17 Burst results for "Verner Von Braun"

"wernher von braun" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:22 min | Last month

"wernher von braun" Discussed on WGN Radio

"This is an incredibly hard business. We're trying to do something that hasn't been done in over 50 years. And we're doing it with new technology. We're doing with new operators and new teams, the new command and control, and new software And that is the Artemis mission manager Mike serafin saying everybody wants to see the next milestone, but they're learning along the way. The previous statement we had from NASA, by the way, was from NASA spokesman Daryl nail. Well, 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo is our number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 as we look at the beginnings of the NASA return to the moon. With a slight postponement this past day, another attempt will be made for the Artemis mission unmanned test launch on Friday if that doesn't work Monday is the next launch window. Now to Clifford in Berkeley, California for our guest Joe post of the technology firm SAIC good evening Clifford. Hello. I would like to know if we have a permanent base on the moon. Sooner or later and astronaut will die on the moon. So I want to know what are the plans for a corpse in the moon base. And for that matter, what if there's a baby born in the moon? What are the plans for that? I think inevitability I'm sure that those are being covered, my guess would be that there would be return flights back to the earth and probably a corpse would be returned, although it's entirely possible that someone might, I suppose, be buried on the moon. As for pregnancy, I suppose that's an inevitability with men and women on long and secluded and dangerous missions Joe. So yeah, I believe your NASA has always had a plan for a corpse on any mission. I mean, it's always a possibility. Human life is very fragile. As far as the second part, I don't believe I have any, I'm not sure if that has explored that and I'm not aware of anything regarding pregnancy or baby being born. But I mean, obviously, they take everything else into account at some point, somebody's got to say, you know, we got men and we got women up there. And this could happen. So one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo when 866-505-4626 Dave in the San Jose, California. Hi, Jim. How are you? Hi. Fine, thank you. And your guest name? Joe poised POI ST Joe post. Hi, mister poised. Yeah, I heard you talking about asteroids, and I want to point out something that I saw when I was 12 in 1966. I was laying out in the backyard looking at the sky in this 50 mile across. Space rock, about 3000 miles away from earth, went from one side of the sky to the next, that fast. And it took up a 6th of the sky, and my first thought was not a 6th of the sky. There has been nothing of that nature that, I mean, something that was took up a 6 to the sky, the moon doesn't take it to 6 to the sky. I thought, and well, whatever. We're glad to hear that you did. That would have of course been the lead headline across the entire world for that century. But anyway, good to know you saw something that took up a 6th of the sky when the moon takes up maybe, I don't know, two or 3% of the sky. Okay. One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6. Joe poised to what extent do you see our return to space being a private sector activity? So I think this is a shared now that NASA is moving into where they have commercialized a lot of the Leo, the low earth orbit launch mechanisms. And as we look at the now the whole lunar system and this whole Artemis program, there is a mix in public and private adventures and what we're doing. If there's things that are always going to be if there's one of a kind or there's a technology that's one of a kind NASA typically explores that themselves. If there's things that we've done or we're just advancing maybe something like the outpost or something like an International Space Station, like they've done it, they've explored it. Now those are the types of things that we can turn to commercialization because there's a business for it. Exactly. Where is a profit motive there? Yes. Yeah. This is one that I've always wondered about. And I go back a few years, I can recall the first musings about going into space and going into orbit and that in order to create artificial gravity, we would create sort of spoked wheels in orbit and the wheel would turn, creating artificial gravity. We have learned since, of course, on extended space missions aboard the International Space Station. That bone density suffers from prolonged weightlessness and astronaut health appears to suffer. And I always thought, well, way back when you had figured out how to make artificial gravity, just use a space station that turns like the spokes on a wheel. Whatever happened to that notion, I don't believe I have an answer to that and I'm not sure if I even remember that technology. Yeah, well, you've got to be a geezer like me, but I mean, that was the initial way back when Wernher von Braun was first amusing about what we can do. Now that we have these old German V two rockets and it won't be long before we'll be able to put something that will actually be in orbit around the earth. Pre Sputnik and always the space stations where these wheels and they had a hub and they had went out and people lived out in the wheel part and they had artificial gravity. And we need that. And goodness knows that's no big trick. I just was curious. I didn't know if you had an answer or not. I don't think there is an answer. I think somebody is stupid. I agree. I don't think there is, I mean, like everything else is NASA explorers. You can either be something that is not cost effective or something beyond that would not be the benefits aren't necessarily going to outweigh what the cost are or the advancement of the technology. Maybe, or maybe NASA is stupid, which is my opinion in this particular case. So dead astronauts, I'm not sure how you judge the cost efficiency of that. Anyway, for whatever, we'll come back and talk some more. Joe pois from SAIC, the technology firm, one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo. The Artemis unmanned mission. Temporarily scrubbed, they try again on Friday back in

NASA Mike serafin Daryl nail Joe post Clifford Joe Jimbo Artemis SAIC California Berkeley International Space Station San Jose Dave Jim Wernher von Braun Joe pois
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

