37 Burst results for "Vermont"

Fresh update on "vermont" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

01:02 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vermont" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Over a lifetime. It's a prosperity issue too. Homeowners in the U.S. have on average 40 times more wealth than renters, according to a September 2020 report from the Federal Reserve. In light of this crisis in homeownership, here are 6 ways that communities and companies around the country are legislating and innovating to help Americans buy a house. One. A narrow case study in reparations for black families, like most cities in the U.S., Evanston Illinois has a long history of racist housing laws for decades, black residents were segregated into poor neighborhoods, where occupancy rates were estimated to be 150% and some units lacked crucial amenities like heating. While hundreds of vacant homes were available in more desirable parts of town, landlords and real estate agents explicitly barred black families from renting them and banks blocked black families from financing. Owners and agents of vacant property plan to prevent the negroes from spreading from their own quarters. A 1918 Evanston news index article read. Housing segregation fueled wealth inequality, black families and Evanston earned $46,000 less than their white counterparts on average. Former Evanston alderman Robin roo Simmons sought to address that sordid history, while in office in 2019, she created the first ever taxpayer backed reparations fund in a U.S. city. It sets aside $10 million in revenue, raised by the city's tax on recreational marijuana over a ten year period. The first $400,000 out of that reserve will go to victims of racial housing discrimination and their descendants divided up into $25,000 grants, which can be used this year for down payments on new homes, mortgage payments or renovations on existing homes. That initial $400,000 will hardly solve the problem. There are more than 12,000 black residents in Evanston and the initial outlay will provide just 16 households with funding. But Simmons argues it's better than zero and the program also sets a key precedent. In the years since Evanston stood up its reparations fund several other locales, including Detroit, Michigan, and Amherst, Massachusetts have voted to explore or start similar programs. If you think of any significant transformative national or federal legislation, it started with localities and grassroots efforts organizing and pushing their local leaders. Simmons says. This is no exception. Two. Community land trusts buying the home, but not the land. The most unique part of the two story home in winwood Vermont that Sarah and husband Colin Robinson bought for $172,000 in 2008 wasn't its quaint terrace garden or the funky bunk room upstairs. It was the fact that the robinsons didn't own the land that it was built on. That's because the house is part of what's known as a community land trust. CLT, a nonprofit community controlled collection of properties. The first CLT in the U.S. was created in Albany, Georgia in 1969. Now there are more than 220 nationwide offering more than 12,000 homes total. While the particular rules of each CLT are a little different, the idea is the same. Aspiring homeowners share the cost of purchasing a house with the CLT, which owns the land, the home is built on. When the homeowner sells he or she returns a share of the appreciation with the CLT. Champlain housing trust the CLT that helped the robinsons become homeowners is the.

Evanston U.S. Robin Roo Simmons Federal Reserve Simmons Illinois Colin Robinson Amherst Winwood CLT Detroit Massachusetts Michigan Vermont
Fresh update on "vermont" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:45 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vermont" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"We need to demand that out of the state leadership. And so and by the way, I get so frustrated about this. This is the ultimate logical fallacy that we're all living through. Meaning that you are not allowed to even have an opinion or even say something after a year and a half of this circus. If you're not a doctor and you don't have a degree. Like excuse me, like, can I just ask some very simple questions? Ask some questions, right? Like why is it that the most vaccinated countries on the planet have the high highest COVID rates they've ever had? That's an interesting question, right? Why is that the most vaccinated state in the country has the highest COVID rate of any state in the country, Vermont? Why is it that Joe Rogan, who I have a lot of respect for, don't agree with them on everything, obviously. But he's very entertaining and hilarious that he decides to take Ivermectin and he gets smeared as say it's a horse dewormer, even though Ivermectin is a drug for human beings and want to Nobel Prize to help human beings and cured river river blindness in millions of people in Africa. We're not allowed to talk about that. Why is it an Aaron Rodgers, by the way, I've never liked Aaron Rodgers, but I have so much respect for him after this last week. I got to say, what Aaron.

Joe Rogan Vermont Aaron Rodgers Africa Aaron
Charlie Talks Reclaiming the Nation on Veterans' Day

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Charlie Talks Reclaiming the Nation on Veterans' Day

"You look at our amazing veterans and the people serving in the military, they're from a portion of the country that gets kind of a majority of all the condemnation for whatever possible reason. I think it's super unfair. And when you go look at who's willing to go die for our nation, it's from right here. It's from this part of the world. It's from South Carolina. It's from North Carolina from Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi and Alabama. And there is kind of this ethos of this part of the world of service and of duty and of love of nation and country and I travel the country. We were just in Vermont and we were in Oregon and Boise. There is a continual war on the American south. And I'll let you guys sort out if you know there's problems that south has to fix, like whatever. But you're my fellow countrymen. And I think it's so wrong to say, you know what? We are now going to impose our values. And by the way, you have to go remove all of your statues, which now they remove Thomas Jefferson, who is a wonderful man, and they removed him from Virginia. I think in Richmond, Virginia. And I'm always struck in the Bible. One of my favorite things in the Bible is this kind of refrain of remember. And right before the ten commandments, many people don't remember this, is it says I am the lord your God who delivered you from Israel from captivity in Israel. There is this constant emphasis on remembrance and on not forgetting what happened before you. And when you forget your history when you forget the ties that bind you together, there might be other reasons why those monuments might be standard. They say, oh, they're there because a white supremacy, or they're there because hundreds of thousands of people from this region bled and died for a cause that they believed in. And maybe that was part of the healing process to keep our nation together. And who are you, like, smug person from Manhattan to come in and say that we have to go remove every single statue from this part of the world. You guys shouldn't put up with it quite honestly. And I think it's wrong on a variety of different levels, but it also goes towards this idea of trying to impose one's values in a different part

Virginia South Carolina Boise Mississippi Kentucky Tennessee North Carolina Alabama Vermont Georgia Thomas Jefferson Oregon Israel Richmond Manhattan
COVID-19 hot spots offer sign of what could be ahead for US

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 hot spots offer sign of what could be ahead for US

"Cobit nineteen hospitalizations are up in parts of the western and northern U. S. because of the contagious delta variant virus trends are improving in places like Florida Texas and other southern states but covert nineteen is spreading north and west heading into the winter as people go indoors close their windows and breed stagnant air in recent days a spike was reported at a college in Vermont link to Halloween parties and a Boston elementary school had to close in Michigan the metro Detroit area is considered a hot spot with nearly four hundred coalbed cases and hospitals are overwhelmed in New Mexico and Colorado health officials are lamenting how many people are no longer wearing masks and how many people chose not to get vaccinated Dr Donald Milton at the university of Maryland says we're going to see a lot of outbreaks in unvaccinated people that will result in serious illness and will be tragic I'm Jackie Quinn

Boston Elementary School U. Florida Texas Vermont Dr Donald Milton Detroit Michigan New Mexico Colorado University Of Maryland Jackie Quinn
Tax Foundation Website Lists Top Marginal Rates by State

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Tax Foundation Website Lists Top Marginal Rates by State

"The combined federal and state top marginal income tax rates for each state under the Democrat Bill prepared by the tax foundation website by the way Here are the rates New York 66.2% California 64.7% New Jersey 63.2% Have I 62.4% Washington D.C. 62.2% Oregon 62% Minnesota 61.3% Larry Hogan Republican governor state Maryland He wants to be president at this clown 60.4% Vermont 60.2% Now in Kansas they massively increase the income tax under a Democrat governor It would be 59.6% in Kansas Delaware 59.3% So let's stop there for a moment One two three four 5 6 7 8 9 ten 11 12 So 11 The 11 top states tenor Democrat one has a Democrat governor who rammed this through Then we have Kasich Was the governor of Delaware for some time Excuse me They governor of Ohio for some time 59.1 percent Wisconsin 59.1% Mitch McConnell's Kentucky 58.9%

Washington D.C. Larry Hogan Tax Foundation Kansas New Jersey Oregon Minnesota Maryland Delaware
The Truth About Thomas Jefferson

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | Last month

The Truth About Thomas Jefferson

"Thomas Jefferson was one of the most incredible men ever to live in the history of the planet. He was a statesman, he was a president, he was he was a civilization changer. He's the author and was the author of the Declaration of Independence. Now we must understand the beauty of the declaration independence. When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary, for one people, to dissolve the political bands with another. Deriving from the powers of the earth the equal and separate station. I'm going from memory here, so I might be bouncing around. And it goes on to say the laws of nature and nature's God. Thomas Jefferson was able to connect the fruits of the enlightenment and the roots of antiquity. Thomas Jefferson did that. Thomas Jefferson connected the fruits that came out of the ideas of freedom of speech and consciousness and self government, separation of powers checks and balances. But he did not go only and merely towards the enlightenment as if Machiavelli, what Machiavelli or Rousseau or Hume would have done. Jefferson instead struck a balance. Jefferson understood that there was a new type of thinking that was derived from the ancient. And then if we forget the ancient and go too far into this new way of government, it will collapse, but if we go to into the ancient, there's no claim to challenge the monarchy. Thomas Jefferson being a brilliant man wrote the words that we hold these truths to be self evident. That all men are created equal amongst these are life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, originally, it was property. Now the exact reason why they're getting rid of Thomas Jefferson I don't know their exact reasons because he owns slaves. Is that what it was? Do you know that Thomas Jefferson actually worked to abolish slavery when he was governor of Virginia in the 1790s? Do you know that Thomas Jefferson heavily influenced by George Mason who wrote the Virginia declaration of rights? In 1776, argued for slavery to be ended do you know that Thomas Jefferson who, of course, wrote the declaration, inspired the first state to abolish slavery in 1777 Vermont? Did you know that Thomas Jefferson was partners with Ben Franklin for the first ever abolition convention? Held in 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Do you know that Thomas Jefferson was the first president to sign a moratorium saying that no new slaves were allowed to come into the United States? Thomas Jefferson was a good

Thomas Jefferson Machiavelli Jefferson Rousseau Hume Virginia George Mason Ben Franklin Vermont Philadelphia Pennsylvania United States
It Takes More Faith to Be an Atheist Than a Christian

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | Last month

It Takes More Faith to Be an Atheist Than a Christian

"I visit college campuses a lot and I'd say in Vermont, half the room were probably atheists last night. And it's fashionable. So some people would say, Eric, there is no proof that there's a God, therefore I'm an atheist. You embarked on this book to show, hold on a second. It takes, it takes more faith to be an atheist than to be a Christian. Okay, that is like the understatement of the millennium. It takes, I mean, I've heard people say that Frank Turk has said that. Trust me, once you read just what's in this book. I mean, there's way more. But it has become to my mind. If you read just this, you realize that real atheism is preposterous. And I don't just mean people don't believe in God or idiots or they're wrong. No, no, no. 50 years ago, it was tenable. It was something you could say, I've come to the conclusion, whatever. It could make sense. It could be we would say it's wrong, but 50 years ago, you could say, all right, well, you're an atheist. Today, based on this information, I would say it is not possible to be an intellectually satisfied atheist. If you want to be an agnostic, I will take my hat off to you. That's one thing. But to say that I know there's no God based on several things, I simply don't think it's possible. And I think people are going to get angry and a guy called up. I had the honor of guest hosting Charlie's radio show today, because, you know, he sleeps late. And he's young, he's a hill learn who learn. And no, but seriously, he let me guess host the show. And so a guy called up, I did call ins, and he said, I'm an atheist, whatever. And he said, you don't give any hard evidence of God. And I said, this is what happens. I think when you talk to atheist, they don't really even understand I'm not trying to be mean. But when you say hard evidence, that's exactly what is in this book. When you talk about the fine tuned

Frank Turk Vermont Eric Charlie
Has America Become a Country of Cowardice?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:47 min | Last month

Has America Become a Country of Cowardice?

