36 Burst results for "Vermont"

Survey Of Contact Tracing Workforce Shows Little Growth, Despite Surging Cases

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 8 hrs ago

Survey Of Contact Tracing Workforce Shows Little Growth, Despite Surging Cases

"US death toll from covid nineteen now exceeds one, hundred, sixty thousand according to Johns. Hopkins University Corona Virus Infections are nearing four point nine million while contact tracing is crucial to curbing the spread NPR Selena Simmons Duffin reports and NPR analysis finds the number of contact tracers isn't growing fast enough to keep up with rising case loads after serving states in mid June NPR found the were thirty seven thousand contact razors nationwide six weeks. Later, that number has only marginally increased. It's now about forty two, thousand several states didn't respond to multiple requests from NPR so the real total may be higher our. Of the staffing figures based on local case counts found only four states and Washington DC have enough contact tracers. Those states are Alaska Maine New Hampshire and Vermont Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Alaska Maine New Hampshire Selena Simmons Covid United States Washington Dc Johns Hopkins University Vermont
Fresh "Vermont" from Gary and Shannon

Gary and Shannon

00:47 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "Vermont" from Gary and Shannon

"Of voting and waterways. It's slow in PICO Rivera on the 605 from the South side as you come away from Washington or Slauson, heading toward the five, actually seeing a few delays beyond that toward Florence, duty count, trans work underway and the north side of the 65 also heavy for you from the water five back to the five and so going for you as well through the Nowalk area. From Rosecrans Avenue five North bound toward the 605 for the North bound on the five as you make it through the East l. A area in the Boyle Heights five north around Indiana. Gotta crash. There's the two left lanes Shutdown. That'll be heavy for you to leave Atlantic and then unrelated sewing will continue for your head towards downtown L A. And the 101101 south. So going for you right now leading Vermont Avenue or Melrose is you make way back towards 1 10 Okay. Bye. Traffic sponsored by Discover K a pie in the sky Hopes get too. They're faster. I'm Nick Calio Keeney. Sometimes food is more than just food. It's part of our community. So this year, Discover is giving $5 million to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott's barbecue post office pies and hundreds more. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Now,.

Pico Rivera Nick Calio Keeney Boyle Heights Rodney Scott Florence Melrose Atlantic Slauson Nowalk Indiana Washington
Why does Donald Trump want to ban TikTok?

Risky Business

06:26 min | 3 d ago

Why does Donald Trump want to ban TikTok?

"For those who are blissfully unaware late last week, us? President Donald Trump announced that he would ban Tiktok and furthermore he said he would block Microsoft from taking over the APP which was apparently a deal that was in the works Then he's back flipped and given Microsoft, forty five days to complete the transaction and he's, but now he signed that the US Treasury should get a copy of the deal which seems weird in a country, which is terrified of socialism so like That's a basic recap, but there's so many little weird bonkers nuances to this Britain I actually bret benefit and I actually read about published on risky Biz in the Linke's quakes showing. But look, let's let's get the conversation going now and we'll start with you, alex, know they're probably some national security ramifications or concerns around APPs lactic TIKTOK. But why do we get the impression? That's not what's driving this whole thing? Well, you make it then. Prussian, because the president of the United States continues to change his justification of what he's doing is making a national data protection law up on the fly on twitter. and. So you know it's it's quite possible that watching what's going on that. You'd reasonably conclude that this isn't a well-considered change in policy, but perhaps part of the ongoing trade war and yell perhaps a mix of trump's anger at what would normally be protected speech against him on Tiktok and partially to distract from the fact that at the same day that he made that announcement, it was announced that the United States economy shrunk by nine percent in just one quarter. And so you know all those things together. Is really polluting this process now that being said I, think there are some interesting risks here in there is something we have to talk about about Chinese APPS and the data of Democracies sitting servers available to the PR. But if you're going to do that for my perspective Tiktok is probably not even the top five or top ten companies. I'd be concerned about there's a lot of Chinese companies that are much more critical inner city and much more important data than they are. This seems. To be completely driven by trump and not by some kind of process and either the White House or or the agencies were, there can rationally considering these things. Now look you and I, we have access to gripe bonds that most people don't actually have access to. A wonderful part of the job. I mean, my gripe tells me that this is not going through the usual processes. I mean the US investigation into Tiktok did start last year. Right? This is a legit sign. Lee Rooted investigation, but it's the escalation since like last week, that is just the just the mad pot, and as you say I mean why the hell out we talking about we chat and that's that's a curly a one to a strategy. I know that there are politicians here. Who Use we chat as a way to communicate with Chinese Australians, for example, right? So that whole thing is a can of worms and I think blocking chat in. A, lot of places around the world is going to be a real loser, right? So that's maybe one reason people don't WanNa. Touch it. But yeah, this is a very complicated. Nuanced issue that has just been. The whole thing strange. Isn't it? It is so syphilis. The law that we're talking about here is was really built to protect kind of the American industrial base around defense. Rightly, you have an important helicopter manufacturer and you don't WanNa get bought by Iran. That's what cities is for. It has never been used as a back door for data protection framework right here. In the United States, we do not have data protection framework. There is no law that says you cannot ship social security numbers of Americans to a Chinese company. Nothing prevents that in theory now, obviously, we have A. Rules that have been created through FTC decisions and such. But overall, we don't have a framework for deciding what is really important Pi and work in it set up, and so to create that out of whole cloth, using a stiffest interpretation is really probably the worst way to handle what is eight really really complicated problem, and like you said, there's other companies put away the top and I think for my perspective, we chat the top Vermont for me. Right is used by the entire chinese-speaking Gaspara. Anybody who has any in China uses it, and that includes people in Singapore people in Hong Kong people in Taiwan. So lots of these places where Chinese intelligence is really interesting. What's going? We chat has become. Part of People's daily lives, and unlike tiktok, it carries very sensitive data. Right? People run their companies. All we chat, they have their personal communications reach at the. They probably arrange affairs and do things that are very black maleable on we chat and there evidence from Citizen Lab, and some other folks who have done worth that demonstrate that you can kind of get side channel information out of we chat that demonstrates that they are watching and they are doing at least scanning of certain phrases, even communications that go. I. Mean I m point, I. think that's well known and well established that we chat is certainly used by the EPA to do surveillance, right? Like that is the reason. So successful in the reason that they can block other communications, funnel people through it, but this brings us to an important question. There are some concerns that say censorship on TIKTOK. For example, there was a case where they would deleting videos that referred to. Human Rights abuses occurring in Xinjiang in in China, right, and that turned into a into massive Khufu four. Good reason. Don't get me wrong Let's not pretend for a second, the PSE or a bunch of fluffy. Fluffy pandas. Okay. That is that is certainly not the case. But let's, be real. Trees names for them. But let's look. Let's be be real here. Right? Like the hottest security angle to this, right? It's it's. It's hard to make a case that it's. It's a terribly dangerous APP now when the United States blocked the sale of grinder. To to an offshore concern I, mean I think that was another Chinese company that wanted to buy that. Absolutely. Anyway, near when they wanted to buy a company that track Global Hotel reservations again, that it's type of information is incredibly valuable to US intelligence in two, thousand, six, the US government's blocked checkpoint, which is an Israeli from blind buying sauce fly because source for. Through. SNORT had deep in US government networks. The right in all of these situations where this has happened before you can point to a single reason and you can say this is why. Absent here,

United States Tiktok President Donald Trump Microsoft China President Trump Alex Wanna Vermont Iran Bret Britain EPA Twitter. White House LEE FTC
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:24 min | 4 d ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"But what are your surveys showing on those other drugs and? And how will the Policies of working et Cetera Andrea what can you tell us? Some of this is exploratory because there are not policies in place for all these substances, but even in asking about Last fall when we had the the cases of e cigarette dating associated lung injury, the epidemic. Is Valley and we didn't know much about what was causing epidemic. We were asking we were in the field and we were asking about what substance people laughed vague and what we found is that in our youth and young adults about fifty five percent of our ever vapors reported using nicotine but a quarter reported last meeting marijuana or Hash Oil and as we learn more about that epidemic, we learned that it was largely related to vaping t thc from an informal source. and the fact that. Our young people who are vaping last-ditch Marijuana. I don't think that would have been captured in time you know to able to report to the state and to get a sense of the magnitude of of what could be happening in our state without the quick data collection so that that we are always looking at what new things are coming up where we know that in the broader population. A stimulant use is up and so we're we do ask about stimulant use and we see that about twenty percent. Of our young adults have ever tried prescription stimulants not the way doctor would prescribe them but recreationally. I think, these are what are we retirement adderall or what else? What else? Yet Fridolin. Things that people would get generally use for add treatment that that they're using as Recreationally. So. We're we're always just trying to keep up with what? what substances are coming up. We ask an open ended question about Are there other substances that you're aware of or that you've tried that we haven't asked about you? Try to keep up with other things that are coming into play that we're not capturing in our surveys. And other any sort of new substances to are there any are there any new ones taken hold in Vermont? Not. That I know of yet, we'll. We'll. We'll keep you posted as we get more data and but we're we're also asking general questions about how young people understand addiction. What does that mean to them? Is that something that they're they're concerned about is, is it something that resonates with them in terms of prevention messaging you know where we have a broad brush Were able to really be flexible and try to get at what will help us develop programs that will be most effective in preventing substance use. what are the trends on alcohol? Are we making progress or is it getting worse or about the study? was what's happening with that? You know the thing about alcohol use and marijuana use that in our Vermont young adults we have higher prevalence of ever use and past thirty days than we have at the national level That's one of the things that we think why we think doing this work in Vermont is really important. We're based here but when we're when we're seeking funding from federal agencies, you're Montas unique there's a There's a different attitude towards substance use sometimes in Vermont that we're trying to figure out we are unfortunately about out of time but I really appreciate my my two guests joining me this morning Andrea Volonte of the university, of Vermont, and Rhonda Williams of the Vermont Department of Health Very Informative stuff keep collecting that data there and. Helping to inform policy on these fronts. So thank you so much. Already. That's what I did for today's edition of the day grab show. TV FM and am and tune in again tomorrow stay tuned for Bill Sayer Common Sense Radio..

Vermont marijuana Is Valley stimulant Marijuana Vermont Department of Health Bill Sayer adderall nicotine Andrea Volonte Montas Rhonda Williams
Boston - Travel Order For Massachusetts Visitors, Residents Returning Home Goes Into Effect Saturday

WBZ Midday News

00:39 sec | 6 d ago

Boston - Travel Order For Massachusetts Visitors, Residents Returning Home Goes Into Effect Saturday

"Order for Massachusetts goes into effect today, visitors and in state residents that air returning home must now fill out of Massachusetts travel form. They must quarantine for 14 days unless they're coming in from an exempt lower risk state. Or they can provide a negative Covad 19 tests from the last 24 hours now. Those who fail to comply with that new travel order could be fined 500 bucks a day. The current exempt states are Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, Maine, Hawaii, New Jersey and New York. And by the way incoming college students are definitely included in that order. Weekend talks

Massachusetts New York New Jersey New Hampshire Connecticut Rhode Island Vermont Maine Hawaii
Vermont farmer returns prosthetic leg that skydiver lost during jump

Tim Conway Jr.

00:16 sec | Last week

Vermont farmer returns prosthetic leg that skydiver lost during jump

"And a farmer in Vermont has returned a fake leg he found amongst his crops. A farmer says he searched his property looking for the prosthetic limb after seeing a Facebook post about a skydiver who lost his leg Saturday during a tandem jump the sky, But diver said he didn't realize his leg was missing until after he'd landed.