07:33 min | 2 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"In Berlin and you've got a car, where would you go? It's a tough tough choice. If I would go eastward or north, but as we are talking to fight the Bavarian stereotype, which I love, I love the very end. Please don't get me wrong. I love them dearly. But I would have north because I have to show them the beautiful Baltic coast. Favorite place ever is rugen island, the biggest island of Germany, and it has the nicest, beautiful, white, sand beaches, and it's actually the place where we dip into the sea and its refreshing yet. Yes, the sun is burning, but you are not roasted when you lie on that beach, and it's beautiful thatched houses, and it's really, really particularly beautiful. Don't you have these charming Victorian wind guards on the beach where you can sit there and there's this chair with a big windshield above you. Yes, yes, those beautiful that we call, yes. It's beautiful. You can be in a miserable Baltic wind storm on the beautiful white sandy beach and in the shelter of this sunbathing chair with a wind with the window. And there are those beautiful baths that go back when tourism basically was then invented by the emperor, the German emperor, brought those first like around 1900, that's when they started to become big among the people of Berlin that for a father fashionable and fancy outing went up there so you have those beautiful wooden bridges, wooden carved houses. And a lot of us visit Berlin surprisingly from a cruise ship in the north. What is the cruise port in the north? And people, they've got the train actually waiting for the cruise ship and then you sit on that train for I think nearly three hours to get into Berlin and then you have 6 or 7 hours in Berlin and you take the three hour train ride back to your cruise ship. That's a lot of train travel for one day in Berlin, but if all you have is a day and you've always wanted to see Berlin, it works. I spent the day environment munda deciding to not go on that long train ride. And I really enjoyed varna munda because you had that sort of a Coney Island of the north coast of Germany, and it was nice. You got two days with a friend in Berlin, where are you going to take it? All right, one day I think I would go to Leipzig, which is kind of like southwest of Berlin, maybe one and a half hours max, I think, on a train. And it is a very amazing city. It's very young. Great student population as artsy. So not as highbrow, but there's a lot of people. It's kind of still affordable, so a lot of artists are there and they even have like the noir led to a shield like a kind of a new school of art being there and being actually quite prominent. I think it's one of the artists that's on the international market, one of those guys that are really earning well with their art. So it's full of art and it's full of life, great museums there. And topology also Leipzig is very important for German history and recent German history for being the city where basically in the whole run up of the fall of the wall like 1989 in the summer where people are more and more visually like obviously a discontent with their East German regime, they took to the streets and marched every Monday and they really started a huge happening, so like we saw these images where like tens of thousands of people are lining the streets of Leipzig saying go home commies, you know, we had enough. We want to travel. We want freedom. So they call it still held and stud. City of heroes. It's kind of a bit of a pompous title, but no, there's some truth in it because people were shaking off their fear of being spied upon or being put in prison. They said, listen, we had enough. It's like in prog. You know, jangled a key change go home and that's really what life tickets on about and you can really go on a tour there and really explore this history. Leipzig, when I was in Leipzig, I was impressed by the reality that if you're going to bring down the wall and win your freedom, do it during the day and when there is media present because Berlin got all the media and all the images, but Leipzig got the short end of that deal because it wasn't as well documented for the media. But when you go to Leipzig, you see it really was a leader in bringing down the wall in an inspirational way. Also, when you're in Leipzig, you can see the amazing Stasi museum about the secret police. Oh, that's very powerful. And I do want to remind people that all of these sites that we're talking about are easy access from Berlin because of Germany's wonderful transportation system. And let's just add briefly on Leipzig. Let's not forget it's a musical city, you know? That's right. The likes of Bach. So if you're a bark fan, that goes away. Our guides to what you can find in Germany just beyond Berlin are holger Zimmer and Carolina marburger who live in Berlin and Fabian Ruger, who was raised in Berlin, but now lives just a little up the coast from Portland, Maine. We have web links to our guests in the weekly travel with Rick Steves show notes. You'll find that at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. By the way, our conversation was recorded pre-pandemic. Our phone is 877-333-7425 and Richards calling from Denver. Thanks Richard. Hi Rick. Hey, how are you doing? Very good, thanks very good. Do you have a comment to our question for our guidance? With Dresden are there museums or sites to see about the firebombing? With the Baltic Sea, are there sites that one could look at? I'm not positive on the geography, but was there testing up in that area with the V one V two program? Could we look at Dresden or potential V one V two sites for context? There is a on the island of there is an actual museum to the production of the V two because that was where the main experimentation and the first production facility was and so today there is a very good historical documentation on site that gives the whole story of von Braun and the rocket engineers up there. Okay, so Wernher von Braun and the V two V production site in Panama. And that was a missile that could drop a bomb. That was a big deal. It was used against and now in the museum rugen island up in the north coast, right? Even though the allied bombing of Jerusalem is so crucial, yet in the city they focus more on the beauty of the baroque era. But a little bit outside of the military history museum, which is the most outstanding military history museum I know. It's a bit different from the average one because it does focus on a cultural history of the war, so it does involve a critical look at what war and weapons do. They will have the V two and everything that is involved actually on site and it's done so brilliantly I recommend any tour you can get in there. It is vast and spectacular. It's really hard to do all of it, but it's an incredible site. So it's one of the my favorite museums when it comes to World War II. Outside of Dresden. Just in its interest and it's just not in the heart of the city. And what is the name of the museum? The military history museum. All right. Hogar, anything to add about World War II sightseeing in these cities. I'm not really World War II sides, but what comes to mind right at the coast is also on rugen is this amazing huge what is it 1.5 miles or so block of concrete and it basically was the idea that the Nazis had for mass tourism. So they built a scene pictures of that. A fascist nightmare. It's like everybody could have walk in their jackboots up here and lay on the beach for 1.2 hours and then you're going to go back home and read that kind of thing. So really organized early masters and nowadays is all going to be transferred into condominiums and fantasies. I've just been there in a couple of weeks ago and it's quite an amazing building because you really see the changes and the transitions. Physically it's perhaps the biggest surviving piece of Nazi architecture. That's amazing. Richard,

Berlin Leipzig rugen island Germany Coney Island of the north coas Baltic Sea white sandy beach Stasi museum Rick Steves holger Zimmer Carolina marburger Fabian Ruger Dresden Wernher von Braun Richards Maine Portland Rick Denver Richard
"wernher von braun" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

History Unplugged Podcast

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on History Unplugged Podcast

"Cars look the same. All of those Jags and Ferraris and Seattle and Asuka's, they kind of all look the same. They kind of have that double bow side profile with a kind of vestigial fender over the front or kind of an integrated with a kind of echo of the cycle fender in front and then another fender and the rear. And they also sort of look the same. The one that didn't look the same was the Mercedes going, but that was like for the time reverse engineered from alien craft. So I sort of reject the idea that everything was more distinctive than it is now. There's a lot of commonality and a lot of style and a lot of conformism for kind of the same reasons we talked about before, which were everybody is trying to one up everybody else and people are stealing designs from other people. And there's just a lot of crossover and commonality. But it is true now that designers have far more restriction in terms of what they can do. And ironically, it leads to more creativity, not less. So I might be, that might be contrarian take and different point of view. But I think there are people doing great work now within even more rigid confines than existed in the immediate pre with pro swore era. One vehicle that you focus in episode on that is unquestionably unique is the lunar rover. And I love the symbolism of it because during the hottest points of the space race, when 4% of the U.S. GDP is spent on NASA, the cost to get something to orbit is something like 20 to $50,000 per pound. So anything that we send to the moon that is not absolutely mission critical on life support is so important and so symbolic and laden with me like the American flag that is as important as what you find in a burial tomb for an Egyptian pharaoh. What do we send to the moon? We sent a big car. It's one of the most incredible development stories for anybody who's interesting in cars or the space program or just human achievement in general. Yeah, we got to get a car to the wound. How do we do it? It's such an American idea. And what's so funny about it is the idea wasn't, you know, it's such an American sort of manifest destiny idea, but it was dreamed up by Wernher von Braun, who was sort of spirited out of the guy wrote a great book about it called across the airless wilds. A guy named Earl swift wrote a great book about the development of the lunar rovers that went up on Apollo 1516 and 17. A chronicles everything, and he talks to some of the people at Huntsville who were pivotal in its development. And at first, the plan was to send two lunar modules up there. One for the astronauts and one for the vehicle. The vehicle being so important to extend the range of exploration. Because astronauts could only get so far on foot. So to put them in a car would allow them to really interrogate the service of the moon, bring back samples from a wide range of areas and climb over stuff. And it was more important. I mean, Jerry Seinfeld has that great joke about isn't enough to go to the moon. We have to drive around there. We kind of did have to drive around there in order to find out what the moon was made of, find out to bring samples back and to see what we were dealing with. But the design evolution was incredible. It started as a 6 wheel concept, and then with that budget cut that went from two learner modules to one lunar module meant that the thing would have to fit inside the thing that carry the astronauts to the surface itself. So they had to find space in the belly. And they went down to four wheels. And I think part of what and swift makes this point. I think part of what led to GM getting that contract is that vehicle looked most like the car. Most reassuringly like a car of any of the other designs. You know, when you're dealing with those distances and all that untested technology, you want something that feels more familiar, you know? And I think that that was one of the psychological impetuses behind going with that GM design that might not look like a car to us, but the rival proposals were totally crazy. There was like one that looked like a space spider. It had these kind of floppy wheels that were like flower pots turned on their sides. But the genius of the GM design was not only that was kind of like, but also those wheels that were able to cope with that terrain. They were like piano wire piano wire mesh with chevrons, like composite chevrons, sort of sewn into them, retraction. Really, really cool design. Well, another thing that you touch on and this has been a large part of the argument of automobile design over the last century is performance versus safety and you mentioned this in episodes on the Chevy corvair and the minivan and I'm a proud maneuver on driver. Oh, excellent. It's a very functional with children. I thought, you know, I'm going to get over myself. I'm not going to pretend I'm too cool for school. A while ago I had a guest who compared the age of discovery to NASA's missions. And interestingly, he argued that NASA was too safety conscious that we're missing out on discoveries because frontier discovery is inherently dangerous. And that was understood in the age of discovery. And we sort of lost that human spirit of doing so and now that same argument doesn't apply to mass transportation because if I'm driving my kids to Chick-fil-A, I'm not really thinking about being like Vasco da Gama or Ferdinand Magellan. I just want no one to die. So the considerations are different. But if I'm a Playboy on the Italian Riviera with my ascot or scarf with my supermodel girlfriend, whatever, then the considerations are different. So how have you seen that tension played out in different vehicles? Hey everyone, Scott here. One more brief word from our sponsors. Well, I think, yeah, vehicles used to be certainly in terms of the minivan and we talk about this in the corvair episode. They used to be, you know, agents of freedom and adventure. And risk and that kind of that appetite for that really died off. And the symbolic meaning of cars changed from adventure vehicles to safety vehicles and things that protected our families, particularly in the case of the minivan. I think that point is true about NASA. But when Gus Grissom and those two other astronauts died in that test fire, I think that was a pivotal moment in NASA's sort of risk appetite. And Gus Grissom was an American hero and for him to die in a training exercise. I think was a lot for the American public to take. And I think some of that risk aversion is tied to the fact that we don't want to see our heroes die. And we don't see anybody die. We want to protect our families. And that sort of tradeoff started to really move towards safety away from risk and adventure and freedom. And I think corvair is a great exemplar of that corvair really has this reputation for kicking off a safety crisis in American automobile making. And beneath all that beneath.