"Here, reading to you from Barry Weiss about what is happening in this country. The we got here because of cowardice we get out with courage. And she gives examples here. People fired. The Vermont school principal fired because she said she supports black lives, but not the organization Black Lives Matter. Black Lives Matter is a hate organization. If you support it, you support hatred in this country. Undiluted, left wing, Marxist hatred. Okay, period. Everybody knows that. No, not everybody. Most people know that. Most people know much of what the left stands for is a lie. But you can't say it. I say it. Just as I say that it is better to have natural immunity than to get a vaccine. I've never said people shouldn't get a vaccine and lied about. I was lied about in The Washington Post in the CNN play for you to see and then way of Chris Cuomo's way of distorting what I said. Lying on CNN comes so naturally that I don't even believe they're aware of the fact that they lie. And I will play it for you. This is what this is what we have entered. So she gives example another one of the Hispanic utility worker in San Diego fired because somebody said made a white supremacist hand gesture. He was in fact cracking his knuckles out of his car window. You're guilty. If one person on the left says you're guilty. In this ideology she continues Barry Weiss. The quality of opportunity is replaced with equality of outcome as a measure of fairness. If every one doesn't finish the race at the same time the course must have been defective. Thus the argument to get rid of the SAT. Or the admissions test for public schools like stuyvesant in New York or Lowell in San Francisco. In this ideology you are guilty for the sins of your fathers. In other words, you are not you. You are only a mere avatar of your race or your religion or your class.

Barry Weiss Chris Cuomo CNN Vermont The Washington Post San Diego Lowell San Francisco New York
Conservatism: Preserving the Small Against the Big

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:04 min | Last month

Conservatism: Preserving the Small Against the Big

"And I think there's something special about Vermont that we shouldn't forget that we as conservatives should focus on, which is the idea of preserving the small against the big, which is that sometimes it's important that we as conservatives recognize we want to have local communities stay strong, family stay strong and that we of course want limited government, but we also don't want overreaching corporations either destroying timeless family businesses that have been passed down. And so I kind of always like coming to Burlington, I don't know if Burlington likes me coming, but apparently it's thank you, where it's. Actually really interesting and important where this is one of the few cities that has still kind of kept at least from an aesthetic standpoint the idea of small town America. And not wanting these soulless godless corporations to come in and destroy small business and entrepreneurship and there's some very interesting contradictions that I think that Vermont is living through right now that we'll talk about. Because Vermont has always been this idea that we want to keep the way we want to keep things the way they are, which is actually a conservative idea. And some people on the more socialistic left would disagree, they would say that, well, no, we want to we want to abolish private property or stop business, see they're already cheering for the abolition of private property. We have a nice start already. So you won't mind if I take your poorly worded sign. I could tell. So they must be consistent then. But there is this idea though that we as conservatives in the last 18 months, thankfully have stopped being corporate cheerleaders. I think that's a really healthy thing that we as conservatives should stand for the good the true the beautiful for the local and the decentralized, not the foreign and the distant and the

Vermont Burlington America
The Mystery of America's Current Labor Shortage

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | Last month

The Mystery of America's Current Labor Shortage

"There's a mystery out there, and you can help us solve it. Some of you have an idea of how we can answer this question together. I think I have a good idea of what is happening, but I don't have the complete picture. But I definitely know the problem, and we're going to talk about the problem together, and then we're going to figure out what exactly the main reason the driving reason is and then what I think their solution is going to be. Wall Street Journal writes this piece and it's exactly what we've been saying on our team because we're traveling the country and we saw the most bizarre thing yesterday. So The Wall Street Journal has the piece where did all the workers go? So we are in loudon county and we on our way to Vermont, and we asked ourselves the question we said, why are the Starbucks? And again, some people on our team love Starbucks, I know I'm going to get blown up by that but whatever. Go to second vote dot com and learn how terrible Starbucks actually is second vote dot com. Promo code Charlie to get some money off. Starbucks were closing at ten a.m. in Northern Virginia. They were open for 5 hours. They could not find the workers to keep Starbucks open. We went to Cheesecake Factory last evening after our event. And I kid you not, there must have been what 20 tables that were not wiped off are cleared on our way. They said that they have only half of their workers showing up to work. I went to a place in Phoenix Arizona last weekend protein house, great place, if you're in Phoenix you should check it out. It's a terrific restaurant. Two great conservative Christian patriots that run that place. And they said that they are paying people as cashiers, $17 an hour, and they can't get people to do the work. $17 an hour, and they just kind of show up whenever they want to show up they do whatever they want. We are hearing about this labor crunch all across the country. People are calling it a tight job market a strict job market and I can't quite figure it out. Now before you email me freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com you say, well, Charlie, it's obviously the stimulus payments, those have stopped. Charlie's obvious the generous unemployment benefits. Those have stopped they're still continuing in certain states, nowhere like where they used to be. Or Charlie, it's all this, so let's work. There's lots of different elements to this. There is no obvious answer. If you think you got the obvious answer to this, then email me freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com because I'm genuinely interested. There is a labor shock and shortage that we've never seen before.

Starbucks Wall Street Journal Cheesecake Factory Loudon County Charlie Phoenix Northern Virginia Vermont Charlie Kirk Patriots Arizona
Bari Weiss Is the Type of Democrat That Used to Exist in America

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:11 min | Last month

Bari Weiss Is the Type of Democrat That Used to Exist in America

"Are the people on television at all ever self aware at the damage they're doing to American society will Barry Weiss is one of the few that deserves to be platformed. Again, I don't agree with her on everything. In fact, I'm sure that if we have different views on abortion, in different views on transgender stuff. In different views on I don't know, pick your certain issue. I'm sure that I'm much more strict on immigration than she is. Whatever. But she believes in something that will help keep this country alive for the time being. She believes in something virtuous. Freedom of speech dialog differences of opinion. Individual initiative, she believes in liberty. Barry wise is the type of Democrat that used to exist in this country. Very wise is the type of Democrat that used to say, you know what I agree to disagree. You might have a difference of opinion, but I'll still allow you to speak. She is different than Brian's Brian stelter, who's the type of leftist that we're gonna have to encounter ten at University of Vermont, where at University of Vermont, they say, oh, we disagree with you. Therefore we want to shut you up. Barry Weiss would say, I disagree with Charlie. Let's see what he has to say. It's a completely different approach.

Barry Weiss Barry Wise American Society Brian Stelter University Of Vermont Brian Charlie
Virus surge hits New England despite high vaccination rates

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Virus surge hits New England despite high vaccination rates

"The delta surgeon covered nineteen cases has hit New England hard despite the region having some of the highest vaccination rates in the country Vermont leads the nation with sixty nine point four percent of its population fully vaccinated followed by Connecticut Maine Rhode Island and Massachusetts nonetheless the region is seeing a surge in covert nineteen cases that straining the healthcare system hospitalizations are approaching the pandemic peak from last winter and intensive care units and some places have reached capacity still experts say the high vaccination rate has spared New England the death rate seen elsewhere but the head of Rhode island's covered response now says the goal of seventy percent vaccination may not be enough in true population level protection will require in excess of ninety percent I'm Ben Thomas

Connecticut Maine Rhode Island New England Vermont Massachusetts Rhode Island Ben Thomas
Notable Figures Share Their Endorsements for PM as Canadians

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Notable Figures Share Their Endorsements for PM as Canadians

"Former president barack obama yesterday effectively endorsing justin trudeau to be reelected canadian prime minister today former democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton also effectively endorsing justin trudeau for reelection in canada but then coming up fast on the left flank there's vermont senator bernie sanders not to be outdone weighing in today. As well not on behalf of justin trudeau instead senator sanders is endorsing jagmeet. Singh from the new democratic party and again do canadians care what former. Us presidents and former democratic presidential candidates. Think about who. They should vote for in their own election honestly. Nobody has any idea. Nobody does that. This will have any influence whatsoever. Any any impact whatsoever but whatever's going to happen there is a close enough call at this point that we've got this weird late development of american politicians weighing in

Justin Trudeau Senator Sanders Jagmeet Barack Obama Hillary Clinton Vermont Democratic Party Canada Singh United States
The Creation Story of SpidrTech With CEO Rahul Sidhu

Code Story

01:37 min | 3 months ago

The Creation Story of SpidrTech With CEO Rahul Sidhu

"That first. Mvp first pilot that you built how long it took you to build. What sort of tools you use to bring it to life. They they tell you that there's a lesson learned when you build an mvp they tell you to kind of start with a. You know like a roller skate. Skateboard than bill to a bicycle than a motorcycle than a car. And then a ferrari over time even though i read the book lean startup. I you know it's one of those lessons. Add to learn the hard way we started to fifteen. We're that horizontal techstars program new york. The product that we were looking to build at the time is not the product that we have today raise a precede round about a million dollars. Depart through some of the capital to to to learn some these lessons. It wasn't until we're like. Hey look we're probably not gonna get this out to market before. He ran out of money that we decide. If we're going to have to basically try something else. So i remember i flew out to burlington vermont. The former chief there. Michael sherline great guy. He had us out in his boat out on the lake. And and trying to brainstorm what we can do from there and one of the things he left us with. It's just keep it simple and help. Police departments solve the customer service problems specifically public perceptions in very important us. We want to make sure that we're providing the best service we possibly can help us compete while the customer service side with these companies like amazon. Etcetera that are driving up expectations consumer expectations on you know what to expect when they enacted services that kind of clicked for us and we decided to start something simple which is just an automated email or text that goes out to people if a report gets filed for them but just give them some basic information. That's it started.

