35 Burst results for "Vermont"

Sanders says 'a lot more work has to be done' on 'human infrastructure'

Broncos Country Tonight

00:33 sec | Last week

Sanders says 'a lot more work has to be done' on 'human infrastructure'

"Senator Bernie Sanders says now is the time to invest in the human infrastructure of America in a working class family. Can't find good quality, affordable child care. That's human infrastructure on CNN's state of the union, the Vermont Independent, said the U. S must invest in low and middle income families. After dealing with the challenges caused by the pandemic, he says. It's time to show these families that the government here's their needs and is looking after them. He went on to say President Biden's infrastructure proposal is serious, but noted that even if passed, more work will still have to be done.

Senator Bernie Sanders Vermont Independent CNN U. America President Biden
Sanders visits Alabama, boosting Amazon workers' union effort

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

Sanders visits Alabama, boosting Amazon workers' union effort

"Starters. They won't longer bathroom breaks. That's just one of the reasons. Some amazon workers in alabama are trying to form a union. This new push coming at an amazon warehouse in birmingham alabama. Where vermont senator bernie sanders showed up. Friday offering his support amazon workers supporting the union citing relentless quotas and poor working conditions amazon fighting the union effort saying it's creative thousands a warehouse jobs in alabama with an average. Pay fifteen dollars thirty cents per hour and benefits including healthcare vision and dental

Amazon Alabama Bernie Sanders Birmingham Vermont
Some Pedestrian-Friendly Street Changes May Stay After The Pandemic Ends

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Some Pedestrian-Friendly Street Changes May Stay After The Pandemic Ends

"Walking more since the pandemic began, there's been a sharp increase in pedestrian fatalities. Leading to an increased urgency in many cities to recreate streets as shared spaces instead of solely being focused on cars. Bath Osborne is with the nonprofit advocacy groups Smart Growth America. We have pretended that humans outside of a car didn't exist or were disposable and designed our roadways for only one user. Those who had a big metal contraction around them. As board says the pandemic has prompted cities from Oakland in Seattle to Louisville in Burlington, Vermont, to experiment with new Street uses. Some include outdoor dining and food truck applauses. Others have displays of artwork or urban playgrounds. Well, some will be temporary. Others may remain long after the pandemic ends.

Bath Osborne Smart Growth America Oakland Louisville Burlington Seattle Vermont
Bill is back to make Washington, DC 51st state — still faces high hurdle in Senate

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Bill is back to make Washington, DC 51st state — still faces high hurdle in Senate

"The license plates for D C. Residents read in big, bold letters and taxation without representation. It's a rallying cry against D. C is the lack of direct voting power in the U. S. Congress as NPR's Barbara Sprint reports. Statehood advocates are hopeful that what was once seen as a liberal pipe dream is now gaining traction. 30 years ago, delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton first introduced a bill for Washington D. C. Statehood. She's back at it, and this time, she says, it feels different. We've gotten off of the wish list, too. On approach of a new reality. Norton says she's encouraged by national polls that suggest growing support for statehood and the record number of co sponsors. The House legislation and its Senate counterpart, have Her bill, which strength the size of the federal district and admit the remaining area as the nation's 51st state. But Republicans stand universally opposed, arguing it would take a constitutional amendment to admit D. C as a state. Here's Georgia Congressman Jody Hice during today's House oversight hearing, the Democratic Party attempting a political power grab of obtaining more senators, that's entirely what this is all about. That phrase power grab is a constant and GOP messaging on statehood, referring to the fact that the district votes overwhelmingly for Democrats and would likely elect two Democratic senators. But Norton tells NPR that at its core statehood is not about politics while we're looking for is equality with other Americans, especially since we pay the highest federal taxes per capita in the United States, she notes that D C has a population of over 700,000 residents larger than Wyoming and Vermont. Last year when the House first past Norton's bill, Republican Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas, dismissed that point. Wyoming is a well rounded working class state. New state of Washington would not be. It was a barb that stung many residents in the district, including business owner Deana Dorsey Calloway. You can't see me, but I'm having an emotional reaction. The eyes are watering probably hear my voice quivering of it, because Just it's disgusting. It's you're a sure of an entire population of people here in Washington, advocates argue statehood is also a civil rights issue, as most of DC's residents are minorities. We do believe this is one of the most important racial justice fights of our time that stash a Rhodes, campaign manager of 51 for 51, a statehood campaign from our perspective, leaving 700,000 mostly black and brown residents without a vote in Congress is racism. D C. Residents pay federal taxes and serve in the military but have no voting Congress. This is an injustice and honestly a stain on American democracy. Norton's bill is all but guaranteed passage in the House. There's broad support from Democrats in the Senate and the White House. But there's a road block. The Senate has a big brick wall in front of its called the Filibusters that house bills are passing and slamming right into. That's Ellie's up Nick of Fix our Senate, a campaign focused on eliminating the legislative filibuster, which requires a 60 senator threshold to advance most bills. Not all Senate Democrats are on board with eliminating the maneuver, arguing it's meant to protect the minority party. But unless that brick wall is eliminated or changed, D C statehood goes back to being on the Democratic wish list.

Barbara Sprint Norton Jody Hice NPR Eleanor Holmes Norton House Washington U. S. Congress Senator Tom Cotton Senate Deana Dorsey Calloway Wyoming Democratic Party GOP Georgia Vermont Arkansas United States DC Filibusters
Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:07 min | Last month

Senate passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill

"The Senate has approved a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package after a strictly party line vote. It's been modified from the House version, so it's being sent back there for approval before heading to President Biden's desk as NPR's Susan Davis reports. Democrats change the House passed bill to make government benefits less generous. They reduced the income thresholds to receive $1400 stimulus checks to $75,000 for individuals and 100 and $50,000 for families. Also reduced extended unemployment benefits from $400 a week to $300 a week and ended the program a month earlier. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders said Americans will soon feel the impact of this legislation. We're going to help restore faith in the United States government among the people of our country. The bill is the largest standalone economic stimulus package in American history. Congress has now approved $6 trillion in the last year to confront the Corona virus pandemic. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington

President Biden Susan Davis Senator Bernie Sanders House Senate NPR Vermont United States Congress Washington
Senate rejects Sanders $15 minimum wage hike

WBZ Afternoon News

00:51 sec | Last month

Senate rejects Sanders $15 minimum wage hike

"In Needham. Back to Washington for 46, where the effort to raise the minimum wage has had another roadblock. I came back up in the Senate today, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders hoping to get the provisions for that $15 minimum wage back into the cove it relief bill. In his words, Senator Sanders said It was absurd that the Senate parliamentarian told them it can't be done the richest country in the history of the world. We can no longer tolerate millions of our workers being unable to feed their families because they're working for starvation wages. However, the effort did not make it through just 42. Democrats siding with him. The effort inevitably falling short of the 60 votes that was needed to add that to the legislation now, several New England lawmakers actually voted no on this, including both Democratic senators from New Hampshire. That's strange. Shaheen and Maggie Hanson and Main

Senator Sanders Needham Senate Vermont Washington New England New Hampshire Shaheen Maggie Hanson
Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

The Michael Berry Show

02:42 min | Last month

Abbott ends Texas mask mandate, opens businesses '100 percent'

"Me giving update from texas yesterday one thirty in the afternoon central standard time. Our governor greg. Abbott made the following statement. I'm issuing a new executive order that resents most of the earlier executive orders effective next wednesday. All businesses of any type are allowed to open one hundred percent that includes any type of entity in texas. Also i'm ending. The statewide mask mandate now immediately. The mayors in the county judges of the liberal counties like houston harris county. They have had one hell of a year. They've been on the news every day. They wear their masks and they say these are bad times. The end is coming. But we're we're protected you and it's been a great time for them. I mean we've got a black mayor. We've got a woman hispanic county judge and the national media is just loving it. They've wanted to win over texas and look at look at this. They even look right. We got every all the boxes checked. Aw and every day they hide behind that mask. Close the businesses down. We're all in this together and people are just furious. Well instead of getting applauded for his statement. Greg grab it our governor. Who's a power grabber. He's been insulted because he could only give us back that which we already had. Any should've never locked us down in the first place. We're not vermont. We're not grateful for whatever government gives us isn't california or new york. We're texans were texans and one hundred eighty five years ago. Texas were under siege. At the alamo. And we never forget that fiber of our being our sense of independence. Government is not our friend. It's not our comforter. It's an impediment on the way to where going so when he made that announcement. I didn't cheer. I didn't thank him. It was about time