Earl swift NASA Ferraris Asuka GM Wernher von Braun Seattle Jerry Seinfeld Huntsville U.S. corvair Gus Grissom Ferdinand Magellan Chevy Vasco da Gama Scott
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Past Gas

Past Gas

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Past Gas

"Okay, say you have a cabin. And a really good dog. And you get up every morning, each shop would. You hang out with your dog, is that obscurity? Yeah. Yeah, that sounds great. I think you have to be involved in something kind of public, and then like a YouTube channel. Then move away from the public eye. Like YouTube channel. Obscured. So say you had a YouTube channel. Yes. And then you move to the Woods next to a nice Lake. This is really specific. And then you live like Nick cage and pig. Yeah, 'cause he was a famous chef in that and he had the spotlight for a while. And then he didn't want to be in he wanted to be obscured from the public eye. Yeah, I'm gonna live in obscurity one day. Let us know your address whenever, for sure. You can come by. Let us know that GPS coordinates because I know that there won't have an address. We'll make a video out of it. Yeah, you're on the channel. For sure, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Finding my long lost boss. Wait, your roommates with Rivers Cuomo and you guys are making an album? And it's gonna have Hurley from lost on the cover. Degner, meanwhile, would meet his end much sooner than kaden. Degner was a changed man after his fiery crash in 63, quote he lost his glow sense of humor, everything, said teammate, Jim Redman. Even when you return to the track, people close to him say a dark depression and washed over him. Degeneres personal relationships also began to deteriorate. Many friends said he pushed them out or cut them off. Degner even fell out with Paul Petrie, the friend who had risked his freedom by helping smuggle Degeneres family to the west. So I guess that's answers that question how they got to West Germany. As time went on, degner is reliance on morphine and other medications took an extreme mental and physical toll. His family says he began to experience delusions and paranoia. When he died in 1983 at the age of only 51, rumors quickly circulated that he had committed suicide or may have even been murdered by the East German Stasi after a decades long quest for revenge, but the most believable version of events that he died of heart failure from ill health. We can feel for danger's plight, but it's hard to arouse much sympathy for caden and all of this, given his status as an ex Nazi engineer. We mentioned Wernher von Braun earlier. According to writer max oxley's book, stealing speed, the biggest spy scandal in motor sports history, kaden had an opportunity to join the celebrity scientist state side after the war, but declined. Probably part of operation paper clip. 100%. Bernard von Braun was a Nazi war criminal, and we put him on TV. Yes. Caden's life could have easily taken a very different path. Both men reflect how complicated life was for Germans during and after World War II. Complicated is a good descriptor of that stuff. But I don't want to be seen. That's also an easy way to say, oh, it's complicated. It's a very easy way to excuse things, and I'm not excusing it. You know? A lot of these guys were spared. They were spared the hangman's noose by things like operation paper clip, or as we just read in this episode, the Soviets did the same thing. They had their own program saving these Nazi scientists. Yeah, we did. The USSR and the United States fought over the Nazis. They were chases and races to get to these scientists first before the other side got to them. And these guys, they get a new job and a new country and a new territory under new leadership and try their best to forget what they did in the past. And maybe try to make peace with it in some way, but it's not excusing it. But at least when it comes to Ernst degner, his legacy is that he took things into his own hands. You know, one of my favorite earnest movie is Ernst jumps over the iron curtain. Mine is Ernest scared stupid. That's a really good one with the tree and the leprechauns in it or something. Just like little trolls and then they don't like milk so they feel super full of milk. Oh, yeah. All right, we've got some listener mail, James, do you want to hit that? Hey guys, I just wanted to start off by saying how much I love this show and all the other media donut media makes. You guys brighten up my Monday every week. I wanted to chime in on what the yugos equivalent today would be. I think at around $14,500, the Mitsubishi mirage is pretty close. It's cheap and kind of cheaply made car that gets good mileage and that's about it. Thanks for all the great stuff you guys. I can't wait for the next high low. Steven. Space. Space coast coast to coast. Thanks, Stephen. That is a pretty good, pretty analysis car, I guess. I drove one on a race track. When? Driver. Oh yeah, how was it? Terrible. It's a three cylinder. It was the worst car that I could have. Well, all Stephen, you'll be happy to know that by the time this airs, I think the first video in a three part series we're putting V8s in the three 50 Z's, and yeah, we're right. We're currently in the throes of it. We've started both of our motors. I cut a hole in the bottom of high car and accident. We're putting on angle kits, Nolan's car. Is it on the ground right now? Not yet. Almost on the ground should be on the ground Monday. Hopefully, mine will be too, because we've got to go to the dino Tuesday, and then 6 days from when we're recording this, we're going to drag racing, and yeah, when is the alignment guy coming? I don't know, man. We'll talk about it. We definitely have to get a photo of both of you guys in front of your cars with your arms crossed. For sure. For sure. Classic drag race photo. Hit us up at pasca donut media dot com. We'd love to hear from you, hey. Thank you very much for listening to this episode. This was a really fun one. I don't know about fun. It was really interesting. Great story. I'm going to check out fun. Follow the boys at Joji Weber at James pumphrey follow me at Nolan J Sykes. Subscribe to the podcast, tell your friends about it. Leave us a review. That's how these things work. That's right. Stay in touch. Support our sponsors. And if you want to make a podcast, you still didn't make one. It's pretty easy. All you need is like microphone. Why is this why is this your sign off now? I want to encourage people to do things. Okay. I don't want to just say, hey, take care or be kind or I love you. I want to encourage our audience.

Degner YouTube Nick cage kaden Degeneres Jim Redman Paul Petrie degner East German Stasi max oxley Bernard von Braun Rivers Cuomo Ernst degner Wernher von Braun West Germany Hurley caden Caden paranoia
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