Facebook Vermont
Weekend mayhem continues, with seven murders across New York City in 24 hours

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | Last week

Weekend mayhem continues, with seven murders across New York City in 24 hours

"This past weekend was like most recent weekends in the city. It was bloody at least seven murders in the past 24 hours, and Samantha Liebman reports more homicides in the city Sunday, including the shooting of three teens here in Cypress Hills, a 16 year old boy killed. It happened around 6 40 last night, Police say. An SUV drove by George Walker Junior Park here on Vermont Street and someone started shooting through the sun roof that 16 year old shot in the head. A 17 year old also shot and an 18 year old in critical condition also shot in the head. Police too. Investigating an SD Salaam is friends with the group and says they were all good kids. We used to hang out with them. They was good people. They was actually six and they like their was getting out games. Meanwhile, the other murder Sunday included a fatal stabbing in the Bronx of a transgender woman and a man shot in the back and a possible domestic dispute in Queens. All this contributing to the rise in murders and shootings. As of last week. Shootings up 69% murders, up 24% over

Samantha Liebman George Walker Junior Park Cypress Hills Salaam Queens Murder
3 Teens Shot, 1 Killed in Brooklyn, New York City

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:26 sec | Last week

3 Teens Shot, 1 Killed in Brooklyn, New York City

"Seven homicides throughout New York City Sunday, including three teens. They were shot one fatally at a park in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn, a 16 year old fatally shot and pronounced dead at the scene outside the George Walker Junior Park on Vermont Street, an 18 year old in critical condition this morning. A 17 year old in stable condition that in connection with that drive by after a gunman in an SUV opened fire from his sunroof suspects at

George Walker Junior Park Cypress Hills New York City Brooklyn
One dead and two injured in Brooklyn shooting

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:38 sec | Last week

One dead and two injured in Brooklyn shooting

"A teenager was killed in two others wounded in a shooting in Brooklyn just after 6 30 this evening, NYPD officers responded to a report of a shooting at home on Vermont Street, Crosby Avenue. In Cyprus hills. When they arrived, they found three teenagers shot police. A 16 year old boy who was shot in the head was pronounced dead at the scene. An 18 year old man who was also shot in the head. Is hospitalized in critical condition. A 17 year old boy was shot in the leg and was transported to a hospital in stable condition. So far, no arrests.

Cyprus Hills Nypd Brooklyn
Chicago is the latest to enforce quarantine requirements for people travelling from coronavirus hot spots

Win at RETIREMENT the Harwood Way with Robert Harwood

00:20 sec | Last month

Chicago is the latest to enforce quarantine requirements for people travelling from coronavirus hot spots

"Ordering quarantines for Florida residents traveling to them beyond the holiday weekend. The latest, a Chicago whose new 14 day quarantine requirement will go into effect on Monday, July 6th. Pennsylvania, Kansas, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Vermont and the Tri State area of New York are among those that have restrictions for people traveling from Corona virus hot spots. A glitch and disease

New York New Mexico Corona Chicago Florida Vermont Pennsylvania Kansas Massachusetts
Multiple states requiring visitors from hot spots to quarantine

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:21 sec | Last month

Multiple states requiring visitors from hot spots to quarantine

"More cities and states are ordering quarantines for Florida residents traveling to them beyond the holiday weekend. The latest in Chicago, who's new 14 day quarantine requirement will go into effect on Monday, July 6th, the Tri State area of New York, Pennsylvania cancers. Massachusetts, New Mexico and Vermont are among those that have travel restrictions were people traveling from Corona virus. Hot spots

New York New Mexico Corona Florida Pennsylvania Chicago Massachusetts Vermont
House Vote On Washington, DC Statehood Was Years In The Making

Skimm This

05:20 min | Last month

House Vote On Washington, DC Statehood Was Years In The Making

"Being two hundred and thirty two votes in the affirmative one hundred and eighty vote in the negative. Last Friday the House of Representatives passed legislation that would increase the number of stars on the American flag from fifty to fifty one for the first time members approved a bill that would make the capital of the United States Washington DC its own state right now. It's a federal district basically. Within a country that typically houses the national government and is directly controlled by it. The bill says that while federal buildings like the White House would still be federal property. Everything else would be part of this new state, and instead of the District of Columbia. It would be called the Washington Douglas Commonwealth named after abolitionist. Frederick Douglass in theory. It doesn't take that much to create a new state, basically the house Senate and the president. All have to be on board, but DC's history is a federal district is complicated. To explain. We have to go back to the seventeen hundreds. During the American Revolution, the Continental. Congress didn't have a permanent home. The continental capital bounced around from New York to Philly, and then as the result of a compromise between southern and northern states they met in the middle literally in seventeen. Ninety President George. Washington picked spot for the nation's capital along the Potomac River, and it was named the district of. Columbia And the founding fathers wanted the receipts they wrote into the Constitution that DC should be federal city article, one section eight clause seventeen to be exact. They said otherwise Congress in the White House could be too influenced by the state government in which it lived. Tradeoff, though was that DC? Residents lost their representatives in Congress and in the Electoral College. This wasn't something people just let slide. In fact, someone in Congress has fought for DC to become a state every year since nineteen sixty five. Remember no taxation without representation from history class. That's when Americans under British rule demanded representatives across the pond in exchange for their tax dollars in the seventeen hundreds. And you can still find that slogan on DC license plates in twenty twenty, because district residents pay federal taxes, but they don't get to elect representatives with power to represent their interests in the federal government. Instead they have a local government, but even that is still subject to federal control through something called. Rule by invoking home rule Congress can actually block any law. Local officials or residents support. Some things have changed since seventeen ninety, though in its to thirty years of taxation without representation, the D. C. Population has grown to over seven hundred thousand people that's larger than the populations of some states, including Vermont and Wyoming and thanks to the twenty-third amendment district residents now at least gets vote for president and have their vote counted. DC has three votes in the electoral college, but advocates argue three electoral votes is not enough, and they've faced opposition in large part from Republicans in Congress. That's because Washington. DC residents have voted overwhelmingly for Democratic presidential candidates, so the concern is if you make it, state dens will get more of an upper hand in Congress moving forward. Mike we said this is a fight that's come up pretty much every year for decades, but this year the fight for DC to become a state has stayed in the spotlight. That's partly because of the recent protests over racial injustice. In DC. The trump administration has sent federal officers to clear protesters from the streets. Here was DC mayor Muriel bowser on PBS last month, where the capital city were federal district where seven hundred thousand tax paying Americans and I'm the Mayor Governor County executive all at once, but because we are not a state the federal government can encroach on our atonomy. Those recent clashes between protesters and federal officers have raised more questions about whether it's fair for the federal government to have so much. Say in how the city operates. Advocates also argue that the fight for DC to become a state is a civil rights issue. The majority of the district residents are people of color which means Washington. DC is one clear example of a place in which black Americans are being denied representation. So. DC statehood passing in the house last week was historic, but to be clear. It's not likely to pass the Republican controlled Senate. And president trump is also said he opposes the idea which means this bill will probably go nowhere, but if the balance of power changes in Washington and November it could be back on the table again and other US territories buying for statehood like Puerto Rico home to more than three million Americans could also have a shot at finally becoming part of the Union. Happy for the July.

DC Congress Federal Government President Trump Washington House Of Representatives White House District Of Columbia Washington Douglas Commonwealt Frederick Douglass Senate Potomac River Muriel Bowser New York Columbia Puerto Rico
A Musical Celebration

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:36 min | Last month

A Musical Celebration

"We have some special guests planned for. For this hour and the first one is Mr Chris Chris. Norman is a musician music educator and you might know him from the Vermont PBS. Show Mr Chris and friends. He's also created the Mr Chris and friends family hour. It's a half hour episode of learning exploration and fun for the entire family that has been airing Thursdays at six. PM on Vermont. PBS Kids Channel. and. He also runs a live program in Vermont called Music for sprouts Hi Mr Chris Nice to talk with you again. Hygiene so glad to be here. Well I'm excited to have here and I know that you have very strong feelings about the power of music so since we're doing this sort of musical finale and musical celebration. Why do you think celebrating with music or coming together around music is so important and fun and powerful. I do feel that way and I've seen the power firsthand in sharing songs and listening to songs. You are feeling feelings in real time, and sometimes there's feelings that are hard to put into words or sometimes it's hard to share them any other way than with the song so I think that a song or music can be a wonderful way to have a conversation. With your friends and your family and your community and share, those deep and big feeling sick feeling. Yeah, I've been using music to help me feel really good big feelings and to help me feel express some sad feelings. His things have been really different over the last couple of months and kids haven't been in school. Our jobs have changed Sometimes. It's hard for us to see friends and family that we really care about, and you know the news sometimes been difficult to understand and to try to figure out what's happening, and so sometimes I put on music and I dance, but sometimes I put on music, and I cry and actually Chris I think both of those feel really healthy. I agree, and and when you put on music, and you cry, and you dance, your feelings feel very real and when you do that with other people You don't feel alone sometimes when you're feeling a really big feeling, you can feel like you're the only person in the whole world that could possibly be feeling that feeling, but music is a way that we. We can remind ourselves that we're not alone

Mr Chris Chris Mr Chris Nice Vermont Vermont Pbs PBS Norman
Brain Juice. It Was Brain Juice.

The Ladies of Strange

06:27 min | Last month

Brain Juice. It Was Brain Juice.