Texas Abbott Harris County Greg Houston Vermont California New York
The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

Up First

02:48 min | Last month

The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

"Senate considers covert relief this week. That's right accounts is the first big legislation of joe biden's presidency. It passed the house this weekend although with no republican support. We have no time to waste if we act now decisively quickly emboli we can finally get ahead of this virus. Democrats want it signed before the latest round unemployment benefits expires in two weeks so now moves to the senate under procedure that would allow it to pass their if necessary with zero republican votes but that procedure does not allow passage of the entire bill which is a higher minimum. Wage is out of it. Npr white house correspondent. Isha roscoe joins us this morning. Hey good morning good morning. What happened to the minimum wage increase. So the bill has been labeled as a budget bill And the reason why democrats went with that is so that they don't need sixty votes to get it passed And so they don't have to worry about a filibuster But the senate parliamentarian says. The minimum wage doesn't count as part of a budget bill. A biden did say. He was disappointed at the parliamentarians ruling. But the white house signalled that it didn't want to go against that ruling of vermont. Vermont senator bernie. Sanders had proposed imposing tax penalties on big companies. That don't raise their minimum wage but our colleague. Susan davis is reporting that senate democrats are abandoning that effort after facing some resistance a stripping out that fifteen dollars minimum wage may actually make the rescue package easier to pass. Given how slim the majority is because some more conservative. Democrats have voiced opposition to that level of hike in the minimum wage of course up progressive democrats have said that raising the minimum wage should be a top priority and that arcane senate rules should not stand in the way okay in any case they are going to stand in the way but the rest of the measure is there one point nine trillion dollars in aid to americans help with covert. How important is this to the president. It's totally an important. Be has really centered. His whole first one hundred days around it. The white house has been pushing hard to get something done What they're stressing that even though it doesn't have republican support in congress polling has found it to be very popular including among republicans. You know biden celebrated the house passage on sunday and urged the senate to act quickly saying if we act quickly and boldly we can finally get ahead of this virus. There is a deadline extended. Federal unemployment benefits expire mid march and senate democrats have pledged to get this done before that so they have two weeks

Senate Isha Roscoe White House Senator Bernie Joe Biden Biden Susan Davis Sanders Vermont Congress
Senate Votes To Acquit Trump in Historic Second Impeachment Trial

AP 24 Hour News

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Senate Votes To Acquit Trump in Historic Second Impeachment Trial

"Within a P news minute, Hazare 57 The nays are 43. Two thirds of the centre's president of having voted guilty. The senator judges that responded Donald John Trump, former president, United States Is not guilty as charged the article impeachment That's Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy, announcing the result of the Senate second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. Seven Republicans joined Democrats voting to convict Trump, making it the most bipartisan vote in the history of presidential impeachments. But the former president welcomed his acquittal, saying in a lengthy statement that his movement has only just begun. Thinking his lawyers and his defenders in Congress while promising supporters he'll have more to share in the months ahead. But back in the Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer said Republicans who voted to acquit would rue this day January 6th. Will live as a day of infamy in the history of the United States of America. Failure to convict Donald Trump will live as a vote of infamy in the history of the United States, Senate, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell explained. In his view, the Senate has no power to convict and disqualify a former officeholder who's now a private citizen. But he had harsh words for Trump and his actions. This was on intensifying crescendo. Of conspiracy theories. Orchestrated by outgoing president who seemed determined. Either overturned the voters decision or else Torch. Our institutions on the way out, and he insisted the former president but still liable for everything he did while he was in office. I'm Ben Thomas AP News

Donald John Trump Senator Patrick Leahy Senate Hazare United States Donald Trump Vermont Chuck Schumer Congress Mitch Mcconnell Ben Thomas
Trump lawyers rest case

AP 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Trump lawyers rest case

"After House prosecutors and former President Trump's lawyers finish their cases in his impeachment trial. Members of the Senate ask questions Lead House manager Maryland Democrat Jamie Raskin, telling them Trump was the instigator of the events that led to the January 6th riot at the capital for us to believe otherwise. Is to think that somehow Rabbit came out of a hat. And this mob just showed up here on their own. All by themselves. This is dangerous. Senators. The future of our democracy. Truly Rests in your hands. Trump Attorney Michael Vander Wien dismisses a question posed by Vermont independent Senator Bernie Sanders as to whether Trump was determined to reverse the election. It's your relevant to the question before this body. What's relevant in this impeachment article is Were Mr Trump's words. Insightful to the point of violence and

Donald Trump Lead House Jamie Raskin Trump Attorney Michael Vander Senate Maryland Senator Bernie Sanders House Vermont Mr Trump
Crews investigate elevated carbon monoxide levels, exploding manhole near Washington DC apartment

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Crews investigate elevated carbon monoxide levels, exploding manhole near Washington DC apartment

"Last year in Tennessee failed in the House and Senate. It was a dangerous situation in northwest D. C. Last night, an explosion sent a manhole cover into a parked car. Nobody was injured, but the car's bumper was damaged Heavily. The explosion happened in the Logan Circle neighborhood at Vermont Avenue and end Street as D. C. Fire and GMS investigated elevated carbon monoxide levels. Those levels were inside a nearby

Tennessee Senate House GMS
Biden Wants Congress To Pass COVID Relief Before Mid-March

NewsNation

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Wants Congress To Pass COVID Relief Before Mid-March

"Wasn't it? Biden is pushing for Congress to pass his coronavirus relief package and hopes lawmakers can have it on his desk before mid March. Vermont Independent Senator Bernie Sanders, telling CNN state of the union that the bill will help the ailing economy. We have got to pass that legislation as soon as we possibly can, because at the end of the day we're in the midst of massive income and wealth inequality. The bill will provide relief to small businesses and the hospitality industry, which have both been hit hard by the pandemic.

Senator Bernie Sanders Biden Congress Vermont CNN
The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

05:48 min | 2 months ago

The True Cost of Sustainable Skincare with Tata Harper

"I feel like there's so many misconceptions in the beauty industry really in the luxury industry in general too. But you know Clean beauty is not elevated enough or clean. Beauty doesn't work as well. And i think what's interesting. Is that you kind of saw those challenges. Or you heard those misconceptions and you're like no. I'm gonna change this right like i love that i'm gonna i'm gonna give it a try because enough you know because i think that now what we need is a lot of consumer products that make our life better deal you know not just like superficially better but like really that they They elevate our quality of life. And from that lance. It's what really kept me motivated and really like we spent like five years creating the harper because the formulas didn't exist. No one knew how to use like natural ingredients to preserve or to a mall. Sify or to again or to stabilize those were not like raw materials were used just for like marketing and And there was not a lot of science around like the formulation aspect of natural skincare and took a really long time to make them happen and also formulate from a different point of view because a lot of natural skinner was always formulated with this idea of minimalism and and a lot of like the first gen natural products. They were created a lot. I by the low hus movement remember that movement that lifestyle movement that is being natural so the fact that the product was natural was actually more important than the even that the product worked ben and data no for skin care. Because you only buy skin care too because it works right exactly. Why you don't like by this moisturizer to save the planet like you buy this moisture is great moisturizer and then you have your charities and other things to do other things but But yeah no i was. I was really challenging. It was almost like with the creation of our company. We talent almost every aspect of being a maker of skin-care not only from the ingredients and the formulas but also by having our farm like what you were saying before the farm has been such a special place for us because a lot of skin care is outsource. The majority of the companies are outsource. They outsource almost every piece of their of their Of their business to third parties whether it's the formulation to labs that a lot of times abusing tons of basis and just you know the smell or the color or the incentive vitamin seen our. We're going to add. Hulo renege on jason or you know things like that but you find a lot of companies that have very unique products and formulas that are really unique so for us it was always very clear that we needed to have our own our end and our own formulation Our own chemists and our own lab so that we can really formulate products from scratch like we like doing and that every ingredient has a purpose and also every single one of our formulas doesn't rely on just one ingredient like we're not like on one ingredient type of company where company that by ingredients from all over the world and use them in the you know in different formulas in very high concentrations. So no i mean. I think it makes so much sense. And i love that you guys and your approach is truly like farm to beauty right. I feel like that's such a Sort of a marketing term that you hear thrown around alongside clean beauty etc. But you're literally you know harvesting in growing ingredients on your farm for some of your formulas So can you explain a little bit more about how that process works in terms of You know like organic farming and how you guys are actively working milan. I mean. I think that's fascinating kodaly so just to clarify one thing. We do bring ingredients from all over the world. Sure yeah we bring ingredients from like eighty four different countries. Okay we have like no self and post limit on like we're just gonna talk about vitamins where we are see company we really curate technologies from all over the world whether it's green tag or you know things from tradit- you know from a lot of tradition traditional chinese medicine you're also bringing a lot of and butters from amazon but anyway so we In the farm. There's a couple of things happening so number one. We have a garden where we grow a lot of Not even a lot. We grow specifically five herbs that grow really well in our soil in vermont in our farm which is a clay soil and those are calendar. La barra sweet alfalfa and kolenda and we grow them in our farm in in our organic farm and we make one ingredient that that That we produce at the farm every single month that basically captures all of the oil soluble nutrition from all of those herbs. And the and it's done in a very temperature controlled process that it's very specific and that ingredient that is called our farm beauty complex goes into almost every single one of our formulas but in the farm. We also have a lot of barnes because it was an old dairy farm converted into a skincare farm. Now i love