Michael Sherline Ferrari Burlington New York Vermont Amazon
College Football Bets: Week 1

Behind the Bets

03:14 min | 3 months ago

College Football Bets: Week 1

"On. Espn dot com chuck section. I've given them out daily wager. But you know we'll rip through a few here i want to start with. Ecu this numbers come down a little bit. They play thursday night against appalachian state and look. I think he's us live dog. Jay vermont talked about it as well. They have a bunch of veterans including senior quarterback and app. State's been a little shaky as well. And they have a new quarterback and chase. Bryce you might remember him. He played a key. Clemson then transferred to duke ten and a half a lot of points for team that always seems to pull games out of the hat and have crazy place at the end. I like myself getting double digits plus ten right now but still i would out jumping on on ec as long as you get double digits and maybe a little sprinkle on the money line. That could be some fun The came by actually liked the most Kinda scared about it and it's umass and everybody who listen to pod on a somewhat regular basis knows. I'm kind of the betting bully as humans. A frequent guest. Your calls me. I like to bet on bet against bad teams. Just just do it right. Like orioles season win total under. I've certainly bet against umass in the past but thirty eight is just way too many points. And i'll tell you why won't bell and umass went out and got a bunch of transfers. Their quarterback is a six foot five inch from from colorado like the university of and or colorado university of boulder. And they have two running backs that transferred in one from rutgers. So a team that was like. Fcs not too long ago or fcs quality has some real players and you only have to get thirty eight now pits good. But they're at tennessee. The following week nerd uzis not a guy who's going to run up the score. He's old school. Fourth quarter they'll bring in the is a little bit and on top of that. Probably the best handy angle. I have is the offense coordinator for pit is a guy named mark whipple. He's coached umass twice head coach. Also the most recent time was just a few years ago. This is not situation where he wants to embarrass his former program. Umass is a special place in his heart. Whipple's going to call off the dogs as well. So i just think if you can get about two touchdowns even if it's garbage time i think plus thirty eight is the play in. That game is crazy. As it sounds another game. I like is essentially a coin. Flip game and it syracuse minus one. And a half. you might remember. I've talked about it with jay motto. The over three in the win total. They're going to split time at quarterback. Babies made that announcement. I don't love it. I would prefer. Tommy devito to be the entire time but dual threat with michigan state. Sorry mississippi state transfer garrett schrader. They're just better at a lot of positions that ohio but most importantly syracuse addressed. Their offense align issues. There was a pathetic. Offense couldn't even average average about two hundred fifty yards per game. Not passing just total yards per game. The veto would be injured. A lot spent a lot of time on his back. If they're okay on the offensive line this is just a syracuse team. That's just better. No more frank. Solich at ohio. Bob cats will rotate. Quarterbacks curtis rourke. Who's obviously the brother of nathan rourke the former stud bob cats quarterback and then armani rogers transfer from unlv. Ohio's very good. They looked good last year against the too bad teams really bad teams in the mac akron bowling green. But i think use gets there which is better talent especially with vito healthy and maybe we hope and improved offensive line. Fourth play i want to talk about

Umass Jay Vermont University Of And Or Colorado Mark Whipple Espn Bryce Clemson Orioles Jay Motto Syracuse Rutgers Tommy Devito Garrett Schrader Bell Whipple Colorado Tennessee
Cyclist Craig Dalton Describes How He Got Into to BMX

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Cyclist Craig Dalton Describes How He Got Into to BMX

"How did bmx bikes. Turn into something more for you. What was the. What was the next piece of this for me. Part of the challenge was i moved away from illinois. Move back to these. Two new jersey and my group of friends was entering high school at that point. Bmx just wasn't a thing. At that point. I transitioned more into writing for Purpose going to and from school. But a a seminal point in my cycling upbringing was really around my junior year of high school. My dad agreed to take me and two friends. On a at this point he called a bike packing trip through upstate. Vermont and upstate new york and vermont. And i don't know why he thought this was a good idea but he took us out there and i remember the funny story. I remember the first day i had won. A hand-me-down racing bike of his to ride. My friends had cobbled together with some advice from my dad. Decently capable dropped bar. Touring bikes and my dad. Were setting up and begging for equipment. That has two small front panners. That's it and he's packing them up. And my friends. And i have the rear rack. The big panthers were trying to strap things to the caboose. My dad's like looking at us like you want to pairs of shorts to shirts and a pair of sandals full. Stop at of course. We tried to try to edit back down but we ended up having a lot more gear than my dad did. And i remember starting that first day i unlike my other two friends. I did have a pair of cycling shorts but of course i wore a pair of cutoff shorts on top of it because fashion. We'd want that embarrassment fashion fashion. Yes but fortunately for having the cycling shorts underneath i was able to swap out like name probably half an hour into the first day. I said embarrassment be gone like my friend.

New Jersey Upstate Illinois Vermont New York Panthers
I Always Wanted to Build a Tiny House

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

02:07 min | 3 months ago

I Always Wanted to Build a Tiny House

"My guest today is even waldman. Even is a tiny house author speaker and teacher. He built his own tiny houses on wheels. In two thousand twelve and has been passionately helping future tiny house dwellers ever since. Welcome ethan thanks less. It's great to be here. So how did you first become interested in tiny houses. How far back do you want me to go. I guess a good place to start is. I was out of college for a few years Working a couple of different kind of corporate jobs. Getting getting my feet wet kind of experiencing that that nine five cubicle lifestyle and i was not digging it so i had moved to vermont and gotten a job with a smaller company hoping like hey maybe maybe the big corporate culture isn't for me but maybe if i moved to a place that i love it will work out but i still just found. It actually got worse. Because i moved to vermont surrounded by wonderful mountains and skiing and mountain biking all these these activities that i love to do finding that i was. I was locked down to a desk for for much too much time. And so i decided to take a sabbatical. The company was really flexible. So i took a month of took all my vacation time and then some unpaid time and i did a bicycle tour on the west coast of the united states. With my cousin you know where you have the four years on your bike. You're carrying all your gear It's like the tiniest of tiny houses because you're carrying all your stuff with you. It's almost nomadic and throughout the trip we actually used a website called couch surfing and stayed in several tiny houses. But when i got home from the trip. I really it kind of forced me to take a restock of my life. The house that i was renting seemed so big and so overkill and i just realized like oh i could. I could drastically reduce what i need for my housing

Waldman Vermont Ethan Skiing West Coast United States
Why Are Democrats So Against Ensuring Election Integrity?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:26 min | 4 months ago

Why Are Democrats So Against Ensuring Election Integrity?

"Isn't it interesting that the democrats or the people that run the federal government. They never get in the way. When states relaxed their own voting laws for example when california loud mail in balloting. The federal government's have let's states rights issue when oregon went to universal mail in balloting. They said well. That's a states rights issue when colorado went to near mail and universal balloting a states rights issue when illegals now can vote in municipal elections in california. And they're trying to get that done in vermont. they say well. That's a states rights issue when all of a sudden cities like portland and seattle chicago and new york. They want to disobey federal immigration law. The federal government says well. That's a states rights. Issue when colorado wants to legalize marijuana or crystals or whatever kind of mushrooms. I guess denver wanted to do. I guess they did that recently. Say that's a states rights issue even though it's against federal law you could. You could argue. That shouldn't be but it is but the moment that the forty eighth state in the union decides to check the process of how their own elections were conducted. The federal government threatens to go full little rock nine on them threatens to go full federal force against them why politico dot com last week in us. We're so busy last week covering so many stories but this just as applicable today as it was a couple of days ago department of justice fires warning shot against unusual post election ballot reviews the justice department new memo reminded states that allowing ballots to be mishandled can violate federal. Let me stop nowhere. Does it say audits are against federal law. They're saying that. If you don't do the audit correctly it could be against federal law. This feels like federal intimidation. And you see this is so. It's so hypocritical. it's so contradictory. But it's so typical of the democrat party and the american left and the collectivists. Which is they're all for states rights and the tenth amendment if it fits their socially degenerate aims if it fits their relax voting measures that they want but the moment that a state wants to use states rights to try to ensure election integrity. They are going to use the federal government to try to intimidate them and intervene at any means possible.

Federal Government Colorado California Oregon Vermont Portland Seattle Denver Chicago New York Department Of Justice Justice Department Democrat Party
The Obamas Are Throwing a Party, Ignoring Democrat COVID Policies

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 4 months ago

The Obamas Are Throwing a Party, Ignoring Democrat COVID Policies

"So here they're having this massive event the Obama's are going to have to spend Maybe millions. In their $15 million mansion. White supremacy has been very, very bad for them. Very bad. Went in this before, and I remember being attacked was hilarious by the goofballs in the media. You know, Martha's Vineyard is like it's like an island called, you know, It's like Vermont. There's there's like 12 black people. They're not gonna mark you don't understand. Off season, there's actually 4% and Give me a break. Obama never has parties in Newark and Camden and And and so forth. No, no, no, no. He hangs out where the white supremacists are. That's where his mansions are. The white supremacists are Much like LeBron. Anyway. All that aside. I'm talking their talk. You see the race stuff. Ladies and gentlemen, we're being told This is what I mean about how you can't take these. Educational Well, these medical fascist, seriously talk to your own doctor. Your doctor doesn't have Anything to do with politics or publicity or anything. Your doctor just works hard as a doctor, talk to your own doctor. Your doctor knows your medical background. Your doctor knows what's good for you. Ask your doctor. If you want a second opinion, ask somebody else is that But you don't listen to this crap from pus, AKI and Biden and Fauci. What does Fauci no. Not a lot, apparently. Anyway. So what about this thing that Obama is going there? It's like the Democrats leaving Texas and then spreading their virus Hall over Washington, D. C. It's okay. The righteous Other Democrats

Barack Obama Vineyard Martha Vermont Camden Newark Lebron Fauci AKI Biden D. C. Texas Washington
Carl Levin, Michigan's Longest Serving US Senator, Dies at 87

Daily Detroit

02:03 min | 4 months ago

Carl Levin, Michigan's Longest Serving US Senator, Dies at 87

"First elected to congress in nineteen seventy-eight michigan's longest serving senator chaired the powerful armed services committee. He was very active around civil rights local development and protecting american workers having interviewed senator levin and read his memoir. Getting to the heart of the matter. I have some reflections. I imagined that if senator levin had a role in a television show he'd be fictional president. Jed bartlett's closest ally in the west wing practical and patriotic levin's thirty six years in the upper chamber as a democrat had paradoxes a democrat who investigated spending and financial excess in government as well as wall street a staunch believer as chair of the senate armed services committee. That america has a strong role to play in the world but voted against the second iraq. War levin was consistent with himself. He was a man who spent decades of politics. But i sense. He felt good about his impact when he saw himself in the mirror. Getting the heart of the matter reminds me of the writings of ben franklin. The similarities with the founding father aren't just physical appearance surprising wit and clearly understandable style both levin and franklin shared the belief that the long game mattered that even if it wasn't politically popular in the moment moment to make things happen in a country with a lot of people with differing views. You shouldn't always take everything off the table for your opponent that making is how democracy actually works his memoir is a blueprint without saying it and how we might put the broken engine of american democracy back together again. Levin rhetorically lays the parts on the table. I won't get into all of them. But they include the broken filibuster where he called out his own party for creating it then in order for an electorate and your colleagues to trust you you need to have a consistent northstar and compass and he's right if you look at the popular senior senator from vermont. The reason that he gets photo shopped everywhere sitting on a chair isn't because of any particular political stance it's because whether they agree or not people connect with him because they believe that he is who he says he is.

