23 Burst results for "Veterans Radio"

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"BDC, Jeff. Welcome to Veterans radio. Thank you, Jim. Thank you very much. Well, you're an Army veteran. We'll talk about that A little bit later. You come out of the automotive sales industry. You've been with envy BDC now as the operations and certification manager for about three years. And there's always something new going on at envy BDC. So why don't we start there? Jeff? Tell us what's new going on at envy? BDC? Well, Jimmy Mean to start off. We have been growing by leaps and bounds. So, um, we're constantly investing into new new technology. About a year and a half ago. Um, we implemented a new online certification. Application based, um, portal. We're now the veterans. We'll have more access to not only their application but more access to other veteran businesses and to corporations that are members in our organization. So between you know the technology the hardware to software. Um, we're growing. That's on the certification side. But on the operation side we are we have brought in. Um uh, Kathy point in whose are in the O task force and her Her segment, If you will is aligning the MV BDC with the Veterans Service organizations, so and I mean there is constant growth told you may hear through the V F W Rosie the Riveter. Many groups like this throughout the country, um, are getting their business owners or veteran business owners in identifying them and and we are working to collaborate together. We're also expanding our role in in the government sector because the S B a will be inheriting if you will. The C V E in 2022. We are fundamentally, um, helping the S b a, You know, and understanding that the terminology The, uh, basically what we call a veteran status guidelines out of the loss. And we hired a gentleman by the name of Mark Sutton, who comes from that believers to the American Legion. He's had years in there and brings a lot of government. Uh, you know, related contacts, um, and sources so Our organization is not being even tied more to the government and throughout their whole process. Well, that's an important point to make for for our veterans out there who may be business owners. Originally yourself certified. You are a veteran on business that had a lot of shenanigans going on. That's why corporations that we need somebody reliable. We need a group reliable to certify folks, and that's how envy BDC came along to fill that need with corporate America. And now we've come on back ground false circuit where the government is saying, you know, we don't do a great job on this certification. Let's get it out of the hands of all the little departments, including the Via that handle this. Let's put it over with S B A and S B A has to say. Who's best at this, and they had to look at what envy BDC is doing, and that's where your government affairs comes in. So it's kind of an interesting full circle. Um Yes, this is going on now for, uh What do you what? He had a 789 years into this so interesting turn of events. You mentioned that your technology also helps with networking. And so I know you've had some programs and that you have some programs coming up where veteran business owners Get to network with buyers, but also among themselves. Tell us a little bit more about that marketing. I'm sorry that that networking piece well, um, Normally during non covid years, we would have a basically our national face to face event matchmaker where we bring in some of the world's biggest corporations who are members with us who require our certification. They have face to face opportunities to put Picture product Picture Service. But with the Covid will be in our second year of online event and those that event will be a two day event. November 3rd and fourth would be online. Uh, veterans are welcome to go to envy pdc dot org to register for the event. Um, you do The veterans need to know that you know there is open to them also because you know if they have a matchmaking opportunity And, um They know they could, you know, work with somebody like Walmart or Tom, Verizon or Johnson and Johnson. Um they're going to require certification, so This is where we show real opportunity to our veterans, and then you know it's a two day event online and then, um, if they decide that they're going to need to apply well, we'll take them and we'll take care of them. Well, it's an interesting Way in for folks just sort of maybe answer. The question that's rolling around in the mind Is this Is this worth any? Does this have value to me to go through this process? Because it is a rigorous process does have a little cost associated with it. But by going to this Virtual networking event online. The match me room meant maybe a business owner could see that. Jeez, I I see opportunities here. You don't have to be a fortune 50 company or Fortune 500 company to participate. These are these are business of veteran owned businesses at all sorts of levels, aren't they? They are one of the big misnomers. Um, out there is that this is for small business. The MV BDC. Um has a couple of billion dollar veteran owned companies. Um, 78 plants around the world, um to the startup. You know, the guys still has a little CNC milling out in his pole barn. But yet he wants to do some work for forward. But, um, so we have all sizes of businesses. And you know, as these matchmaking events occur, you there's all levels of requests from. Hey, we need somebody in Tennessee too. I need somebody who can carry freight across the country. So you get all sizes. All requests. Um you know a lot of people. Requests have been has come through the M D. B D. C and we have seen a lot of growth for companies, and that's one thing our veterans need to know is that if they grow And they become a medium sized company, a large sized company. Well, the C V E. The S P A is no longer going to verify or certify them. We're the only ones who are doing that large of companies across the globe, and that's a good point. Cause I actually had a client who was so successfully grew out of being considered small enough. For the S B a certification and he called me up, he says, Jim, I can't believe this. They they pulled my certification. I said, no, no, they didn't pull your certification. You've been too successful. You're no, you're no longer a small business. That's what's happened here, and they still need that certification to keep with some other of their customers. And again, that's where envy BDC comes in. To say no, no, This is a certified veteran on the business. Absolutely, Jeff. We're talking to Jeff King, who is the operations and certification manager for N V. B. D. C. As we wrap up the spotlight here, tell us our listeners again, Jeff, where folks might learn about the certification process through your organization and how they might register as they were interested in the November 3rd and fourth matchmaker. So, um everybody needs to know that our website is envy. B d c dot org.

Jeff King Jim Walmart Mark Sutton American Legion Johnson and Johnson Tennessee Tom Verizon November 3rd 78 plants 2022 Jeff two day 789 years second year S B A Jimmy Mean Kathy N V. B. D. C.
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"If you'd like to become a sponsor of veterans radio, that's where you go so All right, Let's get into this. The number again 73482 to 1600 Joining me right now is our of a resident therapist. And that is Melissa Angle and Melissa Welcome back to Veterans Radio. Thanks, Dale for having me. I appreciate being here. So tell me, I know in your practice. You have probably had some veterans that are calling you because they are concerned, um or upset or angry. I guess probably the emotional spectrum is filled from one end to the other with what people are going through because of our withdrawal from Afghanistan. Yeah, absolutely everyday In my practice, I'm I'm talking with veterans about their feelings of the withdrawal from Afghanistan and it's like you mentioned, bringing back a lot of memories as well for Vietnam era veterans. So I've seen a big influx of people really struggling to cope with, like you mentioned the anger primarily and the sadness And the grief that comes with being in a war. You know for me, This is personal. My partner served in Afghanistan and so as a civilian, and as a partner, I I see the tall I see the impact of it personally. And you know, that's why I wanted to be with you guys today to sort of spread the good news and the idea that Although these feelings are big feelings and their legitimate and valid, there is a way to move beyond this and to get back to a sense of normalcy, and we haven't had that in a couple of years. So I'd like to. That's true. They were kind of just sort of work through that process of like, how do how do we cope? And the first thing I wanted to say is that it's normal. All these feelings that people are having a frustration and anger. I wasn't even there. I didn't serve and I'm pissed off right. So these things are happening all around us. And the media has got a very Kind of, you know, slanted, uh, way of approaching the topic That really doesn't speak to the experience, which is a unique experience for each individual who served So the first thing I want to, you know, just encourage people to recognize is that if you are in a veteran community, the best thing that you can do is check on your bodies. Reach out to them. Ask them if they need event asking if they need to talk. Recognize if you're the one who needs a body and needs to talk. And connect with those people who were also there who experienced similar things as yourself. And that really is just a priceless type of Intervention that no medication or professional therapist can match is just the support of the people that were with you, So I just want to encourage folks to just start within their own communities and within their own families. Start talking with your partners. Start talking with your spouses, your Children, people around you in your community. I know for myself. My partner's been asked a lot of times, you know, how do you think and how do you feel about what's going on in Afghanistan with people who know that he was there? And it's been an opportunity, but it's also been a stress right, So it's better to have those conversations with people that we know will be supportive and understanding and encouraging. But how do we do that for each other? If we're already like in the muck ourselves, right if we're not in a good space about it. We might not be the best person to either reach out or we might need our own help before we can sort of give a hand to someone else in need. So that's really just sort of the next stage is if this is really causing some impairment in your life and in your mood and your relationships. And you need to seek professional help. And you need to find a clinician who is an expert with veterans, mental health care and reintegration and doing those two things are going to probably be the biggest buffers that we can We can encourage people to take is just that reaching out to their community and then reaching out to professionals if they need additional assistance beyond that. Well, there's a couple of things obviously think they can. Do We know that there's a veteran's crisis line out there and we encourage people to utilize that line. Its, uh that number is 1 802 738255 and impress the number one when you get there, um And as as Melissa pointed out, if you don't think that you can I don't want to use a term handle this, but deal with the situation and it's bothering you right now that you may want to seek some professional help out there and there and and and that's one of the things that we're going to be talking about today. Is that it? You know, there is no one uh Treatment for people with post traumatic stress and our two guests, both of them. Melissa and Michael. Gear are, uh, going to be hopefully talking about some things as we go along that will show you that post traumatic stress can be Cured. I don't know if cured the right way but can be can be absolutely the right word. Yeah, absolutely. It can be. You know, one of the biggest deterrence for people reaching out to help is fear fear that it won't help and it won't benefit them. Our reluctance to feel like they deserve that help in the first place that I call it the Black Knight syndrome. I didn't have it as bad as other guys, right? Um so there's a lot of reasons for why people don't get help. But for those that do what's really critical is that they're informed about what their options are when it comes to treatment. If you're going to provider and they're saying, Well, this is a terrible thing, and you're going to be this way forever and handing out bottles of prescriptions and not really addressing the underlying issues. It's probably not going to end up with you getting a lot of benefit from it. So it's really about knowing where to seek help, and when, but also it's about realizing that PTS is a treatable condition. It's not a death sentence, and it's not something that is a result of some sort of failure or pathology. It's a normal adaptive response of the nervous system to experiencing trauma. And that's what we know. We know that you know. Most of us at some point are going to go through something that rocks our world, and if we find that months later, it's still causing our bodies to react and respond. And that's when it's a big cute. Your body is going to be the first cue to let you know. Hey, every time I see this, or I hear this, or I go there, or I talk about this right? Brings out of big feeling of anxiety or tension or intense emotions, like anger and frustration. So you know what I guess I want to focus on is just once you've gotten to the idea that you might need some help. What do you do? Well, it's going to be individual for each person. Different people respond to different treatments, and I kind of want to call it the old guard in the new guard, So I'm going to break it down into a couple of sections there. So the old guard is the traditional medication management, prolonged exposure therapies, cognitive behavioral therapies and things like that that the V a administration in the health care At the V A are providing to our veterans, and these are long term evidence based, effective treatments, but they're not as good as some of the newer, brain based treatments that are out there and it's frustrating for me. You know, I used to work at the V A. And I wanted to see change, and I wanted to see Veterans getting the best possible care and what I found is that with a lot of government agencies There's a reluctance to change. And that idea of the way that we've always done. It is the right way to do it. And for some folks, that's true. And it does work in the VA's saves lives every day, so I don't want to discourage anyone certainly from going down that path. What I can say is that there are newer, more novel treatments that are more tolerable in general that are shorter term that don't require medication or hospitalization or residential services of any kind..

