35 Burst results for "Venture Capitalist"

Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 3 d ago

Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

"From one three. I'm david brown. And this is business. Worst daily on this tuesday march second. Let's say you were invited to a party. Where the guest list included oprah drake and jared lehto as well as top venture capitalist business executives journalists and all manner of influencers. Would you go well. That party is happening on a beta version. Social media app called clubhouse and in about nine months. The app has gained an estimated three million users and a billion dollar valuation clubhouses content is like a series of audio only presentations and panel discussions he s. That's right audio. We'll get to that in a minute. These talks happen in so-called rooms which are really like well conference calls there's a presenter or panel other people are listening to anyone can raise a hand and ask a question or participate in the discussion. You can meet people and have conversations and because presentations are not supposed to be recorded by users. You're either there or you missed out the thing about clubhouse though is that it appears to do everything wrong. First of all as i said earlier. It's audio based that's right. Viral video challenges or memes. Not even a cute cat photo. That means that all of those people who hate to use the phone have to logon and have an actual conversation also android users. Sorry you're out of luck. This app is for apple devices. Only at least for now finally membership is by invitation. So unless you know someone who's willing to fork over one of their coveted invites you're locked out again for now. Clubhouse founders say that eventually the format will be open to all but what is that for now. Exclusivity is what's driving growth in roughly nine months. Fomo fear of missing out has fueled the apps popularity some even say that the old school style of having conversations is the key to its success. You have to listen and be able to say something meaningful. So people are striking business deals finding content partnerships and having conversations with some truly interesting people. Some are even finding romance on the app. According to a report in forbes clubhouses his popularity is even turned the head of industry giant facebook. Which has reportedly started developing an audio product to compete with clubhouse the new york times reports facebook founder mark zuckerberg made an appearance on the app earlier this month to give a talk about augmented and virtual reality. Facebook didn't confirm the report but the times also noted that the social network has a habit of buying upper competing with apps that dabble in areas. That could pose a threat to its user base like most media platforms clubhouse. Has its issues to the app. Urges you to give it access your contact list and uses that information to identify others for you to invite according to forbes quote even if you've no interest in joining clubhouse whatsoever the service may well know your name mobile number and how many friends you have on the network. It may even be violating european privacy laws. The report suggests clubhouses apple exclusivity also has some trying to hack the app so it can be streamed on android devices tech crunch report last week. Clubhouse had its first significant data-breach when someone managed to stream audio feeds on a third party website according to bloomberg the stanford internet observatory or s. I o a stanford university internet watchdog programme race security concerns earlier this month in light of these issues clubhouse says it has taken measures to prevent any such breaches from happening again. But it's not clear. Exactly what is being done.

Oprah Drake Jared Lehto David Brown Facebook Apple Mark Zuckerberg New York Times The Times Stanford Bloomberg
From wild idea to COVID vaccine  meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

Science Friction

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

From wild idea to COVID vaccine meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

"Renew and november. When the first cases started the pop up and wuhan china their description of the virus there description of how easily it was transmitted between families once. We heard that we knew that. This virus had the potential to be a bad actor at that moment in time we said. How are we going to get the sequence for this virus and we started calling our friends and china. We called our friends at the cdc trying to get the sequence of this virus the minute that was published. We started to make our vaccines back on. I think it was january twelfth. We started making the first aren a vaccine that day. It has all happened. Unfathomably fast has an at twelve months later and the pfizer and maduna vaccines have made their way through large clinical trials with good results into syringes and now already into millions of arms. But this quite a back story here. We thought that it would be useful in a pandemic. We thought it would be influenza pandemic but you back in two thousand and five. When we made the initial observation we knew that aren a had a great potential therapeutics. Who with his collaborator catala career. How is a good bit to win a nobel prize for the science driving. Mri vaccines. he's one of my guests on science fiction today. What's been lost in the fast pace race to develop covid nineteen vaccine. This past year is a hidden story of dogged. Pursuit of a nollie scientific idea over decades often in the face of skeptics and nice ideas we went through pharmaceuticals venture capitalists. All other people. it said. Hey we have a great new invention here. And they weren't interested. They said now aren as too hard to work with. We don't think it'll ever work and they just weren't interested now with a pandemic bang with suddenly counting on mri vaccines lock eyes and medina's to help save us. But before this pandemic this brand new technology of marigny vaccines had never been approved for use in humans before. It's incredible isn't it. The heddon even made it to the stage of large scale clinical trials in humans. I don't think anybody could have predicted. Just how effective these vaccines were. And i still get chills. When i remember the moment when that announcement was made a few months ago biologist onto fox is future fellow and associate professor at the university of western australia. It has proved the nice as wrong. I mean given that fifty percent effective is the baa that the world health organization would've liked to say as the minimum to be getting ninety. Five percent is just astounding really hardly any vaccines have that level of efficacy. Cullen pat and professor of pharmaceutical biology at monash pharmaceutical sciences. He's team is working on two different. Mri vaccines for covid. Nineteen in collaboration with the doughy institute in melbourne change from the point of view the future of emo toy syrupy and we haven't had a vaccine working against corona virus. Before i could understand the science. And i could see how theoretically it might work. But i just couldn't see how we could actually make enough to be the billions of doses needed for the world. And that's still looking doc- rod it's entirely contingent on just to pharmaceutical companies meeting. The world's entire supply demands including ours here in australia. Will you receive the pfizer vaccine together just before christmas. We did the vaccine driven by your discovery. Can you describe what that moment was like figuring. My family always yells at me. Because i'm not excited enough. And they're right for man who co owns the intellectual property licenses to medina and i dream osman humble kind of guy. We were incredibly excited. When we saw the results of the phase three trial that are vaccine. Worked and of a safe and had ninety. Five percent efficacy. I'm already moved on to the next thing the next back scene. The next gene therapy you. I'm incredibly excited. That this vaccine is working that it's gonna make a dent in this pandemic many think that there's a nobel prize in chemistry waiting in the wings for you and dr katie. Rico what do you make of that. So people tell the too modest. And i really don't do things for prizes or recognition or anything else.

Catala China Pfizer Aren CDC Cullen Pat Monash Pharmaceutical Sciences Medina Influenza Doughy Institute University Of Western Australi BAA World Health Organization FOX Melbourne Osman Australia Dr Katie
You Are What You Subscribe To

Lochhead on Marketing

06:18 min | Last month

You Are What You Subscribe To

"All right. So i wanted to share with you something that my wife. Carrie ann i did the first At the beginning of the new year. And that's We sat down and we reviewed everything that both of us were subscribed to and we sorta did a purge and a respectful and together. We said you know what kind of content do we love. What do we want to learn This year what should we stop consuming. What should we start consuming and we did this very thoughtful very proactively over the course of about an hour and the high here for me is. I think it's important to be very very careful. Whose ideas that you let into your brain you know. We only have so much brain shelf space and we only have so much. Time to consume books podcasts Whatever the case you tubes whatever we like to consume and so being very thoughtful about what we put into our brain is actually a very important thing and i think there we put some shit in our head. That can hurt us pretty badly. You know if you're a longtime listener you know Have no love for the hustle stars. And i think they've done more damage to entrepreneurs and marketers than any recent group in history For a simple example you. I've heard hustle porn star. Say hustles the most important word the english language. Well i've also heard hustle porn star. Say no one ever worked himself to death well in japan they have a word for it. It's called karoshi and it translates into death by overwork. So nonstop hustling for twenty. Five years is probably not what you want to do. In addition even worse maybe is. You can hustle all you want but there's a difference between hard work and smart work hamsters hustle in their wheels to and they don't get anywhere. So what's your hustling about matters. And if you're a regular listener you know that i believe that Legends become known for a niche. That they own. So if you're hustling to design your own category that's one thing. If you're hustling trying to compete with an entrenched category king. You're gonna be in for a world of pain and yet millions and millions of business people still consume the stupidities of these hustle porn stars every day and the marketing and entrepreneur. World is stuffed with stupid ideas. Here's another example that drives me nuts minimum viable product. Why is this a good idea. Who the fuck said we. The first thing we deliver to the world should be something called a minimum viable product. It should be called a product. You fucking think is legendary and awesome and you wanna share with the whole world nother just dumb dumb dumb. I could go on with a very long list of very dumb ideas that are marketed to marketers and entrepreneurs all the time the bottom line is be very thoughtful about what you put in your brain because what you put in your brain is what you get out of your life now. Personally i like to go back to some of. Oj's peter drucker can touch him he. He's the original management thinker. His book the effect of executive changed my life by way of example. David ogilvy david. Ogilvy david ogilvy. If you're an entrepreneur if you're a marketer you're not a student of david ogilvy get on it. I go back and look at it all the time. Another one you might love in a similar vein is george lois. He sort of the punk rock version of david. Ogilvy check him out also. Of course the geez of positioning. Our reese and jack trout the so i love to go back and look at a lot of the original masters now some of the newer things that i love checking out is Check out a master class. This is incredible way to learn how to do to be taught writing by malcolm gladwin by way of example or taught how to do a three point shot by None other than steph curry. They have legendary people in many many different domains teaching their skills. It's an incredible product. Love masterclass podcast. You might wanna check out and this is not an extensive example or an extensive list. It's just an example of a few. That i like One of the jeez of marketing podcasts. Marketing over coffee by my buddy john wall and his partner. Christopher penn legendary Venture capitalists mike. Maples junior. his podcast is called. Starting greatness insanely great. Another legendary entrepreneur. Podcast is called no bowl and it's created by my buddies paul martinez and randy comas. And it features that teaching of the legendary bill campbell. Who was none other than steve. Jobs is coach if you're in the b. two b. world couple of podcasts. I love dave gerhardt's b. to b. marketing leaders. Podcast check it out. G. is emerging og. He's awesome My buddy brian burns has the One of the top sales podcast for b. two b. people be to be revenue leadership and the brutal truth about sales and selling brian burns. Check him out. And then the other one i like on sort of the lead gen funnel management Get leads enclosed shit online in the more beat. A sea world is russell brunson and he's got a whole series of podcasts and books most of them have the word secrets in them. Checkout marketing secrets podcasts. And he's all about hooks and offers and driving traffic and all of that stuff so those are just a couple to think about but most importantly i'm encouraging you to sit down and ask yourself a couple of key questions. What the kind of content i love. What do i most want to learn in the next twelve months. What should i stop consuming. What should i start consuming and remember. Be very careful whose ideas you let into your head because your thoughts become your actions your actions become your outcomes and your outcomes become your