"We are the ladies of strange I'm Ashley I'm Tiffany and I'm Rebecca. Thank you for joining US each week. is we discuss the history mystery? In theory of all things, questionable and Airy, good job, guys. You got through it. Straight face no GIGGLEFISH I bit my tongue, and almost said something, but I thought you guys with. Yell at me for stopping. That sounds like a bad side show clown straight face fits. What. I don't know that's just what came in my head. When I sent straight face, no gigabits man. Oh, okay, another clown murderer! No I'm thinking like. In nineteen fifty sideshow clown probably would be in like freak. Show like American Horror Story Freak show. I mean he could be a John Wayne Gay. See Ma'am Times to. Why are you on your laptop? I'm not on my laptop. Are you lying I'm not a D. do you see my laptop open? I don't think you close now yet is closed. I WANNA teach us some stuff to have a history lesson history, okay? And seven years ago, I got really excited about this forefathers. Numbers in there so Jackson Beverly Wilga where collectors of vintage photographs and had in their collection a dagger type. Oh you don't say an old photograph taken using a process that involves a silver plate and Mercury Vapor, and his photo was of a young disfigured man. the photograph was believed to be taken in the nineteenth century. The man in the picture was believed that the man had encountered a whales. He was holding Harpoon like object in the image. TIFFANY's face. That was fun. they couple had the image on display in their home for years in December of two thousand and seven, the couple decided to share the image on flicker and titled it a one eyed man with Harpoon super, super creative, so one win was. When did they have it? In their home? Court were the years they had in their home, but they didn't post it till flicker until two thousand seven. Okay, so they decide like a random picture of some random disfigure. Yeah, some people collect mentioned photographs. My Dad is one of those on. This might make him happy. One Flicker user contacted the Combo commenting that the man probably isn't a whaler as he wasn't holding a Harpoon in the picture, was he holding buy outs. Oh, sorry I thought. You said he was holding her. They said it looked like her. so another user saw this picture and said Hey, this might be the only surviving photo of Venus Gauge, not famous gauge. Where's verb? Not Verb just just benny US I. Don't know that name so shown, either. That's why I said. Where's Fergany isn't firm? So, y'all ready to learn about Fini's gauge. Liz Foreign and eighteen twenty three, the DSP gauge lead, either an uneventful lifer didn't bother keeping a journal because he doesn't pop up again until eighteen forty eight, okay. Okay. No list of at the age of twenty five Fini's was working as a railroad, foreman and common dish Vermont and on September, thirteenth eighteen, forty eight made a really good attempt at receiving the Darwin Award. Oh my God. Yes, so excited, so phineas worked for the RUTLAND and Burlington railroad company as a form part of his job involved coordinating, blasting out rock to make way for new. New Rail. Lines does part of the job required knowledge in geology and trigonometry, so I have a note to me, saying Insert statement about how trig is as useful of the maths, I will say I really liked. trig choke is super. Useful triggers the most Hallo basic addition. Wouldn't just like OPRAH EMMY BE MORE USEFUL THAN TRADE? Because I never took trig and I'm getting along just fine. Your overcompensating at all. No compensation here I come to terms. Okay, so geology and trigonometry so not only did. They have to be pretty clever, but he also had a handle his crew, who was described as a gang of men who basically needed all the. Since they enjoy things brawling shooting and drinking, they sound like sounds like my. Sounds like the type of people that didn't take trig. had good people skills. Though so is crew liked them to blast the area involved not only defendants have to create schematics aware to drill holes that were a couple inches wide, and a few feet deep, but also had to be able to place them along natural joints and rifts in the rock to make the job easier because why work harder than you have to the cracks just like push it a little harder so i. Like my mental health. Hey? Push it just one step further fine, are we? I completely lost what I was going to save. Thirty Oh. Did He Oh, I was thinking like the he needed to do dousing, but you're talking about like actual cracks in the ground. Yes, we're not looking for water. He's trying to clear out pathways like blowout rock lay lines, not like no crat down, sorry. You bring a witchy friend along. Here is the source of power here. Blow the spot so once. These holes were drilled. Blasting powder was placed into the whole untapped down. Using typically crowbars. Vinnie. As was kind of a big deal. He had his own tampering device made by local blacksmith to Tampa device was basically a Joplin with thirteen point. Two five pounds was forty three inches long and tapered from a diameter of one point, two five inches, which was an eas for taping into a point. Any guesses on where this is going. That's his Oh. Oh, is that how he lost his eye? So once I found stated that the incident happened a one day while camping bananas endured the Osha Guidelines for tapping blasting powder into the earth with a long metal spike. Parentheses, which wouldn't be the Osha wouldn't be until nineteen seventy-one, but that's not the point. Close parentheses and I can only assume look down into the hole above the spike. CH- one source I founded the incident happened around four thirty pm near quitting time, so either finance wasn't paying attention as he was telling his routed group to behave, or his assistant forgot to put the ever important sand into the hall before tampering because San Prevents, sparks from getting to the plastic powder either way. The blessing powder ignited

Trig United States Fini Osha Jackson Beverly Wilga Tiffany John Wayne Gay Oprah Liz Foreign Fergany Benny Tampa Joplin Foreman Rutland Vermont Burlington Darwin Award
Los Angeles County Coronavirus Update: Highest Single-Day Total of New Cases Since Pandemic Began

Steve Cochran

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles County Coronavirus Update: Highest Single-Day Total of New Cases Since Pandemic Began

"Twenty U. S. states now seeing a rise in corona virus infections Mike Bower reports as film and TV production begins to restart today Los Angeles county is reporting the highest single the total of new cases of corona virus since the outbreak began besides California the twenty states include Texas Florida North Carolina Arizona Tennessee Washington South Carolina Missouri Utah Kentucky Arkansas Nevada New Mexico Oregon Idaho Vermont Hawaii Alaska and Montana Texas which was among the first dates to start the reopening process set new records for cove in nineteen all spittle as Asians on three consecutive days this week with over two thousand patients hospitalized

Mike Bower Los Angeles County California Alaska Texas Arizona Tennessee Carolina Missouri Utah Kentucky Arkansas New Mexico Oregon Idaho Vermont Montana
Kid Press Conference with Governor Phil Scott

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

03:58 min | 2 months ago

Kid Press Conference with Governor Phil Scott

"Peter Hirschfeld Nice to talk with you. Good to talk with you Jane and I have to tell you I'm so excited to hear what questions the kids are going to have the governor today. Yeah me, too. I hope he's prepared. Can you explain just first of all what a reporter is and generally what a reporter does! We have pretty fun jobs. I have to admit because we spend all day learning about things that are happening in our towns in the state in the country, and even the world sometimes, and then we write stories based on what we've learned so that we can get people information that in some cases might be really important to them. In order to do that job, we have to be kind of like collectors of information. And sometimes we collect that information by reading things like government documents for example sometimes we get information by talking to people like legislators or mayors or the governor, people in our communities or sometimes expert who can help us understand different topics that we might not know that much about sometimes we get information just by going to places and watching things like a select board meeting in a local town or going to the State House to watch committees. They're make big decisions. or maybe going to to something like a protest is to learn more about what people are upset about. We have what we call a representative democracy in the united. States in that means we elect people to Serb government, and they make really important decisions about how our society is going to work and reporters tried to do is get people all the information. They needed so that they can decide whether their government is doing a good job. And sometimes when reporter learns about things that maybe aren't going so well. It allows the people who read their stories to. Ask and demand changes and improvements. Can I highlight one word that you said because I to just make sure we're clear on this, you said reporters write stories. This is not the kind of story that is fiction that is made up or not true. What a reporter does has to be based on fact so when you say you write a story, you're writing something that incorporates what you've heard from other people what you know to be true and what you have found out. You're not making things up, and you're not really sharing your opinion. What's the difference between factual reporting and just telling someone what you think about something? Yeah, that's exactly right Jane, so this isn't the kind of story that you would read in a picture book for example or A novel. That is fiction What reporters are doing? Is discovering facts and information, and then just using those facts in that information in the stories that they right so even though we call them stories or not, the kinds of stories you might find. In! Some of the books you read it school. One way I like to think about it is. There's a big difference between I. Think and what I know and reporters stick to telling people what they know. Bar Job is to give the public facts and information so that they can make their own opinions about things. Get an example of something that's happening right now. Governor Scott, who you're going to be talking to assume wants to make some budget cuts next year because Vermont government doesn't have as much money coming in, but a lot of legislators that work in the state. House, don't WanNa make budget cuts because they say there's going to be a lot of people that have a lot of needs and budget got is when you think you have a certain amount of. Of money to spend, but then actually you're only allowed to spend a little less than that. That's right. You don't have as much money as you thought you were going to have so the job of the reporter in telling that story isn't the tell people who's right or wrong. The governor or the legislature. The reporter's job is to collect as much information as possible about their proposals explain to people what those proposals would do and what they would mean. In then explained the potential consequences of those proposals, but then lead up to other people to decide what they think is the right thing to do.

Reporter Jane Peter Hirschfeld Governor Scott State House Representative Vermont
Early June: You Can Still Plant

Plantrama

04:06 min | 2 months ago

Early June: You Can Still Plant

"I would like to say, is that for most people in most parts of this country? Early June is not too late to plant. Now there may be some areas you know in the Florida, you know Texas where it's very hot already. Even in those areas you can probably put in some of those heat, loving plants, tomatoes, eggplants that stuff. Yeah, yeah, but in most parts of the country you can still be planting in early June, and frankly through most of June and it. You can still plant some things from seed so if you haven't yet. Yet put in seeds for your summer squash or your cucumbers or your beans get them in the ground now the warmer soil temperatures will mean that those things will be right out of the ground and up and running, and we'll just catch up. You'll be amazed at how quickly they catch up and other things like the Salads and the Rubella and crops like carrots and radishes by all means plant though seats so are you saying that the warmer soil temperatures will shorten the germination time on those seeds? Yes, yes, though the warmer the soil, the shorter. Shorter Germination time for most plants you can plant a lettuce seed in April in it might take two to three weeks to germinate that same lettuce seed in May might take a week to germinate, and that led a seed in June will be up and three days. Well, that's great especially. If you're an impatient, Gardner like me now I wish I hadn't planted my lettuce seeds. Already because I'm going out there every morning and I'm looking and I'm like where are you? Where are you come on, show your face. Okay, that's good to know it is. Is Not, too. I think a lot of people do think if they haven't already started their seeds by June that they've missed the boat and I'm glad to know that that's not the case that's right and in terms of planting from plants, you know it is a little late to start a tomato from seed right in the ground, but you can certainly plant tomato plants and eggplant plants and pepper plants now so it's not too late to get those in the ground implant form if your garden centers still have them or if you have had them. By your kitchen window, or or in a place you are feeling more and more guilty that you have put them in the ground that happens to a lot of us. Don't feel guilty. Just get them in the ground. I have a friend in Wisconsin and so he's like zone four and he posted the other day on facebook. Because other people are saying Oh. Yeah, there. These are tomatoes. Got Them Ready I'm going to put him outside and he's like. Don't do it. We're going to get some more frost up here and he. He really is a hardcore about this, and he said he said. Said I don't want the earliest tomatoes I want the most tomatoes, so he waits, and he puts his tomato plants out later, because then they are more vigorous, and they do produce better because those soil temperatures are warmer, so take a lesson from that it's not just a matter of last frost date that's deceiving without testing the temperature of your soil with the soil thermometer. You can get a good idea of soil temperature by what your nighttime temperatures are, and if the nighttime temperatures in your area are going below fifty at night, then the soil is too cold for those warm weather crops. But once you can look at that long range forecast in you see that the nighttime temperatures are reliably above fifty for the next seven to ten days. That's a sign you can plant, and for some regions like northern Vermont to and Cape. Cod and northern Wisconsin that fifty degree at night often doesn't come until into June well I. think that's the perfect takeaway and we should end it right here. I did not know that about nighttime temperatures, being reflective of soil temperatures, and I would say to all of our burgeoning vegetable growers there. That's the most important takeaway from this

Gardner Wisconsin Rubella Florida Facebook Vermont Cape Texas
Who Is Strong?

5 Minutes in Church History

04:24 min | 2 months ago

Who Is Strong?

"Just about everybody had one. Strong's exhaustive concordance of the Bible. Seem like you have a Bible and somewhere next to it. You would have strong's concordance. It was first published in eighteen ninety. It contains a numbering system for Hebrew and Greek words. And it has eight thousand, six, hundred, seventy four, Hebrew roots that are numbered and five thousand, five, hundred, twenty three Greek roots that are numbered. This is massive this work, this exhaustive concordance, showing where every word in the Bible could be found with its book, Chapter and verse. It is massive in this before computers before software programs, and before search engines, which means this work was all done by hand well, this same strong also served as editor of the massive ten volume. Cyclo Pedia a Biblical theological and ecclesiastical literature. It was published from eighteen, sixty seven through eighteen, eighty one. And if that's not enough this same strong, finally worked on a committee that produced the American Standard version of the Bible for thirty years. This committee labored from eighteen seventy one until the SV was published in nineteen o one. Charles Hodge was one of those editors Pantheon of scholars of the day one hundred and one editors all worked on the American Standard version, and one of those one hundred and one was the strong. So, who is he well? He is James Strong. He was born in New York City on August, fourteenth, eighteen, twenty, two. He died in New York in eighteen ninety four. He wanted to be a doctor when he was young, but he went off to Wesleyan University in Middletown Connecticut and there he studied Biblical languages among other things he was really layman, and he had a fascinating career. He organized a railroad company, and then built the flushing railroad in the eighteen fifties. It was later incorporated in his actually part of the the railroad subway system of the New York road today. He also served as a mayor of his hometown on Long Island. He taught for a while in Vermont. But his main career was at drew theological seminary, and there he was for twenty five years just prior to going to drew, he was the acting president of Troy University, and sometime in the eighteen fifties, he published an article that the Methodist Church should establish a seminary and the new. York vicinity to train ministers for the Gospel. He was mocked for that article. There were many who thought that you shouldn't train ministers that God just hand picked them, so they should be God trained, not man trained, but strong persistent, and he was soon joined by others and drew theological seminary opened. He was part of what was called the strong five who were among those five who started the seminary. The early president of the seminary was James mclintock. He knew strong back from their days when they were working on that ten volumes cyclope. That massive edited work that strong also served on so the two of them together set off with some other faculty to establish drew. One of his colleagues at drew, said this of James Strong. At night in the library, he worked like a plow horse, but in the lecture room he was a Colt. No one ever went to sleep in his class unless he wasn't bad. Health or an embassy saw well. That's what they thought of James Strong. He spent thirty five years working on the strong's exhaustive concordance. It was published in eighteen ninety. It became a standard text, and as I said just about everybody had a copy of strong's concordance. Well, that's who strong was and I'm Steve Nichols the thanks for joining us for five minutes in Church history.