Sify Lance Skinner Harper BEN Jason Milan Amazon Vermont Barnes
One Thing Millennials Aren't Killing? Public Transportation

Environment: NPR

03:55 min | 2 months ago

One Thing Millennials Aren't Killing? Public Transportation

"Millennials are often blamed for killing things. You know like gulf mayonnaise vacations marriage. It's almost become a cliche. Well there is one. Many millennials and their younger counterparts in gen z save public transportation urban living concern for the environment and a lack of romanticism. About cars are some other reasons why. Npr's mvp has more. There's one word that twenty four year old michelle. Santa maria keeps using when she talks about public transit. I feel like it's so cute. it's just cute. it's so cute. i think it's cute. I mean it's clear that for her. Public transportation is about a lot more than just getting from point a to point b. santa. Maria is one of the many millennials who aren't as car crazy as their parents generation. She belongs to a facebook group called. And brace yourself. It's a mouthful. New urbanism seems for transit oriented teens. The acronym is numb tots. Which is what they call themselves. There are more than two hundred thousand members. And they share funny posts but also debate transportation policies and fantasize about a world in which nobody needs a car but the pandemic has crushed that dream across the country drop in ridership have led to budget cuts and service rollbacks which means a lot of trains and buses are coming less frequently. If at all said the honest it's infuriating in a way. William clark is also a number top. He's twenty five years old and lives in philadelphia. He worries about transit workers as well as the commuters who ride buses and subways not because they love them but because they don't have a choice because when you reduce the amount of service you have to pack more people onto your vehicles at least a higher possibility of contract code. It's actually pretty scary. He works from home now. But he's trying to support the system in other ways. He's a member of a transit. Riders union in philadelphia where he advocates for the needs of writers in the city. Who might not be able to make public meetings across the country. Twenty five year old. Alex lee is advocating for transit. In san jose california he got himself elected to the state legislature and appointed to the transportation committee. If you start putting transit then you're really hurting the people that depend on it. Most people who don't have access to cars or people who rely on these little life against soon for work and lobbies are essential workers twenty-seven-year-old tens and trump used to be one of those essential workers. He was an icu nurse until he moved to vermont in burlington mason wide. And here's the other thing. It's the middle of january. We just had a snowfall and biplane is just as clear as any road. He left in part because he feared for his life biking on the streets and the commute on the subway could take as long as three hours. So what numb tots like him. Think about the new. Us president whose nickname after all is amtrak. Joe and who's appointed a millennial people judge as transportation secretary some are hopeful but ciampo is not impressed is actually millennial. He seems ancient. Let me look at this age. I'm fairly certain that he is to get on my phone and be like. Oh dang is he we google it and it turns out buddha. Judge is thirty nine so so i guess he counters but it doesn't think like a millennial no i don't i don't think so compel thinking like a millennial means not thinking like a politician like those politicians from previous generations who promised major upgrades to public transit systems and never delivered a peasley npr

Riders Union Santa Maria NPR William Clark Philadelphia Transportation Committee Michelle Maria Alex Lee Burlington Mason Santa Facebook San Jose Legislature California Vermont JOE Dang United States Google
Creator of 'Bernie' mittens partners with teddy bear maker

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 months ago

Creator of 'Bernie' mittens partners with teddy bear maker

"I'm Julie Walker Bernie Sanders infamous inauguration mittens which became instant memes are the gift that keeps on giving the men's are in such demand creator Jen Ellis to stop making them have to find a partner I'm actually at the moment you change the designer and how to make them in the Vermont school teacher sent them to senator Sanders five years ago and just heard from him after they took on a life of their own it was like talking to an old friend honestly I never met him before and he called me and I was nervous Alice is grateful the means are making people laugh and marvels at the fact Sanders is so skilled that never losing a minute of walking all the time I don't know what his strategy is for not losing him for months anywhere says a portion of mitten sales proceeds will go to the local make a wish charity I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Bernie Sanders Jen Ellis Vermont Alice Sanders
Woman sells crochet Bernie doll for over $20,000, donates to charity

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Woman sells crochet Bernie doll for over $20,000, donates to charity

"You've seen all of the Bernie Sanders means from Inauguration Day. A famous photo now of the Vermont senator at the inauguration shows up seemingly everywhere these days, and it raises thousands for charity, too. Thanks to a local woman. Compost, Brian Calvert explains. The photo shows a bundled up former presidential candidate sporting a pair of knitted brown tan and white mittens. The picture is definitely made the rounds and it also motivated Toby King to get out her crow. Shea Needles mind blowing because I knew Burning was training because of that picture, and I already had a Bernie pattern in a burning doll. So I just went and got that and I modified in Super quick plan. She wanted to do her own version of the Bernie in the photo. By way of crew. Shay and from beginning to start didn't get up and it was seven hours. But that's on top of the hours and hours of actually designing that that I did like a year ago, when it was all said and done. The Redmond woman had a doll, a perfect likeness of the now infamous photo. She even re created a tiny version of those mittens, the mittens, mittens or not that hard, it's just the color changing a special stitch. Now what to do with a tiny crew shade. Bernie Sanders doll. Toby King immediately thought of doing something good with it. After all, Bernie himself was already cashing in on the popular pose much of sweatshirts. And donated two meals on wheels. Vermont and I said that that is perfect. That is what I want to do. She decided to sell it on eBay and give the proceeds to meals on Wheels America, she tells K II TV. That's when things got really interesting for 99 cents, And then a few minutes later. I want to take the screens. I was like, Wow, it's five bucks. The auction ended earlier this week and the winning bid $20,300 Toby King of Redmond had no idea that good she could do And now she wants everyone to have a crow shade. Bernie. She's not planning on making more. But she is putting the pattern for the doll in her Etsy store named Toby Time. Crow Shea. I'm so so just so happy that everybody is making their own little Bernie and planes and Bernie's out there and just it just makes everybody so happy. Brian Calvert Homo news. Come on his time 1

Toby King Brian Calvert Bernie Sanders Bernie Vermont Redmond Shay Ebay Etsy Store Toby Time Crow Shea America
Bernie Sanders' mittens, memes help raise $1.8M for charity

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Bernie Sanders' mittens, memes help raise $1.8M for charity

"You may be laughing at those photoshopped images of senator Bernie Sanders in his winter coat and mittens but they're raising a lot of money for charity the Vermont senator bundled up on inauguration day getting photoshopped into the cast of friends with Forrest Gump on a bench on the moon and on the bridge of the starship enterprise but the social media phenomenons raised nearly two million dollars for Vermont charities Bernie Sanders has been selling shirts and stickers of himself in that brown parka and wool mittens he says the chair man Sanders merchandise keeps selling out online even Getty images will be donating its proceeds to add the Sanders photo two meals on wheels and Burton snowboards is donating fifty jackets to Vermont families Jackie Quinn Washington