Carrie Ann Ogilvy David Ogilvy George Lois Malcolm Gladwin Steph Curry Brian Burns David Ogilvy Peter Drucker Jack Trout Christopher Penn Maples Junior David Japan Paul Martinez Randy Comas Ogilvy Dave Gerhardt Reese John Wall
GameStop stock plummets as Wall Street reels

Buck Sexton

00:45 sec | Last month

GameStop stock plummets as Wall Street reels

"Wall Street is recovering from yesterday's big selloff, and traders continue to watch the dizzy moves of stocks. Like Gamestop in AMC. They become targets of online retail investors that sent their share skyrocketing, pushing back against big hedge funds that bet they would fall. Venture capitalist and Reddit co founder Alexis Oh, hey, Deion told CNBC Squawk Box, the pushback shows. Finances another sector disrupted by the Internet. Seen this across media. It seems across so many different sectors, and now it is happening to finance Gamestop share values whipsawed rising and falling after more than doubling in price. On Wednesday, online trading platforms such as Robin Hood and interactive brokers moved to restrict trading, citing the extraordinary volatility. I'm Jennifer King News and analysis at town Hall. But calm. I'm Keith Peters in Washington.

Gamestop Alexis Oh AMC Deion Reddit Cnbc Robin Hood Jennifer King Town Hall Keith Peters Washington
Major indexes regain lost ground; GameStop, AMC swing wildly

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Major indexes regain lost ground; GameStop, AMC swing wildly

"Chaotic action on Wall Street is drawing applause for the democratization of trading but also concerns about a bubble and the need for regulatory action one street is recovering from yesterday's big sell off and traders continue to watch the dizzying moves of stocks like gamestop in AMC they become targets of online retail investors that sent their shares skyrocketing pushing back against big hedge funds that bet they would fall venture capitalist and reddit co founder Alexis Ohanian told CNBC's squawk box the push back shows how finance is another sector disrupted by the internet students across media issues across so many different sectors and now it is happening to finance gamestop share values whipsawed rising and falling after more than doubling in price on Wednesday online trading platforms such as Robin Hood interactive brokers moved to restrict trading citing the extraordinary volatility I'm Jennifer king

Gamestop Reddit Co Alexis Ohanian AMC Cnbc Robin Hood Interactive Brokers Jennifer King
Biden to nominate Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo to be commerce secretary

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Biden to nominate Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo to be commerce secretary

"His selection of Marty Walshes. Labor Secretary. Walsh has been Boston's mayor since 2014. He served as president of laborers local to 23. Before he was Mayor. Walsh headed up the Boston Building Trades Union organization. Biden will also reportedly pick Rhode Island governor Gina Raimondo to lead the Commerce Department. She's a former venture capitalist and previously served the state treasurer there. Raimondo will help set trade policy and promote opportunities for growth. Biden administration stance on international trade will likely market dramatic shift from President Trump's tariff heavy approach. Other news tonight,

Marty Walshes Walsh Boston Building Trades Union O Gina Raimondo Boston Biden Commerce Department Rhode Island Biden Administration Raimondo President Trump
Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

Future Tense

09:45 min | 3 months ago

Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

"What used to be referred to as the sharing economy. Let's quickly remind ourselves what sharing actually means if i give you a ride in my car and don't expect anything in return that's sharing if however aguirre rod in my car and you have to pay for the privilege. Well that's cold commerce and that's why when we talk about uber and deliver ruined task. Grab it and even airbnb. These days we now refer to them as gig economy companies. Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing. Can you bring those types of platform co to scale or in trying to grow. Do they risk going down. The path of what we know has happened to some of the big companies. It's an interesting question. Because i think the question of scale is somewhat misunderstood in the gig space many of the areas where you've had rapid growth our in services that are person to person services and are primarily local ride hale and delivery errands and tasks and so forth so these are personal services and people who provide them are locals and they're providing them to local so for those you actually don't want them to get two big. There's no reason that they should all you really need is what we can think of as interoperability in the apps. So let's say. I use a ride hailing app in my city and that's most of the time that's what i'm using it for but occasionally go somewhere else. I wanna be able to open that app and get a ride held. They're all that means. is that those. Local co ops. Have to all be part of a network that platforms where scaling to a large. You know market makes more sense are the online platforms and the accommodations platform. So those make more sense to scale up. We have seen some other kinds of structures at least in nonprofits and so forth not necessarily always a co op structure. But you know something similar where we have some of these platforms that are actually operating more globally and the one i studied stocks is global platform. So yeah they can scale. I think the question is how big do you want them to scale. And i think that really varies by the service. Were talking about

Aguirre Rod Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

Future Tense

07:22 min | 3 months ago

After the Gig: How the Sharing Economy Got Hijacked and How to Win It Back

"Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing.

Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
Becoming the Director of Your Life - with Fritz Brumder & Jerry Colonna

The Reboot Podcast

05:21 min | 5 months ago

Becoming the Director of Your Life - with Fritz Brumder & Jerry Colonna

"A. Fritz. Each. You could mean, she was jerry thanks for coming on the show before we get started. Wanted you just take a minute him introduce yourself. Sure my name is I her I am the CO founder and CEO of a company called brand lives. We are based in Portland Oregon and I've recently exited the business in now I've moved my family to bend, Oregon and things are going really well right now. But. Wasn't necessarily always that way. So we'll get into kind of Janta Printer Journey of brainless. Was the. CEO. Wasn't the. Would it be helpful to talk a little bit about the was the CEO Journey? Yeah I think what's most helpful for me I. A now out of the company that I started it was. Over a seven year process, but we are really in a hard for seven years. had one co founder in the company, but he was just really on board more. Of the initial co-founder Story a little bit more but. I am in a period where I'm still kind of decompressing from that process. It ended well on a minute. Really good spot right now. Have some breathing room and have time to think and be creative and and working onto passion projects and hopefully launched my next company. But as a result of some of the like. The turmoil I experienced as a result of starting in next thing, my company. There's a little bit of fear in that process of. One in my ready to. Jump. Back on the hamster wheel knowing that the energy and effort that it takes to start a company from Ground Zero just to give you a little bit of an idea of scale, we raised around five million in capital. Peaked at about fifty employees and contractors and. Had Global operations throughout the world live video delivery tool. So basically create communication and collaboration for product companies or customers were. People like Nike Levis go crow. So it was Super Fun ride for the vast majority of it, but also pain along the way. So. Maybe before we SORTA die being. Where you are now. And some that fear, and maybe we can spend a little bit of time sort of plotting out a little bit of a path forward. I think for context it won't be helpful to talk a little bit about. The transition out and what the last few months were like. Yeah. So my first question is, why did you leave? Well it's it goes back to about a year ago. So the company. was doing really well, we navigate a number of things that mentioned have one co founder and we we were a spin out company so. You know from the early company creation process, we navigated some pretty tough decisions very very well, and then we grew in that process was insanely rewarding fantastic management team culture, the company momentum of becoming the May. Top four hundred of Inc. five hundred list of I two to three years in business that we were growing well over one hundred percent those first couple years. On, and then just as the numbers got better know even though we're adding over a million in a are. The percentage growth rate was telfer and I started to notice some issues with my own in particular. I was just we weren't seeing eye-to-eye in. Too. Many situations. And started to become a problem out as we are trying to make sense of. Why is the company not growing over one hundred percent anymore Even, though we were making solid progress, it was. Challenging to make sense of that. I had one one venture capitalist one angel investor, my co-founder, an independent on board. So I was I mentioned been to rebuild circles and I was looking back at my journal entries from a lot of those sessions. There were times where I realized. I don't think I have the right border I'm not really managing my board the right way. and. I tried a number of different things to sort of realign redirect. But, ultimately, it led to me trying to make some changes on board. And then I walked into a board meeting. Only, two board members were there. Now, that kind of meeting goes and that was February two, thousand eighteen. And so they said, now's the time to hire a new CEO identify contest job for but. We want to his company next level we feel like it should be growing over one

CEO Co Founder Co-Founder Oregon A. Fritz Portland Jerry Of Inc. Ground Zero
Is NYC on its deathbed?

Freakonomics

09:35 min | 5 months ago

Is NYC on its deathbed?

