and you know I mean at that help well probably helps if you're turning on crescent street okay. I'm not sure if it hurts. You know because you know somebody's if you get if you pulse traffic like that then you'll you'll get pedestrians and opportunity across when there's not a lot of traffic. Did you agree with the town raising taxes. Would you voted for it. You know I think that the the the the taxes the property taxes supply like fifteen percent of the town budget. I mean we pay less in property taxes than we do for the library. A voice like a half or third and we pay for the Fire Department. So I think that you know the property. Taxes is probably a bit of an burden for the big tax pitcher. I don't exactly know where it's going. But I know that they've had to build up reserves. I'm the fiscally conservative guy. I borrow money. I don't have personally. And so I think that if they're if they're building up reserves and getting in a stronger position than I think that's a good thing so Yes or no you would have voted yes or no. I'm not saying I'm not that up on the exact vote so I can't say Are you in favour of three terms for the council members or this referendum. That's going to be voted on for four. Oh the three year term versus three year terms. Yeah you know I think I prefer a three year term. I don't know if I would have signed up to run if it was going to be four years and I know that's a risk. Ah also the thing about March verses November. I think the reason why they had the election in March if you know. It's an odd time when a lot of the part time residents are here. If you have it in early November I know most people now vote they vote online or they vote and they mail in their votes and so I'm really not sure how that would affect the number of people vote but they originally moved it to to March to give more people the voice. What is your number one issue boy? That's a tough when you know. There's so many things I think that probably number one thing is to not lose sight of what makes Fort Myers beach really a great place. There's there's so many things here I mean I'm completely in love with the island and not just the downtown. The people I love the nature just fascinated with the science of what goes was on being backed up by the by their preserve. I think my number one thing is to not screw up what works we can go forward. But there's a a lot of really good things and you know working in haste would would would could create a lot more problems than than you would saw by whatever you're trying to force through other in that what's the next issue. Come up and give me a real issue. That was really real issue by issue. I assume you've got to be something going on the town something that you had running for a reason. I'm ready for reason but you know the biggest primary reason is I want to see a fairly creative guy and I want to see this downtown redevelopment it done in a way that really speaks to speaks to everybody and I think that's looking for an issue but I think there's going to be a lot of issues that arise from that there's a lot that's going to be a part of that. I travel a lot. I've been to one hundred forty one hundred and fifty different countries. I've seen what people do with their with their public areas. That work work. And I think there's an awful lot of potential here to really make this this shine And that's probably number one reason for running. Okay so is a town too heavy handed with code violations. Do you hear people complaining about that or they complaining just to complain or is that a real issue. I think that you know the town for for when I've been here to me. It's always been a place where they have lots of ordinances that aren't enforced. I mean you know a a lot of people. Don't even understand that the laws you should have your dog on a six foot non retractable leash. Everybody and their brother has retractable leashes. Yesterday I was hit by a dog on on a long retractable leash. Okay I'm yeah I'm looking live but There's and you know you're not supposed to drink on the beach sunset you you know you see everybody doing that so I think it's probably been a lot of people who are used to to ordinances not being enforced and it's a bit of a shock when they're actually enforced. I understand Dan. You know doing something way. It's difficult to another but when you have a big like I know that the short term rental is kind of a big thing. But if you're renting a place your places next to people who are either renting or living there and you have an obligation to be available in case. There's a problem to solve the problem with people you're renting too. I mean that makes a sense okay. So you'd think to town manager is doing a good job. How would you rate them on a one to ten scale? You know from what I see. I think he's doing a good job. I think think he brings a lot of money into the town. I think he He knows how to get grants for things and so I think that financially he's been a he's he's gotten a lot of things in the town I think he's been around a lot and he knows very practical