08:08 min | 6 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"This month of will manica is brought to you by LinkedIn. What does it mean to you to be professional? On LinkedIn, important conversations are happening around what that word means and how it's changing as we rethink when, where and how we work. LinkedIn members are talking about things like needing more flexibility and taking time away from work to focus on family or mental health. Those things should not stunt career development and growth. Instead, the workplace will be better when we show up on our own terms. Professional is ours to define and our authentic selves are our professional selves. Post your truth, show the world the authentic professional you and join the conversations redefining professional on LinkedIn. LinkedIn. Welcome, professionals. Hey listeners, it's Jenny with another podcast, I think you'll love. TED Talks daily. Every weekday you'll hear new ideas on every topic imaginable from artificial intelligence to how the war in Ukraine can change everything. One episode in particular that I thought you'd really like is the recent talk from creator comedian and actress Lilly Singh. Lily gets into how women and girls are conditioned to believe success is a seat at the table. When really, we should build a better table. She's hilarious, and not only shares intimate experiences from her career, but also offers ways we can build a more inclusive society. Where girls are encouraged and empowered to do great things. Stick around to hear part of her talk or head over to ted-talks daily. From the Ted audio collective, wherever you listen. Hello, from wonder media network. I'm Michelle Monaghan. And this is will manica. This month we're highlighting innovators from inventors to activists who explored in forged new paths that lead us to where we are today. Today, we're telling the story of a woman whose unique contributions to the space age were almost erased from history. A newspaper refused to publish an obituary her son had written because they couldn't verify any of the information. She was later dubbed the best kept secret in the space race. Please welcome Mary Sherman Morgan. Mary Sherman was born in the small town of ray, North Dakota, on November 4th, 1921. She came from a large farming family and spent her childhood immersed in farmyard chores. Her parents didn't send her to school until she was 9 when the local district forced the family to comply. The district gave young Mary a horse as transport to and from the schoolhouse. Her late start in formal education didn't seem to hold her back. She graduated high school as the valedictorian in 1939. Mary had an impressive affinity for chemistry, which earned her a place it might not state university as a chemistry major. When World War II broke out, Mary left her degree unfinished and went to work in a munitions factory as a chemical analyst, producing explosives for the military. After the war, she was hired by North American aviation in California. She was the only woman out of 900 engineers. In 1951, she married a fellow engineer, George Morgan, and became Mary Sherman Morgan. 6 years later, on October 4th, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite into space. Sputnik one. Its report from man's farthest frontier, the radio signal transmitted by the Soviet Sputnik, the first man-made satellite as it passed over New York earlier today. The satellite may have been the size of a beach ball, but it had a monumental impact on politics, science, and technology. As NASA said, it marked the start of the space age in the U.S., USSR, space race. Up until that point, the U.S. Military's efforts to design a competitive orbital space rocket weren't working out. They hired Mary's company to create a powerful rocket fuel. Mary was named the technical lead of the project. Her tireless work resulted in high dine, the rocket fuel used for the first stage of America's first successful satellite launch, explorer one on January 31st, 1958. Explore one later detected the van Allen radiation belts surrounding earth, making it the first scientific discovery made in space. Mary retired from work after the arrival of her second child. She passed away from emphysema in 2004. The press coverage of explorer one from the time is rich with photographs of Wernher von Braun, who was widely celebrated as the inventor of the rocket that launched the first U.S. satellite. Even though his rocket never would have taken off without Mary's hydyne fuel, her work was little known in unrecognized for many years. This was, in part, caused by the secrecy of the program, but also due to Mary's own intense privacy. She intentionally eschewed the fame she could have had, said her son, in biographer, George Morgan, who has been on a mission since his mother's death to bring back her story from oblivion. Thanks to his persistence on getting her name out there, Mary Sherman Morgan has come to be known as the inventive rocket scientist she was. For more information in pictures of some of the work we're talking about, find us on Facebook and Instagram at will manica, podcast, and special thanks to Jenny and Liz caplan for inviting me to guest host. Talk to you tomorrow. You see, my goal was always a seat at the table. It's what women are conditioned to believe success is. And when the chair doesn't fit when it doesn't reach the table when it's wobbly when it's full of splinters, we don't have the luxury of fixing it or finding another one. But we try anyways. We take on that responsibility and we shoulder that burden. Now, I've been fortunate enough to sit at the few seats at a few different tables, and what I've learned is when you get to see trying to fix the seat, won't fix the problem. Why? Because the table was never built for us in the first place. The solution, build better tables. So, allow me to be your very own Ikea manual. I would like to present to you a set of guidelines. I very eloquently call how to build a table that doesn't suck. I've been told in very literal. Now, right off the bat, let me tell you, this assembly is going to take more than one person or group of people. It's going to take everyone. Are you ready? Should we dive in? Let's do it. Up first, don't weaponize gratitude? Now, don't get me wrong. Gratitude is a great word. It's nice. It's fluffy, a solid 11 points in Scrabble. However, let's be clear. Although gratitude fuels warm and fuzzy, it's not a form of currency. Women are assigned 10% more work and spend more time on unrewarded, unrecognized and non promotable tasks. Basically what this means is all the things men don't want to do are being handed to women. And a lot of those things largely include things that advance inclusivity, equity, and diversity in the workplace. So hear me when I say, a woman shouldn't be grateful to sit.

Mary Sherman Morgan LinkedIn Mary George Morgan Lilly Singh Michelle Monaghan Jenny Soviet Union North American aviation Ukraine Lily U.S. TED ted North Dakota Wernher von Braun Liz caplan ray U.S. Military emphysema
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"And so it's cognate with scissors, schism, skin, skin, is that which divides you from the world. Shit, or scat, is that which has been divided from you. Into the world. And so there's this cognate between science and shit or science and cutting with the whole idea being that you're dividing into parts, classifying. It's the taxonomic impulse. And to know is to know where something belongs to divide it into its parts and put it in its proper place. And that taxonomic impulse can be very static, it's actually one of the things that Darwin had to overcome in recognizing evolution that the taxonomies are in motion, but it also can lead to a kind of myopia that my job is done when I've classified something. Is this bird an X and Y or a Z? And that again can be, it can be ideological or it can not be. But scientists are humans, humans, and they're fitting in with a world with a world practice. And that's limiting. It's kind of inevitable. It's unavoidable. It's hard to be if not impossible. Out of the world that we're walking in. And it's fascinating because I think ideologies also have an impulse towards forming taxonomies. And there is so just being at MIT, I've gotten to learn about this character named Jeffrey Epstein. I didn't know who this was until all the news broke out and so on. And it started to wonder how did all these people at MIT that admire would hang out with this person? Just lightly. Just have conversations. I don't mean any of the bigger things, but even just basic conversations. And I think this has to do. You said scientists are widget builders and taxonomies. I think there's power in somebody like the Nazi regime or like a Jeffrey Epstein, just being excited about your widgets. And making you feel like the widget serves a greater purpose in the world. And so it's not like, you know, sometimes people say scientists want to make money and they have a big kind of ideological drive behind it. I think there's just nice one, the widget. You like building anyway. Somehow somebody convinces you some charismatic person that this widget is actually has a grander purpose. And you don't almost feel think about the negative or whether it's positive, just the fact that it's grand is a ready super exciting. Yeah. Yeah, I think that's right. I think that's the story of Wernher von Braun, you know, in the fascination with rockets and this will, you know, in large something in the world and here he is, he's an SS officer. He's working around slave labor. And then, but his rocket then gets compressed into the western world or the American world and basically launches us to the moon and we forget about the sauce how the sausage was made. Originally. Well, can you talk about him a little bit more because he's such a fascinating character? Because he was a Nazi, but it was also an American and it had such a grand impact on both. And there's this uncomfortable fact that he's, you know, one of the central figures they gave birth to the American space exploration efforts. Yeah, he's an interesting figure fascinated in a kind of a tunnel vision way with space flight. He meets these beautiful rockets already beginning in the 20s, early 30s. Ends up for a while at Panama using slave labor to build V two engines and so forth like that. And I remember going to panaman where people.