"Last month executives from more than one hundred and sixty of New York City's largest employers, banks, and law firms, sports, leagues, and Real Estate Developers sent a letter to the Mayor Bill De Blasio. They warned that his poor management of the pandemic was threatening long-term damage. There is widespread anxiety the wrote over public safety cleanliness and other quality of life issues that are contributing to deteriorating conditions in commercial districts and neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The five boroughs of New York. City to see you know are the Bronx Manhattan Brooklyn Queens and Staten Island. Also just so you know Bill de Blasio is Democrat who even before the pandemic was almost comically unpopular. We don't need to get into the details, but if you want to read up on him, just do a search for de Blasio that's DB L. A. S.. and. Then arrogant or hypocrite even schmuck. Considered this campaign ad from a fellow Democrat. The less bill de Blasio is the worst mayor in the history of new. York. City and that is. Rose. Congressman. You don't sound very happy about that. Blacks Rose Macau. Grossman now you and I happen to know each other a little bit through a family connection. My son, has worked on your campaign in in your office in DC. Do you saw me swear to not let that relationship influence this interview I solemnly swear rose represents new. York's eleventh district historically the only congressional district in the city, the votes Republican it includes all of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn one of the highest rates of unionization of any district in America cops firemen. Teachers. Nurses. First. Responders Sanitation Workers, folks who we just recently started calling essential workers but quite frankly, they were always essential like every member of the House of Representatives rose is up for re election in. I don't care about politics my friend. Not Right now. On employment skyrocketing the economy in disarray people fearful further. Fearful. For their future of their families the time to be thinking about how to help people making government finally work again, people are so disgusted with their government that's on the left, the middle and the right. You recently said there is no reason that every single teacher in New York City should not be tested at least every other day as far as I know that's not even close to happening. It's not happening because a failure of leadership a failure of imagination nobody has confidence in this city right now there's no plan there's no solidarity. There's no resources with a system of pool testing with a system with New York City is acting almost as if it is a venture capitalist, it comes to figuring out the most innovative ways to beat the pandemic investing in them early on with private partnerships and then dramatically scaling them. There's no reason we couldn't be testing every single teacher every other day we asked Mayor de Blasio for an interview but he declined there are at least two reasons why in political circles de Blasio is considered particularly unskilled last year he spent a lot of time outside the city for president even though he had virtually no constituency. He's also managed to annoy the one person a New York City mayor can't afford to annoy the governor of New York Andrew Cuomo. New York mayors have a history of acting like the most powerful person in one of the most important cities in the world which to be honest it's not entirely inaccurate. A lot of the city's leverage runs through Albany the state capital what we need, and what this has not done is we need someone who's willing to exist in reality. Guess what if you want the city the prosper you need the governor. If you want the city to prosper, you shouldn't be at tagging housing them. You should be working with him but as Max rose season, the Basel Administration was failing New York long before covid hit in some ways the mayor and his administration took up a new form of laissez faire economics where they said well, we don't have to invest in the future of this city because people have to stay here, people will need to stay here. People will always come here and build their businesses. We don't have to do anything. Well, that's of course, not the case this is a competitive country and it is a competitive world. During the pandemic New York City's been competing with neighbors like New Jersey and Connecticut, and New York suburbs also Florida and Arizona in Nashville Austin those at least are a few of the places that some New Yorkers have fled to. But how many? The truth is no one really knows yet. Pre pandemic the city's population was eight point three million. The New York Times analyzing cell phone data from that four hundred, twenty thousand people had left the city between March and may most of them wealthier residents with a second home. But that measurement has an obvious limitation leaving the city with your cellphone doesn't mean you won't return especially if you own your home since right now is not the easiest time to sell a New York apartment. Here's another probably better metric since March, roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand New Yorkers have filed with the post office to change their mailing address. That's about double the number from the same period last year. So that suggests roughly one hundred and twenty-five thousand higher than normal outflows that goes with a significant decline also hard to measure in the number of people moving into new. York. Still in a city of eight point, three million, this doesn't seem to qualify as a mass exodus. To. Get a slightly finer greened look at population outflow. We called up Nancy Wu I'm an economist at St Easy where I look at the trends about real estate and then create analyses to tell stories about the data street easy is listing service used by landlords and renters, buyers, and sellers and real estate agents. It manages a pretty impressive database. I have access to all of the market data on the sales and the rentals listings in the universe of real estate listings in New York, city and what has seen since the. So Manhattan rental inventory as of July there's been thirty seven thousand listings on the market that is a sixty five percent growth from last July and how about in say Queens and Queens you should now has two point, two, million people whereas Manhattan has only one point six, million in Queens there six, thousand, six, hundred listings on the market, and that's a twenty six percent increase from last July. So inventory grew everywhere when looking at the borough level but grew way more Manhattan. So that's some rental data. What about home sales in July? There's thirty seven percent fewer Manhattan. That went into contracts than in the same month last year there's largely been a fast forwarding of the natural attrition of the City so New Yorkers were planning on moving to the suburbs within one to two years are doing. So now instead so these New Yorkers are taking advantage of the low mortgage rates to move to the suburbs. So that's another hint that the outflow may not be as apocalyptic as some people think at least not yet that may be more of a one time acceleration of constant trend. Although of course, those outflows are usually countered by inflows will keep moving into New York. There are a lot of reasons to suspect not particularly in the short term, the city is diminished and it remains relatively expensive especially housing although that too is changing at least a bit in Manhattan rents fell by three percents year over year since last July that's the biggest decline we've seen since agree recession when rents fell ten percent but Wu says, we may be seeing only the beginning of this trend we do expect Manhattan rents could fall by more than ten percent because there's a lot of factors where the pandemic has more impact on rents than the great recession did. That may be especially true for two reasons. The first is that a recovery from pandemic is likely even more uncertain than recovery from a financial crash. The second is that the pandemic isn't done doing its damage on the economy just last week, we saw tens of thousands of new layoffs and furloughs announced by firms like Disney and united and American Airlines and even when jobs aren't based in New York City, there is a trickle down effect on the financial services and banking industries here on consulting and accounting firms on commercial real estate and the hospitality sector. A recent audit by the New York State Comptroller reported that over the next year between the third and a half of New York City's restaurants and bars may close permanently.

New York City Bill De Blasio The New York Times York Manhattan New York State De Blasio Staten Island Bronx Manhattan Mayor De Blasio Nancy Wu New Jersey Rose Albany Responders Sanitation Workers L. A. S..
Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

How I Built This

07:58 min | 5 months ago

Jennifer Neundorfer of January Ventures

"And today we're gonNA hear from Jennifer new door for she's the CO founder and managing partner of January ventures. It's an investment firm focused on tech startups founded by women and people of Color Jennifer join me to talk about how her company is approaching investment strategies during this unprecedented moment and how they differ from other firms overall. What we're doing differently is really building a venture firm that is designed around access and transparency. That's not what venture has traditionally been known for, and it's what has really under served winning and underrepresented founders, and so we make it very easy for founders to pitch us and find us in everything that we do is focused on removing friction for those founders at the early stage and what type of startups do you look for? We invest primarily in tech enabled talker businesses. So we are investing in companies that we believe can be high growth scalable companies that are going to be capitol efficient. We are investing the capital early and then are looking for outsized return. So we're looking for companies that can go on to be hundred, million, billion dollar companies, and really be those outliers that generate returns for our fund and. You you invest in the in the seed stage. In the early stages of a business we invested the precede seed stage and what are the reasons that we do. That guy is when we started January, we did some early research and there had been a lot of data talking about how how little venture dollars women receive in two thousand, nineteen female only teams received just three percent of. Venture dollars, and if a woman happened to have male co founder, she received eleven percent of venture dollars. But what we found in our data as we look just at the earliest stage is that there's not only a gender gap, but it really starts early. So for every dollar that a male found raises at the precede or seed stage, a woman raises thirty eight cents and a black. Woman just two cents, and so that is really where we are focused to January. Because as you imagine a dollar versus thirty eight cents on the dollar versus two cents on the dollar, many of those are handicapped from the start, and so our focus is on getting them the capital and resources that they need to really generate momentum for their business and get to that scalable growth curve. How large is your fund right now? Yeah, we're deploying out of the twenty million dollar fund. Were typically writing checks that range up to half a million plus because we're investing stage when founders are raising. Two hundred fifty three hundred up to a million dollars on a really at those earliest ages and often the first capital in. And who who are your investors. Are Investors Range. So many of them are the typical investors that you would expect to see family offices, high net worth individuals, and some institutions and foundations. But from the beginning my partner Marin, I wanted to be very deliberate about who are investors are limited partners were because. So much of the traditional venture model has relied on a very small set of investors or limited partners and has reinforced this flywheel around making that small group very wealthy, and so what we have done in both of our funds is proactively reduce the barriers for nontraditional investors to invest in our funds whether that is a founder who is just beginning to. Capital Wealth and may not have a lot of equity and finding ways for them to participate or pitching LP's who follows height of the the traditional circuit that most funds pitch. You know whether it's by geography ethnicity we've really tried to work hard to diversify our alkies. How do you find startups to to invest in? I mentioned that venture has been so long on really inaccessible to most founders and a lot of that is because many venture capitalists rely on their network to source deals, and that's fine. But most of the people that are in someone's network look or are similar to similar characteristics who that person we hear a lot of talk about the tests Cana found her get a warm intro to them, and if so then they're willing to consider taking meeting. We turn that on her head at January, and so from the day that we launched, we have been open to cold pitches and when we went out with that, many of our peers told us you're crazy. We weren't gonNA see great pitches. There was no way we could handle that certain volume. And we were pretty overwhelmed. When we launched in October two, thousand eighteen, we saw four hundred pitches within the first week and so very quickly we leverage technology to develop a scalable way to review those deals were very generous with the first thirty minute meeting. We want Martin I want to be the first people at our meeting these founders right we want to be the ones who are judging whether they are a fit for a thesis, and then we have a higher bar for. Who we spend time with who we due diligence on and ultimately invest in because the nature of our businesses there's a very wide top of funnel, and in any given fun were making twenty five thirty investment. So there is pretty Winnie in process but were deliberate in the organizations that we work with to make sure that we are reaching founders that really fit that underrepresented mold and telling them that are light is on and we WANNA be fund of choice for them so tummy. Tell me some of the startups in your portfolio. Yeah. This is the part that I love talking about it sort of talking about your kids on. And it's hard to pick just one but I'll you a sense for some of them. We are investing problems that we believe are big and we really care about solving were really focused on investing in companies that are addressing big broad problems that are going to shape the future, and so one of those founders that is really doing this is a founder Julia. Collins, who is the CEO of the Company Up Planet Forward Julius founder who has deep roots in both food and sustainability and great founder market. That's something that we look for a lot and Julia is building a regenerative supply chain for sustainable foods. Just Chris. Quigley you sir. Can You? Can you kind of explain just plain plain language orders a regenerative supply chain me I mean I, I notice supply chain means a note regenerative means. Yeah. That's a great question guy. It's really about the ingredients and wear brands and CPG companies are sourcing the ingredients for their foods and they would basically evaluate the sustainability and on a number of different metrics including the carbon footprint including those ingredients were were actually farmed and then be able to suggest alternate sources and it'll turn it whether it's a different farmer on a different type of ingredient that have the same impact so that I as a brand could make those adjustments and make a more sustainable. And regenerative food product right. So if you were looking for palm oil, for example, this platform could say, Hey, you know this is a better place to source your palm oil from. That's exactly right and they are really the first ones to do that on an what we've seen in the past six months is that consumers union between being at home and suddenly really caring about what food they eat, and then all of the very visible events in the last couple months around climate change and sooners are really starting to There's a there's an acceleration in consumer awareness of climate-friendly foods and being conscious of the choices that they make and wanting to be sustainable.