thing. So you know I like Roger. He's a bit of a hand off kind of town manager. But I think that I think he's doing a fair job. You know compared to we've had in the past if you were not running for office. What three people would you vote for? Well I've I've met Jim a little bit. I think he's very very astute politician. You've been around politics. It's you know. I know. Dan is a nice guy. We share a lot in common with I. I you know joining technology that goes I think that his views we used to me or a little bit. Extreme wanting things like you know put bathrooms in residential areas and allow e bikes on the beach. I know canola forest creature pretty well. I know that the one I don't know about any context to do with the Baptist Church Union might had but I know that he is very loyal to the armed services and the one of his driving reasons for getting involved is to get a memorial to the armed services He's he's a nice guy and I don't know if I really know many other people running okay. So the What was the other question? That just Margarita Ville what's your what's your stance what has your stance it's been on that. Since this whole thing started from day one. Well I think you know I I would not go out of my way to try. To overturn preview. Cancel is done. They voted unanimously. I think you know there will probably be some issues coming up. They probably minor. And I think you know just to work conscientiously in and logically with them to get get things done. I think it's you know. Oh it's GONNA go ahead. I think a lot of these lawsuits are are more vindictive than they are really aimed at stopping they probably would like to stop by doubt out they're going to So you know I think go ahead you know my my preference personally. The first one was a little large. The seawall gave me some concerns. Most because I think that a I I don't think they can keep the sand where they said they're going to keep the sand. I do like the MOM. And Pop. Feel for Myers beach. Some of my favorite things sitting here with around around here. You see these things that are You know the run by residents or people who are close by I think is a great part of Fort Myers beach but that said I didn't buy the land you know when you buy land and you can pretty much say which you within reason which are going to put there so you know. I think now that it's gone down this far far down the road I would just work to facilitate getting it done in a in a fair and logical way and when you come to the Council meetings and your reports pretty pretty regularly from the committee member Committee meetings that you share that you attend. What is your opinion on how this counsel's doing I think council great? You know I've seen different councils I you know. Sometimes you'll reach him sensationalized news and you'll see things like the talk about all these arguments in that kind of stuff but you know they walk into the meetings and they're all they like to be together sometimes they disagree on things they do it in a usually in a very congenial and respectful way. And so I think this council has been a good model and and you know some of the members of the outgoing members You know Anita She is such a people person. I'm really impressed with her. And you know Joanne with her Her just deep down you know intelligence intelligence and logic into what's going on. I think they're both going to be missed on the council in sixty seconds sell everybody why they should vote for you you no. I'm I'm thinking compared to a lot of other candidates see. I'm a middle of the road kind of guy. I'm beholden to no one. I don't I haven't taken any money from any of the big developers I I feel very passionately to preserve what we have. I realized that sometimes you have to compromise and I think pretty middle of the road candidate. But since I've been here I I love to learn about things. I'm very curious kind of guy and the more I learn the more I realized that there's a lot of things that are very fragile and then we have to work to to to really protect and water is one of the big reasons to I've as head of the Marine Research Task Force We've been in involved with this kind of thing for a while and a lot of ways to have much of a voice. We work very hard to try to set an example of how to other communities should behave and I think we're led to continue that and onto to fight for what we have and to preserve what we have in cleaning the water the beaches and the town and finally how can people reach out to you. Find you who Your campaign Donate to if they if they like to or just reach out and talk to you well small town using just look around and find us but Yeah yeah I have a diving. Email address of record. Billy each edgy. Mail DOT COM. You're free to email me if you have any questions that are concerned you can come to any one of the committee meetings and you can can also talk there or if you see me on the street walking on the beach riding my bike doing whatever they say. Hi Bill thanks so much for coming on. Appreciate your time and good luck in the race thank you.