Charles Hodge Strong New York City Cyclo Pedia Editor Steve Nichols James Mclintock Long Island York Acting President Troy University President Trump Vermont Methodist Church Middletown Connecticut Wesleyan University
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

The Town Haul

09:07 min | 2 months ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish school. So I believe you know similar to Liz. I grew up outdoors playing all the time spending all day in the summertime that we would be out as soon as the sun was up and become home. You know. As soon as it was starting to get dark I grew up camping. You know we would go to the closest national park to win where we grew up was Shenandoah National Park here in Virginia and I still live in this area in that area. So we we go to the park all the time. It's beautiful and so I take my little girl there as well So just growing up. We spent a Lotta time outdoors. I really enjoyed seeing wildlife and spending time and hiking and going to the beach and searching for seashells and that sort of thing when I graduated college. Actually a little bit. Before I graduated college I went on a trip to Andros Island. The Bahamas in it's a family island in the Bahamas and I went to a field station their biological field station and that is where I spent the next six years of my life. After College I worked at the field station. I worked with college. Students and high school high school students helping down learn about ecology and learning field skills in that type of thing and that really helped me really understand value of hands on learning. So you know whenever you education as you know there's sitting in the classroom and learning there is value to that there's also value to being out in the field learning skills. You know the experiential part of that and so. When after that after I left the field station I worked for nonprofit for a little bit in the environmental security sector and that really looked at conflict around natural resources so water timber diamonds was another example and that that was looking at conflicts most likely outside the US. And then. When I started looking for a new opportunity I was really attracted to. Nwf's education programs. We have a very large education program. National Wildlife Federation engaging. Little kids all the way up through adults and so that is kind of what got me hooked at. Nwf and applied for a job on the campus sustainability team. And so I've been here since two thousand three. That's awesome okay so I will let you guys now kind of feel these answer. You know whoever wants to answer white and build upon each other's responses in we're going to focus a lot on education recycle mania but you know the. Nwf Is a massive umbrella brand for a lot of different environmental conservation causes. So I did want to do a little bit of background about the mission. You know the strategic plan the six pillars of what makes the NWF and then we can get into the specs of the educational programs so whoever wants to field kind of the overall NWF mission answer can A. I'll go again and you know the midst of NWF is really to unite ensure that wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world and There's no doubt in all of our minds and these days that our world is rapidly changing whether it's with this pandemic Like we're facing right now or the pack that more than one third of Americans. Fish and wildlife are at risk for extinction or the climate crisis. And of course all of these impacts what the impacts are on any of our marginalized communities so you recently. I just wanted to mention this because I think it's really important and it really sets the stage who I believe. Nwf is particularly right now and our it was CEO Calling Amarah who recently said that we need to be leading this charged with compassion. You know during this time because this pandemic is clearly showing that men. There are many structural inequalities in our societies such as access to clean water food healthcare or the

National Wildlife Federation LIZ Christie Europe Shenandoah National Park Youtube Jones Rubicon Oregon Andros Island Bahamas Lake Champlain Basin Vermont United States Director Greensboro Official Virginia Ceo Calling Amarah
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

The Town Haul

04:53 min | 2 months ago

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today thank you. I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish

National Wildlife Federation Christie Europe Youtube LIZ Lake Champlain Basin Vermont Oregon Jones Rubicon Director Greensboro Kathy Lake Official Partner
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

15:32 min | 2 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"This together. It's the Dave Ramsey show. Wd We're back and we're gonNA talk with Shane. Rogers this next twenty five minutes or so here on the day Graham. Show on WD FM and am. He is with the remote stainless sustainable jobs fund. Which is has organized a rooted in Vermont Promotion about Local foods in our state Before we proceed with all of that I want to make a couple of announcements one. Is that Stay tuned after eleven o'clock this morning we're going to be going to another edition of Governor. Fill. Scott's regular news conferences. He brings in other top state officials and together they make various announcements related to the states response to the covid nineteen crisis and what's being opened. What rules might be being relaxed at this stage of the game and so on and so forth and so always interesting and informative events with the governor and his folks that See to occur Monday Wednesday and Friday at eleven. Am We're carrying them all live here on Wd FM and am? And I should add to that by the way that Bill Sarah's commonsense radio program which normally airs between eleven and twelve in the morning I will not be heard bills got a day off in out of respect for the governor and the state officials who are going to be making various announcements related to the covid nineteen crisis and the other thing I wanted to mention was that Got a follow up email whether it was a it was a correspondent who sent a note in during that first segment from Middlebury talking about today's event a food food distribution program down there And I followed up with the note saying that According to facebook postings in the area the folks there are already seeing big traffic jams around the food distribution site. A lot of folks are are lamenting. What occurred in Berlin last Friday when There were thousands of cars people lined up to get food from free distribution site. Remember folks if you don't really need it It's not just a matter of. Hey Free Food. Let's go down and get ourselves You know a bargain or whatever this is for people who actually need it and if there's that much need out there are economies maybe bigger trouble than we thought If if there is if there are folks that just looking for a Freebie. That's a different story and unless you want to sit in a traffic jam all day and force others. Who actually need to be there. Also the traffic jam. Please stay away. If you don't have a genuine need. Please stay away. That's my advice alright. Well let's bring in Shane. Rogers the with the sustainable jobs fund and rooted in Vermont. And I believe he's on the telephone this morning. Good Morning Shane. Hey Dave thanks for having me glad to do it. And so tell us a first off about The Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund. And and then let's zero in on the rooted in Vermont program and So start with a section A. Of The question. Please sure so. The Vermont sustainable jobs. Fund is a nonprofit that really works throughout Vermont on various different sectors and the sector that I I work in specifically is on Vermont. Food system and Vs J. F. is the backbone organization for the Vermont Farm to plate network and the Vermont. Farm to plate network is Total of about three hundred organizations and businesses and agencies that are working towards Beaumont food system plan so they're working on everything from distribution and aggregation to food access to Land Access and everything in between and I am specifically working on a program and a project that we call rooted in Vermont and lower doing with rooted in Vermont is. We're really trying to celebrate. How offer monitors have been doing local food things for generations right so think everything from hunting and fishing to forge in gardening and really also getting down to just making sure that people feel good about picking up that block of Cabinet Shudder from the grocery store when they go out? Because as we're seeing right now especially Vermont is positioned pretty well to have a resilient food system where our farmers are working really hard. You know to feed their communities and All the support that we can give us consumers to not only make sure that Our small farms. Continue to exist after this by To really shore up Some of those cracks that we're starting to see in the food system now that This pandemic yeah you know I tell you I I had a couple of folks on. I think it was the week before last from the University of Vermont College About Agriculture and Life Sciences We had this Cease to society segment every Thursday. Second Hour. Which is now going on summer vacation. But we're hoping we'll be back in the fall and These folks from the University of Colorado Culture in life sciences. We're talking about local foods in Vermont and I asked them to tell me How Close Vermont was to if it had a goal of imagining itself as an island in able to sustain itself on food grown either within the state or within you know maybe fifty miles of our borders or whatever New Hampshire New York Massachusetts Quebec. How close were we to actually being able to feed ourselves and the answer was Quite a ways away You know we're we're not not even close to halfway there but what what's your read of that. Do you think that's true or do you think that we're closer than Than maybe that estimate Told us I think that's a pretty keen assessment of it to be honest You Know Vermont is A really ahead of the curve from a lot of states throughout the country on their localized food system by Also the fact is that we live in a northern state. We have really long winters and Sure we could probably feed ourselves caloric Lee Right I. I saw a news article where someone said that if we wanted to plant potatoes throughout the whole entire state You know we could get enough calories For every single vermonter if we converted more farmland. Bhai who wants to eat potatoes day in and day out. You know that would not be a fun diet or a good diet to have more realistically what we're looking at is really a regional food system. So that includes you know all our New England states in New York as well and really identifying what that looks like to be able to feed US regionally. And even when you're looking at You know the goal one of the goals that have been set by a couple of organizations throughout this area is really trying to get to feeding fifty percent and providing fifty percent of our food by Two thousand sixty so the reality is. I don't think we're GONNA be able to feed ourselves especially if folks you know what oranges and Avocados and coffee and all that other stuff that goes with it by. Our farmers are working really hard to be able to provide a lot of good stuff that we need spring. Greens and of course Are Maple Syrup topper pancakes and some of the beer and wine? That's been being produced as well. I we talk about the the the crucial problem of coffee. Right right how are you going into morning? I think a lot of reminders are heavily reliant on coffee in the morning myself included and We I'm not. I'm not picturing that people growing much coffee in Vermont roasting it. Yes but not Not Growing it here in the Green Mountains Unless and until we have some really severe climate change. Yikes let's not even go there But I think the I think that You Know I. It's obviously it's a good thing to think about Supporting our local our local farmers to the extent you know they are providing some of our dietary needs and so on and and obviously I think a lot of people in Vermont sense that the agricultural economy here is very important in terms of keeping people employed and working and and keeping some of our our where you know or financial wherewithal within the state's borders so there are many positive aspects of it but I also want to keep in perspective that And not not get people you know. Sort of overestimating The role of local food. We're going to need to be importing food and and Related items into Vermont for a for a long long time to come and and So let's hope that the supply chains Of whatever type remain as open as they can because we we rely on them we. That's the nature of our of our our current society. In the way we feed ourselves and and all of that sort of thing. But you have you you. You have some some interesting stuff going on. And and one of the one of the issues with the local food movement in Vermont. Right now is we had this concern really As of a month ago or so and I think it's still continues to some extent about farmers markets in the state those are key lynchpin of kind of the local foods scene here And while they've started up This season seasoning are looking a lot different than they did. Last season is that fair. Yeah that's a fair assessment. And there was a lot of work happening. You know within the state and With different organizations that are involved with the farmers markets to make sure that our farmers have outlet to reach consumers. I think one of Best Parts about is just the mass amount of farmers markets that people can pop into and you know folks rely on that to be able to connect with people throughout their area To not only sell their goods but on the other side you know to pick up those farm fresh good so it's been I think what we're seeing is. How adaptable our farms? And our farmers markets have been you know we had to. Everybody had to kind of take a step back and reassess what that would look like. And we're seeing a model that I think should be able to carry us through the summer and for as long as this will last and people are doing a really good job at making sure that everybody a stained safe while still being able to provide that local food. One of the things that you all are are it. Looks like an involved in is the effort by the Vermont. Food Bank State over Mont Abby Group Vermont National Guard to provide boxes of chicken produce dairy products and non perishable food distributions held throughout the state I gather that event in Berlin last Friday was one of these in the one today in Middlebury. Is that right? Yeah and I will say that. We're not directly involved with that. But you know the Vermont. Food Bank and Those different groups are involved with the Vermont. Him To play network by. They're really doing an awesome job at at making sure that Vermont. Who are in need are able to get that food and I think really one of the biggest things that shows that There's a lot of cracks in our food system right. And we're seeing that more and more and It's really driving home. The point that There's work that we still need to do to be able to shore that up because folks shouldn't be having to go hungry especially when something like this hits and there's so much uncertainty and it's it's been inspiring to me to see not only these organizations and agencies stepped up but also just communities in general i. I don't know where where you live gave. But in my area I just seen an outpouring of support on Front Porch Forum and on different social media Of people really wanting to make sure that their neighbors are provided for. And they're taking care and I really think that's the Vermont Way and that's part of the reason why we're seeing so much success in that's right we're not just all out For for ourselves. But rather we're looking out for each other too which is pretty inspiring if you ask me if you look at the pictures from the particularly the died. The Times Argus had from the event in Berlin on on Friday I I guess I have to ask was the that looks like a lot of need when you see all those cars lined up there around the airport in stretching out onto the interstate and neighboring roads and so on of people lined up to get food Tells me that this economic crash we're experiencing is real. It's huge it's it's put people Way Too often into pretty desperate situations Do think that that those pictures accurately reflect a a huge boom in need out there or do you think the a significant percentage of the folks in that line on Friday were there be just because they heard hater something here for free. I really think that it reflects the need I know UV Came out with a study when this all I hit and they saw Food Insecurity had risen by a third since the pandemic started. And it really paints a picture for me at least that a lot of folks in our state you know are living in one paycheck away from a crisis and I think that's a shame in and of itself and while there's a lot of great work happening on the ground whether that's through our state agencies or whether it's through these organizations or businesses that are stepping up Really like you said I. It's it's an indictment on one the economy that is making it possible for something. Hit like this people to experience that much I wouldn't I wouldn't think that many people lining up just to pull a Freebie right and of course we would encourage people not to not to do that because there are people that truly struggling out there. Yeah that's that's what I was saying at the beginning of this half hour and we were talking about it with Steve Pappas of the Times Argus In the first half hour this morning. Same kind of a conversation Shane. We've been talking a little bit about these food distribution sites around the state. Let's see Berlin last Friday Middlebury Today. And and by the way it looks like we're hearing reports of traffic jams around the middle recite today. I don't know if there is bad as they were on.