Founder January Ventures Co Founder Jennifer Managing Partner Partner Cana Julia Marin Quigley Martin Chris Collins CEO
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 7 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Paypal, Banks and Real Life Infrastructure Inversion

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

05:04 min | 7 months ago

Paypal, Banks and Real Life Infrastructure Inversion

"When the hit reactions were dramatic CEO of Wyoming based Avantis Bank and passed on the showcase on long tweeted game on USOC sees announcement that it's following Wyoming allowing national banks to custody digital assets is great news for Crypto long-overdue, and hopefully we'll help the US regain ground. It lost to other developed world countries by dilly dallying for so long winters, equal customers and crypto venture capitalists. This will spur emanate boom as us. Banks acquired digital asset custodians, and that was only the first two of her twenty four tweet storm on the topic link in the show notes for those who missed it. In other parts legal mind mark, Coyne hoarder, and passed on the show Preston Burn tweeted I've never been more bullish on crypto today crypto lending, and saving maybe how the payment of interest becomes thing. Again, thanks are desperate for yield the faster they move the more market share there will obtain lawyers and bankers are definitely excited. But why does this matter and what is it mean? Jonathan let's start with you today. Well looking at it from my perspective of someone who's tried to do startups in the for some time, the largest filter that is a had versus half not versus based on the technical or Business Acumen. Or Merit of your company is to do with getting a bank account and keeping a bank account and being able to even have customers in every state I mean the whole point about the bit license was the fact that banks were refusing to service customers of people running crypto startups. So what this does if? The executions being the statement says it is is it means that we're going to enter an age where crypto startup can actually have a bank account in America and actually be serviced and not just be a crock in or a Gemini or Aucoin base, but actually be three people you know asking for bank services. So you know the government tends to break your legs and then ask you to thank it when it gives you a crunch and it's really glad to see that at least now, they're giving entrepreneurs a crutch. Because like spin broken for a very long time hang on. I'm a bit confused here because this regulation is about freeing up the ability of banks to directly custody Crypto, and at least what you're saying seems to be more about whether banks are allowed to extend. Fiat. King Services to crypto companies why do you think the two are related one of the purposes? As to why money transmitter licences became such a big deal for crypto services is that the act of transmitting your token your value instrument is itself currency or is considered a value transfer, and so banks would onboard in dollar terms the ability for people to get crypto. But if you actually wanted to engage in crypto related services with Crypto you yourself had to. Take. That on, get a custodial and become a money services business because there weren't any financial service providers that would do that for you, and so there are a lot of projects that I know of that have lodged. That are in existence that can't even deliver the tokens to their system to people because they're waiting for money transmitter licences because the act of. Giving it to their customers would be considered money transmission, and so I think that we become so blinded to think that banking means crypto banking for crypto means the dirty Fiat side of it and not the awesome crypto side of it and a lot of the crypto related activities now can be done natively by a bank, which means that as a small startup. Become a bank. I don't have to become a crack in order to be able to do trivial thing I wanted to do with bitcoin or a colored coins. So I, just want echo that on the one side our experience on the show with trying to have a bank account. Well, we've actually been d platform because the word bitcoin is in the name right and that was for a while fairly controversial, and then on the other side of things, the work that I did with token Lee we often found ourselves without the ability to have a credit card processor because even the. Idea of touching tokens that were non speculative in nature that did not have prices that could appreciate. Well, that was still something that was on the other side of we know what we're talking about right and so you had banks that were just wildly uncomfortable with this and even the high risk tolerant ones you know the ones that specialize in dealing with really kinda sketchy applications, even those oftentimes wouldn't deal with noncontroversial uses of. Tokens and sort of anyway. So just the clarity that. So long as a company is following, the law banks can interact with them that I think is a pretty major statement and a major change from the way the banks have at least behave to this point. We'll see if they actually do anything differently with it but I think again, we're going to talk a little bit later about kind of the pay pal announcement and Sort of this shift that we've gone through where Crypto was on the one hand kind of in the very early days, people would adopted or companies would adopt it and get kind of an earned press boost, and then that went away for a while as things got boring. Now we're kind of on the entire other side of that curve, but we're going to have that conversation for just a little

Fiat Wyoming Avantis Bank Dilly Dallying United States Usoc CEO Business Acumen Coyne Jonathan King Services Preston Aucoin America Noncontroversial LEE
Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

TIME's Top Stories

04:49 min | 8 months ago

Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

"Natalie Portman among those launching women's soccer team in Los Angeles to highlight heroes that are women by an m peterson of the associated, press. Actress Natalie Portman and venture capitalist. Karen, Nordmann lead a group that will bring an expansion national women's Soccer League team to the Los Angeles area in twenty, twenty two. The team tentatively named Angel. City will bring the League to eleven teams. Louisville AFC will join the nine current. NWS L. Clubs next season. Portman. Nordmann are joined by gaming. Entrepreneur Julie Erman. The consortium President in the majority female group others involved include actors, evil Longoria. America Ferrara, Jennifer Garner and Ouzo a Deuba. Tech Entrepreneur and Reddit Co founder Alexis Oh Hainian the husband of tennis star. Serena, Williams is the lead investor through his firm initialized capital. Portman Nordmann and urban all have a financial stake in the team. I think it's so important to have role models and heroes that are women for kids both boys and girls to see, and it's just such an incredible sport in that it really is a team Sport Portman, said in an interview with the Associated Press. You see one woman success, and all the others are cheering her on because one woman success is the whole team's success among the founding group are more than a dozen former players, including mia a ham, Abby Wambach and Julie Foudy. Other female business leaders. Portman said she heard Wambach. A former US national team. Forward speak at a time is up event and started thinking about how female athletes are regarded in society. Then she and Nordmann met Becca Rue, the executive director of the US Women's National Team Players Association. We started going to games, and we just got so into it, and it was just kind of a revolution to see my son and. And his friends, these little eight year, old boys at the time wanting to wear their REPEA-, no jerseys and Alex Morgan Jerseys I was like. Wow, this would be a different world. It wasn't unusual to them at all. Portman said there were hints that the group was coming together last year when Portman Gardner Longoria and other celebrities went to a national team exhibition game at L. AFC stadium before the World Cup. The women also reached out to a local supporters group that has been campaigning to bring a team to Los Angeles. The plan is to bring on additional investors as the team takes shape. We knew that there would be a strong and passionate supporters group here to support this and from there it was about. How do we do this in the right way? How do we do this differently Urman said? The group is partnering with the La Eighty Four Foundation. A nonprofit formed after the nineteen eighty four Los Angeles Olympics that promotes youth sports. Angel City also announced its formal support of the foundations play the fund aimed at helping kids in minority and underserved communities. We believe these players need to be playing on one of the best stages in the world, but we also know that we have the power and the platform and the voice to make a meaningful impact in our community. Erm, said, and so it's important for us to do that from day one in the same way that we are building to put eleven incredible players on the field from day one. The NWS cell, which began play in twenty, thirteen was the first professional team sport to return to action in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic with the challenge. Cup, tournament, in Utah, the semifinals are set for Wednesday. The official name of the Los Angeles Club and where it will play are expected to be announced later this year. The growth trajectory of the NWS L. is incredibly exciting, but we also need to be strategic and thoughtful about how fast we expand and the communities. We partner with and W ESL, commissioner. Lisa Baird said in a statement Tuesday. We've long sought the right partner in L. A. Considering the NWS L. Fan base that already exists in the region and the massive interest in women's soccer in general.