Fort Myers beach Bill Beach Bay Oaks vice chair Fort Myers Myers beach chair of Research Task Force Myers Marine Resources Task Force Fort Myers Brandon Florida Advisory Board Utah Committee Committee Dan The vice chair Public Safety Committee tennis
Voice and the Mayo Clinic with Joyce Even

Voice First Health

22:41 min | 1 year ago

Voice and the Mayo Clinic with Joyce Even

"I'm doctor carrie fisher physician and voice technology futurist voice technology is rapidly becoming the operating system of are lies and it will completely revolutionized the way we experienced healthier let's talk voice hello and welcome to episode thirty nine of voice first house it is so great to have you along today for this episode today i have special guests and joyce even is these vice chair of content management and delivery livery global business solutions for mayo clinic end if you've been following along in the space then you know that mayo clinic is a pioneer in voice technology when it comes to healthcare and they are really paving the way for a lot of organizations to do some great things today joyce comes on and we talk all about how mayo clinic got start invoice why they think it is such an important technology and we talk about some of the skills they produced in some of their early success is as well i think you'll find this discussion very very interesting so without any further ado i'd love to welcome joyce even onto the podcast well hi joyce thank you so much for joining other listeners hear a voice herself it's a real pleasure to have you on the podcast today well thank you for having me terry i'm really excited to be here wonderful well i think we should start are first by introducing you to perhaps you could tell tell myself in the listeners a little bit about who you are in the end what you do what you're story well i'm a vice chair of content management and delivery here in global business solutions from mayo clinic global business solutions really is a an area male clinic that takes male clinic knowledge in content out to the world and so i'm here today to talk about this exciting new channel of leveraging voice as we take are now like out to the world fantastic and obviously you know anybody that's in the medical field knows at mayo has incredible reputation when it comes to a content so the seems like a natural progression for mayo so let's let's talk about that why first of all when when did male first start dabbling invoice if you will and why did male make the decision to do we actually started dabbling in voice back in twenty seventeen of for many years mayo clinic has been delivering health information in through multiple channels we started out with krant back a hundred years ago and then as we progress you know that became working with a the well as the web grew in existence and then also with mobile devices as we continue to look look at what the next new channel would be that's where voice really popped up so we felt it was just the next points in evolution was to say how would this work if we were delivering health improved mason through voice technology jeep versus 'em the traditional ways that people access information today so we really starting back in twenty seventeen a saying what how do we have constructor content differently when it has spoken versus when it spreads so that's a very good point how do you construct you're constant differently when it is spoken versus when it is written so can you tell us a little bit about that like what do you do differently to make sure that it's gonna be i received well through a voice do as well as we began to investigate how we would do this what we did recognize is that we would have delivered some different tool sets in order to producer content that would allow us to actually hear it being spoken back to us and so are team of editors began to experiment with some of these tools and the first thing we did did was create the mayo clinic first stage skill for alexa and it was through the development of that skill that we practice how to develop some of this content to be spoke versus a thinking about the user breeding breathing it we start at wit's end this small area of content because we felt it was something that we could better manny trip is about fifty topics that was more information all wasn't supposed to be in emergency see service but more informational 'em also something that we felt was fair conducive to a home situation so if you had a minor mishap in your home that you could just speak to alexa and say what should i do i my hand a that was how we began are journey with boys but still learn how we might be able to deliver that content spoken an be able to help people in their home that's great and so that skill has i'm sure and i'm assuming has 'em you'll did a lot of interesting information for you and for mayo as a result of testing if we if users like what what what has come of that and how how things progressed from that yes of the the skill still recedes quite a bit of activity and so we've continued to expand upon down in not only leverage with alexa but that we made that available than with google goal is well and so it continues to grow and we keep learning from that on how to make the information better understanding more how people are asking the questions understanding that intent is really important as you're developing being content for boys but then we've progressed that was so what we refer to as third party scale where somebody actually has the download an app in order to leverage that content we've progressed and began to work also them with amazon on first party content meaning that you don't have to download a skill in order to ask alexa question and so we worked with amazon to deliver over eight thousand health concepts that someone can simply ask alexa a tell me what the symptoms of an old sir are end that alexa will respond without you having to say a download that scale or say open male clinic first day that's amazing 'cause i think that that's a totally different level of interaction with these devices instead of having to to enable these skills is as you mentioned and so when you're providing content because you you obviously have massive database of content through the mayo clinic are you simply taking that content and now putting it into voice or you leveraging somebody information lessons learned from the skill and changing the way that content is actually actually delivered to the user through voice we are lebron james what we've learned