Vermont University of Vermont College Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund Shane Berlin Dave Ramsey Vermont Farm Rogers Mont Abby Group Vermont Nation Scott New England University of Colorado Culture Green Mountains Cabinet Shudder
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:17 min | 4 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I don't WanNa say concerns but one of the things we have to factor into this. That makes it very difficult at this time For Instance Pretty Much. All of my staff is working from home. They're all teleworking at this point But they also have because schools are out in. Daycares are closed and You know maybe their partners are their spouses or their partners are essential workers or whatever all impacts how they are their ability to work from home and I know that for instance in our staff Prior to the last three weeks we actually about six or seven weeks ago. We started looking at Basically taking an inventory of all of our staff And what their capabilities were from home. did they have Internet service to have a PC at home A phone line. Whatever and and trying to determine what the needs we're going to be as we were starting to go down this path. We literally started probably six to seven weeks ago looking at this. We ordered extra laptops in so that we would be able to send people home with with the proper tools that they would need In order to serve Vermont offers We've been able to transition quickly But it does take a toll on families Y You know when you've got the kids running around the house and and You know spouses trying to work from home and and It does create some interesting scenarios and and we have to basically adjust and be flexible with what we're doing. I mean it's you know the the idea that someone will Perhaps worked seven forty five to four thirty. Which are the state hours it might be? They started at six thirty. And and You know maybe work till eight o'clock at night but take breaks in between during the day as the day goes on because they might have to assist with Childcare or or other things around the house So you know there's a lot of systems that you know we've we've been adjusting. Since I took.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Between now and July. I get that Certainly over these first few weeks There's a lot of scrambling and shuffling to deal with the health situation at hand. This is where the request for the general public to be really diligent to do social distancing. You've got to flatten the curve. So that We slow the influx. That's going to happen to a medical system and as we can find a temporary new normal that will then allow the legislature and administration. That's working on the budget side of things to do that. Work necessary through the next few months. I do think that will be possible however the new normal clearly I believe is going to carry on for a few months. Obviously the current school closures through April. Six other states and municipalities have had closed their schools for the remainder of the school year I don't know whether the governor's going to do that or not. But I have to believe that the April sixth time line will be extended given the current Statistical and Epidemiological progression. That's expected you know in our own country in the last twenty four hours on that same. Cnn headline page. There's at four thousand five hundred new cases David sermon. Lieutenant Governor the state of Vermont. We are about out of time but I appreciate you joining me this morning. I hope we can get updates for you in the coming days and weeks This has been very informative and helpful. Well have me on. Anytime and on our website L. P. Vermont Dot. We'll try to clean up dates as well short handed. So it's GonNa be tough already. Thanks again for today's program a tune in the morning for another addition of our show and stay tuned. Now for special news conference with the Governor Phil Scott..

David sermon L. P. Vermont Dot Phil Scott Vermont Cnn
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:01 min | 5 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"She was in street. Clothes and and She said they've been told that they they need to You know where they're gonNA close to work and then change when they get to work and then change again before they leave work. The object of that whole exercise being not to bring home Any exposure cove nineteen on on scrubs basically And I would. I would gather that. Similar routines are changing in In long term care facilities as well right. I think that's absolutely true as much as I can be happening. That's absolutely happening. I mean I am awed I I will echo said I'm awed by the healthcare workforce out there right now in the work that they're doing just showing up every day commonsense no nonsense approach to taking care of people that they are charged with taking care of the. This is a this is unprecedented in the state of Vermont. I think this is unprecedented in this country and across the world. And we've all been hearing those stories so I agree one hundred percent with you hats off to every single one of those healthcare workers that are just showing up every day to take care of people And I think that all of them harshened are in place. People are working really hard to do what they need to do to prevent the spread. And that's been the message from the governor from the very beginning of this what we need to do is minimize knowing that it's a virus and knowing that it's out there and knowing that there's some level we're going to have to deal with. We absolutely need to slow it down. We need to make sure that are are most acute care facilities are hospitals are have the capacity that they need all the way through this To Take Care of people that most need them And I think that that both healthcare workers and really Vermont is in general are doing extraordinary work to just limit their own exposure limit the risks themselves with the risk of each other. You know you see people staying home and hungering down and being really cautious about that and I think our healthcare workforce is on high alert. And doing that both in their private and personal lives but also in their professional lives and pretty amazing way. You know I've also heard An I T shirt people. I've seen this. But in other countries you know there are these moments in time where the whole country's just kind of shouting out to healthcare workers and I know that that's happening in pockets in Vermont as well where certain point in time people are coming out on their road and clapping and hooting and hollering. And begging just say thank you to those healthcare workers that are that are living next door to us right all all in our neighborhoods everywhere across the state justice and thanks for hanging in there and doing the work that they do and I am. I am so proud to be part of the state and so proud to be part of this effort in whatever small way I am because it is. It is on firing. Yeah it it. It really is.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:22 min | 5 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Long does that disease hang out on account or whatever and that kind of all if they don't know how long before they'll figure that out well first of all within your sneeze and cough can can pollute a room up to six feet so again. If you're around someone who's sick. You really ought to be standing as far away from them as possible As far as how long it leaves on surfaces I do not know I believe several hours but again I do not know With any kind of assurance to be able to say that that is why you should wash down all surfaces where you're coming contact with especially in in a public place like a grocery store with Again a sanitizer. That has at least sixty percent alcohol That's that would be something that would be a wise thing to do And and even if we know if you you know if you knew it was three hours would you touch it? Four hours later and not wash your hands. Of course you know that makes doesn't make sense so it makes sense to just continue to wash your hands and wipe down surfaces that you've touched that May Have Contaminated Alright. Well I want to thank my guests Doctor Never Richter and healthcare writer. Hamilton Davis for doing extra duty here on the day Graham show. Wd FM and am talking about this difficult topic of the Cobra virus. The two of you thank you so much for coming in this morning a few months ago. I think it was sometime last year or so. We had a visit From a gentleman named Stephanie Wolfert. Who IS A veteran mill? Us military veteran Has had a lot of experience with PTSD and has Decided to make an art form out of this and Stephan Wolford is going to be in the central Vermont area over the next couple of weeks. putting on performances of his play cry havoc as well as Participating in forums devoted to trying to help veterans who are trying to ease their lives of PTSD and and reduce the symptoms. There and Mr Wolford Just arrived in the studio in the last Fifteen or twenty seconds here so glad to see that you were able to make it in this morning. Thanks so much for joining. Thanks for having me and so I do recall. We had you on the program once before I believe the last year before the show and you Have you been bringing the show around the country since then? Yeah in fact My wife and I it converted Mercedes Sprinter van because we're on tour full-time. We traveled around the country. We've put on over one hundred thousand miles in the last two years hitting over thirty. Two States Delivering not only CRA HAVOC PERFORMANCE BUT DECREE OUR PROGRAM. De Crude which is a treatment program for veterans And so So it's really a two pronged approach here with which you return to central remind here and I know that you are One of the one of the sort of touch spots for you here is Norwich University. Of course a big military presence at the nation's oldest private military college there in Northfield Vermont and So tell us Let's see I. I saw his schedule..

PTSD Us Mr Wolford Doctor Never Richter Northfield Vermont Stephan Wolford Stephanie Wolfert Norwich University Hamilton Davis Vermont writer Graham
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