Senator Bernie Sanders Vermont Forrest Gump Brown Parka Sanders Getty Burton Snowboards Jackie Quinn Washington
Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy returns home after hospital visit

"For months senator Patrick Leahy has been released from a Washington hospital expenses the eighty year old senator Patrick Leahy is looking forward to getting back to work after a brief visit to George Washington University hospital Lahey reported not feeling well at the capitol in was sent to the hospital as a precaution and for testing earlier Tuesday he'd been presiding over the Senate as president pro temp at this time I will administer the oath of the senators in the chamber swearing in colleagues ahead of next month's impeachment trial for Donald Trump Leahy is the longest serving member of the U. S. Senate he was elected to Congress in nineteen seventy four Jackie Quinn Washington

Senator Patrick Leahy Lahey George Washington University Washington Senate Donald Trump Leahy Congress Jackie Quinn
"vermont" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"While still having the convenience of shopping finally i am beginning to build a mailing list for this podcast which i want to use to keep everyone. Up to date on other interesting events and upcoming episodes. I'm running to raffles. Actually right now for anyone who signs up for my mailing list and if you go to my website or the bottom of the current blog episode you can get more details on how to sign up and how to enter the raffles this week. I talked about the founding of want of course for my would go onto become the fourteenth state long after ratification of the constitution by the original thirteen. However this path was far from obvious at the time. In seventeen seventy seven and seventy eight. All sorts of factions outside of vermont. Wanted to ignore this issue since it was as i said potentially so divisive the of vermont. Independence had the potential. Destroy the union before it was even fully established. So everyone thought. Let's bear our heads in the sand and deal with this at a later time but had they not done so just imagine what would have happened. If popular opinion in new york turned in favor of britain in order to retain that state's control of vermont. it would've divided the union at a critical time. And if new york pulled out there would have been no contiguous union of states. There were of course a great many other land disputes between the states. And this really could have become a wedge issue that broke apart the union forever so in this case. Procrastination was exactly the right strategy. Congress simply ignored vermont's claims for independence and kept. The thirteen states focused on defeating britain and gaining their own independence. When the united states congress finally did turn its attention to this matter in the seventeen ninety s. It was forced to do so because they frustrated. Vermont was seriously considering overtures by the british in canada to make vermont and independent state within canada. And that will probably be a topic of a future episode. If i get that far in this whole process a state border disputes could become the issue that destroyed the union and resulted in war between the states. It is a testament to the leadership of the time that they successfully navigated these issues and eventually convinced state leaders to compromise on these land issues rather than go to war. The union states had a very real and tangible value to the survival of the individual states and they had to make hard political choices in favor of maintaining that union. Another big issue. That vermont raised that. The other states were ignoring. Was that of slavery again. Congress ignored the divisive issue of slavery in favor of keeping the union together. Vermont was the only state to completely outlaw slavery during the war today it's popular to sneer at the founders for being a bunch of slave owners who refuse to end slavery. The truth is there was not a significant anti slavery movement before the war. Even the quakers were conflicted on the idea of abolition a generation earlier people often forget just how revolutionary the idea of all men created equal..

vermont united states Congress britain new york canada vermont.
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"How you doing this morning. Good, Hey, how are you I hung up but then I heard you mention me so I called back. Appreciate it. Yeah. Well, first of all, I can't wait to read the article in seven days and I I really agree with what can set to it's just not an issue of the quantity of water but it is also the quality issues. But I want to say one thing when it comes to water in. Vermont as clearly asked these said, it wasn't a lot about water in Vermont, but we.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

07:02 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"From Radio Vermont it's the Dave Graham show on wd. It's your show. About the people places and the issues that matter the most to you. Now. Here's your host. Dave Graham. Good Morning Vermont it is. Wednesday the twenty first of October twenty twenty and we have a good show lined up for you today. WE'RE GONNA BE TALKING FIRST OFF. With. Ken. Picard is a reporter with seven days. Seven days is out with its weekly edition a little bit later today on the on the newsstands and will feature a cover story about water in Vermont and the I think the headline was trickle deterrent I don't have it in front of me, but that was pretty good alliteration trickle deterrent. And and then It also reminded me. Of A book, just out a couple months ago by Mary, trump the niece of our president I think that'll was too much not enough. So maybe another way to describe. For water situation in this age of climate, change in the second half hour, it'd be speaking with Steve Pappas, the editor of The Times Argus and. Rutland, Herald, we're going to be asking him about the latest news on the coronavirus outbreak that seems to be focused right in the Montpellier. beginning with a with a sports arena year central Vermont, Memorial Civic Center. Hockey and broom. Ball. Games going on there which I seem to have been. Turned out to be the source of some spread of the coronavirus in the Central Vermont area hoping lineup CBS news correspondents after the top of the hour break and then. In the second hour we're GONNA be talking about migratory birds in Vermont this time of year obviously when we have visitors were heading south and and. Finding out all about the state of migratory birds in Vermont from Doug more of the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, as well as David Muir, who actually is a former state officials he was the commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation. Under Governor Peter Shoveling. But these days he's executive director of a Audubon Vermont and so we'll be. Checking in with David in Doug in the second hour to and finding out all about migratory birds in our state But let's get right into our conversation with Ken Picard on this excellent story Author in seven days coming out today as I mentioned should be on the on the website Kevin. Get Ken. Tennessee other authors story. So pardon, any confusion can thank you for joining me this morning. Yeah. Happy to be here. Thanks vitamin. Kevin mccollum by the way just to give full credit here. So. And so really interesting. Interesting set of issues guys looked into there and it sounds like. Very important peak in one of these stories where Hey, folks we need to be paying attention and. Go ahead, it's funny that you mentioned the politics because you know just like our political situation I think our our climate is being driven to extremes as well we are. We are definitely seeing you know just in the in the last year I think people it's easy to forget that just about a year ago. We had that big Halloween Storm Twenty nineteen. Five inches of rain dumped down on us. It was completely unexpected. Sent rivers to flood stage in. A year later about half the state of a drought condition. So yeah. It's certainly A. A lot can change in a short amount of time here. Yeah. and. What I mean obviously you both of these things were present challenges to. Public visuals in particular budget writers at the State and municipal level who are trying to figure out. Okay, we get floods on one end of the spectrum. May We need bigger culverts and? more resilient drainage systems and so on and so forth. at night at the other end of this serum maybe we need better storage systems for water went and it does come down Are we making any progress on this stuff. Well. I think one of the things that one of the messages that I got from talking to the experts and I want make it clear that I am definitely not a climatologist or even a you know routinely and environmental reporter but Speaking to the folks up at the Gund Institute at the University of Vermont. You know one of the things that they said to us was you know Vermont, we should play to our strengths and one of the saints that we have is that Vermont has been typically a water rich state and if we protect those. That are already wetlands and repairing areas and streams and rivers. I mean, it sounds kind of like a no brainer. But when we use those that natural infrastructure that will help us both in times of flooding, it will slow down fast moving water and they will also get us through these dry spell's that we've been going through. And those are certainly expected to get longer. I think a lot of our monitor's don't have much experience with long multi year droughts. Having. Lived myself before I moved here, eighteen years ago I lived out in western Montana and. Forest forest fires were just a normal part of life out there. But you know to see this year to see. You know a wildfire burning underground in Killington You know that's a that's kind of a new thing for us, and so you know you I hate I hate to use the expression new normal Olga gets overused but I mean we're. We've got to get used to some different conditions and I think you know if we can protect the areas that we do have will definitely help us you mentioned you know building the deeper color tes and and you know sort of these attention palms and whatnot I mean I think those those can help as well. We really need to slow down the water and and just you know make things. Have Water be able to absorb into the ground. I mean, let's talk about the the sort of The drought intimate. It's really kind of current right in front of us now. Issue even though I mean I look out the window here and it's Raindrops on the window panes. And and it's a cloudy day looks like rain rain in the forecast and etc but I. Your story indicates that the rain we have been getting really just in the last couple of weeks here in October. Is Not enough to kind of offset the drought, which has been the norm in Vermont for.