Jeffrey Epstein MIT myopia Darwin Wernher von Braun SS Panama
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"And so it's cognate with scissors, schism, skin, skin, is that which divides you from the world. Shit, or scat, is that which has been divided from you. Into the world. And so there's this cognate between science and shit or science and cutting with the whole idea being that you're dividing into parts, classifying. It's the taxonomic impulse. And to know is to know where something belongs to divide it into its parts and put it in its proper place. And that taxonomic impulse can be very static, it's actually one of the things that Darwin had to overcome in recognizing evolution that the taxonomies are in motion, but it also can lead to a kind of myopia that my job is done when I've classified something. Is this bird an X and Y or a Z? And that again can be, it can be ideological or it can not be. But scientists are humans, humans, and they're fitting in with a world with a world practice. And that's limiting. It's kind of inevitable. It's unavoidable. It's hard to be if not impossible. Out of the world that we're walking in. And it's fascinating because I think ideologies also have an impulse towards forming taxonomies. And there is so just being at MIT, I've gotten to learn about this character named Jeffrey Epstein. I didn't know who this was until all the news broke out and so on. And it started to wonder how did all these people at MIT that admire would hang out with this person? Just lightly. Just have conversations. I don't mean any of the bigger things, but even just basic conversations. And I think this has to do. You said scientists are widget builders and taxonomies. I think there's power in somebody like the Nazi regime or like a Jeffrey Epstein, just being excited about your widgets. And making you feel like the widget serves a greater purpose in the world. And so it's not like, you know, sometimes people say scientists want to make money and they have a big kind of ideological drive behind it. I think there's just nice one, the widget. You like building anyway. Somehow somebody convinces you some charismatic person that this widget is actually has a grander purpose. And you don't almost feel think about the negative or whether it's positive, just the fact that it's grand is a ready super exciting. Yeah. Yeah, I think that's right. I think that's the story of Wernher von Braun, you know, in the fascination with rockets and this will, you know, in large something in the world and here he is, he's an SS officer. He's working around slave labor. And then, but his rocket then gets compressed into the western world or the American world and basically launches us to the moon and we forget about the sauce how the sausage was made. Originally. Well, can you talk about him a little bit more because he's such a fascinating character? Because he was a Nazi, but it was also an American and it had such a grand impact on both. And there's this uncomfortable fact that he's, you know, one of the central figures they gave birth to the American space exploration efforts. Yeah, he's an interesting figure fascinated in a kind of a tunnel vision way with space flight. He meets these beautiful rockets already beginning in the 20s, early 30s. Ends up for a while at Panama using slave labor to build V two engines and so forth like that. And I remember going to panaman where people.

Jeffrey Epstein MIT myopia Darwin Wernher von Braun SS Panama
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

06:49 min | 8 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"So I guess as we start to wind down here, what does it all mean, Isaac? What is the overall I guess kind of endgame for you and for what you've kind of figured out after doing all this research and writing, both of these books on these subjects. It's hard to say I wish I had better advice, I guess. For me, it really makes me question spirituality, the nature of reality and all these things. But it's also maddening at the same time because, you know, there's really no way of knowing for sure what the true sort of faith should be. I find myself leaning towards my Christian roots, but at the same time I see a lot of issues and I read a lot about recently about Buddhism. There's a thing called Christ consciousness. I'm an Orthodox Christian and it's like a very sort of old school traditional Christian viewpoint. There's a guy father seraphim rose who wrote a whole book about the alien invasion and how it's going to be a luciferian sort of takeover, which I again highly recommend that one. But he more or less is of the camp that, no, you entertain any kind of other spirituality. It's all a path to hell. So it's kind of a tough spot to be in because I want to keep an open mind, but like Carl Sagan said, you know, keep an open mind, but don't let your brains fall out. It's hard to know. I mean, it really is. It's really difficult. So why would they say that though that all was what we just said that all old rose lead to hell or whatever it was? Yeah, father rose, he's of the monk or he was a monk, and he was of the camp that if you're not an Orthodox Christian that you're adhering to a false teaching, gotcha. I mean, he was very hardcore about it. I'm not God. I clearly don't know what. And this is where I have a problem is I have a hard time believing that a God who loves us would condemn us to hell for something that we think we're doing the right thing. I think George Carlin had a really good bit about God, you know? He's like, he said, well, don't do this, or you go to hell, don't do that. You're going to hell, but don't forget, I love you, you know? Yeah, exactly. So I don't know. I wish I could be a better source of what to do with this information right now. I'm just sort of compiling it and presenting it and letting people make their own path of what they want to do with it. Do you think that some of this stuff will start becoming more apparent sooner than later or is it a long-term type of a plan? If I was to put a timeline on it, I'd say 5 to ten years, no later than another 20 years. Because 2045 is when we hit the singularity, that is when technology and artificial intelligence will surpass man's intelligence and I believe by then we are going to be in for a real problem. So how do you know that that's the date for the singularity? So ray kurzweil, he's written several books on this topic. And using Moore's Law, which says that the number of transistors you can fit on a chip doubles every two years, the idea is presented a quantum computing. They've kept it pretty much on track from what I understand according to this exponential curve. And you know, we kind of all experienced. I don't know if you ever get into cryptos, but man. Yeah. I was starting to feel really old when I try to figure out how to do some of this stuff, but I think I'm working with it right now as a matter of fact. Crypto's NFTs and what sort of thing. You know, it's amazing to me. I remember, gosh, this was before the new millennium, so probably 98. I used to listen to Art Bell and coast to coast radio, constantly. You've been on after dark and on dark matter and all that sort of stuff, you know, kind of the legacy of art lives on. But he was talking about how the theories were that very soon in the near future, you would have a device that could have every movie and every song and every TV show ever on a device that's the palm of your hand. And this is back when still, if you went on an airplane, you would take a box of CDs with you and your DVDs with you and lo and behold, it was right as we look at our cell phones, not even 20 odd years later. So it doesn't surprise me when you say 20 years from now that the computer intelligence will outweigh man's intelligence and like you said, that's where the problems start. Yeah, definitely. And 2001 a space Odyssey, they had iPads on there. You know, that's back in 68. Yeah. And Arthur C. Clarke, who he wrote that whole sequence of space Odyssey books, when you look at the scientists and what they end up creating, like, for instance, Wernher von Braun, Jack Parsons, they grew up reading comic books, the pulp magazines talking about how these cartoons about man getting to the moon. And that's what inspired them and they said, you know what? We're going to do this in real life. And a lot. So a lot of times when we watch these science fiction movies, you've got to understand that's motivating some of these scientists out there, you know, so like the matrix, that influence some ten year old back in 1999 who's now 30 writing the code and put us in the metaverse, you know? When I met George Lucas years ago and I said, does it blow your mind that the things that you basically created in your movies are now coming true? And he said, the things that created my movies, I read about in comic books, 30 years prior to that. Wow. No, to think about it. You know, it's like the stuff that he read in comic books is what he manifested into his movies that is now those movies are now coming to life. So it's very interesting when you think about all of this and some of it I believe a 1000%, some of it, you never know what's gonna happen, but either way, it's a very interesting food for thought and very well researched and well written by you Isaac. Thank you. Appreciate it man. That's a big compliment coming from you. Thank you. Well, I'm sure in 6 to 8 months we'll have something else to discuss. Along all this stuff, unfortunately we will. Exactly. It's always great to have you, man. And like I said, it's very much something to think about. Very terrifying in a lot of ways as well. But something we should all keep our minds open to because you never know when it's going to sneak up on us. Most definitely, man. Yeah, that's kind of all I petitioned for is understand that this could be a possible scenario do the right thing for you and your family. That's kind of what I leave people with because I certainly didn't get into this to be a life coach or for people to follow me and all that kind of stuff because everyone's got their own life to live. Right. Well, thanks, man. I appreciate it and we'll talk to you again talk again soon. Cheers, thank you. Thank you..

seraphim rose Isaac Carl Sagan George Carlin ray kurzweil Jack Parsons rose Moore Wernher von Braun Arthur C. Clarke George Lucas
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Discussions of Truth