Natalie Portman Portman Nordmann Portman Gardner Longoria Los Angeles Abby Wambach Soccer United States National Team Players Associat Los Angeles Olympics Los Angeles Club League Julie Erman Angel Louisville Afc La Eighty Four Foundation Associated Press Alex Morgan America Ferrara Partner
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 8 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

Marketing School

05:32 min | 9 months ago

30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're GONNA talk about part. Two of thirty lessons after thirty million Seo visits, so Neil, what is number nine? Yeah, yet, so number nine would be from everything that I've done to acquire a links. The best two ways to acquire links have always found his gift free tools Eric mentioned that in the previous episode, but the second. Second Way, this is actually the easiest way because creating tools is hard or if you want cream, you can just go to Co. Canyon and try to find one that's already existing and using pay like ten fifteen bucks, but the easiest way is Info, graphics and Infographics, even though the infographics themselves don't necessarily generate a ton of traffic. They can bring a lot of back links which will help your overall site? All right number ten. UNDERSTAND BLACK SEO, but do it in a white hat way, so you know experimented with gray black hot back in the early days when I was doing Seo and you know easy come easy go. That's how you have to look at Seo and also look at life and look at business as well so knowing that blackout does work in some way if you just repurpose okay, instead of doing a link wheel, which is a bunch of different spammy websites linked together and link to your website because they've power each other, that has proven to work in the past, but instead of doing what if you had a? A bunch of authoritative sites linked each other in any link back to you, so that's one example of link will working in a White-hot way and nothing. Link wheels are very effective now, but that's just one thing we learned in the past that once you learn how to repurpose. Think about it just a little differently you go further number eleven is. Don't obsess about SEO updates. Here's what I mean by that is. There's multiple algorithm updates that happen per day. They're not major ones. You'll start seeing major ones multiple times a year, maybe four or five I? Don't know what the exact numbers for major ones. But you don't know what Google is GonNa. Do you don't know how they're going to change? One thing that is certain, though is, they're trying to provide the best experience for the searchers, so few obsess about users, instead of Google and you could the expansion users. Yes, you may see some dips when there are algorithm updates, but in the long run you should go up if you do. What's best for people all right number twelve. At actually. We were talking about this the other day. It's not all about the traffic that you're getting. It's more so about the conversions and the return on investment that you're getting, so don't focus too much on traffic by the way like I I feel right and same thing for Neil's blog. we can write about random subjects and get a ton of traffic, so for example if you write about marketing careers sure. Sure we can get a ton of traffic around at, but it fit the business models that we have right now with the software with the agencies. Now you can argue for in the education space, which is what we're building right now. Those types of creating that type of content matters, but just keep in mind. You've got to think about what matters for you in terms of conversions and Roi, right. Right now and you WANNA around that. It's not all about the traffic number thirteen focus so whenever you're doing. Seo is easier to rank a site that specializes in one thing such as digital marketing than to rank a site that's on everything like about dot com, and about DOT COM has a case study in which they talk about dot com deleted most their content. Majority of it took the remaining. Remaining amount split up into either five or six sub sites, and actually generated way more traffic than when they had once I about everything number four things a little interesting to me because I like learning from the Seo, industries like really good Seo's but sometimes when you follow the Seo Industry, it's funny. I have different lists on twitter, ones, entrepreneurs, ones, venture capitalists, and then you have the SEO lists. Every once in a to share something that's really novel, and and you learned a lot from it and good data, but a lot of times you look at it more if I were to do like a sentiment analysis. The Complain They Complain Complain Complain and they have stuck for years and and years. They're just doing the same thing over and over and over, so they're stacked it right so my my recommendation is learned from the SEO. Industry will understand if you want to advance beyond that that your mindset matters a lot, so you want to be following the people. Your information diet should be coming from people that motivate you that inspire you to be better and unfortunately for me. At least the industry does not do that so number fifteen. When you're doing seo what I want you to end up. Doing is focus on speed I found. That speed is a really easy lover that boosts your traffic. Especially nowadays, everyone's using mobile devices speed wasn't as important for five years ago because everyone was on their desktop or laptop computers, but here's the thing even with five g. out there. A lot of people don't have great reception in certain places, so they're not getting fast connections speed super remember most of the people that search Google from mobile devices all right. Right so number sixteen. Don't worry so much about bounce rates. I used to worry about really high bounce rates, but think about it bounce rate. Is there someone hitting your site and they're leaving sometimes if they get what they need, they're gonNA balance, and you have actually served user there, says some people like Oh my God. How high boundaries SEO? That's not always necessarily the case right? You gotta think about what Neil was saying earlier if you think about the user or customer if he obsessed over customer experience. You're going to be fine like the people that obsess over customer experience of delivering value instead of just as you as you as you seo, they do a lot better and Neil at least for me, speaking for you Neil. I guess we learned the hard way because in the very beginning, I learned obsess over keywords bounce raids, rankings, and all these things and you realize that's what matters. It's about serving people.

Neil Patel Google Eric Su Marketing School Dot Com CO Twitter
Women are perceived to become liabilities the moment they become mothers. And that's just not true

Dare I Say

04:44 min | 10 months ago

Women are perceived to become liabilities the moment they become mothers. And that's just not true

"You know I grew up in the Philippines. I had really strong female role models my mother my grandmothers. We had a female President Corazon Aquino when I was growing up and I grew up as an empowered girl you know part of the Ywca of Manila's one of their team leaders. When I was thirteen and a started organizing leadership conferences for girls when I was eighteen and then so when I left the Philippines to come to school I left Venus. This empowered girl and then I went to Mongolia College. Which is the first ever and oldest college for Women in America which has a strong tradition if educating female leaders that would change the world and right out of college and I was working at Goldman Sachs. I was sparked of launching the Investment Banking Women's Network for Goldman and so all of these experiences. Really you know allowed me to appreciate the importance of having strong female role models in women leaders all around. I think there's a surprising number of similarities. I also grew up with a very strong mother. Who set a wonderful example of how to work hard and achieve your dreams but also have a clear opinion and share that I also went to an all women's college so Wellesley and it was a really powerful example for me to see all the leadership roles filled by women because that was just the assumption. Why wouldn't the leadership refilled by a woman? I think couple of differences. I grew up in a lot of other countries. As well you came from the Philippines. I I grew up in China for three years in Japan in Ecuador and France and so seeing gender equality quite differently in all of those countries and comparing that to the United States was a real surprise for me it was it was so different from country to country in China for example. There's a saying that women hold up half the sky and that struck me as clearly women would would have half of the opportunities would be just as strong and through both school but then also work and now I have three young daughters six year old and almost four year old twin girls and so I care about gender equality even more But this has been with me from his as far as I can remember. We NEED TO ACCELERATE GENDER EQUALITY. So we can have it in your daughter's life exactly that quite a bit actually at the rate we're going. The whole world stands to benefit if women participate in the economy identically. Demand according to Quinlan's research at McKinsey it would boost the world's economy annually by twenty trillion dollars. That's the size of China and US economies combined. It's all countries align their gender equality efforts with the progress made by their most impressive neighbors. The world's economy could grow by eleven percent that's twelve trillion dollars. A remedy for inequality is a daunting task and it starts at home from the United States may seem like a developed nation but the United States for the last decade has been ranking in the twenties to thirties and the global gender gap report and so there is a lot of progress that needs to be achieved and one of these areas is an economic empowerment so the gender pay gap still persists here in the United States. The gap has narrowed since nineteen eighty. But it's been stable over the last fifteen years and as of last year on average women have earned only eighty five percent of what men earned and based on this estimate. This means it would take an extra thirty nine days of work for women to earn what men did. As of last year there is also the perception that this gender pay gap is imaginary. The latest survey shows that around half of the men believed that there is no gender pay gap so this is very much like half of the men are denying climate change. You know. It's the same principle of denying Ariel that exists which makes it even more problematic to solve when we think about the intersection of race and gender gap. It gets even worse with African American women getting paid the least on average a second area around economic empowerment for women as access to capital for women. Women receive less than ten percent of venture capital funding and ever ge US women are starting more and more companies access to capital is not as easy for women as it is for men. If you're a woman of color the probability that you'll get funding from a venture capitalist is less than one percent so there is a lot of work we need to do around economic empowerment women.

Investment Banking Women United States Philippines Mongolia College Corazon Aquino Goldman Sachs Manila President Trump Goldman China Mckinsey Wellesley Ariel Quinlan America Japan Ecuador
Enterprise AI Readiness, and Moving Beyond the Hype Cycle - with Stephen Pawlowski of Micron

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

08:38 min | 10 months ago

Enterprise AI Readiness, and Moving Beyond the Hype Cycle - with Stephen Pawlowski of Micron