Vermont Vermont Fish and Wildlife Depa Ken Picard Central Vermont Audubon Vermont Kevin mccollum University of Vermont Dave Graham reporter Hockey Memorial Civic Center Tennessee David Muir CBS Department of Environmental Co Steve Pappas Peter Shoveling Mary
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

06:23 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"All sorts of gear every day, and they're in the business of trying to keep Americans safe. If we have put a little cloth over our faces to keep Americans safe seems at least we could do honor the sacrifices they make. All right. Let's go into our bottom of the hour CBS news break. We'll be back in a couple of minutes with folks on the Vermont Specialty Foods Association. Exciting things are happening in more in village. The pitcher in more in store are under new management upgrades and improvements are in the works maintaining the ambiance and character while breathing new energy and resources into these iconic properties. We are open while practicing all CDC Protocols Comfort Lunch at Iraq and Delhi and see for yourself with the buzzes all about both businesses are hiring especially seeking fine dining room staff and sales associates for our petite, Still Fund funky and friendly, but better than ever open daily on Main Street Warren Village. The Dave Ramsey show on wd. Stay with US folks we're back in. We're GONNA be talking this half hour about a fun. Subject Specialty Foods Fremont deputies produces an awful lot of delicious stuff in the specialty foods realm and It's really quite a verdict the industry in the state many businesses have become successful marketing, all sorts of delicious things to eat and we talking first off with Erin sigrist. Association director with the Vermont Especially Food Association. And also, we'll be talking with some producers of specialty foods will be checking in with us this in the next few minutes here on the Dave Graham show. I believe Aaron is with us on the phone and good morning. Thank you for joining me. We have Erin Secrest I'm. Not, hearing Erin. Year Lillo I can hear you now that's a good thing. Thanks for thanks for joining me. Erin it's good talking with you. So I was about the annually vent, that is a lot different this year what's going on? Yeah. So I thanks for having us on. We're excited to talk about our annual meeting Typically, we have to in person meetings each year but unfortunately due to Code we've had to cancel those in person meetings and we've moved them both virtual. So Wednesday, we'll be hosting our virtual annual meeting. And usually, our annual meetings in June that our hosting it this year online this Wednesday at one o'clock, and we'll hear from. Jim Pretty exciting speakers actually, we have natalie king who is our keynote speaker. She's the chief sales and marketing at stowe law kitchen. and we also have a a vice president from the National Specialty, Food Association who will share some trends that they are seeing post Kovic or what what they're anticipating will be. Up and coming postcode, and then we'll also hear from Cassandra Lee Perez who is an attorney with A phenomenal. Group of in Burlington, she'll talk a little bit about regulatory changes at the national and a couple at the state level as well. So it should be great event we're looking forward to hosting many of our members at one o'clock via zoom and. Members and non members are welcome members of from on Specialty Food Association, and the Vermont. Retail. Grocers Association. Can Register for free and non members. Can Join for ten dollars. And so the. How would you say overall the specialty foods industry is doing in the in the midst of this. Kobe crisis. That's a great question. Obviously, you know some A. Small producers shutdown at the beginning of covid they were trying to figure out you know, are we quote essential or not essential and their food manufacturers? So they are essential. So as soon as they got their ducks in a row and made sure that everyone could be safe and many of those. Food Manufacturers did come back on online If they did end up shutting down they, they were able to come back online pretty quickly. and. You know it's it's a double edged sword they were up and running pretty quickly. They're pretty nimble organizations but it does take a lot of effort marketing to get those those foods out to market and for people to get to know and try and teach those foods So it's they've taken a bit of a hit but one positive is that these producers here in Vermont are I. I like to use the word scrappy in the best form right they they do everything they possibly can to get. Their food out there in front of people in and do everything they can to promote it as quickly and as as well as they can. So. You know we've all taken a hit whether their food producers or retailers they've certainly. then impacted but hopefully, we are back on track and sooner rather than later and and they continue to do really well. In one of those producers we have, Mark Elvin of Vermont nut pre chocolates on the on the phone with us as well. good morning, Mar thanks for joining US good morning. Thank you for having. And Mark I I'll tell me where's your business based where Vermont we're in Colchester. I see. Okay and. Nut Pre chocolate in the name of Your Business. Tell us about that. What is the I? Mean? I guess what some of the advantages of not free chocolates might be but it sounds like you're trying to carve a car out a bit of each market there. We do we do have a niche market,.

Vermont Vermont Specialty Foods Associ Erin Vermont Especially Food Associ Specialty Food Association Erin Secrest CBS Erin sigrist Dave Ramsey Mark Elvin US Dave Graham Grocers Association Kobe Cassandra Lee Perez National Specialty Main Street Warren Village Aaron Food Association
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:43 min | 6 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Foods Association they normally have conference this time of year and. For a nice face to face meeting and sampling each other each other's specialty foods sure and. This year things are going to be a little different for them but they are still. An important industry in Vermont and contributed many nice things to our lives especially delicious things to eat. So we'll be talking to some folks when this Specialty Foods Association in the second hour of what they do plan for an annual event. In this age of the COVID nineteen crisis..

Specialty Foods Association Foods Association COVID Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Thought Card

The Thought Card

03:03 min | 7 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Thought Card

"Financially savvy travellers welcome back to the thought card podcast. It is officially season for and usually the first episodes of the podcast for the new season I usually, you know share new things happening my life updates, but you know what I said you know let's switch it up this time. So those time I'm taking you live, we're live in Vermont, and if you're a long-time listener of the show, you know that every time I travel I, actually record a podcast episode with my Hunky. Fiance soon to be husband's. So. Welcome back to the Dakar podcast Babe. Scooby back thanks for having me again I know last time you are on the show we were kind of like sharing a little bit that we're planning a new trip to Madrid, which unfortunately did not unfold. So now we actually can. Hop on the Mike and talk about our Vermont trip. So before we dive into today's episode..

Vermont Madrid Mike
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Think that that brings up another interesting point that it's you know it's too early to say what the long term implications of this for for the state but many of the people moving here are doing their jobs remotely and so I think If they do day and their jobs continue. If they can continue to do their jobs remotely I think it's interesting to think about what it means Vermont to have You know a subset of people who are living here and working in a different state and I think that's not that's not necessarily that happened already but but just I think that that brings best another variable in this whole thing, which is that the people who can afford to move here tend to be in in jobs that pay pretty well, and so which is another another concern As real estate trend evermore unaffordable. you know I think the housing market has really heated up in the last couple of months and I think it's it's it's it's. Driving the average home prices up. Into into You know just a strategy that's unattainable for most people So I think that's something that we kind of have to wait and see how that plays out while. Yeah that that is a concern obviously when when, when increased demand drives up prices for housing you now squeezing out of the market those who maybe close to getting into it but now loves it and. Can't and? Anybody. Talking about sort of what to do about that problem. Not that we really not that we really found. I think it's a it's a pretty widely acknowledged problem that that it's really expensive to live in Vermont and I think that this, May this may sort of force a reckoning with that Yeah but it seems it seems inevitable. The I I don't. I don't know exactly how how that problem gets solved. Obviously, people have talked about it. For a long long time, the whole affordable housing issues been with us since long before this pandemic. became. The headline. I wonder..