Senator Levin Powerful Armed Services Commit Jed Bartlett Senate Armed Services Committe War Levin Levin Michigan Congress Ben Franklin Iraq America Franklin Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Hello thank you for joining the american revolution today. Episode one seventy seven the republic of vermont in march seventeen seventy eight the vermont legislature was elected and met for the first time this was significant because no one not even the other thirteen states recognized vermont as an independent state. I mentioned almost in passing back in episode one thirty one. That vermont had declared its own independence in january of seventeen seventy seven the continental congress. And just about everyone else outside of vermont. Pretty much ignored this declaration. The main reason for ignoring it was that it was divisive. The continental congress was doing everything it could to keep the thirteen states. United it did not want to highlight a matter of local contention between the states to explain. Why perhaps a little background would be helpful in the colonial era. The exact territorial borders of many colonies were ill defined and sometimes contradictory new york thought its eastern border was the connecticut river. This was based on the original land. Grant to the duke of york from the king in sixteen sixty. Four new hampshire believed that its western border. Went all the way to lake. Champlain was roughly as far west as the western border of massachusetts. This was based on a decree by king. George the second. In seventeen forty therefore the area between lake champlain. And the connecticut river was in dispute by both colonies. Of course none of this really mattered and any colonists began to settle in the territory in the seventeenth century. The area was also claimed by france. As part of quebec. The french established for saint an in the region to help secure their claim the first british settlers in seventeen twenty four came to the territory from connecticut. This disputed inland territory. Mostly remained the home of native americans until after the french and indian war then at the end of that war in seventeen sixty three. There were an estimated. Three hundred colonists. Living in the region governor. Benning wentworth of new hampshire began. Selling land grants to colonists shortly after king. George the second decree of seventeen.

vermont connecticut river congress new hampshire new york lake champlain George Benning wentworth connecticut Champlain legislature france massachusetts quebec
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"How you doing this morning. Good, Hey, how are you I hung up but then I heard you mention me so I called back. Appreciate it. Yeah. Well, first of all, I can't wait to read the article in seven days and I I really agree with what can set to it's just not an issue of the quantity of water but it is also the quality issues. But I want to say one thing when it comes to water in. Vermont as clearly asked these said, it wasn't a lot about water in Vermont, but we.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"From Radio Vermont it's the Dave Graham show on wd. It's your show. About the people places and the issues that matter the most to you. Now. Here's your host. Dave Graham. Good Morning Vermont it is. Wednesday the twenty first of October twenty twenty and we have a good show lined up for you today. WE'RE GONNA BE TALKING FIRST OFF. With. Ken. Picard is a reporter with seven days. Seven days is out with its weekly edition a little bit later today on the on the newsstands and will feature a cover story about water in Vermont and the I think the headline was trickle deterrent I don't have it in front of me, but that was pretty good alliteration trickle deterrent. And and then It also reminded me. Of A book, just out a couple months ago by Mary, trump the niece of our president I think that'll was too much not enough. So maybe another way to describe. For water situation in this age of climate, change in the second half hour, it'd be speaking with Steve Pappas, the editor of The Times Argus and. Rutland, Herald, we're going to be asking him about the latest news on the coronavirus outbreak that seems to be focused right in the Montpellier. beginning with a with a sports arena year central Vermont, Memorial Civic Center. Hockey and broom. Ball. Games going on there which I seem to have been. Turned out to be the source of some spread of the coronavirus in the Central Vermont area hoping lineup CBS news correspondents after the top of the hour break and then. In the second hour we're GONNA be talking about migratory birds in Vermont this time of year obviously when we have visitors were heading south and and. Finding out all about the state of migratory birds in Vermont from Doug more of the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, as well as David Muir, who actually is a former state officials he was the commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation. Under Governor Peter Shoveling. But these days he's executive director of a Audubon Vermont and so we'll be. Checking in with David in Doug in the second hour to and finding out all about migratory birds in our state But let's get right into our conversation with Ken Picard on this excellent story Author in seven days coming out today as I mentioned should be on the on the website Kevin. Get Ken. Tennessee other authors story. So pardon, any confusion can thank you for joining me this morning. Yeah. Happy to be here. Thanks vitamin. Kevin mccollum by the way just to give full credit here. So. And so really interesting. Interesting set of issues guys looked into there and it sounds like. Very important peak in one of these stories where Hey, folks we need to be paying attention and. Go ahead, it's funny that you mentioned the politics because you know just like our political situation I think our our climate is being driven to extremes as well we are. We are definitely seeing you know just in the in the last year I think people it's easy to forget that just about a year ago. We had that big Halloween Storm Twenty nineteen. Five inches of rain dumped down on us. It was completely unexpected. Sent rivers to flood stage in. A year later about half the state of a drought condition. So yeah. It's certainly A. A lot can change in a short amount of time here. Yeah. and. What I mean obviously you both of these things were present challenges to. Public visuals in particular budget writers at the State and municipal level who are trying to figure out. Okay, we get floods on one end of the spectrum. May We need bigger culverts and? more resilient drainage systems and so on and so forth. at night at the other end of this serum maybe we need better storage systems for water went and it does come down Are we making any progress on this stuff. Well. I think one of the things that one of the messages that I got from talking to the experts and I want make it clear that I am definitely not a climatologist or even a you know routinely and environmental reporter but Speaking to the folks up at the Gund Institute at the University of Vermont. You know one of the things that they said to us was you know Vermont, we should play to our strengths and one of the saints that we have is that Vermont has been typically a water rich state and if we protect those. That are already wetlands and repairing areas and streams and rivers. I mean, it sounds kind of like a no brainer. But when we use those that natural infrastructure that will help us both in times of flooding, it will slow down fast moving water and they will also get us through these dry spell's that we've been going through. And those are certainly expected to get longer. I think a lot of our monitor's don't have much experience with long multi year droughts. Having. Lived myself before I moved here, eighteen years ago I lived out in western Montana and. Forest forest fires were just a normal part of life out there. But you know to see this year to see. You know a wildfire burning underground in Killington You know that's a that's kind of a new thing for us, and so you know you I hate I hate to use the expression new normal Olga gets overused but I mean we're. We've got to get used to some different conditions and I think you know if we can protect the areas that we do have will definitely help us you mentioned you know building the deeper color tes and and you know sort of these attention palms and whatnot I mean I think those those can help as well. We really need to slow down the water and and just you know make things. Have Water be able to absorb into the ground. I mean, let's talk about the the sort of The drought intimate. It's really kind of current right in front of us now. Issue even though I mean I look out the window here and it's Raindrops on the window panes. And and it's a cloudy day looks like rain rain in the forecast and etc but I. Your story indicates that the rain we have been getting really just in the last couple of weeks here in October. Is Not enough to kind of offset the drought, which has been the norm in Vermont for.

Vermont Vermont Fish and Wildlife Depa Ken Picard Central Vermont Audubon Vermont Kevin mccollum University of Vermont Dave Graham reporter Hockey Memorial Civic Center Tennessee David Muir CBS Department of Environmental Co Steve Pappas Peter Shoveling Mary
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Medicare. Remain. In good shape, they're a little worried these days with some of the actions and pronouncements coming from president trump who will be speaking with. Jim Roosevelt of the committee in the second half hour of the program this morning and later on we. have. Some folks from the Vermont Specialty Foods Association they normally have conference this time of year and. For a nice face to face meeting and sampling each other each other's specialty foods sure and. This year things are going to be a little different for them but they are still. An important industry in Vermont and contributed many nice things to our lives especially delicious things to eat. So we'll be talking to some folks when this Specialty Foods Association in the second hour of what they do plan for an annual event. In this age of the COVID nineteen crisis. Let's get into our conversation first off with Kim Door Davita. Gray. Believe he joins us on the phone this morning good morning kit thanks for. This morning. To the back on the show. Yeah and so let's see you been covering some of the Vermont political races and it occurred to me. We ought to get up and get caught up and get a little bit of a report on where things stand sauce recent polling indicated Governor Phil Scott has a substantial lead over his. Challenger Dave's Ackerman. Lieutenant Governor. And yet, there's some folks wondering if the governor's veto of a bill, recently might have an impact on eat into that lead a little bit. What do you have story about this over the weekend? What are you hearing? Right, so this is really in terms of looking at a governor obviously high popular and. handling Cova nineteen and probably the the the pilot market terms of how to cover how to deal with in the country really and so how does lieutenant? Governor David. Documentation tried to break into that support for for governor, Scott, and so there's one possible way outed several course that Ken Try to put some pressure on Scott and one is the governor's recent veto of a bill that legislation passed. It was called called the global warming Solutions Act which it steps goal with a safe mean terms of carbon emission reduction goals. And then it has a clause, allow individuals to sue the state if if if the government does not meet those goals and as well as. A line accountable to recommend what should have how they should musical. So I was legislation that's Ben craddock control legislation passed the governor Saying. He had some concerns about legislation and went back to the legislature and they over road that veto both thousands Senate. However, what's this? Back and forth with show is, is the governor's how's the governor thinks the state should basically address climate change has compared to what? Lieutenant Governor Duckling beliefs, and so this kind of setup dynamic which really. it can show kind of larger philosophical. Disagreement between the two in terms of role of government have taxes at a whole slew of things that kind of go between the fiscal conservative and progressive them that. Yeah the. I. Must've Been I'm a little bit skeptical. I don't know if this moves the needle enough to overcome. What was the Warsaw gap in the polling was quite large. It was it was a Phil Scott had around fifty five percent and and David Ackerman was around the twenty four percents, range and then I believe there were sixteen percent according to this speed. Of undecided voters so The governor has a wide wide margin. In the lead and it's it's basically from the folks I spoke to Before, before over nineteen, if it never happened, this could have been an issue and covers document could have made a big deal but but because of the way they WANNA feel Scottish Ismael Silver Nineteen because of nineteen has realigned people's priorities in terms of public safety, public health economy job. It really doesn't allow much oxygen for for any other issues that document would would've loved to be putting out there with a love talking about again, all free, and so it's really totally thrown that this race was looking at back in January the at very competitive rates. Totally in in in. In Stopgap. It's quite interesting how mu- governor overcoming adversity I think is really a scores that. That governor big points and helps politically I think back to a governor Peter. Someone. Just after the tropical storm Irene swept through the state leaving leaving behind this path of destruction. In many parts of Vermont and. He was credited with really rallying for maters to basically clean up the mess and remained. Strong and and keep up the heat up their courage in the face of what was really in many communities quite a tragedy including, Waterbury? I must say. and. And Governor Someone Kinda got some glow from that and that was I. Think A. Key key part of his success he ran for. Reelection in two, thousand, twelve. Much, closer race in twenty fourteen for him. He didn't have that that that truck that Irene glow is starting to fade I guess by by fourteen and. So it's interesting. How that that overcoming of adversity? Being perceived as a strong leader in the face of adversity can be so helpful to to political. Leader in. Vermont sure elsewhere where to. Do you think that the idea of overcoming adversity is is a Is A key. To Scott's current situation near Kid Norton? One hundred percent You know this is something that a lot of Scots allies have even been saying in terms of you know the one knock on the governor is that he in your SAS never or Arkansas never buses failed to really show his his his ability to lead and and Vision and that his the way he's handled covid nineteen, his team has As able to really Highlight how the governor is able to lead, which again has been a knock from not only The people hosting in terms of his opponents. You've said, you know he doesn't know how to lead these These has hasn't the legislature. He hasn't done all these things. Go Nineteen has really given the governor of an ability to to crush those muscles and and show that he is able to do this. So you know it's a massive massive boost for because again, the way he's handled it and success the status had also going back to the polling for a moment. It's also interesting that donor Phil Scott leaves among Democrats. Democratic. Meetings Voters Korean get into this poll over the Democratic nominee.