10:41 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"My guess. Is Nick. Richardson he is the president of the Vermont. Land Trust Presto is an organization based in my earlier They but they are spread out around the state and been doing a lot of work over the past. I guess forty three years. Now since nineteen seventy seven quite an impressive History there and Nikki. Were telling me before the break that One of your big issues right now is to try to keep farmland in farming thing and one of the tricks. There's to keep farmers and farming in new generations in farming. What about that? Yeah you're a good point Dave and you know it's not in some ways it's not rocket science science right But it is. It isn't important difficult thing to do and We are seeing a lot of change in the nature. Farming and what kind of operations are viable here in Vermont Mont but I want to remind folks I mean I think there's a there's a headline story about farming that We hear a lot about that. It's we're in trouble that The future is difficult. We're seeing Definitely some challenges. We also see a lot of really great entrepreneurs getting out there on the landscape and that's one of the things that we're really focused on supporting. How do we get this next generation performers onto land and that includes dairy farmers by the way we work very closely with our dairy farm community? There are some fantastic dairy operators out there who are doing everything right who are cleaning cleaning up their land cleaning a helping to clean up the lake And we're really excited to be working with those folks in a bunch of different ways. We're also helping. The next generation of more diversified farmers get on an and Vermont. Senator Position I think to be able to Grow food that the rest of the country wants to wants to eat and wants to buy and were excited about that and we feel really Really enthusiastic about that on so I think in some sometimes you have to dig a little bit below that top line story that we've all been hearing recently about the troubles of agriculture. Certainly a lot of challenges but any farmer who's been on this land Knows that that there's always a lot of challenge that goes into farming. And that's that's part of what's exciting about it and people get out there And And they come up with with new solutions for model. So has you know. Some of the the best quality agricultural products in the state including two years running the best cheese in America. You know. So we've got. We've got a lot to work with here. And I think there are a bunch of folks that are really interested in working with us to figure out what that solution can be. So if you go in you and you purchase a conservation easement on a two hundred acre dairy farmland Satan and and and the dairy farmer there is getting older getting ready to retire and and nobody's appearing on the horizon to take over the farm and milk the cows and do all the other things involved in taking care of a dairy farm. But somebody else comes in and says I want to use this barn to grow hemp or And I want to build a greenhouse over here to grow saffron or something Is that success. I think the success of the land continues to the good luck growing having a bar But I I think it's a successive Philan- continues to be an agricultural recoil production And in fact I think it's a success if there continues to be more of a broader diversity of what's going grown in Vermont We are largely really a dairy state. And I think that's great But also be good for us to continue to diversify the products that are grown here. So I say yes and people. People do all kinds of different things in terms of their agricultural production on land That's conserved with the Vermont. Land Trust. We have mushroom. Farmers Dairy farmers We have hydroponic lettuce Atis. We've got beef. All those things are really important to having a vibrant working landscape here in Vermont. The acreage would vary right. I mean you think to traditional dairy farm some of its land in in corn to feed the cows and and You don't need as much acreage of corn and you might just have a smaller lot So so what happens with the balance of the land is all stay with the farm. Or how does that work. We'll once he wants a farm is conserved with the Vermont. Land Trust Land Unless there's some very unusual. All circumstances cannot be subdivided. And so it's that farm is gonNA Move together and it's GonNa be You know one farm complex And so yeah they'll be questions. Thousands of that how that lane gets managed. oftentimes there are other farmers around who might leased that land pull. Hey off of it So there there are a lot of possibilities When you think about what's The a community of farmers that might surround a particular piece and yet we are? We are concerned and focused on The potential that land might start to follow in Vermont. And you know what is it that we can be you doing to help to make sure that that that doesn't happen and I think the work that we're focused on getting the next generation of farmers onto land is implicitly about that where we're looking to put two hundred new and beginning farmers onto land over the next decade. That's twice the number that we did over the past and I think that's both about the opportunity that we see that exists in agriculture and the number of people want to farm in Vermont but also to address that issue. That once land goes foul if it's if it's out of production for five or ten years then you're losing soil productivity vity You know you might. You might might be difficult to turn that land back into production so we want to be working with folks on to make sure that doesn't happen and there. There probably are some places across Vermont or you might be close to a to a leg to a river in other other water system. Where in some cases that might not be such a bad thing to see land? Go back into native grasses grasses to other kinds of other kinds of growth. And so it's going to be an interesting conversation That we're going to be having at the state level. I think for a long time to come where where are the best places for farming and Vermont. How do we make sure that we Are Protecting the other values of care. A lot about as we Ensure that there's a robust future for farming here it. Meanwhile they're these demographic issues on the farm where many many farmers are are getting older and they are getting ready to retire or thinking about retiring certainly in the next five or ten years and And there aren't necessarily the same numbers of young people stepping up How do is helping with recruitment and with that kind of work orb? What's what's happening there? Yeah absolutely I think you know it was really exciting for me. We were in the State House last week. for the Vermont Housing Conservation Coalition Day At the State House and we had forty five people come and not just working with partners but forty five folks come and testify. I had the privilege to sit in the The ABC committees for the House and the Senate last week and bring farmers in You know four four out of the five farmers that we have our new and beginning farmers folks that were you know three to four years in young folks starting families families Taking farms that were either. Just come out of production or have been out of production for some time and returning them back to a higher value for us so It is essential for the demographic challenge that we face across remote is is just is true if not more so in our rural communities are working landscapes and so we need to bring in the next generation of folks that are GonNa come in and take over imagine this land the benefit of all of us and I think the lucky thing for us here in Vermont and we literally have hundreds of people bowl Who are in contact with over Motlanthe and our partners who are interested in doing that and a lot of them? Have the skills to be successful. So we're really excited about it. I who I was reading up on the Vermont Lane a little bit and one of the things Here says Employees Vermont offers export products and materials. This is describing. Farmers enforced worse than owners as small business owners and and VAT and partners of providing services to bolster these sectors and shed light on their importance in our overall economy. It also mentions the fact that small business people who are farmers and foresters are buying materials and services from nearby businesses. Now there is sort of picture you know somebody going down down to the grain store or just going down to buy a new part for the tractor or something at the at the local tractor dealer or whatever what kind of what kind of help is able to provide on that segment of the economy. Well I I think it's a really important point theatre articulating. Their Dave is that Farms and and and working working forests contribute and really important ways the vitality of our rural communities and I think we all have seen the data or if you had something. We spent a lot of time with that The economic and social indicators the You know the statistics are broadly speaking for rural communities or in some ways moving in in the wrong direction while The Economic Statistics Chilton County. are are much stronger and so we're really focused on that. And what can we do to help to support rural communities to vital going forward and one of the best things. I think that we can do WANNA things. That's absolutely essential for us to do is make sure we protect the businesses. That are already in emplacing and do so much to contribute they create You know the networks and the the sort of foundation for anything that's GONNA come in a real economies and if you lose farming and you lose forestry I read from a rural economies than you lose general stores you lose schools. You know all of those things they they really are interrelated and depend on each other just like I think it's my have you strongly here in Vermont that we are interrelated and depend on each other and we need to work together whether we live in in Chilton county or suburban can potentially suburban community around Burlington or we're in Ferdinand or Benetton or you know wherever you are we're one st and we need to be working together to solve problems. Climate resiliency is another topic. That gets a lot of attention these days and I gather that the Vermont Land Trust is a quite interested in this and Ndo what's What's happening on that front with folks? Yeah thanks Dave I mean I think we're you know we're doing some some nation leading work in bringing landowners together to participate in forest carbon markets. And it's a very complicated set of issues and topics And the ways in which it works that I could spend a couple of hours and still still probably I. I might not be able to explain it with with the full detail that we all need to understand it. But the essential pieces this that our forests earn Vermont sequester store a tremendous amount of carbon each year and we're figuring out ways that the typical landowners across from folks that own one hundred and fifty two hundred acres can get access to revenue so get paid basically for the carbon that's getting sequestered western their forests and that helps people To do the kinds of stewardship that lead to healthy for us over time. Vermont has eighty percent of our forests are privately owned and people are making private individual and I would say subway's business decisions about how they manage this forest and so getting helping people get paid for the revenue that comes get get revenue for the carbon and that's sequestered in their woods is gonNA help them To make decisions about their stewardship that leads to healthier force over time. And we're working really closely with folks to make that happen We have a demonstration prod project that's underway right now. Twelve landowners eight thousand acres up in the northern Greens..

Vermont Vermont Land Trust Farmers Dairy farmers lake And Vermont Mont Land Trust Dave Employees Vermont Vermont Housing Conservation C Nikki Nick Richardson president Senator Ndo State House Chilton county emplacing lane
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:32 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Store. The friendly funky and almost world-famous warrants door for sponsoring our podcast and Speaking of by looking up recent shows by guests Nick Richardson. Richardson is my next guest. He is with the Vermont. Land Trust Statewide Organization. Based in Montpellier involved in as its name implies in a lot of land use issues in Vermont and we WANNA get caught up with the Vermont. Land Trust find out what it's been up to lately. What some of the issues out? There are from their perspective and Nick. Richardson is with me in the studio Knicks. Thanks so much for coming in this morning Dave. It's a real pleasure. Thanks for having me yet and So tell us a little bit about. What is the Vermont Land Trust? How long has it been in business? And what what are your main missions. Sure I'm well I'll just say I know today. There's a lot of focus on national politics and the Iowa caucuses are happening and that's totally appropriate and It's you know it's important in a lot of ways chaotic time. It's exciting for me to be working with an organization like the Vermont Land Trust. That is really focused on doing good work. All across our state and It's about a life we've been around for about forty years now started in nineteen seventy seven And grew from a small local land trust in the audit Kuichi Valley to be a statewide conservation organization. We're one of the largest land trusts in the country in one of the smallest states in the country and have conservation easement on on about eleven percent of the Land Vermont about seven hundred thousand acres. Wow that's that's all The result of great work by a team of really dedicated hardworking folks at and our state partners And each one of those easement is the result of a direct conversation with the landowner here in Vermont saying yeah I want to conserve. Serve my land Put it into the land trust and make sure that that land stewardship and keeping this is working land something that's going to happen Into perpetuity for her for a long time to come and It's been a really great honor to be working With with those landowners across the state and and increasingly with with our communities and saying how can land a part of the solution for Vermont in terms of Economic Development Community vitality. You know all those things that we're all trying foreign foreign shooting for we're really asking the question from Lantra What is Vermont? Need from us today recognizing that that answer might be a little bit different than it was thirty years ago. Yeah I wanted to ask you about that And I will say that in just a couple minutes we go to a bottom of the hour news break for CBS News. So we're going to continue the conversation after that break But I wanted to and find out. What's the biggest change you've seen over the past thirty years in terms of what is needed from the Motley? Trust in what you're actually doing. Yeah thanks I mean I think the biggest change we're seeing now is that there's a lot of shift happening in our agricultural economy right so the nature of farming is changing And Conservation easement just has taken the development rights off those lands to make sure that it remains working lands. It's just not enough day of realizing that we need to be working very actively with landowners To be thinking about who's the next generation of farmers that can come in here and do his great job stewarding these resources and and Stewardess working lands as the folks that have been in this land for peace in the past. So we're working really the hard with Exiting farmers and landowners and bringing really working to bring the next generation of farmers onto land in Vermont. And I'm excited to tell you more about that all right. I think we are going to do that in just a couple of minutes. Looks like we are getting ready to go to our body our CBS news break. Maybe a couple of words our sponsors nick. Richardson is my guest. He's with the Vermont Land Trust and We'll continue.

Vermont Land Trust Vermont Nick Richardson Land Trust Statewide Organizat CBS Montpellier Iowa Knicks Kuichi Valley CBS News
"vermont" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