Melissa Angle Melissa Michael Dale 1 802 738255 Afghanistan Veterans Radio two guests both today 73482 to V A first two things each individual each person V A. first cue months later first thing
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Now that we have all of our army veterans standing at attention for their rousing march, we want to bring you a story about a Korean War veteran who was recently Provided the Medal of Honor. It's Colonel Ralph Pocket, sort of the grandfather of the Army Rangers. But we're going to tell the story a little differently as we like to do here on Veterans radio, and we're going to tell it From the viewpoint of the gentleman who Kind of made it his life mission to get Colonel pockets metal upgraded to the Medal of Honor. We want to welcome to Veterans Radio today. Lieutenant Colonel John Locke Retired U. S. Army. And we're going to talk about the most recent Medal of Honor recipient Colonel Ralph Puckett. Who was 94 years old when he received the Medal of Honor. He was given it, uh to him by President Biden in May of 2021. Colonel. Welcome to Veterans Radio. Well, Jim, thank you very much. I appreciate you having me on. Well, let me just set this up so that our listeners understand you're kind of the real deal, and then we'll get to the story. But As I mentioned you retired from active duty as a lieutenant Colonel, you served for 28 years from 1974 to 2000 and two You went to the West point. Get your BS in electrical engineering and computer science, and you picked up a master's degree and operational research and statistics from rental ear Polytech Institute. So you know, you're kind of a smart guy here. Um, but you were in the army full full. A lot of people. Yeah, And some people might say, Wait a minute. How can you say that? He was in the Army. John tell us about the events that led up to Ralph Pocket receiving the Medal of Honor. Well, as you noted, it was a little bit of a of a journey. An odyssey to say the least. About 18 years in the making, Um, upon reflection, we're driving down the Medal of Honor ceremony The other week, um, was going over to go with my wife, and it dawned on. I was trying to figure out exactly what the impetus was that set this all off? Obviously had written a book on Ranger history and, uh, Literally embarrassingly stumbled across the battle Hill, 205. And then lieutenant Pocket and I consider myself a relatively knowledgeable military historian in a number of things, but I was not aware of this and I and also as a fellow grad graduate at this point, it was kind of embarrassing. So I decided I wanted to look into it some more and in the process of writing the book reached out to Colonel bucket at that time. This was the early nineties. And he was very generous in the sense of providing me materials that I could use to write the chapter associated with the Korean Rangers, Eighth Army Ranger company and so that had placed in the back of my mind the fact that, uh, there's more to this story here this is it's not the downplay, but he stretches imaginations. Singer Service Cross the second highest award of what she has two of them, but, uh, for years, I just kept thinking. And there was more that there's more to this, uh, had an opportunity to speak with at that time it was Colonel Stan McChrystal. Who's the regimental commanders? 75th Regiment. And, uh, But I had that opportunity to talk with Colonel. Then Colonel McChrystal. He agreed that it was Medal of honor worthy in his own mind. So that was there in the back. And finally around, 2000 and three had an opportunity to put together a packet four. But at that time I realized why not take this the next Tap. I had just retired a couple years prior and was in the process of doing other writing and research and such. And finally I just said to myself, I've already taken it This far was, you know, Take this baby around the the road, you know, around the neighborhood a couple times for spin. Let's see what we can do with it. And so that really was the impetus. That's what started the the journey in the quest to secure for him an upgrade to the middle of honor. Well, tell us about what the battle of killed, Uh, two or five was about in Korea back in November of 1950. Well, the interesting thing with the battle and this is what I was looking to get. Uh, conveyed in the comments from the president binding was that the battle really started before he'll 205 here. We have a brand new second, lieutenant. You know anyone who served there is certainly anybody who's been in a leadership position. Uh, junior officers, Junior NGO can appreciate what it is trying to motivate and bring a unit together. And in this instance you have a brand new second lieutenant. Out of West Point all you Has a little bit of infantry schooling from Benning, and he goes over he volunteers for and next thing he knows he's assigned as the company commander to raise as atheists is novel, Eighth Army Ranger Company, Uh, First Ranger unit to be, um, brought to active duty post World War two, and he has two classmates or is the tune leaders and he's only allowed to bring on board on non combat non infantry type of individuals. And so he's soliciting and interviewing all sorts of you know, Clark's, uh cooks, drivers mechanics. I mean, everybody who's not skilled at all and carrying a rifle, and then he has to take and put together not only personally hand picks and selects each and every individual and by his own admission later on, he would indicate you know, I had every type of dash American that there was every type of ethnicity. He also brought on board to African Americans, who and which is real. Uh, rather novel given the fact that Truman had only desegregated the military year or two prior to that so again, he was just looking forward to things from these people are Are you passion motivated enough to learn what needs to be learned? And are you willing to follow me? And so that was primarily his criteria, And then he led by example, we put together a training regimen that he initially had been told he had seven weeks to execute, but he ended up with them. Only about 5.5 weeks. So again, he's taken from scratch these individuals and training them, forging them into a relatively elite. Certainly, for that time frame, uh, light infantry unit, And so now you move that forward and you know, to Thanksgiving weekend of 1919 50. He's assigned there in the Ranger companies assigned to an armored task force. And so the day before they actually had to fight. They took another hill Hill 2 to 4. And in the process of doing that, they endured not only some casualties to enemy fire, but they also endured fratricide. American tanks. The tanks they're riding into battle on, end up, firing on them and killed three rangers. So you know they get on top of the hill top. They're digging at night. It's about zero degrees. They have no food. No hot, you know? No, no, no Cold weather gear. Uh And so now you're asked the very next Morning the 25th of November to go ahead and attack killed 205. And so you're you're already relatively fried. You've already attacked one hill the day before you've suffered, Uh, K I A as killed in action in the process. Uh, you spent a miserable night You've had individuals who? Hypothermia and frostbite. They actually lost a couple rangers. So we had to go back because of frostbite and hypothermia. Ther mia, Uh, total sleep deprivation. Now they're asked to take Hill 205. And so the whole process there was riding into battle taking the base of the hill and during that time me You know, Colonel Pocket exposed himself on three different occasions running across the field so they can identify and locate where an enemy machine gun was. That was stopping the advance. And so they were to eliminate the machine gun. So he placed himself at risk. There has his life at risk doing that three different times they take to help. And finally later on that night is when the battle occurs, starting around 10 o'clock about 2200 hours..

Jim 28 years November of 1950 May of 2021 John 1974 Veterans Radio Korea seven weeks Korean War Truman 75th Regiment Pocket 2000 Korean Rangers two three Eighth Army Ranger Eighth Army Ranger Company two classmates
Birthday Party Shooting in Colorado Springs Leaves 7 Dead

Veterans Radio

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Birthday Party Shooting in Colorado Springs Leaves 7 Dead

Biden warns China it faces ‘extreme competition’ during his presidency

Veterans Radio

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Biden warns China it faces ‘extreme competition’ during his presidency

"President Biden says China's in for extreme competition from the U. S under his administration, but that the new relationship he wants to forge need not be one of conflict and I'm not going to do it the way that he knows this because he's a sending signals as well that I'm not going to do it the way Trump did. We're gonna focus on International rules of the

President Biden U. China Donald Trump
Growing number of GOP senators oppose impeachment trial

Veterans Radio

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Growing number of GOP senators oppose impeachment trial

"Holding an impeachment trial. Florida Senator Marco Rubio, weighing in on the argument that holding the impeachment trial will prevent President Trump running for president again. I think that's an arrogant statement for anyone to make voters get to decide that we who are we to tell voters who they can vote for in the future. House Democrats will walk the impeachment article to the Senate Monday evening, Arizona report. Bookings have voted to send

Senator Marco Rubio President Trump Florida House Senate Arizona
Recount confirms Biden's win in Wisconsin

Veterans Radio

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Recount confirms Biden's win in Wisconsin

"President Trump continues to allege widespread election fraud In an exclusive interview on Fox News Sunday morning futures, he said Democrats stuffed the ballot boxes they used coveted as a means to stuff the ballot box is Joe Biden did not get 16 million more votes than Barack Hussein Obama. He didn't get it another setback for the Trump campaign today, the two largest Counties in Wisconsin, completing recounts confirming Joe Biden and won the state by more than