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I don't WanNa say concerns but one of the things we have to factor into this. That makes it very difficult at this time For Instance Pretty Much. All of my staff is working from home. They're all teleworking at this point But they also have because schools are out in. Daycares are closed and You know maybe their partners are their spouses or their partners are essential workers or whatever all impacts how they are their ability to work from home and I know that for instance in our staff Prior to the last three weeks we actually about six or seven weeks ago. We started looking at Basically taking an inventory of all of our staff And what their capabilities were from home. did they have Internet service to have a PC at home A phone line. Whatever and and trying to determine what the needs we're going to be as we were starting to go down this path. We literally started probably six to seven weeks ago looking at this. We ordered extra laptops in so that we would be able to send people home with with the proper tools that they would need In order to serve Vermont offers We've been able to transition quickly But it does take a toll on families Y You know when you've got the kids running around the house and and You know spouses trying to work from home and and It does create some interesting scenarios and and we have to basically adjust and be flexible with what we're doing. I mean it's you know the the idea that someone will Perhaps worked seven forty five to four thirty. Which are the state hours it might be? They started at six thirty. And and You know maybe work till eight o'clock at night but take breaks in between during the day as the day goes on because they might have to assist with Childcare or or other things around the house So you know there's a lot of systems that you know we've we've been adjusting. Since I took.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"She was in street. Clothes and and She said they've been told that they they need to You know where they're gonNA close to work and then change when they get to work and then change again before they leave work. The object of that whole exercise being not to bring home Any exposure cove nineteen on on scrubs basically And I would. I would gather that. Similar routines are changing in In long term care facilities as well right. I think that's absolutely true as much as I can be happening. That's absolutely happening. I mean I am awed I I will echo said I'm awed by the healthcare workforce out there right now in the work that they're doing just showing up every day commonsense no nonsense approach to taking care of people that they are charged with taking care of the. This is a this is unprecedented in the state of Vermont. I think this is unprecedented in this country and across the world. And we've all been hearing those stories so I agree one hundred percent with you hats off to every single one of those healthcare workers that are just showing up every day to take care of people And I think that all of them harshened are in place. People are working really hard to do what they need to do to prevent the spread. And that's been the message from the governor from the very beginning of this what we need to do is minimize knowing that it's a virus and knowing that it's out there and knowing that there's some level we're going to have to deal with. We absolutely need to slow it down. We need to make sure that are are most acute care facilities are hospitals are have the capacity that they need all the way through this To Take Care of people that most need them And I think that that both healthcare workers and really Vermont is in general are doing extraordinary work to just limit their own exposure limit the risks themselves with the risk of each other. You know you see people staying home and hungering down and being really cautious about that and I think our healthcare workforce is on high alert. And doing that both in their private and personal lives but also in their professional lives and pretty amazing way. You know I've also heard An I T shirt people. I've seen this. But in other countries you know there are these moments in time where the whole country's just kind of shouting out to healthcare workers and I know that that's happening in pockets in Vermont as well where certain point in time people are coming out on their road and clapping and hooting and hollering. And begging just say thank you to those healthcare workers that are that are living next door to us right all all in our neighborhoods everywhere across the state justice and thanks for hanging in there and doing the work that they do and I am. I am so proud to be part of the state and so proud to be part of this effort in whatever small way I am because it is. It is on firing. Yeah it it. It really is.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Long does that disease hang out on account or whatever and that kind of all if they don't know how long before they'll figure that out well first of all within your sneeze and cough can can pollute a room up to six feet so again. If you're around someone who's sick. You really ought to be standing as far away from them as possible As far as how long it leaves on surfaces I do not know I believe several hours but again I do not know With any kind of assurance to be able to say that that is why you should wash down all surfaces where you're coming contact with especially in in a public place like a grocery store with Again a sanitizer. That has at least sixty percent alcohol That's that would be something that would be a wise thing to do And and even if we know if you you know if you knew it was three hours would you touch it? Four hours later and not wash your hands. Of course you know that makes doesn't make sense so it makes sense to just continue to wash your hands and wipe down surfaces that you've touched that May Have Contaminated Alright. Well I want to thank my guests Doctor Never Richter and healthcare writer. Hamilton Davis for doing extra duty here on the day Graham show. Wd FM and am talking about this difficult topic of the Cobra virus. The two of you thank you so much for coming in this morning a few months ago. I think it was sometime last year or so. We had a visit From a gentleman named Stephanie Wolfert. Who IS A veteran mill? Us military veteran Has had a lot of experience with PTSD and has Decided to make an art form out of this and Stephan Wolford is going to be in the central Vermont area over the next couple of weeks. putting on performances of his play cry havoc as well as Participating in forums devoted to trying to help veterans who are trying to ease their lives of PTSD and and reduce the symptoms. There and Mr Wolford Just arrived in the studio in the last Fifteen or twenty seconds here so glad to see that you were able to make it in this morning. Thanks so much for joining. Thanks for having me and so I do recall. We had you on the program once before I believe the last year before the show and you Have you been bringing the show around the country since then? Yeah in fact My wife and I it converted Mercedes Sprinter van because we're on tour full-time. We traveled around the country. We've put on over one hundred thousand miles in the last two years hitting over thirty. Two States Delivering not only CRA HAVOC PERFORMANCE BUT DECREE OUR PROGRAM. De Crude which is a treatment program for veterans And so So it's really a two pronged approach here with which you return to central remind here and I know that you are One of the one of the sort of touch spots for you here is Norwich University. Of course a big military presence at the nation's oldest private military college there in Northfield Vermont and So tell us Let's see I. I saw his schedule..

PTSD Us Mr Wolford Doctor Never Richter Northfield Vermont Stephan Wolford Stephanie Wolfert Norwich University Hamilton Davis Vermont writer Graham
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Runs not there's also work in ohio where we work with american municipal power on a large scale scale efficiency program in in ohio's municipal utility service territories. We're working in wisconsin on the focus on energy program california oregon illinois <hes> so the consulting side of e._m._c. and the other divisions that are working outside of vermont. <hes> are really on the cutting leading edge of energy issues nationally enter <hes> that work is really beneficial for the state of vermont because those colleagues can bring back the learnings to vermont and then we can incorporate those into our programs to the extent that it makes sense here <hes> an is beneficial and part of the solution that would work in vermont altogether e._s._e. He has how many employees two hundred eighty at this point. Mr keelan commentary cited three hundred and eighty three which is not correct the two hundred and eighty person organization right now yeah <hes> and and so i'm just thinking about the kind of highly technical skills that go into these consulting positions you have. I'm sure traveling around the country and talking to folks about what are the most effective ways to save energy and their own situations and so on and i guess i'm not that shocked doc by twelve people out of this group making the salary range in the in the mid i <hes> that if i could speak to the point <hes> it's not about the words shocked or not. It's about that continuing monitoring because like any entity of efficiency vermont v._c._e. Needs to be focused on. How can they lean their your operations because you have to remember in the end what does paid for by repairs and repairs deserve the best use of their money. I agree one hundred percent. You alright all right well. That's a great note on which to end this <hes>. Thank you very much to rebecca foster of e v. I c efficiency vermont june tierney the commissioner of the apartment of public service. I heard that let go by elizabeth grip copter of beauty digger excellent conversation. Thank you all so much and that's about it for the day graham show on this wednesday morning. I'd stay tuned for commonsense radio with bill sayer have a great day everybody..

vermont ohio bill sayer Mr keelan wisconsin rebecca foster commissioner illinois graham e._m._c. oregon california one hundred percent
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"<hes> who had an op ed column and b._t. Dig or a couple of yeah. No i hear you absolutely the <hes>. The bottom line here is it's an open bidding process. That's done and the ultimate <hes> contractors selected from those who choose to put in responses sponsors and the guidelines of the state are followed so i don't know that that gives you much satisfaction except to say that if north carolina contractors chosen chosen is because there was no better option i actually do have some more comfort that i can provide <unk> becca <hes> we looked into that claim after seeing seeing that in the op-ed <hes> and i agree with the point that mr cunanan made that we should be using vermont firms whenever possible and the good news is that we actually are <hes> so the auditor that we use johnson lambert based out of burlington <hes> they have a partner firm that they use to check and sign off on all of their nonprofit filings that partner firm based in north carolina and so that's why that appeared on <hes> our ninety former i._r._s. Reporting <hes> so i definitely take the point that mr keeler was making about working in vermont building fremont businesses and strengthening the remind economy wherever possible <hes> and we're certainly doing that you know another example is working to bring our rebate processing an in house over moaners doing that <hes> as opposed to in the past austin a firm in southern new england. <hes> the good news there is that we've done that at a cost savings to vermont so it's a win win and that's the kind of thing that we're looking to do more more and more in the future. Take you for the call. I want to go to liam in burlington good morning liam. Yes i think you guys expanded on this a little bit whether you know through binding rising the m._v._p. Or expanding into the mid west and other states <hes> but i keep on hearing that efficient month role might be standing on. I'm wondering what that means generally and more specifically with vermont yes so <hes> thanks for the question liam. It's a great question because it's right at the crux of where we are right now. <hes> <hes> in the past legislative session of act sixty two <hes> was enacted which requires the public utilities commission to hold a proceeding where we look look at what more ought efficiency vermont be doing if anymore and a big topic right now is weatherization and how we heat and how he'd do that efficiently efficiently and that has not been traditionally the central focus of what efficiency vermont's doing last twenty years have been spent mostly on <hes> looking collect usage but <hes> the the low lying fruit in that room has been realized and so now i think it's a good time for us to be asking what it should you be doing a now by way of a second stage and secondly <hes>. How should you be doing that given the presence of the distribution bution utilities and other third parties in the market and the transformed energy landscape so that's what the inquiries going to be about is to see what more if anything they should should be doing and then from my perspective <hes> as the agency that has the ratepayer advocate <hes> what what is affordable for us to be doing and how should we be paying. Oh for that you lose with greek off. I know you need to be leaving in a couple of minutes for a meeting but i wanted to give you another chance to. You've asked a couple of terrific questions. Do you have anything else on your mind that you wanted to run by rebecca foster and june tierney here. I think this is with answering my discussion ezra my main question. I don't think i have anything else to ask. You can advocate on liam's liam's question. I think that <hes> we talked a little bit earlier in the program about the changing energy landscape and you know certainly were excited about the prospect of doing more evaluated work vermont in the future and are interested in seeing what role we could play that would make use of the investment that the state has made inefficiency vermont in the past twenty years make use of the state wide scale make use of the customer relationships that we have we touch about <hes> a hundred thousand residential customers in a year and fifteen thousand business customers so that's basically almost twenty percent of the state participating in our program so we're really looking for new ways as tell leverage that to do more and serve more for monitors and i do want to thank elizabeth group cough for joining us this morning.