04:09 min | 7 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Vermont has introduced a bill calling for the band of cell phones in that state for anyone under the age of twenty one no he's not really serious but some say maybe he should be this was just kind of to make a point John Rogers is the Vermont state senator who wrote the bill I want people to think about what freedoms and liberties are they willing to give up in the name of safety and we know that cell phones kill more teenagers every year then gone stale Rogers says he knows his bill won't make it to the floor and if it did he says he certainly wouldn't vote for it to him it's all about driving home a point over understanding this nation's first and second amendment rights Seton's can extend seventy newsradio health officials are inspecting Yosemite National Park food service areas after at least a dozen people have fallen ill with stomach issues the National Park Service and the U. S. public health service tell the San Francisco Chronicle they launched an investigation after employees investors are part of the problems this month federal officials say they haven't identified the illness or the origin of the outbreak park officials say all those who had gotten sick are getting better or have already recovered governor Newsome wants to in the Houston is ation of animals that could be adopted his budget plan calls for fifty million dollars to go to develop a program to help shelters keep cats and dogs alive Holly size more with the best friends animal society tells KNX only one state currently is a no kill state and not state of Delaware so a tiny states of California the following the over Delaware that would be really huge there's a few other states that are on the cost so the race is on size more says California shelters right now put down more animals than any other state besides Texas put the earth moon and sun on a particular alignment at ocean water and you have a recipe for what's called a king tide and depending on where you are you might see the effects of the next two to three days with the moon is closest approach to the earth aligned with the some of the same time the gravity forces create the king tied a tied up to a foot or more higher than usual maybe spilling over walkways and marinas and a low tide the could be quite extraordinary according to county lifeguard it'll sh specialist polo Barnes you get those very very low tides that go way way out and it's very shallow you know like maybe a hundred yards out low lying areas in Huntington in Newport beach could see some flooding of lifeguards war with dramatic shifts of the tide levels he could have struck a recurrence than usual we'll have one more king tide episode to affect our beaches about one month from now in Manhattan Beach Pete Demetriou KLX ten seventy newsradio the FBI has new protocols concerning how it conducts electronic surveillance in national security cases a justice department inspector oral report had criticized the bureau's handling of the rush investigation now wire tap applications will be more closely analyze before they are submitted for a judge's approval and they must contain accurate information about the reliability and potential bias of sources providing the intelligence additional training will also be implemented five fifty or check your money with John Doniger fast food jobs with a future it may be the end product of taco bell's experiment with paying some store managers a salary of one hundred thousand dollars it's because of the pressure of a tight labor market chains of already had to up their pay game to attract cooks Applebee's biggest franchisee for one says the labor market is as tight as it is ever been but we have we reached the tipping point economists are starting to wonder after the week December jobs report that not only saw fewer jobs created last month that economists predicted but also saw average hourly wage is all that stands still customer concerns about animal welfare nutrition and climate change leading to some big changes for Pinera bread it's planning to have at least half its future menu made up only of plant based offerings basically it's half way there right now roughly a quarter of Pinera's menu offerings or non meat on wallstreet the Dow fell a hundred thirty three the nasdaq twenty five the S. and P. nine we check your money at twenty and fifty after each hour I Bloomberg's Joan Doniger from the H. M. S. capital money desk Kay and extend seventy newsradio artificial intelligence.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:07 min | 8 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Consumption around the holidays. Is I think such a special the thing and something that we In the cheese industry we we really love that. People love to share food with each other around the holiday. Season's Rosie during your just completed studies at the University of Vermont. Were you able to take a course on the history of cheese. I did not the history of cheese but DR K. is sort of principles and fundamentals of cheese. Making Course Angie's I'm just because unfortunately the nature of a master's is only two years so you don't have a lot of time to sit in every course but thankfully my schedule worked out so I could take Dr K. is fundamentals of cheese making course but being in the cheese industry Dr Kim said is somewhat of an icon. I'm not sure if If everybody knows that have how how famous he is and I'd interacted with Dr k before actually in the number of conference and educational settings where I got no chance to hear some of his abbreviated or bridge Lectures on the history three anti making. Yeah it's pretty fascinating stuff. I'm sort of curious. Maybe when I retire I'll come up the Audi the history of course it just. I'm very curious anyway. The the the Let's see here I. This is kind of amazing and I mean this this says the speaks volumes right here. But I've got friends at college drag culture and life sciences occasionally send us a little informational introductions to topics that. We're going to have on the show here on these Thursdays seeds to society segments and This one says Vermont's cheese industry is flourishing with more cheese makers per capita than any other. US State and growing recognition on the national international stage. A A new record was set this summer. The American Cheese Society's thirty-six annual awards competition with Vermont Producers Bringing Home Forty four ribbons including five finalists for best of show make Markey Vermont's best show in the date that that is truly amazing record. Oh my goodness yes. It was an incredible season for us and Dr Cake and actually speak more to sort of the history of cheese making in Vermont. Because I'm a relatively new addition here but I think whatever monsters you don't realize because they're in this incredible bubble in the state that we have some of the best. She's in the country. If not you know comp- cheese that competes on a sort of world world-scale and we're very unique here because we're a small say we don't have many people and we have this incredible wealthier. Incredible sort of concentration traces of these cheeses and high quality milk and these cheesemakers doing absolutely incredible very very innovative thing so we live in very special state for cheese. It's a beautiful thing and just one of the many reasons I think Vermont is feel lucky to live here. Hey you know I hate to say this. But that is We're running out of time here on this edition of the Dave Graham Show W. Dav FM and am Rosie. Neil thanks very much for joining us better late than never and really nice chatting with you so that I could make it for the end Dr Balkans to thank you. Who is well and good luck with the continuing development of Vermont season streets? I'M GONNA WATCH IT already. Rabbit up the day Graham show here on this Thursday Thursday December the twelve thousand in one thousand nine. Thanks for joining us back again.

Markey Vermont Rosie American Cheese Society DR K. University of Vermont Vermont Dr k Dr Kim Dave Graham Dr Cake Audi US Angie Neil
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Runs not there's also work in ohio where we work with american municipal power on a large scale scale efficiency program in in ohio's municipal utility service territories. We're working in wisconsin on the focus on energy program california oregon illinois <hes> so the consulting side of e._m._c. and the other divisions that are working outside of vermont. <hes> are really on the cutting leading edge of energy issues nationally enter <hes> that work is really beneficial for the state of vermont because those colleagues can bring back the learnings to vermont and then we can incorporate those into our programs to the extent that it makes sense here <hes> an is beneficial and part of the solution that would work in vermont altogether e._s._e. He has how many employees two hundred eighty at this point. Mr keelan commentary cited three hundred and eighty three which is not correct the two hundred and eighty person organization right now yeah <hes> and and so i'm just thinking about the kind of highly technical skills that go into these consulting positions you have. I'm sure traveling around the country and talking to folks about what are the most effective ways to save energy and their own situations and so on and i guess i'm not that shocked doc by twelve people out of this group making the salary range in the in the mid i <hes> that if i could speak to the point <hes> it's not about the words shocked or not. It's about that continuing monitoring because like any entity of efficiency vermont v._c._e. Needs to be focused on. How can they lean their your operations because you have to remember in the end what does paid for by repairs and repairs deserve the best use of their money. I agree one hundred percent. You alright all right well. That's a great note on which to end this <hes>. Thank you very much to rebecca foster of e v. I c efficiency vermont june tierney the commissioner of the apartment of public service. I heard that let go by elizabeth grip copter of beauty digger excellent conversation. Thank you all so much and that's about it for the day graham show on this wednesday morning. I'd stay tuned for commonsense radio with bill sayer have a great day everybody..

vermont ohio bill sayer Mr keelan wisconsin rebecca foster commissioner illinois graham e._m._c. oregon california one hundred percent
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"<hes> who had an op ed column and b._t. Dig or a couple of yeah. No i hear you absolutely the <hes>. The bottom line here is it's an open bidding process. That's done and the ultimate <hes> contractors selected from those who choose to put in responses sponsors and the guidelines of the state are followed so i don't know that that gives you much satisfaction except to say that if north carolina contractors chosen chosen is because there was no better option i actually do have some more comfort that i can provide <unk> becca <hes> we looked into that claim after seeing seeing that in the op-ed <hes> and i agree with the point that mr cunanan made that we should be using vermont firms whenever possible and the good news is that we actually are <hes> so the auditor that we use johnson lambert based out of burlington <hes> they have a partner firm that they use to check and sign off on all of their nonprofit filings that partner firm based in north carolina and so that's why that appeared on <hes> our ninety former i._r._s. Reporting <hes> so i definitely take the point that mr keeler was making about working in vermont building fremont businesses and strengthening the remind economy wherever possible <hes> and we're certainly doing that you know another example is working to bring our rebate processing an in house over moaners doing that <hes> as opposed to in the past austin a firm in southern new england. <hes> the good news there is that we've done that at a cost savings to vermont so it's a win win and that's the kind of thing that we're looking to do more more and more in the future. Take you for the call. I want to go to liam in burlington good morning liam. Yes i think you guys expanded on this a little bit whether you know through binding rising the m._v._p. Or expanding into the mid west and other states <hes> but i keep on hearing that efficient month role might be standing on. I'm wondering what that means generally and more specifically with vermont yes so <hes> thanks for the question liam. It's a great question because it's right at the crux of where we are right now. <hes> <hes> in the past legislative session of act sixty two <hes> was enacted which requires the public utilities commission to hold a proceeding where we look look at what more ought efficiency vermont be doing if anymore and a big topic right now is weatherization and how we heat and how he'd do that efficiently efficiently and that has not been traditionally the central focus of what efficiency vermont's doing last twenty years have been spent mostly on <hes> looking collect usage but <hes> the the low lying fruit in that room has been realized and so now i think it's a good time for us to be asking what it should you be doing a now by way of a second stage and secondly <hes>. How should you be doing that given the presence of the distribution bution utilities and other third parties in the market and the transformed energy landscape so that's what the inquiries going to be about is to see what more if anything they should should be doing and then from my perspective <hes> as the agency that has the ratepayer advocate <hes> what what is affordable for us to be doing and how should we be paying. Oh for that you lose with greek off. I know you need to be leaving in a couple of minutes for a meeting but i wanted to give you another chance to. You've asked a couple of terrific questions. Do you have anything else on your mind that you wanted to run by rebecca foster and june tierney here. I think this is with answering my discussion ezra my main question. I don't think i have anything else to ask. You can advocate on liam's liam's question. I think that <hes> we talked a little bit earlier in the program about the changing energy landscape and you know certainly were excited about the prospect of doing more evaluated work vermont in the future and are interested in seeing what role we could play that would make use of the investment that the state has made inefficiency vermont in the past twenty years make use of the state wide scale make use of the customer relationships that we have we touch about <hes> a hundred thousand residential customers in a year and fifteen thousand business customers so that's basically almost twenty percent of the state participating in our program so we're really looking for new ways as tell leverage that to do more and serve more for monitors and i do want to thank elizabeth group cough for joining us this morning.

vermont liam burlington north carolina mr keeler mr cunanan partner new england johnson lambert fremont june tierney auditor austin rebecca foster elizabeth twenty years twenty percent
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"And and that really the <hes> i think is one of the reasons one of the reasons obviously that your organization has won. A lot of national awards has been been by larger israel's success story in the state of reminding has been emulated elsewhere <hes> and just so i understand the structure it basically v i see see is a is an independent company is that right into a nonprofit company which has as one of its arms or whatever maybe you can explain this better the nikon i hope so eventually vermont or one one of its roles is to operate as efficiently reminded in the state correct correct so v i c was founded as a nonprofit in nineteen eighty-six and in one thousand nine hundred nine the organization competed in a competitive bid process to operate efficiency vermont and was selected acted <hes> so since two thousand we've been operating the efficiency vermont programs for the state of vermont and then since that time we've also continued to add to our work outside of the state in ohio washington d._c. Hawaii oregon california we work in about thirty five states <hes> that's a really beneficial structure sure for vermont because then we can bring back the learnings and the experience from those other states vermont while as june said being really regulated and governed by the department of public service and the public utility commission to ensure that vermont has the oversight that it needs and i don't want to forget about elizabeth grip on the phone v._p. Digger unfortunately we're about ought to go to a bottom of the hour break in. We're gonna bring elizabeth in a little bit after that <hes> who are gonna here c._b._s. News upcoming couple words sponsors and continue our conversation about ati fifty vermont after the break here on the graham show w._d. F._m. and a._m. Back shortly folks ah. I wish i had a dollar for every compliment. I get about our selection upstairs at the warren store. The season's collection boasts country casual clothing for men and women dresses for.

vermont elizabeth nikon warren store israel ohio graham Hawaii oregon california
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Setting the course of the direction for the efficiency utility and so when this last go round i mean over the course of the last <hes> twenty years many changes happening in the efficiency utility structure and <hes>. I'll thank you that's that's much better and so <hes> the advisory committee was disbanded back around the time i think when the order of appointment was put in place and the efficiency utility was under the auspices of the icy setting its own course but then when the renewable energy standard was adopted by the legislature just a couple of years ago and other changes in the <hes> the landscape such as <hes> efficiency vermont's of participation in the regional wholesale capacity market its use of reggie funds in the like when those things started taking root at become pick came apparent to the department that the eh distribution utilities and efficiency vermont were having some growing pains around boundaries for who is going to do what in both the efficiency space and in the <hes> he electric acacia space principally around transportation and storage and as those those growing pains became louder and louder it became the department's view that it was time to have a conversation about whether efficiency vermont policy direction should now be set more along the advisory committee model title of its first genesis than allowing the efficiency utility to chart its own course and that was the conversation that we teed up and we have a partial short answer but not a conclusive answer this time from the commission. What's the partial answer you got. The partial answer was not now and if you want to go down this path farther are there <hes> you should have conversations with the stakeholders and see what you as a group perhaps come up with and then let's bring that back in a different proceeding and rebecca foster did the <hes> vermont have have an opinion about this change that the department was talking about yeah absolutely absolutely i think we really welcome. The fresh look and looking at modernizing efficiency. Vermont makes a lotta sense right. Now we know that the energy system is changing pretty dramatically and you can see that for themselves as they drive down the road and see more and more solar panels more and more electric vehicles on the road <hes> when they get their heating bills every winter you know an ups and downs.