Donald Trump Barack Hussein Obama Fox News Joe Biden Wisconsin
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Right. We're back here on veterans radio. And I always play that air Force theme with our next guest eyes ready to appear because she has flown in T 38 See three's a wax B 50 two's F 16 Aggressors F 15 and the B two Spirit bomber. She is also the founder of Iris Independent Research, which What their mission is his military fact strategic analysis. Advanced technology trends. Airpower pretty much everything on Dr of Rebecca Grant is our guest. He is a national security analyst based in Washington. She's written over 100 articles for Air Force magazine and has appeared regularly on the Smithsonian Channel, Fox News, CNN and Veterans Radio. So Dr Grant welcome back to Veterans Radio. Hello, Dale. It was wonderful to hear the Air Force song at a boy's given the gun ready to talk to me. Oh, I knew you would like that. Um, So how are things with you and everything in Washington? And everything in Washington. Well, we are in a very interesting time waiting a little bit Tolo see what some of the first moves might be from presumptive President elect Biden. And, of course, watching around the world to see the reaction. And, you know one thing. A Dale that really strikes me is how much has changed over the past four years with the Trump with Team Trump in office. He Perhaps some people surprised turned out to be quite interested in world politics. He turned out to be a free, energetic and relatively agile diplomat, and he made Um, a score of major major changes to U. S defense and military and foreign policy. And so if the Biden team takes over in January, they're going to find a very, very different landscape. It'll be interesting to see whether they will capitalize on that or go back to some of the older policies from when Joe Biden was vice president under Barack Obama. I am curious about that as well. And I think we all are. You know, it's it's gonna be his own president, or is he going to bring them? You know, bring forward a lot of the things that they were attempting to do. You know, four years ago, eh? So I guess a couple of things That we you had mentioned when you said here is something that we want to talk about Number one would be climate change because it is part of foreign policy. And here's one That was not really a factor in the foreign policy discussions of 2016. Really, Frankly, it wasn't even that big around the time the 2018 midterms but now Climate change is one of team Biden's top international priorities. And I'd love to just take a minute because I've had to catch up and see why this is moved. So front and center tell you also that over in Britain of the Prime Minister Boris Johnson just came out a few days ago with his own Ambitious climate change Plan Force Johnson's the Tories conservative and so interesting to see him working on this as well. No. You know what surprised me at first and may surprise some of our listeners here is that that you know, there's been a long simmering debate about climate and the changes in climate. My view on that is Hey, I've wanted history. I can see this climate changes. You know, the Vikings could sail the Atlantic 1000 years ago when it was calmer. We know that Shakespeare wrote about the many ice age in Britain. The climate changes. But now this climate change has been linked directly to, um um, agenda for international reforms. Top goal is trying to control the overall rise in global temperature prior to the year. 2100. Yes, that's 80 years off, but the immediate linkage now is saying, Hey, you know team, Biden says. We want to take immediate steps. To work on this goal and to put a lot of money behind it. So one of the first things that Biden said after the elections was that on day one on January 20th he will But the United States back into the Paris climate accord, remember what those are? Dale? Right? Yes. I'm doing a number of countries that were trying to work out a solution on their own. Yes, exactly and has done under the auspices of the U. N. They're about 200 signatories. President Trump pulled the U. S out in 2017. Um and you know, here's what's interesting about the Paris accords. Their goal is to try to get individual nations to control their carbon output. So And here's the big problems. Okay? Of course, we'll surprise you. The big problem is China. China has come out and said sure, Yeah, we'll We'll do this carbon control thing. Um, well, control all our carbon emissions and get to net zero. By the year. Um let me think, 2060 right, so the rest of the world Including Biden is looking at more like 2030 2035 very ambitious goals. No. But Biden's platform is to spend about $1.7 trillion to achieve this. Net zero emissions result and this happens through of slew of new technologies and investments and everything from carbon capture two more solar panels. Um, on an island. A lot of it is, you know, there's a very worthwhile goal here, but the international politics angle is really tough. Because China is basically saying to the world, Okay, you go first, you know and speaking, Speaking of China, go ahead. Um And you know, you won't be surprised either to learn that the biggest carbon emitter in on planet Earth. Is the People's Republic of China, so they account for about 28%. Of global greenhouse gas emissions. The U. S is about 14% the European Union around 10% and, you know, perhaps even more, you know, problematic here is That, um China's carbon emissions have gone up so they have gone up from the period of about 1992 2017. China's carbon emissions went up 353%. 353% Well, what did ours What? Ours do Well, I'm glad you asked. Because U s emissions in that same time period. 1992 2017. They went up a little. They went down a little. But the net change 0.4% Basically flat. OK, China up through 33% us. 330.4% OK? Yeah, you do the math, right? A little aside on that is India's Part of that is that just because of so many people It's a bunch of things. It's numbers of people. Of course with China. It's the industrialization on the development that has been made possible, in part by Western cash and trade. But what it is, is it leaves you. India is also a big emitter on so in order to make any real difference, especially in greenhouse gas emissions. You know, it doesn't know planet we could do. All the carbon capture in the world in the U. S. And in Europe and China can ruin the atmosphere all by themselves because it once they get produced up. It goes. So it's really a tough thing, and I think you know the bottom line for me is You've got to be able to have agreements with China and what we've seen and maybe we'll talk about later. It's fine is not doing while respecting their international agreements. Look at Hong Kong. So it's really an interesting stretch to say climate now our number one priority, and yet we know the one nation that we really need to get into line is not going to do it. So interesting, interesting change there. But the MO mentum is very much behind of seeing a lot of climate activity you're using to it. Make me ism. Bad tactics. Right? So in a way, the team Trump is handing team Biden, you know, kind of a good field position because they've pulled out of Paris..

Joe Biden China Um Dale Paris Washington Trump president Veterans Radio Rebecca Grant People's Republic of China Air Force magazine Britain President Trump Smithsonian Channel
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"It's a new friend of Veterans radio, and Ah, I'm anxious to talk with him. He is retired Army General Donald Shank and Donald is also An advisor to the Fisher House, Michigan and that's one of the reasons how we connected here, and I want to thank Fisher House. We're putting us touch with each other. So don just welcome to veterans Radio. Thanks a lot, Neil. I really appreciate the opportunity to be with you and All your audience of righteous veterans who've done so much for our country over Where were their service and their family members whose road it's going to be with you. Oh, thank you very much. It's it's It is a great audience. I have to admit that true Patriots are out there. One of the reasons that we we connected here is that you are part of an organization that is putting out a get out the vote. Webinar Zoom call that's coming up this coming Thursday. The 29th of October. Could you tell us more about that? Yeah. And before I do, I'd just like to reiterate with what you said about just how important it is for. Ah. Everybody to get out the vote this year. You know, this is going to be a very, very interesting Ah. 7 to 10 days coming up. This is an extraordinarily important election for our nation. It's also extraordinarily important, not only for the people at the top of the ticket But for all those positions that and propositions and proposals that are Open times relegated to the back of this, It's important that everybody pay attention. Not only Tio President vice presidential picks but also throughout the ticket. Throw out your balance, rather for the Senate members, members of Congress and House of Representatives, your county city township officials, judges, members of the school board. Every one of those positions isn't working, and every one of those positions is relevant to what we do and how we live our lives every day, and they're things the opportunity to vote for them are things that Wait. No, we hold. Very, very dear is veteran. There's a lot of steak. For our country, the organization that I'm affiliated with. Is taking part in a get out the vote campaign. We're actually having an event is, Dale said Thursday evening at eight PM And this will be a zoom event. Uh and I can give you a Web address here that you can go to And request the credentials for the We don't have the actual credentials log in credentials yet, but they're probably going to be delivered either tomorrow or Tuesday. Okay. We can put that information upon our website. Once we get that information you know, later in the week. Great, but I'll just go ahead and give it to you right now. It's an SL for b dot michigan gmail dot com On email to that address will get you all the credentials. Once we get home in As he said. Once I get him, I'll get him to you as well. You can. You can post in there on your urine form of one site. Could you give me that email address? One more time. A little slower? Certainly. Ah, just spell this out so we can all can understand It's November Sierra Lima or Bravo. Got Michigan's spelled out like India. Charlie Hotel in your goal fell for November. At gmail dot com. Okay, We're gonna have a panel of four people on honored to be on that panel, as is bringing her General Mark Mon Char is also from Michigan. And we're gonna be joined by Ambassador Dwayne Work, whose Ah Ah retired Air Force pilot who's also passed. A senior leader in the Airline Pilots Association, was actually the ambassador to the International Civil Civil Aviation Organization located in Montreal. And we have another air force. Veteran with US General of Fig Newton, who retired in 2001. I believe the commander A lair force education operations inside the United States Air Force. Andi, we're going to talk about. We'll talk about anything. The audience wants to talk about It really talk about the role of government. Why this why this election is so very, very important. What leadership at the National estate levels needs to look like And why are relationships around the world and within the country or so very, very important, the importance of just being good citizens and good citizen soldiers. For those of us who were still No. Neither in the Guard reserve or active duty. Right? I am. We're talking here with with retired Brigadier General daughters Shank. I wanted to just touch on this because I did listen to another interview that you were on with W om here in Ann Arbor and the line that came out of there, and it's something that we all have learned from day one when we go into the military and that we know we swear allegiance to support and defend the Constitution against All enemies, foreign and domestic. And I thought that this was really important because the military um and I guess he could touch on this just briefly, is that you know, we are controlled by the civilian politicians, Whoever it is, I mean, we don't We don't make up our own rules. We don't decide that We're going to go rogue. And you know whatever happens out there, and I think that there are some people that are a little bit concerned about that. So I just wanted you to touch on that for just a moment if he could Yes, that's a great point way. All swore whether it was worth of Englishmen or Ah Warren or commission. We swore to support and defend the Constitution. On. We did not swear fealty your royalties any single individual, but rather to this notion of what A Democratic government ought to look like one of the most important precepts of our government dating back while dating back to Our founding fathers when with Washington Was the primacy of civilian control of the military on DH. We believe that I think everyone. Anyone in the audience would also agree that that is one of the things that has kept Our country actually, quite safe because we have always known That there's a very, very low likelihood members of the military would would do anything except support and defend the Constitution. The United States There are there is a lot of anxiety about exactly what's gonna happen in the next several months, but I believe with my heart of hearts that our military will always do what's required by Constitution and by the way that you remember swore Absolutely, And and I I couldn't agree with you more. So I just want to remind people to check out veterans radio dot net. We will put a link up there for their zoom meeting or zoom seminar that they're going to be holding on this coming Thursday. The 29th of October by note says it is going to be a 1900 hours Eastern time. Correct. Actually, I've been bout we make sure that change was always advised earlier. It's going to be at eight o'clock. I will. I will. I will clarify that. In the next note that I send you just to be absolutely sure. Okay, we'll get that information out there. But I want to thank you very much. Retired General Donner Shank Ah, United States Army and advisor to the Fisher house here in Michigan. Thanks.