vermont liam burlington north carolina mr keeler mr cunanan partner new england johnson lambert fremont june tierney auditor austin rebecca foster elizabeth twenty years twenty percent
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"And and that really the <hes> i think is one of the reasons one of the reasons obviously that your organization has won. A lot of national awards has been been by larger israel's success story in the state of reminding has been emulated elsewhere <hes> and just so i understand the structure it basically v i see see is a is an independent company is that right into a nonprofit company which has as one of its arms or whatever maybe you can explain this better the nikon i hope so eventually vermont or one one of its roles is to operate as efficiently reminded in the state correct correct so v i c was founded as a nonprofit in nineteen eighty-six and in one thousand nine hundred nine the organization competed in a competitive bid process to operate efficiency vermont and was selected acted <hes> so since two thousand we've been operating the efficiency vermont programs for the state of vermont and then since that time we've also continued to add to our work outside of the state in ohio washington d._c. Hawaii oregon california we work in about thirty five states <hes> that's a really beneficial structure sure for vermont because then we can bring back the learnings and the experience from those other states vermont while as june said being really regulated and governed by the department of public service and the public utility commission to ensure that vermont has the oversight that it needs and i don't want to forget about elizabeth grip on the phone v._p. Digger unfortunately we're about ought to go to a bottom of the hour break in. We're gonna bring elizabeth in a little bit after that <hes> who are gonna here c._b._s. News upcoming couple words sponsors and continue our conversation about ati fifty vermont after the break here on the graham show w._d. F._m. and a._m. Back shortly folks ah. I wish i had a dollar for every compliment. I get about our selection upstairs at the warren store. The season's collection boasts country casual clothing for men and women dresses for.

vermont elizabeth nikon warren store israel ohio graham Hawaii oregon california
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Setting the course of the direction for the efficiency utility and so when this last go round i mean over the course of the last <hes> twenty years many changes happening in the efficiency utility structure and <hes>. I'll thank you that's that's much better and so <hes> the advisory committee was disbanded back around the time i think when the order of appointment was put in place and the efficiency utility was under the auspices of the icy setting its own course but then when the renewable energy standard was adopted by the legislature just a couple of years ago and other changes in the <hes> the landscape such as <hes> efficiency vermont's of participation in the regional wholesale capacity market its use of reggie funds in the like when those things started taking root at become pick came apparent to the department that the eh distribution utilities and efficiency vermont were having some growing pains around boundaries for who is going to do what in both the efficiency space and in the <hes> he electric acacia space principally around transportation and storage and as those those growing pains became louder and louder it became the department's view that it was time to have a conversation about whether efficiency vermont policy direction should now be set more along the advisory committee model title of its first genesis than allowing the efficiency utility to chart its own course and that was the conversation that we teed up and we have a partial short answer but not a conclusive answer this time from the commission. What's the partial answer you got. The partial answer was not now and if you want to go down this path farther are there <hes> you should have conversations with the stakeholders and see what you as a group perhaps come up with and then let's bring that back in a different proceeding and rebecca foster did the <hes> vermont have have an opinion about this change that the department was talking about yeah absolutely absolutely i think we really welcome. The fresh look and looking at modernizing efficiency. Vermont makes a lotta sense right. Now we know that the energy system is changing pretty dramatically and you can see that for themselves as they drive down the road and see more and more solar panels more and more electric vehicles on the road <hes> when they get their heating bills every winter you know an ups and downs.