Governor Phil Scott Vermont Lieutenant Governor Duckling Governor David Phil Scott Vermont Specialty Foods Associ David Ackerman Specialty Foods Association Jim Roosevelt president COVID Kim Door Davita Medicare. Irene glow trump Voters Korean Cova Ben craddock Stopgap
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Foods Association they normally have conference this time of year and. For a nice face to face meeting and sampling each other each other's specialty foods sure and. This year things are going to be a little different for them but they are still. An important industry in Vermont and contributed many nice things to our lives especially delicious things to eat. So we'll be talking to some folks when this Specialty Foods Association in the second hour of what they do plan for an annual event. In this age of the COVID nineteen crisis..

Specialty Foods Association Foods Association COVID Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Thought Card

The Thought Card

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Thought Card

"Financially savvy travellers welcome back to the thought card podcast. It is officially season for and usually the first episodes of the podcast for the new season I usually, you know share new things happening my life updates, but you know what I said you know let's switch it up this time. So those time I'm taking you live, we're live in Vermont, and if you're a long-time listener of the show, you know that every time I travel I, actually record a podcast episode with my Hunky. Fiance soon to be husband's. So. Welcome back to the Dakar podcast Babe. Scooby back thanks for having me again I know last time you are on the show we were kind of like sharing a little bit that we're planning a new trip to Madrid, which unfortunately did not unfold. So now we actually can. Hop on the Mike and talk about our Vermont trip. So before we dive into today's episode..

Vermont Madrid Mike
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

15:32 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"This together. It's the Dave Ramsey show. Wd We're back and we're gonNA talk with Shane. Rogers this next twenty five minutes or so here on the day Graham. Show on WD FM and am. He is with the remote stainless sustainable jobs fund. Which is has organized a rooted in Vermont Promotion about Local foods in our state Before we proceed with all of that I want to make a couple of announcements one. Is that Stay tuned after eleven o'clock this morning we're going to be going to another edition of Governor. Fill. Scott's regular news conferences. He brings in other top state officials and together they make various announcements related to the states response to the covid nineteen crisis and what's being opened. What rules might be being relaxed at this stage of the game and so on and so forth and so always interesting and informative events with the governor and his folks that See to occur Monday Wednesday and Friday at eleven. Am We're carrying them all live here on Wd FM and am? And I should add to that by the way that Bill Sarah's commonsense radio program which normally airs between eleven and twelve in the morning I will not be heard bills got a day off in out of respect for the governor and the state officials who are going to be making various announcements related to the covid nineteen crisis and the other thing I wanted to mention was that Got a follow up email whether it was a it was a correspondent who sent a note in during that first segment from Middlebury talking about today's event a food food distribution program down there And I followed up with the note saying that According to facebook postings in the area the folks there are already seeing big traffic jams around the food distribution site. A lot of folks are are lamenting. What occurred in Berlin last Friday when There were thousands of cars people lined up to get food from free distribution site. Remember folks if you don't really need it It's not just a matter of. Hey Free Food. Let's go down and get ourselves You know a bargain or whatever this is for people who actually need it and if there's that much need out there are economies maybe bigger trouble than we thought If if there is if there are folks that just looking for a Freebie. That's a different story and unless you want to sit in a traffic jam all day and force others. Who actually need to be there. Also the traffic jam. Please stay away. If you don't have a genuine need. Please stay away. That's my advice alright. Well let's bring in Shane. Rogers the with the sustainable jobs fund and rooted in Vermont. And I believe he's on the telephone this morning. Good Morning Shane. Hey Dave thanks for having me glad to do it. And so tell us a first off about The Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund. And and then let's zero in on the rooted in Vermont program and So start with a section A. Of The question. Please sure so. The Vermont sustainable jobs. Fund is a nonprofit that really works throughout Vermont on various different sectors and the sector that I I work in specifically is on Vermont. Food system and Vs J. F. is the backbone organization for the Vermont Farm to plate network and the Vermont. Farm to plate network is Total of about three hundred organizations and businesses and agencies that are working towards Beaumont food system plan so they're working on everything from distribution and aggregation to food access to Land Access and everything in between and I am specifically working on a program and a project that we call rooted in Vermont and lower doing with rooted in Vermont is. We're really trying to celebrate. How offer monitors have been doing local food things for generations right so think everything from hunting and fishing to forge in gardening and really also getting down to just making sure that people feel good about picking up that block of Cabinet Shudder from the grocery store when they go out? Because as we're seeing right now especially Vermont is positioned pretty well to have a resilient food system where our farmers are working really hard. You know to feed their communities and All the support that we can give us consumers to not only make sure that Our small farms. Continue to exist after this by To really shore up Some of those cracks that we're starting to see in the food system now that This pandemic yeah you know I tell you I I had a couple of folks on. I think it was the week before last from the University of Vermont College About Agriculture and Life Sciences We had this Cease to society segment every Thursday. Second Hour. Which is now going on summer vacation. But we're hoping we'll be back in the fall and These folks from the University of Colorado Culture in life sciences. We're talking about local foods in Vermont and I asked them to tell me How Close Vermont was to if it had a goal of imagining itself as an island in able to sustain itself on food grown either within the state or within you know maybe fifty miles of our borders or whatever New Hampshire New York Massachusetts Quebec. How close were we to actually being able to feed ourselves and the answer was Quite a ways away You know we're we're not not even close to halfway there but what what's your read of that. Do you think that's true or do you think that we're closer than Than maybe that estimate Told us I think that's a pretty keen assessment of it to be honest You Know Vermont is A really ahead of the curve from a lot of states throughout the country on their localized food system by Also the fact is that we live in a northern state. We have really long winters and Sure we could probably feed ourselves caloric Lee Right I. I saw a news article where someone said that if we wanted to plant potatoes throughout the whole entire state You know we could get enough calories For every single vermonter if we converted more farmland. Bhai who wants to eat potatoes day in and day out. You know that would not be a fun diet or a good diet to have more realistically what we're looking at is really a regional food system. So that includes you know all our New England states in New York as well and really identifying what that looks like to be able to feed US regionally. And even when you're looking at You know the goal one of the goals that have been set by a couple of organizations throughout this area is really trying to get to feeding fifty percent and providing fifty percent of our food by Two thousand sixty so the reality is. I don't think we're GONNA be able to feed ourselves especially if folks you know what oranges and Avocados and coffee and all that other stuff that goes with it by. Our farmers are working really hard to be able to provide a lot of good stuff that we need spring. Greens and of course Are Maple Syrup topper pancakes and some of the beer and wine? That's been being produced as well. I we talk about the the the crucial problem of coffee. Right right how are you going into morning? I think a lot of reminders are heavily reliant on coffee in the morning myself included and We I'm not. I'm not picturing that people growing much coffee in Vermont roasting it. Yes but not Not Growing it here in the Green Mountains Unless and until we have some really severe climate change. Yikes let's not even go there But I think the I think that You Know I. It's obviously it's a good thing to think about Supporting our local our local farmers to the extent you know they are providing some of our dietary needs and so on and and obviously I think a lot of people in Vermont sense that the agricultural economy here is very important in terms of keeping people employed and working and and keeping some of our our where you know or financial wherewithal within the state's borders so there are many positive aspects of it but I also want to keep in perspective that And not not get people you know. Sort of overestimating The role of local food. We're going to need to be importing food and and Related items into Vermont for a for a long long time to come and and So let's hope that the supply chains Of whatever type remain as open as they can because we we rely on them we. That's the nature of our of our our current society. In the way we feed ourselves and and all of that sort of thing. But you have you you. You have some some interesting stuff going on. And and one of the one of the issues with the local food movement in Vermont. Right now is we had this concern really As of a month ago or so and I think it's still continues to some extent about farmers markets in the state those are key lynchpin of kind of the local foods scene here And while they've started up This season seasoning are looking a lot different than they did. Last season is that fair. Yeah that's a fair assessment. And there was a lot of work happening. You know within the state and With different organizations that are involved with the farmers markets to make sure that our farmers have outlet to reach consumers. I think one of Best Parts about is just the mass amount of farmers markets that people can pop into and you know folks rely on that to be able to connect with people throughout their area To not only sell their goods but on the other side you know to pick up those farm fresh good so it's been I think what we're seeing is. How adaptable our farms? And our farmers markets have been you know we had to. Everybody had to kind of take a step back and reassess what that would look like. And we're seeing a model that I think should be able to carry us through the summer and for as long as this will last and people are doing a really good job at making sure that everybody a stained safe while still being able to provide that local food. One of the things that you all are are it. Looks like an involved in is the effort by the Vermont. Food Bank State over Mont Abby Group Vermont National Guard to provide boxes of chicken produce dairy products and non perishable food distributions held throughout the state I gather that event in Berlin last Friday was one of these in the one today in Middlebury. Is that right? Yeah and I will say that. We're not directly involved with that. But you know the Vermont. Food Bank and Those different groups are involved with the Vermont. Him To play network by. They're really doing an awesome job at at making sure that Vermont. Who are in need are able to get that food and I think really one of the biggest things that shows that There's a lot of cracks in our food system right. And we're seeing that more and more and It's really driving home. The point that There's work that we still need to do to be able to shore that up because folks shouldn't be having to go hungry especially when something like this hits and there's so much uncertainty and it's it's been inspiring to me to see not only these organizations and agencies stepped up but also just communities in general i. I don't know where where you live gave. But in my area I just seen an outpouring of support on Front Porch Forum and on different social media Of people really wanting to make sure that their neighbors are provided for. And they're taking care and I really think that's the Vermont Way and that's part of the reason why we're seeing so much success in that's right we're not just all out For for ourselves. But rather we're looking out for each other too which is pretty inspiring if you ask me if you look at the pictures from the particularly the died. The Times Argus had from the event in Berlin on on Friday I I guess I have to ask was the that looks like a lot of need when you see all those cars lined up there around the airport in stretching out onto the interstate and neighboring roads and so on of people lined up to get food Tells me that this economic crash we're experiencing is real. It's huge it's it's put people Way Too often into pretty desperate situations Do think that that those pictures accurately reflect a a huge boom in need out there or do you think the a significant percentage of the folks in that line on Friday were there be just because they heard hater something here for free. I really think that it reflects the need I know UV Came out with a study when this all I hit and they saw Food Insecurity had risen by a third since the pandemic started. And it really paints a picture for me at least that a lot of folks in our state you know are living in one paycheck away from a crisis and I think that's a shame in and of itself and while there's a lot of great work happening on the ground whether that's through our state agencies or whether it's through these organizations or businesses that are stepping up Really like you said I. It's it's an indictment on one the economy that is making it possible for something. Hit like this people to experience that much I wouldn't I wouldn't think that many people lining up just to pull a Freebie right and of course we would encourage people not to not to do that because there are people that truly struggling out there. Yeah that's that's what I was saying at the beginning of this half hour and we were talking about it with Steve Pappas of the Times Argus In the first half hour this morning. Same kind of a conversation Shane. We've been talking a little bit about these food distribution sites around the state. Let's see Berlin last Friday Middlebury Today. And and by the way it looks like we're hearing reports of traffic jams around the middle recite today. I don't know if there is bad as they were on.