vermont reggie rebecca foster twenty years
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:50 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It from Radio Vermont. It's the Dave Graham Show on W._d.. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most of you now. Here's your host Dave Graham Good Morning Vermont it is Thursday August first two thousand and nineteen and we are going to be focusing for one topic <hes> pretty much this entire program today with the exception of our newsbreaks in our conversation with talk media news <hes> our national correspondents respondents after the midshow news from C._B._S. and <hes> other than that we are going to be talking today about opiate addiction in Vermont and about the the state's strategy prodigy for treating people who are experiencing opioid opiate addiction and we have a great line of guests from various aspects of the state's system for dealing with this epidemic in Vermont and <hes> it's going to be <hes> we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA focus first on sort of an overview <hes> and then we're GONNA get into talking with folks who are representing the <hes> the hubs and spokes you hear a lot about the hub and smoke treatment system in Vermont and <hes> we'll be talking with someone who actually has a has experienced addiction in his own life at the authority toward the end of the program find out a little bit about what's next in terms terms of what's coming folks who are experiencing addiction to opiates in Vermont and I want to get right into it because we have a very packed program this morning. We're we're GONNA start with Jackie Coralie. She is with the Burlington Police Department and she actually has a huge portfolio. They're responding to issues in BURLINGTON ranging from from drug addiction to homelessness and she was formerly with the state health. Department has a background in in in social work in the addiction field and Jackie corporate's. I believe actually in the studio with me this morning. I WanNa thank you very much Jackie for coming in today. You're welcome and so tell me. Give me a little bit of an overview here. <hes> what what is the tell me a little bit about what is the the hub and spoke system overall having folks system is a comprehensive system of care <hes> designed to meet the needs of those individuals who find themselves in the throes of addiction <hes> in a nutshell a hub is a comprehensive system system of care where folks go often daily dosed in either what we call Methadone or Buprenorphine <hes> and those are what we refer to as medication assisted therapies Matt Matt Treatments <hes> those folks often go or daily dose they might work to apply to a time where they are getting dosed. <hes> take homes a spoke as more more of a traditional doctors office where you would go in. You're going to get a prescription for Yuban orphan. You're going to have a nurse and a social worker there to work with you on various various life aspects <hes> but that is more of a traditional medical model like you would see in a number of family practices okay and and <hes> let me back up even further. Tell me what are some of the different <hes> experiences are factors that actually lead people to decide initially that they need <hes> <hes> they need to get treatment is usually an encounter with law enforcement or is it just an individual decision family members coming to you and saying hey you've got to get some help here. What's going on on that front all of it <hes> it is this this disease that led us in the state of Vermont to design the hub and spoke model recognizes recognizes that this disease is <hes> <hes> a disease that will take people to their knees so because of that many many people enter the system of care in a variety of different ways? It might be a family member oftentimes when you're in the throes of an addiction to this magnitude you lose is everything <hes> you might have a family member say to you you need to get services <hes> or these are going to be the consequences. It could be a law enforcement moment <hes> involvement it could be a friend it could be another professional. It could be somebody that you are potentially on the streets. It is a very individualistic decision on how in when you're going to access services and the folks who access services who come in for the first time you have any sense of what percentage of them <hes> stay with treatment or is it something that they you know they come in for a day and think they're going to get your life together and then as Li- backward this it is not uncommon for people to engage in medication assisted treatment and <hes> relapse APPs at some point <hes> we hope that people will re-engage <hes> there are those people thankfully that engage in services and do not not experience relapse in continue on the medication <hes> there are those people that relapsed once and then reengaging services and there are some people who this is a multitude multitude they go through a multitude multitude of relapses before they fully engage. It's it's a complex question that does not have an easy answer and I think that depends on the individual where the individual is at and how they are working through their recovery and what is the the system itself and people working system like yourself. You've you've done so at different levels and so on overtime <hes> you must have to be pretty patient with people <hes> because my sense of this is that I mean I I've known people who've had a drinking problem <hes> and and <hes> you know people talk about going on the wagon off the wagon and et Cetera and <hes> and this is something I mean it sounds like a similar situation where it's very very easy to relapse because <hes> you know you're going through your days and you're staying clean or or in the case of of somebody would alcoholism. You're avoiding alcohol for a couple of weeks and then all of a sudden one day comes particularly tough day or something you're you're back to drinking <hes> same kind of thing here right well well. I think you know you're really lucky this morning that you're going to have some fantastic guests speak and I think the commonality that you're going to hear from all of us are that when I deal with an individual I don't look at them. <hes> with the problem I look at them as a human being and and if I can look at them as a human being who is struggling than <hes> I'm able to then offer the services and stick with them when they relapse APPs when they encountered tough times. Nobody asks for this. NOBODY ASKS TO BE HOMELESS TO LOSE THEIR JOBS to lose their family <hes> and when I you have somebody sit across from me no matter what position or job I've been in <hes> I recognize often. It's the addiction speaking to me. <hes> that really is threatened that there's going to be a recovery process and if I can recognize this human being truly <hes> is not the addiction that makes my engagement with them sustaining wow. That's a really interesting thought so so basically you. You're you're looking at two entities one is the person in one is the addiction in Europe regarding them as two separate things. It looks like well I recognize that the addiction doesn't don't WanNA stop <hes>. I mean so if I'm offering treatment <hes> or any of the folks are going to talk to our offering treatment. The addiction gets threatened because addiction wants to keep moving and wants to keep sustaining itself feeding itself with the drug the person that's sitting in front of me that is encompassed by this addiction. Does Not I wanna live like this often times. They are <hes> they are really. They're in a very low place and it takes a lot to ask for help. This is the most shame based disease on our planet yeah and actually to refer to it purely as a disease you know again the old alcohol model people used to talk about it. Is it a is it a sort of a moral failing or is it a is it a purely disease <hes> it seems as though the the consensus among the people who are dealing with us on a daily basis as as a professional like you is that <hes> it's a disease and and we we are going to treat it as the disease and leave aside any any of this sort of blame and shame stuff well. I think I'd I'd say to anybody WHO's listening. If you have a family member you yourself are addicted. We're talking about opiates but that could be a number of addictions. Your brain has been hijacked and <hes> our job in the community is to help that individual vitual lose that dependence on that's Rog Toledo life a normal say to live a life recovery yeah now tell me a little a bit about the <hes> you made a transition from the <hes> I believe from the alcohol and Drug Abuse Drug Abuse Program at the Department of Health to the Burlington Police Department where you're where you are for now the Drug Mental Health and Homelessness Policy and Operations Manager for the Burlington Police Department and <hes> and I know that there's there's been sort or a two polls here and the overall debate about how we respond to drug problems and so on and it's sort of oftentimes framed as law enforcement versus the treatment versus a healthcare model and <hes> the <hes> so break that down for me and tell me what does the transition been and like you for you personally from a purely health-based atmosphere at the health department the Police Department great question. I think this has been a gift. <hes> I have been a clinician. I've been in the public health arena. I'm now in the police department. <hes> I do not think as citizens we recognize day in day out what these folks are up against inst- our officers and blue going out in the streets for me. This has been an incredible experience to learn how policing works but also sorta offer my public health lens on how we work with individuals and I have to say <hes> the police department is amazing and how they're responding the people who are in the throes of addiction and and and that follows right up through the state's attorney's office to right I mean it seems as though they are also <hes> trying trying to <hes> <hes> not not be purely law enforcement crackdown kind of attitude here with more more matter of <hes> making sure that the people who they are ready to make a change have the the resources available. I I'm really blessed to be in Chilton County. We have a Jitney county state's attorney who is not prosecuting for for Misdemeanor Buprenorphine. I am really blessed that my supervisor Chief Del Pozzo understands the Public Health Lens as does the deputy chiefs right and Murad who I work with and other law enforcement folks in the police department absolutely it's about helping it's not about punishing. It's a <hes> it. It is a a really interesting approach. Year hasn't been followed in other states around the country. We get calls all the time. All the time I get phone calls from other states saying you're a social worker worker in a police department. How does that work? There's a there's an anomaly having having this position there and I have to shift up Ozo- he's the one that came up with this idea with the support report of the mayor of Burlington. Wow that is that is interesting. I've got three guests lined up for the second segment of the program Maureen Lee he is director of neurology and Psychiatry Healthcare Services at the University of Vermont Medical Center <hes> Dr Javaid Mosh Puri is medical director of Emergency Z..

Vermont Burlington Police Department BURLINGTON Dave Graham Jackie Coralie Buprenorphine Jackie corporate Police Department Jackie Europe University of Vermont Medical Chilton County Department of Health Li Dr Javaid Mosh Puri Matt Matt Drug Mental Health and Homeles Methadone
"vermont" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Guns in rural vermont much like any other tool that is also sometimes dangerous like an ax or a tractor and that view of guns is fairly common vermont but you also have both sides of the classic gun debate where there's people who are very fiercely protective of all gun rights and don't want any controls and then on the other side people who think guns really don't have a role in civilian life but taylor these suicides are affecting whom what do you know in vermont about seven point two five percent of our population is veterans among the data set that we were working with thirty percent of the people who died by gunshot wound in vermont over that sixyear period were active duty or veteran so that's way out of proportion with the general population and many of the forces that are involved with coming back into society after a deployment even if there's no mental health issues involved that can be very difficult to go from an environment where you are around the same group of people every day relying on each other very closely and you have the sense of closeness to a society especially in rural vermont where you can go through a whole daiwa without really seeing many people at all um indefinitely without relying on any one is closely so you have a lot of these dynamics and play for veterans that don't exist in the general population and then of course these are all people who have been trained to use weapons and many veterans are firearms hobbyists and are likely to own guns themselves as well so guns are a part of life in vermont and i wouldn't expect that that would change anytime soon and and and maybe it shouldn't a at the same time it's pretty clear from the data taylor dobbs that you examined that there is a problem in vermont and i wonder if experts or advocates looking at this data are trying to talk about new ways of thinking about guns in homes with so many veterans in vermont knowing that guns aren't going to go away but knowing that may be some kind of different approach is needed here there are already things going on in vermont to that effect that have really nothing to do with new legislation or policy because those become nonstarters very quickly in the.

vermont taylor dobbs data set two five percent thirty percent sixyear
"vermont" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"I know a lot more men than women who seemed to be better at keeping our life paired down so's wondering if there's a gender thing going on and then another thing is in the in in vermont some of us label ourselves says environmentalists and we don't like to waste things if there's any kind of anti waste thing that makes it hard for people but on any other ideas should totally three questions what should because we were living in an interesting thing the idea of minimalist move intentional living united come up with this concept ray button i know i told you that at first but um you know i i think that that were it's an old idea an old wisdom but we are facing a new problem and that is unchecked consumerism at a level that the world has has never seen and it's because a lot of a lot of different types of of marketing were you you segment customer groups in the figure out the most effective way to to a partition them and sort of divide and conquer ray and as even more pernicious now with the online world because the segment team is formulaic either algorithms so if you're on instagram for example about way not say anyth any like the internet is evil or instagram as evil i'm not saying that i'm saying these are tools but sometimes uh some of the tactics used in the background can be pernicious so instagram is a good example because they will sometimes a run certain algorithms on you as a user you'll be user four hundred nineteen in experiment one thousand six hundred and seventeen be.

vermont