"SO Steve. I wanted to get a sort of kicked off here and get some of your ideas about what you really see as the core components are aspects of Ai Readiness within the enterprise. People use the term. But what do you think it means? Well it is an interesting question. I think is really kind of the genre of all things that are going to completely change and transform how business is going to be done in an essence. That's true it has been around a while and I think they're now with the advance in hardware technologies. He's abuse in terms of software and the Plethora of more data. Were starting to see transformation. People are starting to use in the starting out with point solutions and then as those point solutions start to evolve looking at targeted use cases where they happen to have a set of data and they'll call a company in and say here's my data. What can you do with it in able use it to give me any value in? Eventually it becomes transformative or changes entire organizations and businesses and typically. That's a there's the hype factor in that. It kinda dies off. And there's a general build out over twenty thirty years and so I think in a were probably still at the hype phase but eventually will start to see more and more of a gradual build out where people will start to use it as the same transformative technology that you know people used with the introduction of the microprocessors of example were the revolution that the provided got it and the I think the Internet analogy is is used serve somewhat frequently with intelligence arguably a good analogy because it's not closed off to particular use cases here. Yes so Steve. Do you when you look at where we are with a I N. You mentioned tour of the hype cycle here and then eventually the technology becoming the norm. Do you believe that we are still at the precipice of hype or do you think? We're sliding down closer to reality right. Now what's your take on that? I think we're pretty close to the precipice of hype may be starting to slide down to the backside. When I first started micron six years ago there was very little investment in terms of silicon by venture capitalists and then we just started to be inundated by more and more companies. Claimed they were doing artificial intelligence and artificial. Ai Solutions and the number of silicon companies. I've tracked has been greater than fifty. We're starting to some of those kind of taper off where there's not so many new companies coming in and the companies that are there. Some of them are doing pretty well and they're able to raise money and build a business case in still there are others that are struggling because of being able to provide a differentiation. So things seem to be. They don't seem to be on the on the feverish trend of going up and say everywhere. I think it's really getting to the point where it starting to level off fan in an. I don't know we'll see a big trough but will will start to see as just a slow and steady build out where people will not only use AI to you. Know find a cat picture or something like that but it'll be used really in the point where it becomes transformative were it's affecting our everyday life in ways that we don't understand today doing just simple things that are done you know in terms of different devices that you use like your phone whatnot analyzing your voice to potentially doing pretty substantial things like terminated ruined cyber attacks occur at tried to prevent those or something that would be very prevalent today understanding how disease can manifest itself and to be able to see how it would spread based on knowledge that we we have to date and be able to contain that in a way. That's better than the methods that we're doing today so I'm really seeing more of. It's just starting to you. Know the hype is GonNa tapering off. But I don't think we're going to get the big bubble that we saw before but just a steady build out from there. Yeah I think a lot of people have their fingers crossed that were sliding down the backside and indeed there are some companies that her surviving some companies changing their value prop every six months until they raise around. Run out of money as you had mentioned. Maybe a little bit less in terms of the proliferation of brand new ones. So hopefully. We're settling into something here when you think about sort of what it takes for a company to become Cereti for when I bring up. This question with other enterprise leaders is a lot of things that come up. Talent concerns around data sciences educating executives data infrastructure in this hardware and software. You think about event you think about a hospital becoming quote unquote. Ai Ready many of the listeners. Who were tuned in right now are asking themselves. What are the components are what for you do you think are those pieces that enterprise leaders should see as discrete aspects of the coming ready to use this new? Internet as the you use the analogy. There will you brought up most of them. I think. First and foremost you need a strategy just saying that you have a I. I don't really know what that could There's gotta be some reason why why this particular technology can take you to the next domain. The reason it's really taken off from a hardware perspective is because it's the type of computation. That's very highly. You know that can be done on a plethora of devices in you. You know you're not relying on the old trends of technology scaling like Moore's law to be able to get the kinds of capabilities that you would out of traditional computing as I'd mentioned most algorithms have been around for years and they'd run on traditional. Cpu's now people are starting to use different artwork but there really is a strategy. If if you've got good business processes and good business continuity if AI is gonna get you solutions quicker or it's allow you to be able to analyze the amount of baby. You're getting more and more in faster way than it's the technology for you. It's not gonNA essentially enhanced business capabilities that you currently have or or the services that you're providing traditional computing still has a ways to go and it could potentially be the The focal point. So I'd really focus on strategy first and then you brought up a really good run. Which is people couple years ago when we first started when I first started diving into the AI again onto to school. And then Kinda took a thirty year. Hiatus but when I started diving the day I again question people would ask me as well being from Memory Company House member used today and my answer was I didn't know now that could be my answer could have been. I don't know and then I'm going to avoid the question. What do something else or dive in. And be curious to see. What is the we need to do to be able to for I as an agreement I think there are a number of people in an organization that are going to be afraid that is going to replace job and in some cases over that may be true. But I think there's the opportunity for Enterprises to either going to be some people that want to learn and evolve providing the appropriate training providing the online courses that are available and allowing people to basically grow their skills. I think is going to be really important. Some of them may not have the desire to do that. Generally speaking I think most of them do and their jobs will change is my job is changed over the last thirty eight years. I've been in. The industry used to design things with a pencil. Now use big computers and big a very sophisticated programs through the same thing that I did but things have gotten more complex words or it's been necessary. They need to think about the data. Data's being generated in in significant ways. We've got huge data sets where it takes me just a lot of people to take that data and and label it you know. Give it the key characteristics that you would train the artificial intelligence machines to be able to recognize and be able to make decisions upon having that data in were. You're GONNA cute where you're actually going to do. The kind of work you need to do is going to be really important. Start to see more people look at colocation not only because of the speed over response but just the energy takes the mood that information to the a computer complex just to be able to do the level giving the and the needs in the data amount is going to continue to grow. We don't see that dropping off in any way shape or form and I'm convinced that there are key discoveries in data that we don't know today in so keeping it around a while until you can gain more insight and be able to apply new technologies new techniques that data. I think you're GONNA

AI Steve Ai Solutions Cereti CPU Moore Memory Company House
"venture capitalist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"And so and then the vision in which you saw, obviously all the way through to the iphone and an apse. It's just it was incredible. So that was a seminal moment where I realized I really wanted to be working with somebody as creative as that, and it's great to be in research, but your reporting on what somebody else's doing and it's great to be investment banking, but USA transaction, I just felt like I didn't wanna do once I'd done three app ios. I done three. I've ios, but the idea that I would be working with these entrepreneurs potentially working with these entrepreneurs in the future that grabbed hold of me so year and a half in, I just knew I had to be a venture capitalist. I wasn't the entrepreneur. I was more of the editor wanna help them be around these inspirational creative people that have a vision, but I say that is so he really was the inspiration for my career. You're lucky to have learned that so early. 'cause I think that's a lesson. A lot of us take much longer over the course of a career to fully realize. So once you knew this getting into venture capital is not easy. You know, you have to create a business like Google and then sell the business and then have enough money or have the the pedigree to actually go and and do venture capital. So what was your path? I think p because I got into the industry early, there wasn't as much of a list of what exactly your pedigree had to be, of course, having gone to Stanford. That was helpful because I knew people and it was really pure happenstance and passion around knowing I wanted to be in in this field. I Fortuitously and I think so much so much as the intersection of luck and will. And I had this conviction. I ran into a friend on the elevator who worked at any one of the major venture capital firms. Went out to drinks with him, told him that I I, this is what I had to do with my life. The very next day, the founder of oak the firm, I winded up joining on the east coast. He the individual I met with called the founder of oak and said, I am going. I've I'm going to be funding something called Victoria's secrets. And are you interested in and the founder of oaks had? No, I'm I'm not interested and. A catalog, but I am. I am looking for a research associate with the technology background, and he ended up saying, I've got the girl for you and literally three weeks later I moved to Westport, Connecticut. Wow. So he weeks that's higher by it was a quick higher the he happened to be on the west coast. The next week I the following week went to up to interview with the rest of the team and move the following week. And so I was with them for over thirty years and four years ago founded my own firm also called open oak HCFA is opposed to oaken Muslim partners. So I want to come to the decision in a few minutes about how you decided to found your own firm. But let's talk about looking at companies because I think there are so many founders out there..

founder USA Google Westport editor Victoria Connecticut research associate thirty years three weeks four years
"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Interchange

"Um and then others were you venture capitals don't invest in those sectors what are you doing nancy get a grip so that that was sam hard because you know you like to be these are people i've known for when i was a kind of vanilla venture capitalists some and um you like to think that you uh you know that they respect what you're doing so how did you handle that like what did you tell yourself to get past those kind of comments well we would always just go back to the first principles that were this this globe is burning up we've got to do something uh electricity and transportation are big culprits and so and the world will come around our point of view very soon did you get a chance to roll your eyes at them when our light a next tracker got acquired i was very happy i try not to dish it out at tell us who had the greatest impact on your career you mentioned a couple of the men who were early colleagues and maybe not mentors 'cause i know the term wasn't use as much fish yeah i would i would say that the boss that i referred to who who told me to go for it is name was dan case he was the the ceo of of h and q um and uh he he he had always helped me uh pursue my vision and he by telling me that that made sense for me to to go after that fun because i liked policy and i liked entrepreneurs and then he didn't just say that he convinced the the ceo of jp morgan chase that the time bill harrison that they should support you keep paying my salary while we tried to pull this off and jobs so he he matched his personal support with knowing how to using his status in the organisation to to kind of protect me he went to the sea of jp morgan chase and said financing to build this yeah this fund why i mean he he developed business reasons to do it.

nancy ceo bill harrison jp morgan chase dan
"venture capitalist" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"I'm did dive into vis is pulse jack and that was bill gates speaking at the jp morgan healthcare conference this week the jpm conference as its wellknown is arguably the top of that in the healthcare business world drunk tens of thousands of people to san francisco for both the conference itself is wells all of the rival in spinoff of vents and politico has been reporting from jpm all week first you'll hear my interview with bob her a doctor and obama administration alum who's now one of the preeminent venture capitalist and healthcare at then rock then after the break i caught up with victoria colliver are californiabased reporter who coverage apm with me to talk about the news coming out of the conference in california more broadly just a heads up i'm recording this podcast from the roads to a may sound a little different than normal and just reminder that if you like pulse check you can help us keep it going rate us review us share it with a friend and find me a d diamond a politico dot com with suggestions and feedback and love to know what you think and now here's my interview with bob coach her thousands upon thousands of people have descended upon san francisco for this jp morgan health care conference i am one of those one of those tourists here this week you live and breathe the california venture capital economy all the time you were kind of a dull the ball because all these companies are here how do you feel and what you get out of a conference like this or first walk at a california where the aca is working arched deeds minerals people and we're happy uh we're glad you're here the differ world it under the different world it is a fast anyplace i travel to dc often and i can't describe how different the culture of all right now between the west coast andy see up jp morgan is act is out concert freely interesting experience.