vermont reggie rebecca foster twenty years
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:50 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It from Radio Vermont. It's the Dave Graham Show on W._d.. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most of you now. Here's your host Dave Graham Good Morning Vermont it is Thursday August first two thousand and nineteen and we are going to be focusing for one topic <hes> pretty much this entire program today with the exception of our newsbreaks in our conversation with talk media news <hes> our national correspondents respondents after the midshow news from C._B._S. and <hes> other than that we are going to be talking today about opiate addiction in Vermont and about the the state's strategy prodigy for treating people who are experiencing opioid opiate addiction and we have a great line of guests from various aspects of the state's system for dealing with this epidemic in Vermont and <hes> it's going to be <hes> we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA focus first on sort of an overview <hes> and then we're GONNA get into talking with folks who are representing the <hes> the hubs and spokes you hear a lot about the hub and smoke treatment system in Vermont and <hes> we'll be talking with someone who actually has a has experienced addiction in his own life at the authority toward the end of the program find out a little bit about what's next in terms terms of what's coming folks who are experiencing addiction to opiates in Vermont and I want to get right into it because we have a very packed program this morning. We're we're GONNA start with Jackie Coralie. She is with the Burlington Police Department and she actually has a huge portfolio. They're responding to issues in BURLINGTON ranging from from drug addiction to homelessness and she was formerly with the state health. Department has a background in in in social work in the addiction field and Jackie corporate's. I believe actually in the studio with me this morning. I WanNa thank you very much Jackie for coming in today. You're welcome and so tell me. Give me a little bit of an overview here. <hes> what what is the tell me a little bit about what is the the hub and spoke system overall having folks system is a comprehensive system of care <hes> designed to meet the needs of those individuals who find themselves in the throes of addiction <hes> in a nutshell a hub is a comprehensive system system of care where folks go often daily dosed in either what we call Methadone or Buprenorphine <hes> and those are what we refer to as medication assisted therapies Matt Matt Treatments <hes> those folks often go or daily dose they might work to apply to a time where they are getting dosed. <hes> take homes a spoke as more more of a traditional doctors office where you would go in. You're going to get a prescription for Yuban orphan. You're going to have a nurse and a social worker there to work with you on various various life aspects <hes> but that is more of a traditional medical model like you would see in a number of family practices okay and and <hes> let me back up even further. Tell me what are some of the different <hes> experiences are factors that actually lead people to decide initially that they need <hes> <hes> they need to get treatment is usually an encounter with law enforcement or is it just an individual decision family members coming to you and saying hey you've got to get some help here. What's going on on that front all of it <hes> it is this this disease that led us in the state of Vermont to design the hub and spoke model recognizes recognizes that this disease is <hes> <hes> a disease that will take people to their knees so because of that many many people enter the system of care in a variety of different ways? It might be a family member oftentimes when you're in the throes of an addiction to this magnitude you lose is everything <hes> you might have a family member say to you you need to get services <hes> or these are going to be the consequences. It could be a law enforcement moment <hes> involvement it could be a friend it could be another professional. It could be somebody that you are potentially on the streets. It is a very individualistic decision on how in when you're going to access services and the folks who access services who come in for the first time you have any sense of what percentage of them <hes> stay with treatment or is it something that they you know they come in for a day and think they're going to get your life together and then as Li- backward this it is not uncommon for people to engage in medication assisted treatment and <hes> relapse APPs at some point <hes> we hope that people will re-engage <hes> there are those people thankfully that engage in services and do not not experience relapse in continue on the medication <hes> there are those people that relapsed once and then reengaging services and there are some people who this is a multitude multitude they go through a multitude multitude of relapses before they fully engage. It's it's a complex question that does not have an easy answer and I think that depends on the individual where the individual is at and how they are working through their recovery and what is the the system itself and people working system like yourself. You've you've done so at different levels and so on overtime <hes> you must have to be pretty patient with people <hes> because my sense of this is that I mean I I've known people who've had a drinking problem <hes> and and <hes> you know people talk about going on the wagon off the wagon and et Cetera and <hes> and this is something I mean it sounds like a similar situation where it's very very easy to relapse because <hes> you know you're going through your days and you're staying clean or or in the case of of somebody would alcoholism. You're avoiding alcohol for a couple of weeks and then all of a sudden one day comes particularly tough day or something you're you're back to drinking <hes> same kind of thing here right well well. I think you know you're really lucky this morning that you're going to have some fantastic guests speak and I think the commonality that you're going to hear from all of us are that when I deal with an individual I don't look at them. <hes> with the problem I look at them as a human being and and if I can look at them as a human being who is struggling than <hes> I'm able to then offer the services and stick with them when they relapse APPs when they encountered tough times. Nobody asks for this. NOBODY ASKS TO BE HOMELESS TO LOSE THEIR JOBS to lose their family <hes> and when I you have somebody sit across from me no matter what position or job I've been in <hes> I recognize often. It's the addiction speaking to me. <hes> that really is threatened that there's going to be a recovery process and if I can recognize this human being truly <hes> is not the addiction that makes my engagement with them sustaining wow. That's a really interesting thought so so basically you. You're you're looking at two entities one is the person in one is the addiction in Europe regarding them as two separate things. It looks like well I recognize that the addiction doesn't don't WanNA stop <hes>. I mean so if I'm offering treatment <hes> or any of the folks are going to talk to our offering treatment. The addiction gets threatened because addiction wants to keep moving and wants to keep sustaining itself feeding itself with the drug the person that's sitting in front of me that is encompassed by this addiction. Does Not I wanna live like this often times. They are <hes> they are really. They're in a very low place and it takes a lot to ask for help. This is the most shame based disease on our planet yeah and actually to refer to it purely as a disease you know again the old alcohol model people used to talk about it. Is it a is it a sort of a moral failing or is it a is it a purely disease <hes> it seems as though the the consensus among the people who are dealing with us on a daily basis as as a professional like you is that <hes> it's a disease and and we we are going to treat it as the disease and leave aside any any of this sort of blame and shame stuff well. I think I'd I'd say to anybody WHO's listening. If you have a family member you yourself are addicted. We're talking about opiates but that could be a number of addictions. Your brain has been hijacked and <hes> our job in the community is to help that individual vitual lose that dependence on that's Rog Toledo life a normal say to live a life recovery yeah now tell me a little a bit about the <hes> you made a transition from the <hes> I believe from the alcohol and Drug Abuse Drug Abuse Program at the Department of Health to the Burlington Police Department where you're where you are for now the Drug Mental Health and Homelessness Policy and Operations Manager for the Burlington Police Department and <hes> and I know that there's there's been sort or a two polls here and the overall debate about how we respond to drug problems and so on and it's sort of oftentimes framed as law enforcement versus the treatment versus a healthcare model and <hes> the <hes> so break that down for me and tell me what does the transition been and like you for you personally from a purely health-based atmosphere at the health department the Police Department great question. I think this has been a gift. <hes> I have been a clinician. I've been in the public health arena. I'm now in the police department. <hes> I do not think as citizens we recognize day in day out what these folks are up against inst- our officers and blue going out in the streets for me. This has been an incredible experience to learn how policing works but also sorta offer my public health lens on how we work with individuals and I have to say <hes> the police department is amazing and how they're responding the people who are in the throes of addiction and and and that follows right up through the state's attorney's office to right I mean it seems as though they are also <hes> trying trying to <hes> <hes> not not be purely law enforcement crackdown kind of attitude here with more more matter of <hes> making sure that the people who they are ready to make a change have the the resources available. I I'm really blessed to be in Chilton County. We have a Jitney county state's attorney who is not prosecuting for for Misdemeanor Buprenorphine. I am really blessed that my supervisor Chief Del Pozzo understands the Public Health Lens as does the deputy chiefs right and Murad who I work with and other law enforcement folks in the police department absolutely it's about helping it's not about punishing. It's a <hes> it. It is a a really interesting approach. Year hasn't been followed in other states around the country. We get calls all the time. All the time I get phone calls from other states saying you're a social worker worker in a police department. How does that work? There's a there's an anomaly having having this position there and I have to shift up Ozo- he's the one that came up with this idea with the support report of the mayor of Burlington. Wow that is that is interesting. I've got three guests lined up for the second segment of the program Maureen Lee he is director of neurology and Psychiatry Healthcare Services at the University of Vermont Medical Center <hes> Dr Javaid Mosh Puri is medical director of Emergency Z..

Vermont Burlington Police Department BURLINGTON Dave Graham Jackie Coralie Buprenorphine Jackie corporate Police Department Jackie Europe University of Vermont Medical Chilton County Department of Health Li Dr Javaid Mosh Puri Matt Matt Drug Mental Health and Homeles Methadone
"vermont" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Guns in rural vermont much like any other tool that is also sometimes dangerous like an ax or a tractor and that view of guns is fairly common vermont but you also have both sides of the classic gun debate where there's people who are very fiercely protective of all gun rights and don't want any controls and then on the other side people who think guns really don't have a role in civilian life but taylor these suicides are affecting whom what do you know in vermont about seven point two five percent of our population is veterans among the data set that we were working with thirty percent of the people who died by gunshot wound in vermont over that sixyear period were active duty or veteran so that's way out of proportion with the general population and many of the forces that are involved with coming back into society after a deployment even if there's no mental health issues involved that can be very difficult to go from an environment where you are around the same group of people every day relying on each other very closely and you have the sense of closeness to a society especially in rural vermont where you can go through a whole daiwa without really seeing many people at all um indefinitely without relying on any one is closely so you have a lot of these dynamics and play for veterans that don't exist in the general population and then of course these are all people who have been trained to use weapons and many veterans are firearms hobbyists and are likely to own guns themselves as well so guns are a part of life in vermont and i wouldn't expect that that would change anytime soon and and and maybe it shouldn't a at the same time it's pretty clear from the data taylor dobbs that you examined that there is a problem in vermont and i wonder if experts or advocates looking at this data are trying to talk about new ways of thinking about guns in homes with so many veterans in vermont knowing that guns aren't going to go away but knowing that may be some kind of different approach is needed here there are already things going on in vermont to that effect that have really nothing to do with new legislation or policy because those become nonstarters very quickly in the.

vermont taylor dobbs data set two five percent thirty percent sixyear
"vermont" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"I know a lot more men than women who seemed to be better at keeping our life paired down so's wondering if there's a gender thing going on and then another thing is in the in in vermont some of us label ourselves says environmentalists and we don't like to waste things if there's any kind of anti waste thing that makes it hard for people but on any other ideas should totally three questions what should because we were living in an interesting thing the idea of minimalist move intentional living united come up with this concept ray button i know i told you that at first but um you know i i think that that were it's an old idea an old wisdom but we are facing a new problem and that is unchecked consumerism at a level that the world has has never seen and it's because a lot of a lot of different types of of marketing were you you segment customer groups in the figure out the most effective way to to a partition them and sort of divide and conquer ray and as even more pernicious now with the online world because the segment team is formulaic either algorithms so if you're on instagram for example about way not say anyth any like the internet is evil or instagram as evil i'm not saying that i'm saying these are tools but sometimes uh some of the tactics used in the background can be pernicious so instagram is a good example because they will sometimes a run certain algorithms on you as a user you'll be user four hundred nineteen in experiment one thousand six hundred and seventeen be.

vermont