Michigan Fisher House Army General Donald Shank United States advisor Ah Warren United States Air Force Neil don General Donner Shank Air Force Senate Ann Arbor Airline Pilots Association United States Army Mark Mon Char President Sierra Lima Shank
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"We wanna welcome to Veterans Radio today. The founder and president of NBC. Keith King Keith Welcome back to Veterans Radio. Think in general, I would like to at least correct the title. I've been kicked up to the CEO and the Wells of founder and CEO and Brigadier General Dick Miller has been promoted the president so Um, you know, we continue to grow and share responsibilities and I want to make sure that identify General Miller was the president of our organization. He's doing an outstanding job. Very proud of heaven was part of our officer team. Well, that's fantastic and incident Great Executive group that you have and let me tell her listeners that Keith is a Vietnam era Army veteran. He's a public relations industry leader for many years after service. Not only is the founder and CEO of envy BDC what his efforts have been recognize from all kinds of organizations, and he was in the initial class of inductees to the Michigan Hall of Honor. That's the Michigan and Military and Veterans Hall of Honor last year, so we've had a chance to talk to Keith before on Veterans Radio about his background and folks confined more by Checking for that prior interview, But we have me on today. Keith to talk about Jeez, what might seem like a simple issue, but it isn't And that is what exactly is a veteran. When you're doing the certification process, you know, One of the things they're very always talk about is One people say Well, what do you do for certification? I simply say the first thing I do. What we do is prove that you're a veteran. And of course, you know, we get some strange looks and it's like, Well, what do you mean by that? Unfortunately, many people both civilians, and frankly, many of our veterans really do not know the laws or the codes didn't knew now really understand. The definition that is used to in fact, established the term veteran. And the issue became something of a much Larger discussion that we had, really a test did not anticipate originally, which wass what happens when people think they're a veteran or claimed to be a veteran owned business? And we go in and pull their military records and look at it and come back and say I'm sorry, but you're not really a veteran, or you do not meet our standards of what is a veteran. In the confusion and the easiest point of beginning a conversation is the difference between the loss if you will. We both know the CFR, which is the code of federal regulations, but those address rules and regulations or what is called the state's code, or USC. Which is actually the loss, a permanent laws of the United States. And I kind of joke about we all know the old saying about you know what rules are made for? So there is a difference between rules and laws. Obviously. But the big differences between what the Department of defense has said it's a Valerie or what qualifies is a veteran versus the benefits. But via will give to a person who again may have served in the military. And that distinction gets lost or very confusing very quickly. In typical government confusion, we have diodes definition you have today's definition. S P A has kind of a different definition. And then you get to states and cities and counties and they all have different definitions. This is really what envy BDC is trying to do, which is Go through a rigorous process so that the corporate America really knows. Hey, I'm dealing with a certified honest to goodness veteran owned business, isn't it? Yeah, that's exactly what it is One of the things that came up in and for those you know who are listening and You know, I believe that they are veterans are you know? Obviously we do it. My job is to make sure I get my person job. But the first thing I'd do is prove you're of that. But I have a story that, um is really kind of a a hippie this for what has happened with our organization in corporate America because We what we call on boarding when we're bringing on a new corporate member. We asked them to go in and identify any business in their supply chain any supplier to them that was identified themselves as a veteran. Certified or not. We just wanted to know if you know who's claiming to be a veteran. And then work with us and we will go in and in through our records and see who matches up and you know there's a whole process after that, to actually begin the certification. But what happened is in examples that they escape you one of our corporations. Sent me a gentleman's name and in contact information inside, please certify him. You know, he's one of our best suppliers. We all love them. And these about Baba Baba Block. And so we started in on the certification while the problem Wass is a shaman. Had served two weeks in basic training. And was discharged unfit for military service. Now in his documentation. He actually received what was called a dd 2 56. Which basically is Department of Defense certificate that says yes, you were in the military, but generally no. You do not meet the standards of D O D to be called a veteran. And what happens in that and we see him quite frequently by Dwight said. Hey, because I have a 2 56. It does allowed me. To petition the government to get a DD 2 14 because I'd like to use that nested generally accepted form for claiming you're a veteran and or for benefits. And the government issued a DD 2 14. Well under the statutes that we use under the regulations that we use to say this is our determination of what is a veteran. He did not meet those standards. I mean, simply, and, frankly, ah, it would be very hard pressed For anyone under any rule or regulation to argue the fact that somebody spent two weeks of basic training discharged unfit. He's a veteran, right and we see this at a swell Keith. This pops up all the time, but let's make it clear to people to people. That envy. BDC is not using its own definition of what a veteran is. It's using 38, USC 40 to 11. And it's that standard of what a veteran is that you're using for certification. So why don't you tell people what that standard is? Or what it does. In one it is in. Frankly, you know, you mentioned some of my background and you know, um, in the sense of working at with the Michigan about a trust fund is a border trustee is chairman of the board. You know, we only handled appeal. So I adjudicated thousands of claims.

founder and CEO Keith King Keith founder and president BDC Michigan Brigadier General Dick Miller Department of defense America president Veterans Hall of Honor CEO NBC USC Um officer United States Vietnam era Army Baba Baba Block Michigan Hall of Honor Executive
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Back on Veterans radio, and I played the ballot. The Green Berets for our guest is a former Green Beret and that is Tom Spooner and Tom is the founder of the Warriors Heart. He has dedicated his life to helping fellow warriors win the war at home against addiction, post traumatic stress and Suicide. Let me just give you a little back background of Ah Tom's experiences in this in this This guy's been everywhere I was in the 82nd Airborne is a green beret in you and US Armies Seven Special Forces group and also made in the U. S. Army's first special forces Operational Detachment. Delta as an operator. Um Spent almost 20 years in the service. When he got out, he decided he wanted to continue helping his fellow veterans. And so that's why we've asked Time to come on our program today to talk about his Warriors heart program out in Texas, and they're new sanction a 12 step program exclusively for warriors to hell with their peers. So Tom welcome the Veterans Radio. Right, Dale? First of all, thank you for having me and then I want to thank you for for your service and what you did for guys like me, you guys Where heroes and paved the way for everything that we did in the military, So I appreciate you and I just wanted to say that up front Well, thank thank you very much. It's Ah, It took a long time for for my generation to get to the idea of a mutual admiration society for anybody who's ever been in Anybody who's had to put up with drill sergeants deserves a medal anyway, That is correct. That is correct. Well, I wanted to have you on the program and we had to kind of rescheduled National last month was national recovery month, but I think this program that you've got started here is something that's just going to go on and on and on. It needs to So tell me about why and how you got your Warriors Honor program started. A warrior's heart program started. Okay? Yes. And could you gave my military background and But a big piece of of my background is struggled with alcoholism at a younger age and I ended up getting sober whenever I was 22 years old. Rest of the majority of my military career 18 years of it. Yeah. You know, I was I was active member in 12 Step group in very passionate about helping others. And so I did that, you know, throughout my whole career So whenever I got out of the military, I ended up doing 40 months total time was in combat. So I had a significant amount of untreated posttraumatic stress and then I also had undiagnosed and untreated. Traumatic brain injury so that that kind of got me behind the power curve there a little bit at the at the end of my career, and I ended up having over 20 years in but ended up getting medical for those for those reasons. So I was super passionate about sobriety, super passionate about obviously veterans, especially whenever I got out and I was very involved in veterans suicide. That whatever first got out and then in 2013 metal about name of Josh landed in his wife, Lisa, landed And we teamed up together with the idea of warriors heart, you know, And that is help active duty of veterans and first responders and law enforcement, you know that are struggling with chemical dependencies. And everything that goes with the profession. And so that's kind of how we got started. We opened up in 2016 Esso out 4.5 years Now we've been open and we've had over 1200 warriors come through our programming from all walks of life from active law enforcement to active duty. Reserves to guard you know everything in between, and and I'm really proud of what we're doing and how we're doing it. But it's it sounds like a great program and I don't want to stereotype anybody out there that you know it was in the service, but there are certain Certain things that we that we have to do while we're in the service and and To relax. Put it that way. We may have it. Some of us had a tendency to probably drink a little bit more than we should have our. Maybe we tried some other things that we shouldn't have. And we ended up finding out that we just You know that we couldn't live without those particular stimulants. And for many of them, you know we on itself. Determined that we're not going to do this anymore. But there are people that just can't do that by themselves. And it sounds like you're providing a great program for people that couldn't do it by themselves. That's exactly right. Because the last thing that we are like you had mention Dale that you know what drinking is a big part of the military culture, you know, so and we're not by any means against You know, we're like they mean, like the alcohol, police or something like that. But it we definitely if you're losing your job are losing your family. You know, or worse on top of it, then we absolutely have a problem with him. Like you said. Not everyone has problems that way. You know, a lot of folks just continue on. Here. They either stop or they regulator. They do something like that. Then you got that category that just can't and just like, he said. Deal That's exactly what we're about is for the folks that have tried. Other other means are And just not working for him. You know that. That's what we exist because we're it's a 42 Day inpatient treatment facility. I don't I don't think that there are a lot of people out there that probably I'm speaking mostly to Z two year community or your client based is you know that that they have a problem? And I think probably the the main Biggest thing that you have to do is admit that you have a problem and I think that you know, it looks like a lot of people are referred to your center to the warrior's heart. And, um, I think that's probably where you know you have little interventions where you know, family members or friends will say OK, Jo, you you just can't do this anymore. We need to get help. For you and for us, and, um, I think that's kind of you know what you're doing, and it's It's great that there there is a kind of this girl's of facilities like years across the country. That are providing help for this generation of veterans. And and and I commend you on being part of that, Um, you mentioned that you you know that you just Passed over a 1200 patients that you've seen over the last four years or so. How did you get started out in? Where are you in Texas? Somewhere in Texas. So big. We're Bandeira, Texas. And there it is. Okay. That's not a question about an hour away from San Antonio. Okay. All right. How did you How did you end up out there?.

Tom Spooner Warriors Heart Texas Veterans Radio Warriors Green Berets Dale Delta Green Beret US U. S. Army founder younger age Operational Detachment Um San Antonio Bandeira Josh Jo
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Latest When you need it on demand from Fox News and Amazon, Alexa the view's opinions and content of this broadcast do not necessarily reflect those of this station or its management alot across America and around the world. This is Veterans Radio. This is Veterans radio. And now your host for today's program. Jim Falzone. Welcome to Veterans Radio. I am Gyma Falsone and the officer of the deck today. We've got some great programs for you. I think you'll find very interesting. We always want to remind you, you can find more about veterans Radio at its Facebook site or by going to veterans radio dot net. Where were on the Web. 24 7. You can find a lot of our podcast there as well. We post new ones every Tuesday, so you can get a new story of new interviews. Something you didn't know before by going to veterans radio dot net. Before we get started. We want to thank our sponsors. First up. We want to think national veteran Business Development Council Then the b d c dot or GE. It was established to certify both service, disabled and veteran owned businesses. In the government and commercial or corporate marketplace. You'll find out how they could help your business by going to envy. BD si dot org's. We also want to think Eisenhower Center. It's a brain injury Recovery center. And in particular, its after the.