bill gates jpm bob venture capitalist reporter california san francisco jp morgan jp morgan healthcare obama administration venture capital dc
"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Pain through the hoops inconvenient tv c a loves head of the key decision criteria that joy commitment as the you'll fuss three investments and may be held us changed when you examine the rigorous process that the i'm sure you in asked now with new opportunities i mean i think vera's so many different ways to be successful as a venture capitalist before i got into it i was talking to folks like dijon folks like fred wilson cheering their different approaches and i think it comes down to you can either be a very thesis driven venture capitalist like fred or you could be a founder driven venture capitalist like dijon and i think would fits better for my personality in the way i see things as being a sounder driven venture capitalists so kind of pride myself on being an excellent judge of people and talent over my years as an operator and so i think that i rely on that quite a bit visual not a good thing for me when i was first getting into the business i said how do you do this job ten he said i have three questions i asked myself and whenever i stray from any one of those three i tend to make mistakes but if i stick to own the three were number one do i love this product like do i love using this product if i wasn't working as a venture capitalists but i worked for this company and third do i think other people who love it i mean is it just me or do i think though you know other people will love it and i think that's kind of a great framework for how i looked at things too i have to tell us what a big challenges may whether it's really big surprises may be having as tunnel view vc would be big surprises on entering a longterm realizing that vision i think the biggest challenge to me is if you spent twenty plus years working at startups like a have you wake up every morning and you go move the ball forward on your say whatever that air you work at a company and you have some plan in ugo execute that planner of all the plan and it's very clear how you can spend all of your time working to make that thing better as a venture.

vera fred wilson founder venture capitalists venture capitalist
"venture capitalist" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

African Tech Round-up

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on African Tech Round-up

"Maybe they're not ready at the point where they're going to build an office on on ground where they want to have an africa strategy they want to be investing regularly and that's where we come in to run these organizations africa strategy and then also help and support as coinvestment partners in the long term and that has actually what what we do now what ingress of is now is it is a tech integration firm that helps corporates and investors market to train invest in build products for the tech enabled and millennial populations across africa so like for example we represent the get hub and there and we're working with them on their africa strategy and they're the the the largest get repository in the world uh if you write cody you're building it on get up and so we are building out right now a decentralised developer network at every major university in nigeria and through that we can provide them with um sponsored meet ups every month we can provide them with free get services we can help hack the get hub growth at the same time building a lot of value for the african market and so that's that's one case study in one project were also working with local banks and things like that that's one example of of the work that impressive does but fortunately it's a very symbiotic relationship in that not only can our clients on the aggressive so i become el piece in the fund but it's great deal origination so a lot of the stuff we do is training these sort of um first to market entrepreneurs and preoccupante or as the engineers at university you'll providing them with services having meet ups every mind doing trainings building products for them that can help expand their businesses in scale their businesses and end that deal origination mix for a very convenient life as a venture capitalist 'cause i see i'm seeing an and my team missing everything before david become something it's fantastic you know it's this occurred to me listening to you that folks it places like accenture may be but clincy for whom are as opposed to be fair i mean they're well entrenched in you know established tick or established enterprise as it were in terms of consulting but i imagine they'd look or listen to some of what you're saying and go should that be us.

cody nigeria venture capitalist accenture clincy africa developer david
"venture capitalist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is a about ensuring that freedom is projected on internet wieger facebook twitter read it in iraq had not we do not aren't work venture capitalist big advertisers or take corporate or government had pretty the other thing about gab your fraud is actually not even call who looking right happy frog name is gaby and gaby you can boy uh the craig under frog from your roofing on heroic on bali andrew tora bora r e o you're good very ardent part and christian and for him it would about you only anger who can now he worked in kurmuk who are being persecuted remember currently being persecuted and he wanted to increase fightback and go fraud emblematic buric let's talk about your suit against koogle gert i have a sense of the passion because he wrote on gab hey google go f yourself what is the basis of your lawsuit because the first amendment only protects a person from censorship against the government are lawsuit is not actually be from the first amendment are lawsuits be on antitrust anticompetitive behaviour it is be arnn section 230 the the communications that correct which prevent social media from be responsible for the continent you you here for google to hold on to the content of other you here on our site in spain is completely ridiculous opposition the daily stormer which i i think we can agree is an explicit anti semitic racists site has had trouble finding a digital home in recent times as have other purveyors of hate and they're seeking help from something called the free speech alliance there was a great piece in slate recently that expose lane to an effort by the alde right to build basically a kind of alternative internet a series of social media platforms their own domains and so on would you tell me what it is your home.

iraq venture capitalist fraud gaby kurmuk first amendment social media google spain digital home facebook
"venture capitalist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The goals of society at large and what this says and venture capitalist want the code to do we need more viewpoints coming in more people coming in from different backgrounds who will contribute their experiences to what computers ought to do in their world you describe in your book the back rooms in the areas next to mainframes were coders work as being a very very sequestered very secluded khanna culture where outside influence of any kind much less from a woman or from some on with a social conscience to be frowned upon it's about the code and nothing else don't bring your ideas about the world in here yes the programmers are overwhelmingly men white and asian the investors are i can't say how overwhelmingly men white and extremely rich they of course want to make money when a starter says we are going to make deliveries in selected zip codes well you know what that meat places where people have money all the new businesses i'd say almost all are not making any money over is growing i think it lost six hundred forty five million dollars in the most recent quarter expanding their empire is the big deal so you'd say well what about expanding to a larger population who is asking those questioned eleanor when there is this recent f assode a google there was a real uproar amid level executive issue this memo reinforcing gender stereotypes wound up getting fired from it is this how people inside google in the back rooms think is this the code they're writing that helps govern our lives first of all our james to more was on the executive and he is commenting on the profession of software engineering he said that when then biologically are not capable of being quality software engineers yes this caused a tremendous uproar but i want to say this is not the first sort of angry man i have encountered in this.

eleanor google james executive software engineers venture capitalist six hundred forty five million
"venture capitalist" Discussed on This Week in Startups - Audio

This Week in Startups - Audio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on This Week in Startups - Audio

"You know they look at a company and they decided internally do i believe in this company and that's how they make their decision for me i actually involve others in that says making process nor i'm still making the decision ultimately others aren't make the decision for me but i'm being informed by others which will help inform my decision making process as will actually choose to work with venture capitalists myself to have kind of a vc set of eyes on these deals and that way i'm i'm almost like playing that that checkers game analogy they were talking about two steps ahead on i'm validating that it's adventure class deal before i invest hype opinion off of event a venture capitalist and a venture capital should say hey i'm not writing hundred two two hundred fifty k check so there is no problem with me giving my inside to an at roman running a syndicate because i don't operate at that level but at his may feeder therefore i'm happy to give him some feedback and say yeah in order for me to invest this would need to have the ability to have twenty you know when you get through this you know 25000 customers paying ten dollars a month each and that's when it would feel like a venture business to me they give you where the goalposts are it has run exactly and you have to be a little bit uh jaded in terms of your perspective here because venture capitalist look at thousands and thousands of deals per year and they pass on ninety ninety nine percent of the deals the luca so just because of venture capitalist doesn't like a start doesn't mean the start of isn't venture class it just means at that particular venture capitalist has an opinion about the company.

venture capitalists venture capital venture capitalist hundred two two hundred fifty ninety ninety nine percent ten dollars
"venture capitalist" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"You know they look at a company and they decide internally do i believe in this company and that's how they make their decision for me i actually involve others in that says making process nor i'm still making the decision ultimately others aren't make the decision for me but i'm being informed by others which will help inform my decision making process as will actually choose to work with venture capitalists myself to have kind of a vc set of eyes on these deals and that way i'm i'm almost like playing that that checkers game analogy they were talking about two steps ahead on i'm validating that it's adventure class deal before i invest hype opinion off of event a venture capitalist and a venture capital should say hey i'm not writing hundred two two hundred fifty k check so there is no problem with me giving my inside to an at roman running a syndicate because i don't operate at that level but at his may feeder therefore i'm happy to give him some feedback and say yeah in order for me to invest this would need to have the ability to have twenty you know when you get through this you know 25000 customers paying ten dollars a month each and that's when it would feel like a venture business to me they give you where the goalposts are it has are exactly and you have to be a little bit uh jaded in terms of your perspective here because venture capitalist look at thousands and thousands of jobs per year and they pass on ninety ninety nine percent of the deals the luca so just because of venture capitalist doesn't like a startup doesn't mean the start of isn't venture class it just means at that particular venture capitalist has an opinion about the company.

venture capitalists venture capital venture capitalist hundred two two hundred fifty ninety ninety nine percent ten dollars
"venture capitalist" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Your entire locker room crumble so it's it's an interesting scenario but look cold and the owners in the bay area these are a venture capitalist or a goal uh start up guys like they see the world differently they believe in disruption and they think they're smarter than everyone else in fact a friend of mine bruce on him feld did a story on this the new york times two years ago where basically look public were smarter than everybody and then the store got mac does it oh isn't lay could i was able to cope because i had a teacher jim j aided the guy um lake obe their ago is smarter than everybody else he told the new york times magazine and then they lost to cleveland everyone mocked him but turnout is smarter or at least it looks like he's going they've got the files on lockdown but those kind of personalities in those kind of people do not ever quit trying to crush their competition so it wouldn't surprise me if this is true like if they think this is the way to be that much better now the only thing i'll say is like i i i like i like paul george as a person but he hasn't had great chemistry lochbroom situations over the stretch of his career it's a great lock roadway david west earlier on jeon jones talk about this it's a great locker room with the warriors i personally and not sure i would want a mess of that it would make me a little nervous um let's up when i first started in tv or walked into a green room and a very fame as quarterback who's a borderline nfl player the first conversation i ever had with him was him saying i'm a hall of famer and me kind of laughing which i shouldn't have done and and be like all of your hall of famer no fast by kurt warner hasbie hall of famer and he in a bunch of the people in that room for like kurt warner is not a hall of famer while he's going to be to be official very very soon going to talk about kurt warner why so many players round the league didn't and don't view him the way that many of.