through the per state skill in terms of the number of ways people might be asking the question what they're really what they intend to that question that is that's the most important piece because you can ask a you know what are the symptoms of an ulcer or you can say i have abdominal pain 'em could i have an all sir you could ask many different ways what you might that question and we keep learning from that what they intend to the question is in order to serve up the best dancer that's something that's very unique ten voice is when someone's asking a question you have one opportunity to deliver an answer that's unlike when people search on a device where they may get many possible responses and they get to choose in boise really have have have content prepared to answer that question in understand what question is being asked so we continually keep learning that a i think that's both science an art to that an understanding all the different intense at people may have sure sure no that makes a lotta sense and i'm sure that you know with your position now is being h first party resource with this information that's a very valuable place to be a in terms of highly organization what was that process like becoming lee lee first party a a resource for these health skills was that a difficult process where that's something that amazon was very delighted to have you be part of how did that work yes we we've had a good relationship with amazon over the past years and it it really was the next progression from the first aid skill so as they watch which skills seem to be doing well a from an amazon perspective they were looking to have a trusted partner delivering information for their users in china make that easier for the user they're all of these voice devices and in their 'em owners are really looking for other ways to engage people and they know that there is a barrier if you force people to download apps six cetera and then to say alexa open mayo clinic first eight i mean that's a barrier through to just being able to ask a question so they were looking to work with someone that they could trust in this space and that's really how their relationship began and we continue to work with them we also want to better understand how the users are lebron urging saying the health information where we might be able to take that from a patient perspective not just from a consumer perspective great and so that that actually brings up a really interesting question is well on the whole um you know the news that came out this year a little bit earlier about a new alexa devices becoming hip compliant at least for a select number of people right now but obviously it will be available as we go down the road here what what are your thoughts on that from from males perspective how is that going to impact the patients and patient care for promotion both patients and also for the providers well i think it really opens up some doors for us to think about how we might engage our patients differently than what we have in the past pass especially as we think about delivering patient education for when they first might be diagnosed with the disease to having an after procedural a after procedure to do in education about how they might take care of their wounded or follow up care after surgery were really looking at all these different possibilities per where voice might play and be more effective than traditional patient education is with a patient yeah i think it's a really really exciting area this whole idea of being able to use essentially used these voice these smart speakers as medical devices now with the fis a survey the building this technology so that's really exciting part that i find absolutely fascinating fascinating and i know that a mayor was on the forefront of this whole idea of vocal biomarkers and i'm wondering if you could comment a little bit about that and some of the work you've done in that area and some of your thoughts on that yeah son is an area that's really exciting male clinic were studying biomarkers with the boys so that you could just be speaking at perhaps pick up it'd be eight diagnostic tool not only diagnostic tool per certain conditions but an area that were really looking at is kurt coronary artery disease and seeing if we could pick up simply from a person's boys whether they may have coronary artery disease there this could also be leverage for other types of diseases like parkinson's an m other things as well that simply through the boys set we pick up that there may be something going on and then you could confirmed that through other tests but this would be a very easy way to administer attached to pick up some of these diseases so males looking at this pretty heavily to see if we could do that we feel that through all these different ways that people may leverage their voice that this could just be another technique that we could you we don't see boys as they only seeing a four diagnostic nor do we see that per delivering health information we really see it being additive in order to better mates eight are consumer of patient needs and i think that's really important for people to think that don't think voice only but think about how it could be added to to their experience because people do need a variety of methods in which they cannot absorb the information in which we can also look at an individual to think about what might be going on in terms of their health conditions dish and so we really see all of this is just yet another mode dalla de if you will to how we might be able to treat a person yeah i think that's fantastic exactly one various at i like i said i find the most fascinating the whole idea of vocal biomarkers 'em you know as a physician myself obviously we is vital signs all the time the you know gauge the health of a person blood pressure temperature resprayed all those sorts of things and i actually wonder and i believe that we're gonna moving towards a place where are voices of idle sign and it's the most non invasive vital sign that you don't touch the person you just listen to the person in you can pick out health parameter so this is an area that i i am fascinated by this so i i'm really excited males doing some work in this area 'em are you able to comment a little bit about sort of future directions of this a or or other aspects of your voice technology that you're working on terms of what what is may wanna do next what i think will continue to investigate the biomarkers firm multiple conditions