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"We're back here on veterans radio. We wanted to talk to you today about these monuments and the military bases and that people are trying to figure out what to do with him. And as our first caller said, you know, emotionally I know I'm not really tied to the names of the basis and in that type of thing, and some of them Um, statues that are being torn down? No. I'd like to know what the history of those statues are. Before We start taking them down. You know that. Some people have suggested that we Um Put up, you know, explanations of who these particular generals were in the case of the statues or the name of the particular military installation that you were in s O. We know a little bit about it. I didn't have any idea. When I went into the service, probably like many of you did 40 50 years ago, or even more current who these generals were, but but when doing a little bit of research for today's program, but I was really kind of surprised that every almost every single military base, especially in the South, Eyes named after a Confederate general, and if we look at it from a legal standpoint, They lost. And if it's not that I'm not saying that, you know that we all kind of admired that something you know that the cause of the south or the Confederate fight and so on and so forth. I think, though, but once we learned about it And I'm hoping that somebody doesn't like this comment, But the idea is that these guys wanted to break away from the United States of America. And Ah, you know, in most cases, that's what would be considered a traitorous act. And there there are songs out there that were they. Ah, trying to think of one of the songs that I was I couldn't find a play. But the lyrics of the song were something to the effect of, you know, toe to take down the stars and stripes and put up raise up the bars of the Confederate flag. And I have to let you know that my my my relatives on my father's side. We're from Tennessee. And so, um Being a member of the Confederacy was important to that family for a long time. Um, I had a great grandfather that fought in the civil war for the South. Um, I don't think he really understood what the what they were fighting for. But, um He was captured and was offered the option of going to a prisoner of war camp or taking a pledge to United States and going home. And he said, I'm you know, I'm with you guys because he didn't have any any. He had no slaves. He was a really a kind of a poor dirt farmer. Ended up running a general store down in a small town called Normandy, Tennessee, which is just south of Murphy's burrow where there were a number of battles, But I think it's important that we we look at the Um, the rise. I, you know, I should get another historian on to talk about the change. In what occurred in the south after the war was over. Ah, we've got, uh, caller on the line. His name is John John is calling from Wyandotte, Michigan. John. Welcome to Veterans Radio. And Colin John Doe Hijo. I'm sorry. That's quite all right. Yeah, I wanted to respond on what Ed was saying that I mean, Robert E. Lee himself. Was anti slavery. Now, everybody that fought for the South lot for slavery granted as a state right issue. So Avery was first and foremost in most people's nine, but States created the federal government. Not the other way around. They freely join the union and they should have an constitutionally didn't have the right to freely leave the union. So when people think of it, not everybody, you're a prince of a Confederate flag. The main really think slavery. They think state's rights, which has been a loaded that's become a symbol for that. So a lot of these generals and that were AH base is named after them because of their military prowess, not because they were fighting for slavery. Well, that's that is true. I think that yes, you mentioned that they were fighting for the idea of state's rights that the states had the right to determine their own. Destiny for lack of a better word there, and I think one of the things that I can remember from studying history of that Robert E. Lee didn't want any statues dedicated to him at the end of the Civil War. That wouldn't be too surprised. And I really I think he was really kind of a humble man again. Him and a few others really opposed. Really. That's not what they were fighting for. And like Edward hang, and we just don't teach history. They don't want to know. They don't care to know. They just want to make it all about. Like saying goes with with happiness. The issue was never the issue. The issue is always the revolution. Doc looks don't matter. I have a tendency to agree with you on a lot of that show, But I think the other parts is that we don't We don't teach history the way that we should. We don't have enough time to teach it. Yeah, you know, I mean, now we're looking at, you know, 232 140 years of history. When I was in school back in the late fifties, the early sixties way we barely got the World War two. And you know now we've had you know another 50 years worth of history to cram into there, and you know we're shorting everything out, and I think that that's that's what Dr Caetano was talking about is that we're giving them the Reader's Digest version of history by instead of going in and showing them the whole wants just gave him the highlight, like you said. And if we only have the highlights most of the time we're going to try and pick. The good part's not necessarily the bad parts, right? Well, nowadays, they seemed on ly wanna focus on the bad parts, and that's that's our biggest problem now in the schools. All right. Thanks for having me on take care. Alright. Thanks, Joe Very much for calling. Veterans Radio would like to have your comments out there. The number is 734822 1600 were really interested in seeing how you feel about Should we replace these monuments? Should we take him down? So we take him down illegally? We don't want the people going out there and knocking him down on somebody. You know, people are starting to go after Statues. They're of the I don't know. I can't say the wrong people. But Somebody tried to take down the statue for United US Grant, who happened to be not only the president of the United States after the civil war, but also the general that finally won the war. So you know that this guy couldn't You cannot gonna have, um or of a union Northern general. And you not Ulysses asked. Grant. Um, and it seems like when people were writing history about him that they you know again, they they focused a lot on the negative. You know, we complain a lot about social media today, but the the press itself and casting aspersions on journalists. I don't mean to do that, because it's a hard job. I don't think I would want to have it. But they went after Grant during the Civil War for things that occurred, you know, early on in his lifetime. And I think that that was you know, a miss Take the idea of Of honoring some of these.

United States Veterans Radio Tennessee Robert E. Lee Grant Colin John Doe Hijo Normandy John John John Wyandotte America Ulysses Avery Michigan Edward hang Dr Caetano Ed
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Here on Veterans radio, And that song is played for a special guest that's coming up here in just a moment. Um, as you as you were listening to veterans radio, hopefully from the top of the hour. We're talking about dogs today, and we've already had one organization and now we got another one. This one is called Guardian Angels, Medical service dogs and joining me on the line right now is Mary Lamm parter? And Mary is representative in Michigan for Ah, The Guardian Angels Medical Service dogs. So, Mary Welcome to veterans Radio. To very much. I appreciate the opportunity to share information with you, but this is really fun. I you know, it's really fun talking to you and and also talking with Joe and his organization and also on the line is AH, good friend of Veterans Radio, the executive director of Fisherhouse, Michigan, who has just recently received her service dog and at his Cape, Melcher and Kate, Welcome back to the program. Thanks, Dale. It's always great to chat with you. And it's always good to talk to you and I I thought that you would like your song. I did. I definitely appreciated that. Most people want. Don't understand. K was an Apache helicopter pilot. That was, ah, I guess one of your theme songs that you meant it when I was thunderstruck by CDC and nothing gets you pumped up quite like a CDC when you go out to fly. That's true, But we had other songs that that's another conversation. Um All right. So, Mary, tell me about Guardian angels, medical service dogs. How did have the disorganization gets started? Well, it actually got started 10 years ago by a woman by the name of Carol Borden, who had been in raising and training dogs for most of her life, and she I've been asked by a ninja vigil if She could help train. Her dog specifically are that person's dog, and Carol said, of course, and one thing led to another. And here it is 10 years later. And Carol has now founded Guardian Angels Medical Service dogs out of Williston, Florida and they have paired now 350 dogs. All basically all over the country in that 10 years time carols that renowned trainer and has become quite the expert with service dogs has Testified in front of Congress spoken to many, many organizations around the country on what a service dog is and how to protect service dogs. Hands the benefit how dogs actually save Change and save lives of many of our veterans and first responders. So that was an activist in Guardian angels. Right. I was going to say that you're not just limited to veterans. This far is your service dogs are concerned are you know we are not. But about 90% of our recipients are veterans. Andi. The other 10% is his first responders. Um it's been a little more interesting to try and Educate the first responder community about the value of service dogs. A cz. You're probably aware it's really just been in the last few years that military even eyes recognizing ah, and values what a service dog can do for our our service members with You know, PTSD, mobility issues, things like that. So we're still in the process of really starting to educate our first responders. So About 90% still is what we do we do with our veteran community. Well, I think it's it's really fascinating. When you think about what what Thes service dogs can dio I mean, in reading some of the information on your website, which is where did it go? That was that was medical service dogs. Don't Dot org's, um That there are so many different types of service dogs. Can you talk a little bit about that? I mean, and I'm gonna talk with Kate later, about But her service dog does for her, but You know, In addition, as you mentioned the mobility and the gentleman on earlier said that his dog actually helps them get up. Yes, yes, Our dogs are trained. We do not get into the site are visual impairment. Those dogs a cz, you know, here in Michigan. We have a service dog organization just for the blind. We do not get into that. But Our dogs are trained for alert to seizures to diabetic alert. They can. If it's a mobility trained dog. They can open doors, refrigerator doors, they can pick up items that air dropped on the floor. They do help with balance issues. Um, someone that has difficulty standing up on their own. The dog learns to brace and that person is able to Put their hands on the dog's back and enables them to help stand up. On then, of course. Ah, in the emergence at real emergency If someone has a, um, a lifeline alert system that dog is actually trained to hit a button to call for help. In the event that there there veteran were to fall on, be disabled or have a seizure. So on top of that, then, of course they do all of the things that we hear more about with the post traumatic stress. They do things called shielding to protect that individual from larger crowds that gives up individual security. Uh, feeling of safety. They do all kinds of anxiety, panic attacks on awake people from nightmares. So there are many, many things that are dogs do and it's all many of those things a PTSD, particularly seizure alerts. It's all around the sense of smell. A dog has because of the chemical changes in a person's body on a dog nose long before someone's going to have a seizure or their panic level anxiety is rising, and that's all done from their olfactory senses, which are Over 1000 times more sensitive than a human's. So those air many, many things that these wonderful dogs do. I think I think it's amazing. I've I've Witnessed. I guess you could say I've had a number of veterans students in my my real job. I guess you could say that have brought their service dogs into class. With them. And it is very interesting to watch how the dog reacts not only to their handler, I guess you could say, but the other kids in the class and, um I think I had one That was. Ah had epilepsy and a dog. Wood. Alert a cz you point out when the dog you know was sensed that an attack might be coming on. And I just found that I'm just amazing that think that they can do that. Um, where Tigress a little bit. Where do you find your dogs? Well, the majority of our dogs are actually bred on the headquarters. I call it the farm, which is located in Williston, Florida. And the majority of the dogs are actually bread. They're all shepherds. On German Austrian lineage and the majority are the dogs that are known to be the greatest dogs are are made it impaired, you know, with another one of our great dogs, so We have, you know, 10 12. Puppies in a litter at a time so there can be almost 300 dogs. Our 100 dogs sorry at any given time on the farm from the puppy stages to a dog that the biggest part of two years later is ready for pairing. So the majority there there is some rescue, but they're very careful with rough you dogs..