Vermont University of Vermont College Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund Shane Berlin Dave Ramsey Vermont Farm Rogers Mont Abby Group Vermont Nation Scott New England University of Colorado Culture Green Mountains Cabinet Shudder
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I don't WanNa say concerns but one of the things we have to factor into this. That makes it very difficult at this time For Instance Pretty Much. All of my staff is working from home. They're all teleworking at this point But they also have because schools are out in. Daycares are closed and You know maybe their partners are their spouses or their partners are essential workers or whatever all impacts how they are their ability to work from home and I know that for instance in our staff Prior to the last three weeks we actually about six or seven weeks ago. We started looking at Basically taking an inventory of all of our staff And what their capabilities were from home. did they have Internet service to have a PC at home A phone line. Whatever and and trying to determine what the needs we're going to be as we were starting to go down this path. We literally started probably six to seven weeks ago looking at this. We ordered extra laptops in so that we would be able to send people home with with the proper tools that they would need In order to serve Vermont offers We've been able to transition quickly But it does take a toll on families Y You know when you've got the kids running around the house and and You know spouses trying to work from home and and It does create some interesting scenarios and and we have to basically adjust and be flexible with what we're doing. I mean it's you know the the idea that someone will Perhaps worked seven forty five to four thirty. Which are the state hours it might be? They started at six thirty. And and You know maybe work till eight o'clock at night but take breaks in between during the day as the day goes on because they might have to assist with Childcare or or other things around the house So you know there's a lot of systems that you know we've we've been adjusting. Since I took.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"She was in street. Clothes and and She said they've been told that they they need to You know where they're gonNA close to work and then change when they get to work and then change again before they leave work. The object of that whole exercise being not to bring home Any exposure cove nineteen on on scrubs basically And I would. I would gather that. Similar routines are changing in In long term care facilities as well right. I think that's absolutely true as much as I can be happening. That's absolutely happening. I mean I am awed I I will echo said I'm awed by the healthcare workforce out there right now in the work that they're doing just showing up every day commonsense no nonsense approach to taking care of people that they are charged with taking care of the. This is a this is unprecedented in the state of Vermont. I think this is unprecedented in this country and across the world. And we've all been hearing those stories so I agree one hundred percent with you hats off to every single one of those healthcare workers that are just showing up every day to take care of people And I think that all of them harshened are in place. People are working really hard to do what they need to do to prevent the spread. And that's been the message from the governor from the very beginning of this what we need to do is minimize knowing that it's a virus and knowing that it's out there and knowing that there's some level we're going to have to deal with. We absolutely need to slow it down. We need to make sure that are are most acute care facilities are hospitals are have the capacity that they need all the way through this To Take Care of people that most need them And I think that that both healthcare workers and really Vermont is in general are doing extraordinary work to just limit their own exposure limit the risks themselves with the risk of each other. You know you see people staying home and hungering down and being really cautious about that and I think our healthcare workforce is on high alert. And doing that both in their private and personal lives but also in their professional lives and pretty amazing way. You know I've also heard An I T shirt people. I've seen this. But in other countries you know there are these moments in time where the whole country's just kind of shouting out to healthcare workers and I know that that's happening in pockets in Vermont as well where certain point in time people are coming out on their road and clapping and hooting and hollering. And begging just say thank you to those healthcare workers that are that are living next door to us right all all in our neighborhoods everywhere across the state justice and thanks for hanging in there and doing the work that they do and I am. I am so proud to be part of the state and so proud to be part of this effort in whatever small way I am because it is. It is on firing. Yeah it it. It really is.

Vermont
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Long does that disease hang out on account or whatever and that kind of all if they don't know how long before they'll figure that out well first of all within your sneeze and cough can can pollute a room up to six feet so again. If you're around someone who's sick. You really ought to be standing as far away from them as possible As far as how long it leaves on surfaces I do not know I believe several hours but again I do not know With any kind of assurance to be able to say that that is why you should wash down all surfaces where you're coming contact with especially in in a public place like a grocery store with Again a sanitizer. That has at least sixty percent alcohol That's that would be something that would be a wise thing to do And and even if we know if you you know if you knew it was three hours would you touch it? Four hours later and not wash your hands. Of course you know that makes doesn't make sense so it makes sense to just continue to wash your hands and wipe down surfaces that you've touched that May Have Contaminated Alright. Well I want to thank my guests Doctor Never Richter and healthcare writer. Hamilton Davis for doing extra duty here on the day Graham show. Wd FM and am talking about this difficult topic of the Cobra virus. The two of you thank you so much for coming in this morning a few months ago. I think it was sometime last year or so. We had a visit From a gentleman named Stephanie Wolfert. Who IS A veteran mill? Us military veteran Has had a lot of experience with PTSD and has Decided to make an art form out of this and Stephan Wolford is going to be in the central Vermont area over the next couple of weeks. putting on performances of his play cry havoc as well as Participating in forums devoted to trying to help veterans who are trying to ease their lives of PTSD and and reduce the symptoms. There and Mr Wolford Just arrived in the studio in the last Fifteen or twenty seconds here so glad to see that you were able to make it in this morning. Thanks so much for joining. Thanks for having me and so I do recall. We had you on the program once before I believe the last year before the show and you Have you been bringing the show around the country since then? Yeah in fact My wife and I it converted Mercedes Sprinter van because we're on tour full-time. We traveled around the country. We've put on over one hundred thousand miles in the last two years hitting over thirty. Two States Delivering not only CRA HAVOC PERFORMANCE BUT DECREE OUR PROGRAM. De Crude which is a treatment program for veterans And so So it's really a two pronged approach here with which you return to central remind here and I know that you are One of the one of the sort of touch spots for you here is Norwich University. Of course a big military presence at the nation's oldest private military college there in Northfield Vermont and So tell us Let's see I. I saw his schedule..

PTSD Us Mr Wolford Doctor Never Richter Northfield Vermont Stephan Wolford Stephanie Wolfert Norwich University Hamilton Davis Vermont writer Graham
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Consumption around the holidays. Is I think such a special the thing and something that we In the cheese industry we we really love that. People love to share food with each other around the holiday. Season's Rosie during your just completed studies at the University of Vermont. Were you able to take a course on the history of cheese. I did not the history of cheese but DR K. is sort of principles and fundamentals of cheese. Making Course Angie's I'm just because unfortunately the nature of a master's is only two years so you don't have a lot of time to sit in every course but thankfully my schedule worked out so I could take Dr K. is fundamentals of cheese making course but being in the cheese industry Dr Kim said is somewhat of an icon. I'm not sure if If everybody knows that have how how famous he is and I'd interacted with Dr k before actually in the number of conference and educational settings where I got no chance to hear some of his abbreviated or bridge Lectures on the history three anti making. Yeah it's pretty fascinating stuff. I'm sort of curious. Maybe when I retire I'll come up the Audi the history of course it just. I'm very curious anyway. The the the Let's see here I. This is kind of amazing and I mean this this says the speaks volumes right here. But I've got friends at college drag culture and life sciences occasionally send us a little informational introductions to topics that. We're going to have on the show here on these Thursdays seeds to society segments and This one says Vermont's cheese industry is flourishing with more cheese makers per capita than any other. US State and growing recognition on the national international stage. A A new record was set this summer. The American Cheese Society's thirty-six annual awards competition with Vermont Producers Bringing Home Forty four ribbons including five finalists for best of show make Markey Vermont's best show in the date that that is truly amazing record. Oh my goodness yes. It was an incredible season for us and Dr Cake and actually speak more to sort of the history of cheese making in Vermont. Because I'm a relatively new addition here but I think whatever monsters you don't realize because they're in this incredible bubble in the state that we have some of the best. She's in the country. If not you know comp- cheese that competes on a sort of world world-scale and we're very unique here because we're a small say we don't have many people and we have this incredible wealthier. Incredible sort of concentration traces of these cheeses and high quality milk and these cheesemakers doing absolutely incredible very very innovative thing so we live in very special state for cheese. It's a beautiful thing and just one of the many reasons I think Vermont is feel lucky to live here. Hey you know I hate to say this. But that is We're running out of time here on this edition of the Dave Graham Show W. Dav FM and am Rosie. Neil thanks very much for joining us better late than never and really nice chatting with you so that I could make it for the end Dr Balkans to thank you. Who is well and good luck with the continuing development of Vermont season streets? I'M GONNA WATCH IT already. Rabbit up the day Graham show here on this Thursday Thursday December the twelve thousand in one thousand nine. Thanks for joining us back again.