going be on a coronary artery disease that'll continue for a number of years to be studying that we will also be pursuing suing post procedural patient education which patients we have been developing interactive care plans for after a person in his dismissed from the hospital and will be piloting leading some activities in that arena as well to say instead of meeting to open up an apple again on your mobile phone and then report back whether you might have taken you're wait that day you're taking your blood pressure that a an individual might just speak to the device just say whether they have done the task for that they were there care plan these are all areas that were pursuing to say how might this fit and then interact secure team and that really is where being hip compliant comes into play because we do want that interactivity whip secure team said so that if a person is not following the care plan that their care team is aware of that and can interact quickly to avoid any you know future issues for that patient right so you know with with voice i don't know if you feel this way and i'd be curious to get your take on this but you know we've seen some tremendous 'em technology's come over the years whether it be from there from shifting from the desktop to the mobile phone now were seen this pattern obviously going from a more while sorry from about from topping and swiping typing on a keyboard do voice what is your sense of what is the sense of male now but the whole voice ecosystem if you will is it is it you feel this is a big transformation is this just a sort a natural progression in the technology and is this gonna have any major impact on on people's health or is it more of a smaller progression like i say in were just going to see a natural gradual evolution in the way things are well we do see it as a disruptive force on changing the way we're connecting with an individualized well is with communities in we do feel that they adoption is going is certainly he's going to be very rapid it's not like you have to train someone just speak like we three years had a trained people on keyboard saying how to interact with the computer so i really think that were our 'em were going to see this grow quite rapidly andy adoption will be driven probably more by the consumer then they act so healthcare professional just because i think the consumer in that patient patient is going to expect the ability to use their voice in different settings and be asking for that so i think it'll be pushing the healthcare system we're learning that a more than fifty percent of u s households it's already have speaker devices within their homes and their leveraging their devices for far more activity center originally projected so again i think they will be driving and having an expectation of their providers is to be interacting in this form of technology just like they do for a mobile phone yeah fantastic no i i agree hundred percent with that well i know that a listeners will want to learn more about mayo and what you were doing his organization what would be the best ways for listeners to learn exactly what mayo doing in this area a wide in encourage people that they could go to our website to learn more about male clinic a they can go to a global business solutions at mayo clinic just search on that and they can't come to our website to hear more about what were doing were also participating in multiple voice forums set the boys summit coming up in newark new jersey that'll be july twenty second through the twenty six so please join us there will also be at the voice in healthcare a summit in boston an august fifth and six so we'd love to talk to anyone that would be interested wonderful yes and i had the opportunity to interact with the some other members of organization in a days you've got a great group of people they're very innovative and it's really exciting to see what mayo is is doing here so joyce thank you so much for spending some time with myself with the listeners there's i really really appreciate it it's fascinating to hear a white males doing and how you certainly are leader in this area so again a big big thank you to you forever you're time well thank you very much there you go mayo is doing some incredible things and like i said at the beginning if you are in any type of healthcare field and you are at all interested in voice technology and apt assume you are because you're listening to this podcast and i highly encourage you to check out what mayor was doing check out their first date skill a check out the way that alexa can respond to you're medical related questions with the first party skill very very fascinating all the things that mail is doing i will have links to things that joyce mentioned you're on the podcast episode on the show notes page which you can always find at voice first health dot com a end as well joyce mentioned that they are participating in a couple of events coming up at voice summit and the voice of healthcare summit as well and i also want to make you the listeners aware of a very special event that is occurring right after the voice of healthcare some so the voice of healthcare summit runs on monday august fifth full day and then tuesday august six in the morning directly after lunch there is a brand new event that myself and some of my colleagues a firm they tell tell association harry pappas from academia in a david box and of course will be a support port of bradley met truck in new voice verse dot community a we are putting on the very first voice for healthcare one oh one how to get started boot camp this is going to be in session from one thirty four thirty it isn't optional out on session to the voice of healthcare summit you can register it on the same page at the v o h summit dot com website you just scroll down to the bottom of the agenda and you will find it there so if you're wondering how do i get started in voice technology in lebron's of technology from my healthcare organization whatever that may be this a session will be extremely valuable to you so i encourage you do of course attend the voice of healthcare summit and then look at registering for this optional event directly after it again i'll have all the links on these show notes page at voice first health dot com slash thirty nine one final time a big big thank you to joyce even end the mayo team for

vice chair mayo clinic carrie fisher voice first house joyce hundred percent fifty percent hundred years twenty second three years