Veterans Radio Michigan Mary Lamm Carol Borden Guardian Angels Medical Servic PTSD Williston Kate Florida CDC Joe representative Dale Fisherhouse executive director Apache Melcher Congress
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Welcome to veterans radio with my name is Dale from Barry I was a chief warrant officer in nineteen sixty nine the United States Army in the the beautiful Republic of Vietnam I want to welcome to our special program today this is father's day and so today we're asking that you give us a call here on veteran's radio to tell us what your dad did when they were in the service could be from anywhere or any time this time doesn't make any difference we just want to hear from you today to tell us what your dad was was up to the number to call the studio is seven three four eight two two sixteen hundred that's seven three four eight two two sixteen hundred Derek will be answering the phone and let me know that you're there and we'll bring you on there as soon as we can so appreciate that very much as I said I'm really excited we've gotten some emails from people over the last week of stories they didn't want to come on the air so I will be reading their stories to you as we go along and if we have time maybe I'll tell you a little bit about my story my dad of course it's a good time it's it's quite a story for many of us out there and for what her father said done during their times in a service and I think it's important that we keep those stories alive and so please give us a call I think it's really important seven three four eight two two sixteen hundred first of all I want to thank all of our sponsors for helping out to keep veterans radio going with been doing this now for almost seventeen years which is really hard to believe but then we've got so many more stories to tell we want to.

Dale officer United States Army Derek Barry I
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Signed copy of the views opinions and content of this broadcast do not necessarily reflect those of this station or its management all across America and around the world this is veterans radio veterans radio and now your host for today's program deal thrown good afternoon and welcome the veterans radio my name is Dale thrown very hearing states army aviator veteran from the Vietnam era in nineteen sixty nine I want to welcome you to veterans radio this weekend Memorial Day weekend and I just a quick disclaimer here remember that veterans day is to honor veterans Memorial Day is to honor those that did not come home so we're gonna be talking about that a little bit later on we got a great program here and I wanted to make sure that people are aware that here on veteran's radio that we want to thank our sponsors so much for helping us stay on the air for seventeen years now and number one we've got legal help for veterans and they specialize in veterans disability claims so for more information go to their website that's legal help for veterans dot com or you can give them a call at eight hundred six nine three four eight zero zero they were on duty I'm back at work hi US wings the manufacturers of the finest leather flight jackets in the world U. S. wings is a major supplier of leather flight jackets to the military for more information go to their website that U. S. wings dot com we give them a call at eight hundred six five zero zero six five nine and I should remind you know US wind right now is I offering specially designed a coronavirus masks so he could go to their website at U. S..

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The relationship between the church in the public square in regularly engages with executive legislative and judicial leaders at the local state and federal levels to communicate the concerns of Christians following his address our panel of local pastors will discuss pro life concerns and answer audience questions this event takes place at living word church forty six five hundred north territorial in Plymouth at seven PM the speaker will be Robert pastor Chris Thoma handed eight PM a pastor's panel with Q. and a pastors including Reverend Sam waters of living word church Reverend Jeff noble of four winds church and Reverend friar Joseph Markey of Sacred Heart Byzantine Catholic again this event takes place on Thursday April thirtieth from seven to nine PM for more information call seven three four three eight six zero six zero one or visit Plymouth R. T. L. dot org check out the wide variety of educational fun events put on by the inter district library for kids preschool through twelfth grade all library facilities can be reached by phone to the main switchboard at seven three four three two seven forty two hundred or you can visit W. W. W. dot ACA DL dot org check it out you've been listening to the wham community calendar on sixteen hundred eighty am and ninety two point seven FM to have your even publicized email community and wham radio dot com the views opinions and content of this broadcast do not necessarily reflect those of this station or its management all across America and around the world this is veterans radio veterans radio and now your host for today's program deal thrown welcome to veterans radio technical.

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"We're back on veterans radio and I were talking with the sons and daughters of your team and I want to just read a little bit off of the email that was sent to me about the battle of Iwo Jima which took part in February and March of nineteen forty five and was marked by some of the fiercest fighting of the entire war the American invasion known as operation detachment was charged with capturing the airfield argument you know we're getting closer and closer to Japan real Japanese army positions on the island were heavily fortified with vast bunkers hidden artillery in eighteen or eleven miles worth of tunnels the battle was the first American attack on the Japanese home islands in the imperial soldiers defended their positions tenaciously of the twenty one thousand Japanese soldiers present at the beginning of the battle over twenty thousand were killed and only two hundred sixteen were taken prisoners during the two month long battle twenty seven US military personnel were awarded the medal of honor for their actions not get into that a little bit later on this is possibly one of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific to end World War two and I want to start bringing on our gas I'm gonna try to bring you guys on a one of the time don't even right now is Diane Keiller Diane welcome radio thank you for having me down okay tell me a little real quickly about your dad I told my father was a leading with the navy builder group and he was a member of the thirty first naval construction battalion fifty nine division and my father like many of our fathers didn't talk much about the battle of the Regina that name was what was the name and I thought it was the other Cleveland okay I had done a keeper right the V. near the one that I got the email to to to to ask you to remember to talk about the one thirty third CB battalion I imagine and Tomsky crap once you hear a lot about the marines and now accident that the and that was very costly battle in marine has stated that he would give the campaign was in fact the most costly if that'll include the history as well the hundred and thirty third battalion was fully loaded with the fourth marine division all told with the B. council please be among all the the the unit in okay the most non law during any time in a while working or even in the coming days occurred in the battle of the region be talking more about the CV is because we're talking about that at breakfast time as I mentioned earlier my partner today very little is a navy CB and knows quite a bit about the history of the CD's as well also joining us on the line right now is Mike Yellen might welcome the veterans radio hi good morning how are you doing I'm fine how are you I'm terrific thank you very much tell me a little bit about your dad experiences on the wall sure so my dad Jerry Allen was a P. fifty one fighter pilot who landed on the island I had two or three weeks after the battle began after the airstrip was secure and he yeah I was a fighter pilot and and and help you know a straight man and bomb the frontline in support of the marines right and I will get back to to Jerry Yellin Jerry's been on our program a couple of times you've written a couple books about his experiences there and it's it's it's a fascinating story and finally on the joint is on veterans radio is John Butler and John welcome to veterans radio I I should have done something about it but transaction I'm not tell me John about hearings like mine I'll try to talk louder yeah the tell me about a little bit about your experiences the origin well my father the first battalion twenty seven one twenty seven brains when I went online and looked enormous influence over and then came in and are you connected to the this the rest of my life yeah the objective was to secure through y'all on the right flank was influenced ignition no I don't did you know consumer groups and had to be doing so I'm not one of those times I can answer that John bass alone saying this morning right rules of I don't remember in corporate and yeah I'm in the mood to sixty two suffered tremendous casualties well thank goodness that my father was killed in front only one of them can I do to him man man this happens maintain contact and I use worldwide burner still but strong emotional connection to genius and I bet that I am actually one of our friends who's from New Orleans where my father's name is plans no notice his crew yes in the morning during their input a crucifix on it took a picture and in the collections and through such a machine gun and wrote a book about it red blood black sand she found my phone number and called me so Diana Gina comes I also travel to Regina Lewis and two thousand and five my brother was with me also that was a real mountains for for us and and I'm saying close to this association and also remember that this morning the vision association and as long as you in my life so that's not something that okay well I'm going to come back to you when we talk a little bit about going back to your machine that's what I want to bring joy is back on the line Joyce was kind of the motivation to for me to do this program because I wish I had read her book and it really brought back a lot of members for me my father happened to be in the Coast Guard at the battle of your demand it is Ellis he landed with what's up on a beach in and people are watching the webcast I think we're trying to find those those photos to to match what we're talking about but he was on the beach we will G. M. M. and he just he never told me a word about it and tell it I found of an album actually a couple years ago that he had put together had always official made the photos that were on the ballot we would demand and he never mentioned he never said a word about this intentionally since it's your dad ever talk about it how did you get in you know involved in in the morning well my dad from the time I was very little perhaps my earliest memories are going through a book sitting in his lap and he would tell me about his friends however when I was ten years old he had what they called a nervous breakdown back then and now we're pretty sure it was PTSD that they took him to the hospital and they gave him shock treatments and when he came home he couldn't stop talking about it and so a lot of the information that in the book aside from the research that I get to verify certain things I treated it as historical fiction the century his memories and his friends and what happened to them on the island he happened to be there all thirty six days and his unit are his squad was killed on his remaining for him twice so he had a lot of very ambivalent memories he was very proud to be there but he had all of these amazing stories the one that I always remember significantly is when they raised the flag on survivor she all of the ships and boats all around blowing their horns and everybody for a moment stop the battle was over stop to look and of course at that moment that Cyprus took advantage he lost one of its very dear friends that that that moment it was a very ambivalent dinner sweet moment for him and of course that such a famous iconic image that that was kind of burned in my head probably about I was probably about ten and a half eleven when he was telling me the thesis that particular story it's very interesting that you mention that about ten years older so when we return when I was ten years old we went to Washington DC on the way for a family vacation we stopped at the marines memorial for the raising of the flag there and he again he never said a word but he made a big deal out of are having to go and see this and you just start staring at me and you just wonder what was going through his mind if he was you know trying to be all the way back to that moment when that plane went out and and what they had to go through want to go over to to Diane right now and I and you were talking to Diane keep when we're talking to the sons and daughters of of your team and trying to find out how the battle not only affected their fathers but also affected their lives so then you you mentioned earlier that your father was a CD and when he was he was on the island building you know trying to rebuild the airfield yeah unlike other women about someone I can determine about the platform and data on the island and so on holder and had enough points and he was able to return thank god interesting bell and like what you said about the community in which the memorial like you about ten years old my mother had given me a steel bracelet which was made from what happened you get their crap that my dad had made for her on your team and this is before the POW bracelets of the Vietnam War and gave it to me and it had her name on it a little on edge one of the island and she gave that to me and I think that's when I decided I want to go everywhere when my father went on the weekend that that was my inspiration and like you who other kids in the Latino on my first trip to Washington DC I was with my mom and my fifth grade class my sixth grade class only twelve at the memorial and I remember my mother breaking down in tears and he didn't say a word either about that I knew that was already well but I clearly remember her just kind of moving in honor of the license in the state never we never really appreciate what our moms went through during World War two itself and it's it's almost unfortunately they're all passing away also and I think we need to do a program on them on them on the women left behind and and how did they cope in console on because it's it's really I found really interesting I've mentioned this before in our program is you know that my mom went through the World War two and then I go out to Vietnam and I'm wondering how did she survive mentally and emotionally and I was I was just oblivious to the whole thing any help but I digress as usual getting back to what we're talking about here I wanna bring on Mike yell and Mike I want you to tell me who Colorado what your dad was doing that he wants you know so as I said he was a fighter pilot landed two or three weeks after the battle began and and straight to the front lines and in support of the marines and and and then once the once the army was captured and and was in full control he then flew combat missions escorting bombers over Japan and they're bombing raids he he came.