Discussions of Truth

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Discussions of Truth

"My father's the U.S. Army officer. And I don't want to put America in a bad light. I'm a patriot, but I do think it's important to study history and to get it right and to understand what we did. I will say in defense of the folks that made the deal on the ground, I'm very slow to second guess the decision because I think without Wernher von Braun and the 200 rocket scientists that came to the United States, I'm not sure we would have won the Cold War. It's unknowable. You just can't come to a conclusion like that. But we had because we had that rocket team. We had a ten year head start in projecting power across continents. And that became invaluable in assured mutual destruction and the ability to run the Russians out of money and win the Cold War. So it's very difficult to try and second guess something 70 years later. Decisions that were made on the ground. What is clear is that this was a decision that was made at pretty high levels. It wasn't, it wasn't a lieutenant colonel or a major at army CIC. This involved a lot more people a lot higher up. You mentioned Alan dulles and dulles, of course, the dullest brothers were certainly and I'm not sure if it was Allen, which one of them were involved in the official JFK report. There's an airport named after a dollar. I'm not sure which talk a little bit about what you've discovered in regards to his involvement in this story. Well, Allen dulles is the one that we were most principally concerned with. He was the head of OSS, the office of special investigations of the United States. That is the precursor to what became the CIA, the Central Intelligence Agency. So he was the head of OSS in Bern, Switzerland during the war. It was already known that he was a little sort of cavalier. And I don't want to say he was a self promoter, but he entered into peace negotiations with the Germans with what we described as incomplete authorization from his higher ops. So he was a bit of a cowboy trying to end the war. I mean, for good purposes, but what really became clear about Alan dulles is he and his brother had been law firm partners before the war. Very highly ranked had lots of international lots of international clients and had a very strong interest in the war ending a certain way. That is, in the war ending with a strong Germany, not only that could act as a bulwark against the Soviet Union in the geopolitical sense, but a very strong Germany in a way that would benefit clients. There were not surprising. I mean, the world was beginning to globalize. There's nothing nefarious about having a lot of companies that were doing business in Germany and the United States, even with overlapping boards. But the dullest brothers were all in the middle of all of that. And what I would describe is very intriguing ways. And then his role in OSS and his subsequent role as head of the CIA just positioned him perfectly to know about and to have sort of put his imprimatur on deals like this. I don't think anything happened by way of recruiting intelligence assets without Alan dulles knowing about it. And dean, have you uncovered a direct link to dulles involvement in this particular cover up with handler? So I can't say, no, nothing that would hold up in court..

Alan dulles United States Wernher von Braun OSS CIA U.S. Army Allen dulles office of special investigatio dulles Bern Germany Allen Switzerland Soviet Union dean
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Discussions of Truth

Discussions of Truth

05:29 min | 11 months ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Discussions of Truth

"Is the same Dale garvey the major lieutenant colonel later in army CIC is on the documents of Hans kamler. That's why we think that's a very strong parallel case. And there are a couple others just like it. What was the location in South America that he was taken? So Kyle's Barbie to Bolivia. But there's an interesting and then people moved around after that. There was something called the rat line that got folks a lot of times innocent people, but a lot of times hardened Nazis from Germany or Eastern Europe through the Alps into Italy at which point they were given false papers, new identities and took steamers down to South America. And they were in Argentina, Bolivia, other South American countries that had been run up to that point by right wing dictators that were welcoming these folks. And there's a 1953 CIA report now declassified that we found that showed the CIA was scared to death about a fourth Reich and a resurgence Nazi regime because of the presence of so many Germans, tens of thousands in South America, the German villages and towns, German Chamber of Commerce, lots of scientists, lots of treasure, a great ware with all down there. Everybody speaking German. It was it was like the report that CIA report reads like a forearm fire or something. Dean, there's something that my listeners will be attuned to, and this is an operation by the U.S. government to bring this technology stateside. I think as a result of this developing clash with Russia, operation paper clip is that phrase ring a bell with you and how is it relevant to your work and this book? Sure. There is a book called operation paper clip by Andy Jacobson where she talks about some of the larger patterns of the U.S. bringing Nazis to the United States for self interested purposes. And as that was done, their records were sanitized in a lot of cases. I mean, some of the people that came obviously were not guilty of war crimes. They hadn't persecuted Jews. They hadn't used slave labors. But many had, and many still were valuable to us and we brought them here and in doing that clenched their records. One that she doesn't talk about very much is Wernher von Braun. He was the chief rocket scientist national present. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And he helped us get on the moon and help develop our ICBM. We present evidence for the first time in the hidden Nazi that shows he was much much deeper into Nazi ideology and the use of slave labor and the cruel treatment of slave laborers than ever previously thought..

Dale garvey Hans kamler South America CIA Bolivia German Chamber of Commerce Nazis Kyle Eastern Europe Andy Jacobson army Argentina Italy Germany U.S. government Dean United States Russia Wernher von Braun
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks

"It's lead-up someday a lead up to something very big something we've known about in ufology for many years. Ever since the paper clip. Nazi wernher von braun. Who was one of the heads of nassau a rocket scientists from monday. Germany came over here to help. Start up our own nasa and on his deathbed he spoke to his assistant. Carol rosen and said that there would be these three phases of threats it would be a terrorist threat of an invisible enemy. We've already gone through that. There would be an asteroid threat. Tra- kind of in the midst of now they're talking about mining asteroids or russia's said will shoot him down and if we don't have support from the community that will use our own technology in that is a question in the sell. What kind of technology you guys got russia. You could blast right out of the sky but the real prep of the narrative is going towards project blue. And anytime you hear the word blue in anything from project. Blue book to blue beam. It means special that is code word for each project. Blue beam is is this faked alien invasion. And this would be the point where they usher in this new world order. One world government agenda and we can see it happening all around us that they're starting to move in this direction. Takeaway nation sovereignty. Take away our our rights all the while peppering us with these tantalizing little grainy video does and we see the ts notice. They don't really get into the meat potatoes of the matter. It's always ooh. What are they on sixty minutes they had to throw in. You know people are gonna think you're crazy. I know we never really quite get a serious discussion about it. They're always putting the fear uncertainty in doubt in there. But the big picture here is could be prepped for this holographic sky show this this opera of ships coming down while it's really interesting that there's going to be a massive discovery somewhere on earth that's going to show us a different kind of world that we know it could very well be something out of antarctica. There's a lotta murmurings of things being found out there and movements and under ice bases And that would be the prep for blue. Be so i do. Discuss it in yawned esoteric. I have the whole time line. An outline of what would have to happen in order for this Sky show to happen. And one of the effects is also that we would see this holographic image of whatever country were in so whatever our Western country in europe and north america would most likely be jesus in the middle east. It would be mohammed. Even though they're not supposed to show any image of amish in the east it would be buddha or of zoroaster..

Carol rosen antarctica north america europe sixty minutes monday earth jesus one Nazi wernher von braun each project One world three phases one of the effects Germany nassau russia buddha
"wernher von braun" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Command is the Department of Defense is unified Combatant Command that handles space warfare and for many years Had been located at Colorado's Peterson Air Force space, but it's now announced that Space command will relocate to a facility in Huntsville, Alabama. Huntsville, is known as Rocket City and was the American home to German born rocket engineer Wernher von Braun. And is currently the location of the U. S. Army's Redstone, rocket Arsenal, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the famed US space Camp Evan Brown Fox News. The role of the Space command is to conduct operations like enabling satellite based navigation and troop communication. That's different from the space force, which became a new branch of the military under President Trump as the world tries to speed Over to vaccines into the arms of more people. Mork quickly the numbers keep rising. It's now more than 92 Million infections confirmed worldwide, almost 23 million now in the U. S. And U. S deaths have now topped 383,000. At least three of tonight's 10. NBA games are covert, canceled mainly due to tracing the latest game scrapped Atlanta Hawks at the Phoenix Suns. Phoenix doesn't have enough players do to contact tracing the sons played the Washington Wizards Monday. The Wizards have positive cases. Washington's game scheduled for tonight against Utah got postponed and the Boston Celtics had their third game this week called off as they were scheduled to host the Orlando Magic. Seven games postponed to the NBA this season six this week. The NBA now begins a tighter set of protocols to guard against the virus. Players and staff on the road may not leave their hotels for anything but team activities and may no longer have guests in their hotel rooms. Players at home must remain at home unless for team activities or essential matters. Jarod Max Fox News Mixed finish on Wall Street, The Dow down eight points at the close, but the NASDAQ.