Markey Vermont Rosie American Cheese Society DR K. University of Vermont Vermont Dr k Dr Kim Dave Graham Dr Cake Audi US Angie Neil
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"<hes> who had an op ed column and b._t. Dig or a couple of yeah. No i hear you absolutely the <hes>. The bottom line here is it's an open bidding process. That's done and the ultimate <hes> contractors selected from those who choose to put in responses sponsors and the guidelines of the state are followed so i don't know that that gives you much satisfaction except to say that if north carolina contractors chosen chosen is because there was no better option i actually do have some more comfort that i can provide <unk> becca <hes> we looked into that claim after seeing seeing that in the op-ed <hes> and i agree with the point that mr cunanan made that we should be using vermont firms whenever possible and the good news is that we actually are <hes> so the auditor that we use johnson lambert based out of burlington <hes> they have a partner firm that they use to check and sign off on all of their nonprofit filings that partner firm based in north carolina and so that's why that appeared on <hes> our ninety former i._r._s. Reporting <hes> so i definitely take the point that mr keeler was making about working in vermont building fremont businesses and strengthening the remind economy wherever possible <hes> and we're certainly doing that you know another example is working to bring our rebate processing an in house over moaners doing that <hes> as opposed to in the past austin a firm in southern new england. <hes> the good news there is that we've done that at a cost savings to vermont so it's a win win and that's the kind of thing that we're looking to do more more and more in the future. Take you for the call. I want to go to liam in burlington good morning liam. Yes i think you guys expanded on this a little bit whether you know through binding rising the m._v._p. Or expanding into the mid west and other states <hes> but i keep on hearing that efficient month role might be standing on. I'm wondering what that means generally and more specifically with vermont yes so <hes> thanks for the question liam. It's a great question because it's right at the crux of where we are right now. <hes> <hes> in the past legislative session of act sixty two <hes> was enacted which requires the public utilities commission to hold a proceeding where we look look at what more ought efficiency vermont be doing if anymore and a big topic right now is weatherization and how we heat and how he'd do that efficiently efficiently and that has not been traditionally the central focus of what efficiency vermont's doing last twenty years have been spent mostly on <hes> looking collect usage but <hes> the the low lying fruit in that room has been realized and so now i think it's a good time for us to be asking what it should you be doing a now by way of a second stage and secondly <hes>. How should you be doing that given the presence of the distribution bution utilities and other third parties in the market and the transformed energy landscape so that's what the inquiries going to be about is to see what more if anything they should should be doing and then from my perspective <hes> as the agency that has the ratepayer advocate <hes> what what is affordable for us to be doing and how should we be paying. Oh for that you lose with greek off. I know you need to be leaving in a couple of minutes for a meeting but i wanted to give you another chance to. You've asked a couple of terrific questions. Do you have anything else on your mind that you wanted to run by rebecca foster and june tierney here. I think this is with answering my discussion ezra my main question. I don't think i have anything else to ask. You can advocate on liam's liam's question. I think that <hes> we talked a little bit earlier in the program about the changing energy landscape and you know certainly were excited about the prospect of doing more evaluated work vermont in the future and are interested in seeing what role we could play that would make use of the investment that the state has made inefficiency vermont in the past twenty years make use of the state wide scale make use of the customer relationships that we have we touch about <hes> a hundred thousand residential customers in a year and fifteen thousand business customers so that's basically almost twenty percent of the state participating in our program so we're really looking for new ways as tell leverage that to do more and serve more for monitors and i do want to thank elizabeth group cough for joining us this morning.

vermont liam burlington north carolina mr keeler mr cunanan partner new england johnson lambert fremont june tierney auditor austin rebecca foster elizabeth twenty years twenty percent
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Money over time and reduce our overall overall usage of electricity and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to so elizabeth. It sounds like maybe that that idea of comparing hundred million to two point four billion dollars. Is it pr perhaps a little bit simplistic and you're saying that we also need to factor in terms of overall cost of reminders when when a i mean i'm i'm trying to tell me if i have this right but i mean especially when a homeowner goes out and buys a new refrigerator and gets the rebate <hes> from efficiency vermont for doing so. There's also that cost of the refrigerator the homeowners putting down to some extent right right but i mean i think also is cracked. A lot of these are investment if people were probably gonna make some play a little bit. It's a little bit harder to what she's saying there too. Yeah is that the two point four billion in savings is that just derived from efficiency vermont part of the investments or is that from the sort of overall cost of investment defined makes sense. I think that's something i told frankly don't quite understand sure so that number comes from the <hes> reporting that we do that the department of public service reviews and signs off on every year and that is the total savings <hes> through all of the projects and equipment and purchases that people would make <hes> so using the refrigerator as an example what we would do is say efficiency vermont on <hes> contributed a fifty dollar rebate to a customer <hes> plus some overhead to support the administration plus some marketing to make sure they knew you know what got together and they were aware of the incentive and then we count the savings at that refrigerator will generate over the course of its lifetime while it's an operation compared are to what would have happened anyway in the the standard efficiency model that they would have built and all of those assumptions are fully vetted and approved <hes> as we go through your planning work with the department and the p._c. Oversight and i think it's important to add to that elizabeth. This is john that the department checks that math in the first instance instance and it does so <hes> with the <hes> services of experts <hes> who are retained for the purpose of doing that kind of auditing but then the p._c. You also <hes> takes a look at what the department has done by way of verification as well as the verification that efficiency remote has submitted and then the p. see makes a judgment as well so <hes> you know it's it's math but at the end of the day it's it's math vetted interesting so it sounds like there's there's a lot of auditing that goes on here i mean trust verifies somebody once said <hes> and and <hes> well to be clear david it's trust but verify but auditing can in some people's ears is a term of art and so depending on what context this is auditing in the regulatory context. This is our version of auditing thing. I don't know that c._p._a.'s or that a state treasurer or a state auditor would see it that way <hes> there there is in the broadest definition initiative auditing though i guess you'd you'd consider this to be at least a verification process. <hes> most certainly it would be impossible to do. This program without verification is what what i'm trying to say is that different people have different ideas about what auditing means that's where you get some of the noise about whether this has integrity or not. Let me go to a couple of callers here kate he from ira. What's going on kate <hes> so i know that <hes> the original reporter is not on the show today but <hes> i wanted to ask just a little bit about the accounting firm firm <hes> i know that <hes> we try to support businesses here in vermont <hes> so i was wondering why the north carolina firm yet yeah that was a that was a point raised by don keelan the <hes> who had an op ed column and b._t. Dig or a couple of yeah. No i hear you absolutely the <hes>. The bottom line here is it's an open bidding process..

vermont david c._p._a. elizabeth ira don keelan north carolina reporter treasurer auditor four billion dollars fifty dollar
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"And and that really the <hes> i think is one of the reasons one of the reasons obviously that your organization has won. A lot of national awards has been been by larger israel's success story in the state of reminding has been emulated elsewhere <hes> and just so i understand the structure it basically v i see see is a is an independent company is that right into a nonprofit company which has as one of its arms or whatever maybe you can explain this better the nikon i hope so eventually vermont or one one of its roles is to operate as efficiently reminded in the state correct correct so v i c was founded as a nonprofit in nineteen eighty-six and in one thousand nine hundred nine the organization competed in a competitive bid process to operate efficiency vermont and was selected acted <hes> so since two thousand we've been operating the efficiency vermont programs for the state of vermont and then since that time we've also continued to add to our work outside of the state in ohio washington d._c. Hawaii oregon california we work in about thirty five states <hes> that's a really beneficial structure sure for vermont because then we can bring back the learnings and the experience from those other states vermont while as june said being really regulated and governed by the department of public service and the public utility commission to ensure that vermont has the oversight that it needs and i don't want to forget about elizabeth grip on the phone v._p. Digger unfortunately we're about ought to go to a bottom of the hour break in. We're gonna bring elizabeth in a little bit after that <hes> who are gonna here c._b._s. News upcoming couple words sponsors and continue our conversation about ati fifty vermont after the break here on the graham show w._d. F._m. and a._m. Back shortly folks ah. I wish i had a dollar for every compliment. I get about our selection upstairs at the warren store. The season's collection boasts country casual clothing for men and women dresses for.

vermont elizabeth nikon warren store israel ohio graham Hawaii oregon california
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Setting the course of the direction for the efficiency utility and so when this last go round i mean over the course of the last <hes> twenty years many changes happening in the efficiency utility structure and <hes>. I'll thank you that's that's much better and so <hes> the advisory committee was disbanded back around the time i think when the order of appointment was put in place and the efficiency utility was under the auspices of the icy setting its own course but then when the renewable energy standard was adopted by the legislature just a couple of years ago and other changes in the <hes> the landscape such as <hes> efficiency vermont's of participation in the regional wholesale capacity market its use of reggie funds in the like when those things started taking root at become pick came apparent to the department that the eh distribution utilities and efficiency vermont were having some growing pains around boundaries for who is going to do what in both the efficiency space and in the <hes> he electric acacia space principally around transportation and storage and as those those growing pains became louder and louder it became the department's view that it was time to have a conversation about whether efficiency vermont policy direction should now be set more along the advisory committee model title of its first genesis than allowing the efficiency utility to chart its own course and that was the conversation that we teed up and we have a partial short answer but not a conclusive answer this time from the commission. What's the partial answer you got. The partial answer was not now and if you want to go down this path farther are there <hes> you should have conversations with the stakeholders and see what you as a group perhaps come up with and then let's bring that back in a different proceeding and rebecca foster did the <hes> vermont have have an opinion about this change that the department was talking about yeah absolutely absolutely i think we really welcome. The fresh look and looking at modernizing efficiency. Vermont makes a lotta sense right. Now we know that the energy system is changing pretty dramatically and you can see that for themselves as they drive down the road and see more and more solar panels more and more electric vehicles on the road <hes> when they get their heating bills every winter you know an ups and downs.