Iwo Jima
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

15:39 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Welcome back to veterans radio and this of course was you just heard the anthem of the Vietnam veteran everybody over there knows that song and the reason I say that is our guest today happens to be a veteran is a three time Silver Star recipient name is William bill Albrecht his book is entitled abandon in hell he co wrote the book with Marvin wolf also another Vietnam veteran I've got a nice forward by Joe Galloway in there says the whole Vietnam stories so bill welcome to veterans radio a real honor to be on your show thanks a lot well thank you very much for a green to be on the program on such short notice let's get you into the army backed beginning of time sure well I went to all over yeah I woke in Rock Island Illinois which only blues brothers I might add if you were ever part of the Quad Cities area across the river from Iowa I didn't have a Amanda it might the accomplishment and I of course to the football game was over thirty to have a great college nor the inclination my job my best buddy Joe Murphy we join the army and I'll never forget going down there to target Carlos and he said the what do you boys I have what your intentions are sure we wanna be airborne infantry we want to go to Vietnam and he looked at us like we get it includes those were better here make sure we've already would be set up Hey guys now all well your lucky day I get log here and what I'll be gone now I don't know what I or we won't you know we're gonna find out now off we go and now when I do your car rolled out and got and left Chicago or large fort Campbell right but in the midnight truly early the last train to Clarksville yeah down there they they and during bait you know the gives bunches and bunches of that and not out I will the nuns and priests the rover alternates will work right I would not blame myself and I scored very high and I ended up nearly o'shea yeah they did you take you know I even told OCS officer candidate yeah Hey could have been no good but cool cool cool I have no idea what I didn't even know he got hookers yes without a college degree yeah back then and I passed and although I go to school for boys so we're betting Georgia and I was still eighteen I graduated what you're making model of August graduate August thirty first nineteen sixty seven the newly minted second lieutenant and then right to jump school yeah trooper and then off Fort Bragg special forces officer courts and so now I'm nineteen and I am not forces training qualified by the way I was always the one high school had to buy the beer is always looked older to like start no earthly idea how old I was and like every good special can I would involve your Vietnam on duty and don't you know it's gonna finally Iran between the royal Thai army or a year now my turn went up it was nineteen sixty nine yeah I had only two years commission time yeah I have done what I got out to do and that was to go to Vietnam and from there yeah I knew that I would be going there take a real issue but I would so much better drink so much better trained than anybody than the average guy going there so I told hello this is my duty what are the overwhelming to adventure I had a me I've been trained and trained and trained and now by god I'm going to be able to put everything you related that well just tell me a little bit about the training that you that you did receive after an officer and I don't think that most enlisted people understand the additional training that that you had to go through well you know what your school does yes which was highly highly and and basic retreat package of ranch in fact checker circle what was reported there was a holder for Bailey work lately we were trained in unconventional warfare guerrilla warfare and I know what I did it was very very demanding sure absolutely true however the name again seven months well not enough but training so I would when I got here but what what we were surprised one of the your what's what the we were extremely hard they were given in your head this guy you have to learn you have to crack the books and now I mean it was eight cop go where lot of college guys in there that you're you know we're going through because they're gonna be signed as the medical officer and everybody everybody around it not that but I can tell you one thing god was it'll hurt glad or maybe the lower part of the twelve but technically where I really I really came out well I know there was a it was a tough call because many US special forces people that we got to work with you know were extremely talented and again they were they knew what they were doing one of the things about being a helicopter pilot you touch upon this in the book in this for all your rotor heads out there this is a great book to read just to give you some memories after training what your job was and in Vietnam as that you know we've we were super specialist we never really knew where we were going L. or why we were going let's put it that way we always knew where we were going we just Avenue exactly why because we we were on a need to know basis and so we would take teams like yours you and you know four five indigenous people out into the middle of of Cambodian drop you off but we never knew what your mission was over there and I'm I suppose that's not necessary for us to know that are some what a gal we got Bill Murray yeah I love that line is oh my lord we're talking with bill Albrecht here on veterans radio is book is entitled abandon in hell is also there's a documentary out there called escape from firebase Kate which we'll get to in a in a little bit all right so now you are you have left Thailand you're in Vietnam in nineteen sixty nine correct correct I arrived in country twenty one at the end of the month promoted to captain so younger or yeah certainly yeah yeah leak through I would say arguably but no one ever and that goal yeah I would twenty one by a couple right less than two weeks or so and here I am yep and then again with Rick older so we never we never problem you never actually problem no I will not yeah your honor even though it arsenal porcelain I was supposed to be there when you can monitor will remember right now we're shop with you wherever the need but I want to make a may your special forces that I went out there and honestly we got you all worked on trade I or out to we can doctor nation called little courts right you are really Dr David you're or special forces there make sure what was going and then I came back here and there you go where you want to go yeah I I wanna go I want to go to court mobile strike your core might that might work or take a moment to talk about that that's okay go ahead yeah they had four battalions the recon company up there now to court like where and I think maybe one of them they were all eight out there will be only order in the arts and they're all character all the worker they were just really well motor grader they're highly paid and they were extremely well trained some would say mercenary I would not writing for their call which was not circle drive but they were fighting for their own right and now they're not really a good unit are trying it out would be very much your local car merit in India so are we they're not let that eight twelve American idol battalion and they were all our special what everyone had lots of I where I work because the might react your orders brought to court which was by far the largest court in when eighteen got trouble the first call up to the Mike ports and they were always insert into usually well not always but most hot okay the which is as as you well girl what what there are you guys always seem to attract lead yeah right now although that not the no I will not your no combat experience or small hello thank you your guide refers to guide the lorry you know and our our bill you one act your will and your crew which was out of the Cambodian border in southern to court and now in the trial it was just gorgeous down there truly was I went to boot praying I would junior and then there were senior captain there all brand new Richfield I which is back so your call at your course the character this is a big yeah he really really take care and so I might about what he well right your record over twenty seven twenty so the girl came up in the beating we do it in yeah I we're yeah I gave me a call just breaking it'll all right now occasion that they have now all right reporter Matt are there long over the drive order a big invasion from the north from dental treatment trail and praying work right in the middle of the year but they would make an excellent worker the provincial capital you can then everything is done in your and by the way you are you are taking our borders are based your wonder about her very well there was another you the and now or what but well let me be here I'm getting ready for bed and I'm working with regard to what doctor sing up order with Bob will block your current current one where you get there I will be here right I all right yeah you're near twenty in October thank you you're not going okay well I think I can kind of put some of this in perspective for other people that were over there hi in the October of of sixty nine is when we had some really interesting times as well just a little bit south of where you were in a public place called drop inclined lonely which was another branch of the Ho Chi Minh highway and there was a whole lot of activity going on and now it's something something big was being planned and when I was reading your book the book of the band and help folks this is a great story for you to read I started connecting some of the docks and I'm going to this is why we were assigned to do this or that and why they were reinforcing many of the little fire bases that were in north northwestern there are three core so evidently intelligence knew things were going on but most of us didn't it was it was not sure people thank you know my god yeah my brother Bob it's not right all you you were the first reports the core prior you are getting your work I get a number out the best but you were there for that that was all the card because you have so many other things going on it did not black you know and it kept up real light but I know you do and I do and anybody that we're there only realized after learning on on my part after they're actually and grainy quality or the Bucks are getting along the other the other two core he came up to me and reported and you know what your what your situation like it will be noted that you were playing golf ball they were hard they were out there well I would rather go learn your name people banter now I'm not in your in your little work your guard what her situation your yeah we we take a walk about we get how how big is is was LZ Kate yeah around eighty meter right problem here or do you are covered all what was your or jungle girl triple gold scraped off are great it was not a great place there were high ground around there and you could be on high ground around to look down on me yeah yeah yeah might like what you're okay you're we work right we walked around and what pretty bad or tango overhead cover concert was overgrown with where you go what are not only more it just went on it all right all you know you're right you're you're just under David or Eno out your car the wait call I got there and we could put together so I had a meeting with the officers in the.