NBA Huntsville Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket City Jarod Max Fox Wernher von Braun Wizards Peterson Air Force Boston Celtics Department of Defense Washington Evan Brown Alabama Phoenix Colorado Phoenix Suns Mork U. S. Army engineer U. S
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

09:49 min | 2 years ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Here marked with you and A and Paul. Eight five five four five zero three seven three three. That's eight fifty five four fifty free. I have checked. Make sure we have no calls so anybody's welcome to call them at eight five five four five zero three seven three three but We were talking about some of the many special forces guys you May One of them here That hit the island. Just sort of a prevalence of conspiracy theories amongst the special forces guy you being among them does airborne Countess Special Forces. I don't know well I think. I think a lot of people are just naive. They don't they all know what's really going on. And when you talk to people who've done the things that are going on they kinda get into. They can't open your Eyes Lake and for some reason. There's a lot of like former a green berets seals. And stuff like that here on this island and and even a couple of like Russian special forces guys. I know I mean there's also Philippine Philippines special forces just a general row. This is just a really nice nice place to be a marine. Oh those guys are they. Duck walk the first six weeks of training everywhere. I mean they can't stand up. They duck walk. The the Korean Marines Those those guys are just bad asses. What is duck? Walk like late squat position. And You waddle. Oh you know when you were Lake Strength Yen torture. They just supplying whatever they call it. Here's the thing you know like my my my my dad's cousin. My uncle Johnny. Was You know Ranger Special Forces all that stuff? He was in Vietnam and he was like saying that. The guys that the Viet Cong were really scared of where the were the rock marines. Rock Murray our Republic of Korea Marine the Korean Marines. I mean those guys are just like just tough hombres and so when they'd go into certain villages from what I've heard for some of these guys is they would they would literally raise the they'd try to kill everything like not just people the livestock insects. They would try to destroy as much as humanly possible. Just intended to send a message. Send the message that could usually in their in their areas of operation. The enemy activity went down zero. Yeah soon as they left. It started peek. Back up again. You guys I knew who served in Vietnam like they basically the Viet Cong were given pamphlets. Like if you see these guys. Just disengage and just like leave him alone. And so this is Vietnam but these were Koreans fighting in Vietnam we had we had. Australians on our side we add Canadians joined the US military we had New Zealand Sas. We had all those lives given so the politicians could give it up. Yeah it was crazy. I mean there wasn't a lot of them but there but the you know the other I think what it is. I think they just wanted to get the training and practical experience. Observers to wars are very old so yeah but but like for example in the in the time I've been here I've liked be gotten to be friends with two former seals. One of them way back to the state one do my other neighbor of mine was a green Beret in Vietnam. I mean it just like and then my scuba instructor was a was a Soviet Navy Frogman. There's there's like you you sit here and you talk to these people. I mean while I was on Tinian I used to like regularly drink with with a guy who was a navy crypto dude and in his buddy was a pilot for Air America and we would just sit there talking about the liberty incident which my friend was involved in and then the other guy was the American ship that was shot by the Israelis. Yeah Yeah Yeah. No one wants to know what the heck happened there. Yeah well lots of theories. He told me he told me. He said the Israelis knew about it because he was actually monitoring their their communications from Tel Aviv and the Israelis captured him. And then the other guy was going yeah. I used to fly heroin through the Golden Triangle. It's a fund the guerrillas Blah Blah Blah for the CIA and neo. But you know all this sort of stuff so you hear about you see these movies like American made. It's true story was his name. Bobby Bobby Seale was a real guy and yes bill. Clinton was the governor of Arkansas and he helped facilitate the drug trade to fund the Iran Contra stuff and that's why he became president because George Daddy. Poppy Bush gave Roma Bone because they were all in cahoots with each other. So I mean people go. Oh you're a conspiracy theory. You're nuts no no. I'm not a conspiracy theorist you're ignorant. So what could are you telling me that? George H W Bush gave up his presidency in the first term for Bill Clinton because To say thanks well first of all. They're all like for example Bush Bush and Clinton daddy the w they called each other like brothers from different mother. They used to hang out with each other is usually come from the same circles this skull and Bones Ivy League boy but Reagan got Reagan got assassinated a well attempted the but but the attempt to actually but well what I'm saying. Well okay the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan was carried out by the son of a business associate of George Bush senior and had dinner with Neal Bush the night before and there's a lot of evidence that there was some sort of mind control involved and then like when I was doing my master's thesis for Operation Paper Clip. I got all this. This rabbit hole does go deep am K. Ultra mind-control Lake a lot of mind control stuff so you did your college thesis on so this Operation Operation Paper clip mainly the Wernher von Braun and those guys put kept getting these like documentation on on the Nazis bring brought over with mind control technology just for anyone who doesn't know about the mind control if you're thinking like some spaceship Zapping people. It's not really like that. It's more common sense. This certain words used certain types of music. Just like when you watch a movie. That's a form of mind control. But if you know the techniques you can put it into a pattern into a program to find people to do things. So if a person is has schizophrenia. They have a more open to suggestion than these mind. Control techniques can be used to a very high degree of efficiency to get people to do what you want. So you know. It's just like a training little kids. That's a form of mind control. So if you put your mindset in that paradigm you're going to be able to see these things a lot more clearly and understand what's going on in what they had was The technologies that the Nazis came out with was was called trauma baseman control where they would basically torture people to the point to where it was so bad that the mind fragments into different compartments. And then they can like create different avatars for different you know different personalities and then they could trigger the different personality basically the movie with From from one thousand nine hundred sixty to the Manchurian candidate is based on real stuff and it was state of the art. Actually the technical director of it was the CIA said psychologist. Why would they give this information out? Well revelation of the method. I think I think basically. There's there's a theory that Especially true in the occult circles that when you do something to somebody you have to get their consent. And this is yeah. This is a big part of it. you must tell everybody what you're going to do now. They do that in such a way. Also as a as a way to to normalize it so that people don't actually They're not shocked when it happens because shock is usually a kick to the system that wakes you up and causes you to do something. So if you can normalize these things that are definitely not normal. People usually don't do anything about it and that's for me. A big part of why share these things is. If you're going to do something about it instead of trying to look at all these big things you can't do anything about pick one thing that you're sure you can do something about and go after you know and then try to make those little changes that will build up over time and there's also something called predictive programming Which Hollywood is big? On predictive programming. Like for example Darpa or some other nebulous group. They want to like pushes certain agenda so ten years down the line when when the agendas Pratt fourth. They've already seen it in Hollywood movie. And if you look for different things and how these things are carried out the example the corona virus. It's a good logistical study. What actually is needed in order to you know to implement the media the military the CDC what how are people are GonNa React? And you gather that research information and you can. You can make it more efficient you can tweak the program to fit whatever your needs are called by different name and none of these things are new. What do you think is behind the Corona Virus For China would be economic? You know their their normal growth pattern has been hit so they're Connie's not growing as fast you know. So I think that's what they're trying. They're trying to rebuild their their economy from a different aspects. And that's pushing and suppression of dissidents time with US. Getting hit the public without the international community. Giving them heat because you put him on a million Muslim Leaguers in concentration camps and harvest their Oregon's everybody goes. Oh my God. That's terrible. A million Muslims leaguers. Just.