venture capitalist new york times mac the new york times magazine paul george david west jeon jones kurt warner jim j cleveland nfl official two years
"venture capitalist" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"You know when i came out or was the 1978 it wasn't clear whether it was going to be boston or silicon valley that was going to be the center of entrepreneurship for the united states and technology both had worldclass and still do obviously research universities both driven with a military contracting history and both with technology spinouts but what change was the us government wild for the first time pension funds to put up to ten percent of the fund into risky investments which venture capital was considered as and that really changed um everything for both the areas the country the venture capitalist son the east coast continue to act like bankers and the venture capitalists on the west coast started to act like pirates they took risks on people who didn't fit the mold the culture was quite different in boston and the east coast you have this environment where if you were starting a company you're still probably going home physically for dinner at least once a month and you had to explain to parents who had no idea what the start of world was whereas in the west coast you might send them a letter higher things guy i'll just fine systems rao rights you next week and so the culture was different for both the entrepreneurs and as a as started to point out for the risk capital culture and i think silicon valley didn't have smarter people they just had people who were wire to take different risks who actually came out to california to take risks and to get away from the status quo.

united states venture capital venture capitalists boston venture capitalist california ten percent
"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"The idea itself is nothing so it's a good start in need that but really affect when you talk to venture capitalists people who give people money for their ideas very often they'll say i didn't really care about the idea the idea was not what i invested at what i invested in this the more experienced venture capitalist almost say this universally is the people the business plan the smarts the talents the ability of the guys behind it not the idea uh i didn't invest in uh in october because i thought ridesharing was great idea first of all you knew they were going to be a dozen other people doing it i invested in travis kalanick because of his track record because of his skill set because of the team the heat assembled that kind of thing so what you're asking is in effect while i got a great idea oh uh where do i go to how do i go to the next step in it's not the idea is going to make a successor a failure you're going to have to you you're already at a disadvantage because you don't have the technical chops to bring that idea to life they're plenty of people just getting out of computer science uh programs at universities all over the country who do have the chops and have the ideas so they're gonna write their own a first generation of the idea what they call a minimum viable product they're going to hire marketers they're gonna hire.

venture capitalist venture capitalists ridesharing travis kalanick computer science
"venture capitalist" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on Mixergy

"So that it cannot sank therefore they stop you in the studio by save bc verses venture capitalist her icee veteran capitalists instead of venture capitalist and it doesn't change the meaning they stop you up let's try again with venture capitalists plural let starting at the try again with the word if it's painful but then you get have you done it before have you read about no but i listen to audio audible so and you know what i love audible to an they um they fought me harpercollins recite we really don't want you to the audio book we have the greatest person it's gonna be much more expensive for us to do this other person trust us do this massive what's the reason they're like like i was trying to get the reason why they were trying to swayed me so much and they said okay candidly most author socket reading it you we don't know if the soccer anna and second most people quit after the first day or two because it's too exhausting into frustrating on the first day i've literry said to myself am i going to keep doing this because it's two hours of bucking boashan of like being corrected on minor shed and my i'm going mental and literally we just i clicked in the second day something happened i figured out the rhythm and now i feel like i could i could read the elliot or the odyssey you know it anyway it is nicer when the author reads it down next to the person the in your head are the bookies angel jason thanks so much for joining us it was me every sure you're doing that echoes the first time i've been on the show no this is the second final one other time one yessita alive show and uh it was back when we were in la you order from you're studio i was in my place yes i are excellent vague you think you offer being apartment everyone.

venture capitalists elliot venture capitalist soccer two hours
"venture capitalist" Discussed on BBC - Tech Tent

BBC - Tech Tent

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on BBC - Tech Tent

"And it's because you've got this belief in the block chain technology which underpins virtual currencies critic earns his that you're using this method wiggs explain that absolute while i believe that our reality socially constructed any way but blushing is very important because it's not only gives us opportunity to raise money but also to build a complex economic models behind a company so you can actually build something which is not simply moneyraising mechanism but actually people can what people can do things and you can redistribute profits in a new way now listen if you had a realistic vision for a space business like elon musk space x you would go surely to venture capitalist so bankers or even standard crowdfunding to raise the money for that that would be a more regulated way of doing it instead of which you going down to a lot of people seem an incredibly risky route well not noone believed ilham musk beckons the so actually believes that now legally did raise the money the area did actually as pe also put his own money and some things that i did in is beginning as well but i believe that cryptocurrencies equip the cryptocurrency crowd is the highly highly sort of for phantasmagoric kind of a crowds at an for them investing in space it psalms things it's really rings avellaneda believes that the and from up my talks with them the believes that it's something that should be doing because there's so many project has been said before rechar just basically new crypt parkinson's they don't really change the way we live our lives and i believe we should create the vision that would take us to a new level as a humanity that's very important i said of the beginning it felt like 1999 where we had this dotcombubble isn't this another bubble well i believe it not just there yet am i believe that very soon we will see big boys a joining like big companies trying to use ict as a way to crown fund money.

ilham musk parkinson venture capitalist avellaneda
"venture capitalist" Discussed on BBC - Tech Tent

BBC - Tech Tent

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on BBC - Tech Tent

"And it's because you've got this belief in the block chain technology which underpins virtual currencies critic earns his that you're using this method wiggs explain that absolute while i believe that our reality socially constructed any way but blushing is very important because it's not only gives us opportunity to raise money but also to build a complex economic models behind a company so you can actually build something which is not simply moneyraising mechanism but actually people can what people can do things and you can redistribute profits in a new way now listen if you had a realistic vision for a space business like elon musk space x you would go surely to venture capitalist so bankers or even standard crowdfunding to raise the money for that that would be a more regulated way of doing it instead of which you going down to a lot of people seem an incredibly risky route well not noone believed ilham musk beckons the so actually believes that now legally did raise the money the area did actually as pe also put his own money and some things that i did in is beginning as well but i believe that cryptocurrencies equip the cryptocurrency crowd is the highly highly sort of for phantasmagoric kind of a crowds at an for them investing in space it psalms things it's really rings avellaneda believes that the and from up my talks with them the believes that it's something that should be doing because there's so many project has been said before rechar just basically new crypt parkinson's they don't really change the way we live our lives and i believe we should create the vision that would take us to a new level as a humanity that's very important i said of the beginning it felt like 1999 where we had this dotcombubble isn't this another bubble well i believe it not just there yet am i believe that very soon we will see big boys a joining like big companies trying to use ict as a way to crown fund money.

ilham musk parkinson venture capitalist avellaneda
"venture capitalist" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"And not normal in the sense that it is similar in process to other types of investing every type investigator process but normal incensed that you can't expect outsize returns without actually knowing what you're doing so if i was no p you wanna find people in order doing not put money with people who are just smart scott in my in my frame record be morale fall less beta so if if you were the late 90s venture capitalist ada in that world woods just enormous return thea and the grid dow was probably sixty percent i are ours or whatever whatever the case may be and and it's interesting that in this era when beta has become so cheapen the public's sense that alpha arguably is more and more dear just harder and harder to find such another interesting dynamic is okay so you you want to find good people but they even take your money he told the top hundred rooms are oversubscribed a person listening to this myself i'm that want money with benchmark or want money with sequoia or or gray locker something i i can't get my money in there so it's an it's an interesting a really interesting problem for all piece is also i think the interesting thing that sort of behind that promise self is that when you look at the really successful venture funds the unions were ventures the the foundry groups sequoias people don't replicate their strategies they think the replicating their strategy but people look at this adventure capital generally as being something that's about picking like i'm gonna find a good company that's definitely gonna make money and put money into it as if they're investing in a stock something which one predictable not that stocks are predictable with more predictable.

scott sequoia investigator venture capitalist sixty percent
"venture capitalist" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"venture capitalist" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"It's clear that people knew about this along a not just the pass and he was harassed and the harassing the other people they tend to be these kind of unsaid secrets and as a when someone brings that information fluid it really baroness really is on the organisation in question to do something with it you're on the the reserve a number of people who speaking of running above this week he said the they have reported things knocked had happened than the the just felt scared to take it any further felt powerless by foam what what they have of recall stood to do anything about this and i i suppose finally as someone who's it's it's a business of relationships between entrepreneurs and venture capitalist and people trying to make that businesses success and you can't really afford you might think in your head to ruffled many feathers and demon too many things to give you a bad reputation this is a woman whereas actually it's the people who were doing the really really horrible things to you that a ruffling the feathers on the getting bad reputation and finally they're getting cold out on it and hopefully that can really start to change things up so adjusted odd one thing that we at his to any listeners in the va see our best meant community glow think the power dynamic is really crucial and in a lot of these cases and uh you know such social psychologists have of recommended that one way of removing unconscious bias in fort for example in job interviews is have two separate panels will two separate group during the interview so that if they're all biases in in in either an individual oils with the person's spices dan cut of overtake the others and i do think that it's about having other voices.

venture capitalist