William bill Albrecht
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Not to remove the president from office that's the job for all the Senate that's fox's Kevin Clark at the capitol America is listening new Lara Logan is back the award winning journalist returned with an unflinching look at the border crisis what I care about is one thing the truth and she's taking on the mainstream media tackling the issues that matter to America one story at a time we see this but we don't have to see where they go we don't know what they've been through just to get here you can see on their faces this is my core these guys are runners they're not going to give themselves up it's all happening yes this is what you're used to okay they Ellen that's not the case and we all have families are here to protect our borders a third country having the freedom to take on tough subjects and tell it like it is that what we have a fox nation that's what sets us apart no bias no nonsense Lara Logan has no agenda the must see docu series is available now only on fox nation start your free trial at the views opinions and content of this broadcast do not necessarily reflect those of this station or its management all across America and around the world this is veterans radio veterans radio and now your host for today's program good afternoon and welcome the veterans radio my name is Dale thrown merry I was a chief warrant officer helicopter type pilot in Vietnam in nineteen sixty nine and I want to make sure that you are welcomed to veterans radio we've got a great program we're gonna be talking about a a local will writing project that we did over the last couple of years of gathering stories of our local veterans and I'm in a book week we have entitled we answered the call and I'm really excited to talk we have a couple of guests on phones and in the studio and I think you're going to really enjoy it and one of the reasons that we're doing this program is I want to make sure that across the country people that are listening we want to make sure the people are gathering these kinds of stories we always talk about stories here on veterans radio I wanted to give this program is sort of an idea of how you can go about doing this and so the book because when I when we come back after a quick break we will be talking about how the book was put together and some of the stories that are in it and for those of you that were in the book you could give us a call here today at seven three four eight two to sixteen hundred at seven three four eight two to sixteen hundred before I get really into the program I got to make sure that I I want to give a little shout out to a good friend of ours who is recovering at home and I still maze del mazes left the hospital and is at home recuperating in a dell is is a is a he's a good old boy and I just I love that man and del you get this get get yourself well quickly and I want to get you in here and talk about your stories here on veterans radio so I want to make sure I got that out of the other thing is I got to make sure the people that are paying the bills get some credit too so I want to make sure that we want the what all of you out there to.

president Senate fox Kevin Clark
"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

11:57 min | 3 years ago

"veterans radio" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Radio today a professor of law and bioethics Max Mellman Max welcome to veterans radio thank you pleasure to be here well let's give a little background for our veteran radio listeners be you are at case western reserve a law law school in medical school I believe right I have appointments in both both schools here in Cleveland Ohio can can you explain to you know the regular Joe out there kind of though reason or nature of the this dual dual appointments I think that probably surprise a lot of point people about like what's that about yes so in nineteen fifty three at this law school the first program was created to study the role of law in health and became the field of health law and in nineteen eighty four I was recruited from a law firm in Washington to take the program over after the founding director was rude a retired and it's a great deal of of the issues that are raised in in health law involved ethical issues you know not just legal issues and that's that's another field called bioethics so I had to develop some expertise in both law and healthcare and medicine science and and then also in bioethics so that led to these twin appointments although my primary role is as a law professor swell and listeners Max got his law degree or do jurors doctorate from Yale Law School he did attend Oxford university is world scholar and he did work at a very prestigious or Washington DC C. law firm so while you've been in the academic role along time you bring a lot of those experiences to it and it's sort of interesting as well some where where you said what model my career and life is just been a sequence of four to this events you didn't set out to be a law and ethics S. expert I don't think well I I wanted one when I graduated from law school I wanted to go into government service been a public service of some sort and I was advised to start by joining a law firm and that was in Washington DC there were about fifty thousand lawyers in Washington DC in about forty nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine had the same idea so I never quite got into government officially although I've been involved as an adviser and a whole bunch of capacities since I became a law professor and I stumbled into health law despite stand being in a partners office one day when a drug company called and had a case they needed help on and he needed a young person you know junior person to work with him I have no science background no medical background actually I do now because I was a ski patroller for twenty years but a volunteer but at that time I didn't try to learn how to learn all of this stuff and over the years a begin to get research grants from an I. H. for example I developed a some expertise in a genetics and genomics and in the course of doing some work there the issue came up you know if if we can settle with the human you know human genes to you know go to website offer prevent disease how about you know fiddling with them to make you know more about a handsome or more powerful or more smart smarter humans and so that led into a some research on the field of biomedical enhancement performance enhancement that lead in to work on doping in sports and that in turn led into work on the potential use of enhancement drugs and other you know techniques in in in in a military context and I had some grants of from an I. H. to study that as well and so you know I bye bye learn to and I ended up writing a book about that some years ago called the price of perfection not just about the military but it it you know of so all of those issues kind of came about might my understanding of them came about just by chance well it's a you know and this is a good lesson for everybody out there listening that life is not a straight line and seize whatever opportunity presents itself because it may be a really interesting path that you weren't contemplating so and we run into a lot of people who have that experience certainly I do and many others too but they the article that you wrote that caught my eye is called doping soldiers so that the fight better is it ethical and you know that man that really makes you start thinking about some stuff and those of us who have been in the military quickly relate to experiences that we've had or others have had regarding and we made I think about it in the terms of doping or performance enhancing drugs but we've all had those experiences where whether it's all just that one more Cup of Joe or go pill or some other things so so when you begin looking at this tell tell us what you found about the long rich history of trying to enhance the performance of of military members to be sure yeah I mean the word doping itself comes from a off an Afrikaner word for a substance that does do the warriors swallowed before they went to combat thinking that it would prevent them from getting from bullets from actually being able to get inside them so that goes back to the early nineteenth century and you know we have had the experience in World War one and two of certainly in the British Army of you know having a tauter from before you go over the top which is a kind of a a performance enhancer you mentioned Cup of Joe and you know during the civil war the story is that one of the reasons that the union one was that it had access to caffeine actually instant coffee if you can believe it back then and the the south was blockaded so they couldn't get coffee and and they just weren't as alert and so one amphetamines began to be developed in the mid nineteen thirties speed if you will that caught on in the military and you know up widespread use of that during World War two the Germans in particular used a lot of it because they had actually invented some of it and and that the use of amphetamines you know has persisted would have been some problems with it you know it it can cause lapses in judgment and and and you know nerves and things like that so there was an incident in the in the war in Afghanistan where some pilots flying from Europe direct fifteens in a combat mission from Europe accent the bomb some Canadian soldiers thinking that they were getting a friend of fire from the ground and blames their misjudgment you know that the mistake on having had to take too many amphetamines to to do that combat mission and you know what the military is now we're very interested in is you know say for dub dot drugs and other techniques that are very effective particularly at promoting alertness because that's a big you know a game changer in in combat and and also perhaps changing the diet for example an enabling soldiers to to persist on top you know to function well without without sleep and without you know food or at least without traditional forms of food and so DARPA the defense advanced research projects agency a DO D. has been pursuing this for many years and it's interesting to think about where the science will go and you know that with the new developments in genetics manipulation you know did gene editing and so on there's possibilities there as well well it's again it when we in in this is right how society probably was always moves along it's sort of one little step at a time you look back and you see you can see this long connected trail that gets us to where we are or where we might be going as you start talking about changing the genetics of of of the warrior class but how much thought here we put into what the ethical issues are when we manipulate our soldiers with of performance enhancing drugs yeah most of the thinking has but so some of the thinking has been look we don't want our athletes to use steroids and other forms of doping so why would we want to you know our troops to do that and one of my arguments is that they're completely different situations I mean what is the social advantage of of you know it and actually you know using say you know steroids particularly if they're against the rules not much I mean right the actually gets to win but society doesn't typically benefit from that but if a soldier can survive a combat without being injured can can complete the mission is more safely and and you know and quicker and more effectively there is an enormous social benefit to the to the individual soldier and also to the mission you know to the mission and the you know and and the and the country so very different ethical context a lot a lot of the thinking bio ethical thinking ten terms of military use has been what about giving soldiers of drugs which haven't gone through the formal FDA approval process and so you know a lot of drugs that are used to enhance performance both in in in sports and just you know people in daily life are not approved for that purpose right I mean they have medical purposes but not enhancement purposes so an interesting question that's come up and it came up in the first and second forces can we give up up you know soldiers drugs that have not been you know tested or for fully tested or proved up for the purpose we're giving it to them now this originally didn't didn't involve enhancement drugs that involved vaccines against came a chemical and biological warfare and then the anthrax vaccination program but but that question has arisen because most likely if we do give troops mention handling drugs let's stick with drugs if you will those drugs will not have been tested or not tested very much for those enhancement uses and that's really a bigger problem which is that we we unfortunately we don't have a lot of research on the enhancement uses of drugs like amphetamines and and other sorts of things it's you know it's a lot of people think it's unethical to to to you know test these kinds of drugs and people because you know if it's synced athletes it's it's illegal is against the rules most of the time and so on so one of the big problems ethical problems in using these things in the military is that we don't have adequate knowledge of how safe and effective they are and you know we need to do we need to do research arguably before we start using these things but then of course we've been using them for decades so maybe we have sort of a natural experiment going on and you know we can look at how you know people have fared help you know what what health effects we can see if we think you know she's a lot of people haven't must've been using these things and then you know.

Trump hosts Indian prime minister at "Howdy Modi!" rally in Texas

Veterans Radio

00:20 sec | 3 years ago

Trump hosts Indian prime minister at "Howdy Modi!" rally in Texas

"At a packed stadium in Houston area president trump joining another world leader India's prime minister Narendra Modi's for a trade event that even had a few nicknames Howdy mody even hello mody.

India Narendra Modi Houston President Trump Prime Minister
Israel kicks off US Embassy celebration, boosts border force

Veterans Radio

01:35 min | 4 years ago

Israel kicks off US Embassy celebration, boosts border force

"Radio i'm steve rappoport israel beefing up forces at the gaza border in anticipation of protests tomorrow when the us embassy opens in jerusalem deputy secretary of state john sullivan is among the us delegation in israel for the ceremony we're proud to make the president's pledge my fellow delegates in official treasury secretary steven mnuchin also there the united states has no greater partner then israel the opening coincides with the seventieth anniversary of the founding of israel fox's rachel sutherland another lava fisher opening up on hawaii's big island leading tomorrow evacuations cars moving those are all folks that live here they are closing off access to any folks who are trying to take pictures of the lava or any of the scene out here and also the national guard troops are in place and they are they're ready to respond should conditions get any worse oxes jeff paul fox news we report you decide battle of honor is the highest award for valor in combat given a member of the armed forces of the united states there have been over three thousand four hundred recipients of the nation's highest award this is one of them was deaf sergeant henry irwin's job on the lead beach one thousand nine to drop a phosphorus canister as a marker when they reached the assembly area over enemy territory details after this air position the canister in the launch tube and pull the pin at the pilots orders the flare dropped then flew back into the plane it exploded in her wins face viewing.

Deputy Secretary John Sullivan Israel President Trump United States Partner Rachel Sutherland Hawaii Henry Irwin Steve Rappoport Gaza Jerusalem Official Steven Mnuchin Jeff Paul