Vietnam Poppy Bush Korean Marines Bill Clinton US CIA Ronald Reagan Bobby Bobby Seale Eyes Lake Paul Air America Hollywood Neal Bush von Braun China Philippine Philippines Johnny heroin attempted assassination
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Fueled rocket that our scientists thought couldn't be built the Germans had mastered and on the battlefield honed Coleman was in charge of it what with ending everyone knew it would lose the war the Soviets would become the next enemy we wanted that technology everybody wanted that technology and in November of nineteen forty four we signed a rocket contract with General Electric that six months before the war and come months later on collision the ferries are meeting with representatives of the United States and representatives of General Electric that's five months before the war ended and subsequent to that meeting he moved the rocket team twice to keep them out of the hands of the advancing elections and final move aboard his it's an old train three hundred rocket scientist and basically hand delivered them to the U. S. army and that's how we got the rockets a lot of people have heard of heard of on brown and not the Rocketeer zipping to the United States got us on the moon that's when the Cold War by building the ICBM Amazon com that delivered that rocketing yeah you always hear about Wernher von Braun you have your about Robert Goddard you hear about all these other figures that were so called instrumental at the time to us developing conventionally the atomic bomb and does this rocket technology that we took from **** Germany but you never hear Hans color white why is that because nobody's written about it because at the end of the war supposedly he committed suicide we we postulate in the book and then I think proof that he moves the rockets team in order to hold up what we call the color teal he made a deal to save his own life delivering the rocketing to the Americans and then staged his own suicide and has improved with US government documents commit suicide he surrendered to the U. S. army and we had him in custody for months and months after the war and then he disappeared so that's where the we have to start speculating in the book they had not clear about what became of him almost a year after his reported suicide while we had him in custody we know we interrogated him several times follow in Austria about missing money in Germany about missing scientists that the numbers on the eve of the number of trials and then he just vanished and one of the U. S. documents sent to our researchers activists he never let somebody came and cleaned up the file it seems like there are a lot of these characters not as central to the rocket technology and certainly not as powerful as cobbler woes in **** Germany but you look at them down yo can you look at some of these other figures that were later found out to be basically living in plain sight in America and nobody knew until years later I mean is this another one of those stories are you you say disappeared so all you've got is conjecture to try and follow the trail goes cold well we make a very good case based on consumer cases since hello considered comma ended up in South America you write about people coming to the.

"wernher von braun" Discussed on SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on SUE Speaks Podcast: Searching for Unity in Everything

"In the soviet union andrea was well-connected. Travel the world and he felt that the cia should know about what's going on in russia. And that was all through the sixties. I knew andrea during that period. We were friends. And in nineteen seventy two. I had been doing laser work for fifteen years and wh when i went to graduate school. I was aware that i couldn't make a living doing parapsychology. I knew parapsychologists and all of them were impoverished. Doing other stuff no way to make a living doing esp research. So i did my other thing which was going to lasers which is very interested in at the time but after fifteen years. I decided that i had already built an esp teaching machine for example. And i showed that to wernher von braun and he did very well with this for choice gadget which you can now download from the internet guard. Esp trainer go to the apple store and as a gift is my gif. You can have this little electronic application on your telephone and teach yourself how to do remote viewing psychic ability so von braun with interested in that and at a promise for support from nafta and about that time and went to the cia. And i think that i could help your agents find out where people are hiding or were kidnapped. Americans are they had entree to the cia. Since i had built laser stuff for them in the nineteen sixties. I think that a aspiring. Espn researcher can't just walk into the cia and said how you like to support my parapsychology work. I think you would not get past the front gate. So i still have something new for you. I started out with my esp. Game which i lay on the table as an actual object and at the time when teaching machines were of great interest nineteen seventies. The idea of teaching stuff with machines with arou- so i had this self contained pretty nice looking gadget. Which could off you feedback and reinforcement develop your psychic abilities. And i said i wanted to do that. And also measure brainwaves. So we know when people are functioning psychically and i can help you find your missing agents kidnapped other people and i was able to take the cia promise. And the nasa promise together with astronaut edgar mitchell and to stanford research institute who.

russia andrea edgar mitchell soviet union stanford research institute nineteen seventies nineteen sixties wernher von braun apple fifteen years sixties Espn braun nineteen seventy two after Esp promise Americans nafta
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Hope you're taking notes this week. Number one faith the Bible says and in Verse One of Hebrews Eleven. Faith is believing when I don't it. Faith is believing radical. Faith is believing. When I don't see it what I mean by that? Well the Bible says says in Verse One Hebrews Eleven faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see faith is visualizing the future in the present faith is seeing in advance now. This principle is found all through the world regardless of where the person is a Christian believer. Not Before we say well. I'll believe it when I see it. You've heard that people say that all believe it when I see it but but God says there are some things you have to believe in order to see it now. Anybody who is a professional understands stanzas architects know that they have to believe it that the building can exist before it's built and they've got to see it in their mind and believe it it in their minds I before it gets on paper before it becomes a building. Nothing just happens. It starts by believing that it could look like this before you see it happen. uh-huh any athlete knows that in order to win the race. You've got to see it in your mind. You've got to believe it's possible for it happens. Nobody goes through Olympics thinking. I'M NOT NOT GONNA win. They go with the attitude of. I believe I could win this. You have to believe that in order to see it and they see themselves mentally crossing the finish line before they ever run the race and they go over and over and over in their minds rehearsing and rehearsing that vision that image. Any artist has to see the painting in their mind and believe. It's possible before they put the paint canvas or before they do the sculpture. They've seen it in their mind and they believed that in their mind before they saw it as a reality. A scientist has to think it's possible to do this like go to the moon. You and they have to believe it before it becomes reality some things you have to believe before you see it. Wernher von Braun. who was the father of the American space program? Ribs said no great achievement has ever been achieved in history without faith. It's believing before you have to believe it's impossible long before it happens and faith trust God to make the vision the dream become reality. That's radical faith believing before I see it number. Two faith is obeying when I don't understand it. Faith is obeying when I don't understand it. And God gives us two examples of this in his hall of fame Noah and Abraham no in Hebrews eleven seven. It says this this. It was by faith that Noah built an Ark to.

Faith Noah Wernher von Braun. Ribs Abraham
"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"wernher von braun" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I'll I'll believe it when I see it. You've heard that people say that all believe it when I see it but God says there are some things you have to believe in order to see it now. Anybody who is a professional understands this architects know that they have to believe it that the building can exist before before it's built and they've got to see it in their mind and believe it in their minds I before it gets on paper before it becomes a building. Nothing just happens it starch arch believing that it could look like this before you see it happen. Any athlete knows that in order to win the race. You've got to see it in your mind. You've gotTA gotTa believe it's possible for it happens. Nobody goes through Olympics thinking. I'm not going to win. They go with the attitude of. I believe I could win this. You have to believe leave it in order to see it and they see themselves mentally crossing the finish line before they ever run the race and they go over and over and over in their minds rehearsing and rehearsing that that vision that image any artist has to see the painting in their mind and believe. It's possible before they put the paint to the canvas before for they do the sculpture. They've seen in their mind and they believed it in their mind before they saw it as a reality. A scientist has to think it's possible to do this like go to the moon and they have to believe it before it becomes reality some things you have to believe you've before you see it. Wernher von Braun. who was the father of the American Space Program said no great achievement has ever been achieved in history without faith? It's believing believing before you see. You have to believe it's impossible long before it happens. and Faith Trust God to make the vision the dream become com reality. That's radical faith believing before I see it number. Two faith is obeying when I don't understand it faith Nathan obeying when I don't understand it. And God gives us two examples of this in his hall of fame Noah and Abraham Him Noah in Hebrews eleven seven. It says this it was Bhai. Faith that Noah built an Ark to.

Abraham Him Noah American Space Program Nathan Wernher von Braun.