vermont reggie rebecca foster twenty years
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Elizabeth thanks very much for joining me this morning. Thanks for having me and june. Tierney ernie is the commissioner of the state department of public service. She very kindly made the trip over to the studio. Here in washington is sitting right across the table from me. Welcome good morning june. I'm delighted. I had to be here dave and just as a heads up. I was not able to hear what was just now. Oh that's <hes> that is something we're going to accept except here. Elizabeth rebecca foster is here in the studio with me and rebecca okay. I wanted to welcome us well. This is a very auspicious. I trio of folks to talk about these issues. She's related to efficiency <hes> vermont this morning so thanks for joining us here and <hes> let me ask you first off. <hes> may june tierney. Perhaps so you can give us a little bit of an introduction to <hes>. What are the <hes>. What are the concerns here in. What is what is the public utility commission doing right now now as it reviews these issues full dave to start with i would say we're not talking about concerns. We're talking about an ongoing going conversation about what the best use of repair funds is in this area and what the best <hes> implementation asian by efficiency vermont is and i think it's important to point out that this is an ongoing conversation. I noted in your introduction that you said that <hes> efficiency agency vermont's under contract with the p._c. For <hes> what it does be icees under contract with the p._c. But that's actually not the case <hes> they're under what's it's called an order of an appointment and in that role they administer this entity called efficiency vermont that is styled at least theoretically as tilleke but the analogy is imperfect and if you look at the way that <hes> e._v._t.'s regulated there is a lot of hands on continuous involvement both mint so we are constantly having conversations about how to build a better mouse trap and this is just one additional chapter in that ongoing conversation nation and the department of public service astra some changes not long ago and <hes> tell me about that yeah no. It's it's interesting how that was construed because i think history sheds light on whether department was coming from to begin with a little known fact nowadays is is that it was actually the the department in cooperation with stakeholders that i developed the efficiency utility concept on the way back and then there came a point point those proceedings where some of the feedback from the distribution utilities specifically <hes> central vermont public service company which is no longer in existence it became came clear there was some resistance from the utilities to this idea of having an efficiency entity and so the department hit the pause button and with the with the public utilities the commission which at the time was the board went to the legislature and said hey we think we need better authority clear with authority to do this and that of course begs the question of what this was and what this was two things one how to get done what utilities at the time were either not willing to do or they were doing in a manner that was duplicative meaning. We were spending way many more resources on getting efficiency work done because each distribution utility was doing their own thing as opposed to having a unified approach and that's where officiency remind came from at that time they had a governance structure that had advisory committee they had different stakeholders on it and those folks were tasked with setting.

Elizabeth rebecca foster vermont Tierney ernie dave commissioner washington e._v._t.
"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:50 min | 2 years ago

"vermont" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"It from Radio Vermont. It's the Dave Graham Show on W._d.. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most of you now. Here's your host Dave Graham Good Morning Vermont it is Thursday August first two thousand and nineteen and we are going to be focusing for one topic <hes> pretty much this entire program today with the exception of our newsbreaks in our conversation with talk media news <hes> our national correspondents respondents after the midshow news from C._B._S. and <hes> other than that we are going to be talking today about opiate addiction in Vermont and about the the state's strategy prodigy for treating people who are experiencing opioid opiate addiction and we have a great line of guests from various aspects of the state's system for dealing with this epidemic in Vermont and <hes> it's going to be <hes> we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA focus first on sort of an overview <hes> and then we're GONNA get into talking with folks who are representing the <hes> the hubs and spokes you hear a lot about the hub and smoke treatment system in Vermont and <hes> we'll be talking with someone who actually has a has experienced addiction in his own life at the authority toward the end of the program find out a little bit about what's next in terms terms of what's coming folks who are experiencing addiction to opiates in Vermont and I want to get right into it because we have a very packed program this morning. We're we're GONNA start with Jackie Coralie. She is with the Burlington Police Department and she actually has a huge portfolio. They're responding to issues in BURLINGTON ranging from from drug addiction to homelessness and she was formerly with the state health. Department has a background in in in social work in the addiction field and Jackie corporate's. I believe actually in the studio with me this morning. I WanNa thank you very much Jackie for coming in today. You're welcome and so tell me. Give me a little bit of an overview here. <hes> what what is the tell me a little bit about what is the the hub and spoke system overall having folks system is a comprehensive system of care <hes> designed to meet the needs of those individuals who find themselves in the throes of addiction <hes> in a nutshell a hub is a comprehensive system system of care where folks go often daily dosed in either what we call Methadone or Buprenorphine <hes> and those are what we refer to as medication assisted therapies Matt Matt Treatments <hes> those folks often go or daily dose they might work to apply to a time where they are getting dosed. <hes> take homes a spoke as more more of a traditional doctors office where you would go in. You're going to get a prescription for Yuban orphan. You're going to have a nurse and a social worker there to work with you on various various life aspects <hes> but that is more of a traditional medical model like you would see in a number of family practices okay and and <hes> let me back up even further. Tell me what are some of the different <hes> experiences are factors that actually lead people to decide initially that they need <hes> <hes> they need to get treatment is usually an encounter with law enforcement or is it just an individual decision family members coming to you and saying hey you've got to get some help here. What's going on on that front all of it <hes> it is this this disease that led us in the state of Vermont to design the hub and spoke model recognizes recognizes that this disease is <hes> <hes> a disease that will take people to their knees so because of that many many people enter the system of care in a variety of different ways? It might be a family member oftentimes when you're in the throes of an addiction to this magnitude you lose is everything <hes> you might have a family member say to you you need to get services <hes> or these are going to be the consequences. It could be a law enforcement moment <hes> involvement it could be a friend it could be another professional. It could be somebody that you are potentially on the streets. It is a very individualistic decision on how in when you're going to access services and the folks who access services who come in for the first time you have any sense of what percentage of them <hes> stay with treatment or is it something that they you know they come in for a day and think they're going to get your life together and then as Li- backward this it is not uncommon for people to engage in medication assisted treatment and <hes> relapse APPs at some point <hes> we hope that people will re-engage <hes> there are those people thankfully that engage in services and do not not experience relapse in continue on the medication <hes> there are those people that relapsed once and then reengaging services and there are some people who this is a multitude multitude they go through a multitude multitude of relapses before they fully engage. It's it's a complex question that does not have an easy answer and I think that depends on the individual where the individual is at and how they are working through their recovery and what is the the system itself and people working system like yourself. You've you've done so at different levels and so on overtime <hes> you must have to be pretty patient with people <hes> because my sense of this is that I mean I I've known people who've had a drinking problem <hes> and and <hes> you know people talk about going on the wagon off the wagon and et Cetera and <hes> and this is something I mean it sounds like a similar situation where it's very very easy to relapse because <hes> you know you're going through your days and you're staying clean or or in the case of of somebody would alcoholism. You're avoiding alcohol for a couple of weeks and then all of a sudden one day comes particularly tough day or something you're you're back to drinking <hes> same kind of thing here right well well. I think you know you're really lucky this morning that you're going to have some fantastic guests speak and I think the commonality that you're going to hear from all of us are that when I deal with an individual I don't look at them. <hes> with the problem I look at them as a human being and and if I can look at them as a human being who is struggling than <hes> I'm able to then offer the services and stick with them when they relapse APPs when they encountered tough times. Nobody asks for this. NOBODY ASKS TO BE HOMELESS TO LOSE THEIR JOBS to lose their family <hes> and when I you have somebody sit across from me no matter what position or job I've been in <hes> I recognize often. It's the addiction speaking to me. <hes> that really is threatened that there's going to be a recovery process and if I can recognize this human being truly <hes> is not the addiction that makes my engagement with them sustaining wow. That's a really interesting thought so so basically you. You're you're looking at two entities one is the person in one is the addiction in Europe regarding them as two separate things. It looks like well I recognize that the addiction doesn't don't WanNA stop <hes>. I mean so if I'm offering treatment <hes> or any of the folks are going to talk to our offering treatment. The addiction gets threatened because addiction wants to keep moving and wants to keep sustaining itself feeding itself with the drug the person that's sitting in front of me that is encompassed by this addiction. Does Not I wanna live like this often times. They are <hes> they are really. They're in a very low place and it takes a lot to ask for help. This is the most shame based disease on our planet yeah and actually to refer to it purely as a disease you know again the old alcohol model people used to talk about it. Is it a is it a sort of a moral failing or is it a is it a purely disease <hes> it seems as though the the consensus among the people who are dealing with us on a daily basis as as a professional like you is that <hes> it's a disease and and we we are going to treat it as the disease and leave aside any any of this sort of blame and shame stuff well. I think I'd I'd say to anybody WHO's listening. If you have a family member you yourself are addicted. We're talking about opiates but that could be a number of addictions. Your brain has been hijacked and <hes> our job in the community is to help that individual vitual lose that dependence on that's Rog Toledo life a normal say to live a life recovery yeah now tell me a little a bit about the <hes> you made a transition from the <hes> I believe from the alcohol and Drug Abuse Drug Abuse Program at the Department of Health to the Burlington Police Department where you're where you are for now the Drug Mental Health and Homelessness Policy and Operations Manager for the Burlington Police Department and <hes> and I know that there's there's been sort or a two polls here and the overall debate about how we respond to drug problems and so on and it's sort of oftentimes framed as law enforcement versus the treatment versus a healthcare model and <hes> the <hes> so break that down for me and tell me what does the transition been and like you for you personally from a purely health-based atmosphere at the health department the Police Department great question. I think this has been a gift. <hes> I have been a clinician. I've been in the public health arena. I'm now in the police department. <hes> I do not think as citizens we recognize day in day out what these folks are up against inst- our officers and blue going out in the streets for me. This has been an incredible experience to learn how policing works but also sorta offer my public health lens on how we work with individuals and I have to say <hes> the police department is amazing and how they're responding the people who are in the throes of addiction and and and that follows right up through the state's attorney's office to right I mean it seems as though they are also <hes> trying trying to <hes> <hes> not not be purely law enforcement crackdown kind of attitude here with more more matter of <hes> making sure that the people who they are ready to make a change have the the resources available. I I'm really blessed to be in Chilton County. We have a Jitney county state's attorney who is not prosecuting for for Misdemeanor Buprenorphine. I am really blessed that my supervisor Chief Del Pozzo understands the Public Health Lens as does the deputy chiefs right and Murad who I work with and other law enforcement folks in the police department absolutely it's about helping it's not about punishing. It's a <hes> it. It is a a really interesting approach. Year hasn't been followed in other states around the country. We get calls all the time. All the time I get phone calls from other states saying you're a social worker worker in a police department. How does that work? There's a there's an anomaly having having this position there and I have to shift up Ozo- he's the one that came up with this idea with the support report of the mayor of Burlington. Wow that is that is interesting. I've got three guests lined up for the second segment of the program Maureen Lee he is director of neurology and Psychiatry Healthcare Services at the University of Vermont Medical Center <hes> Dr Javaid Mosh Puri is medical director of Emergency Z..

Vermont Burlington Police Department BURLINGTON Dave Graham Jackie Coralie Buprenorphine Jackie corporate Police Department Jackie Europe University of Vermont Medical Chilton County Department of Health Li Dr Javaid Mosh Puri Matt Matt Drug Mental Health and Homeles Methadone