14 Burst results for "Venture Capital Office"

"venture capital office" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Clock. Tower technology ventures and savvy. Welcome to the show. Thanks man could here. This is a little weird. You're probably walking slash running distance from each other. Normally, we used to do like a quarterly brainstorm down loaded Jelena which I miss Julia Open. Right now do you know? Had believe the with everything in La you can't sit down inside the store and I think they're running all the takeaway through a in Giusto but I don't know for sure. For the Non Angelenos out there. This is one of my favorite restaurants on the planet most like quintessential l. a restaurant is so great. The one positive of the corona virus situation at least down where I am is the proliferation of outdoor seating, which I really hope stays after all the settles down and they just keep it all because La, despite nice it has never had that much outdoor seating was that the last time I saw you or was it I think it must've been. Yeah. It's possibly ran into each other somewhere on the west side. You guys had your office opening when you're popping bottles of champagne hanging out with Peter, thiel and everything else. But that was like over a year ago. Yeah. That's right. You guys have a great listeners. They have a great I used to be calling it somewhat of a Fintech. Space, but probably, not so much co working going on right now. Yeah. We're not sure what's going to happen with that will space that we have in with that industry generally maybe we'll turn it into open air seating for restaurants or something. The whole world can have to do something with this stock of office space that's GonNa get unused for the next decade were debating what to do with ours. So I well, this'll be fun. Today, we'll probably brainstorm lots of my terrible ideas. I'll pitch you usually you're the nice filter on getting to tell me why they're horrific and they usually are but for the listeners who don't know you, let's do the quick one minute background. You've been all over the place grew up I think in the south been out here for a while stops in Palo Alto at Connecticut on the way, give us like the one minute summary. Sure. So I started my career at the apex of the Dot Com bubble graduated from college in Nineteen Ninety nine went joined an investment bank, but in their venture capital practice in so decided to become a vc like the all time highs in August nineteen, ninety, nine spent six years. Three New York three being California run around chasing venture capital which would have been I New York or California. Three years in New York I ninety, nine zero to new. York. And I. got off a plane in San Francisco in August of two, thousand two and was like the only net migrant into the bear that year I think. I would have been the same exact time from the East Coast I. Think I got there in oh one and the only positive thing about being there during that decimation was you could buy anything off craigslist for like five dollars. Every flameout Internet company. If you wanted one hundred, Herman Miller chairs, you could go pick them up for free but that was about it. Yeah. It's so funny to think about, San Francisco Circuit Two thousand two relative to San Francisco Today the most expensive Tech Company Venture Capital Office space in San Francisco. Now is like this area around south. Park and it was just like a bombed out desolate place you could have bought the actual. Ran Around South Park for not that much money and it's really incredible. How much that I bubble you never would have imagined it would be so much bigger than it than it is and it has become. So spent three years run around the bay area before deciding, Hey, if I'm going to be a venture capitalist I should go learn the secret handshake in that industry, which at the time was a business school degree from Stanford. So that's after that and got to Stanford decided to switch gears a little bit market investing did that in business school and then joined a big hedge fund.

San Francisco New York La thiel Stanford craigslist California Fintech Giusto Jelena Palo Alto Herman Miller Julia Open Peter Connecticut
"venture capital office" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

14:16 min | 6 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to be. Oh live. We have a legend with us today for B. O. F. Live I'm pleased to welcome Mickey Drexler. The former CEO of gap and J. Crew and kind of legend in the in the American Retail and fashion world. And I caught up with Mickey briefly on the phone about a week ago and asked whether he would join us today for conversation. Because there's been so much timeouts in turmoil in the American retail landscape over the last couple of weeks I thought it would be really great to have someone like Mickey. Help us all to navigate the changes that are happening and make sense of what's going on and also to paint a picture of what the future might look like as on the other side of this crisis that we find ourselves in so Welcome Mickey to be off lines. Nice to the appreciate it. I wanted to start Mickey Before we dive into the topic at hand if you could just tell us a little bit about how you're doing how your quarantine has been what you doing To keep yourself occupied. I find that everyone is finding new ways to keep their minds and bodies occupant it occupied tile. I'm going crazy I I can't stand still. It's a huge turn for answer. My pants and every day is kind of repeat of yesterday. I have no idea. Tuesday versus Saturday's link. And I get up every morning and not living in a homeless living in a hotel but at such a long story in that makes it less fun. I'M GONNA get up every day. Take a walk with my wife. My kids are one in New York and one's in Sampson and I walked for an hour and a half a long beach here in Miami not on the beach because you're not allowed to and then I come home till the next morning home or whatever wherever I am and life is. I actually like without work. I be dying and this choosing his favorite hobby of mine. My wife is very serious about keeping US isolated Argentine as she should be a so it's it's almost surreal living sway. All of us is just unbelievable. And I don't think anyone really knows what it's going to look like on the other side but it is what it is and I can't wait normal. I do facetime with my grandchild. Some getting to know she's a year and a half and that's my relationship with are in. That's that's like it's not. It's not eas- house. There's a daily routine. I think that we're all developing. I guess it's about injecting moments of connectivity moments of exercise moments of reflection and an moments of work and mixing that all but while being in the same physical space which is kind of challenging. Because it's hard to transition between all of those different but I. I was really excited to talk to you because obviously you know as a as a media publication that covers the global fashion industry of which the the American market still plays an incredibly important part watching from over here in London. What's happening in the retail environment in the United States? It's been harrowing. You know some of the big titans of the American retail landscape are teetering on the edge of bankruptcy some have already filed for bankruptcy some are planning for liquidation including two of the companies that you used to lead an you know. The gap has been withholding rent payments. Furloughing its workers trying to reorganize and restructure its operations and J. Crew has obviously filed for bankruptcy as a way of doing a restructuring of the organizations and they're not alone right this is J. Crew Neiman. Marcus is the gap is his Lord and Taylor as you look across the American retail landscape. It's it's pretty grim out there and so the first question. I just wanted to you to ask you you know. How did we end up here? That so many of these big American retailers find themselves in a position where you know there are teetering because you know the the companies that seemed to be surviving seemed to be seemed to be kind of getting through at least up until now are the ones that were strong going into this crisis. But many American retailers were already Suffering before this all started and this is kind of become the kind of final you know the the proverbial Straw against the camels back so talk to me a bit about how we ended up here in the first first thing I'm GonNa say is Speak to a lot of people every day to work and do whatever most people will say. I have no answer to your question. I mean I have one opinion on how he ended up here with. Most of us don't know what the other sides could look like in my own opinion on and I think statistics There's been for twenty years or so to many retailers too much inventory and I think what's happened because of a corona virus in one short sue. What probably could've happened ten or fifteen years ago. Too much out there to choice to inventory drove down prices drove down margins increase of price. And they're well if you look at Tj. Max I think the biggest most profitable department store in America if not the world and they have a great merchant account rich wanting running at night. I think the great were cheap or is also part of it. I think this just too much square footage for human being in America. It always has. That's one thing. Lack of creativity I think is another thing although with too many stores into choice of what you get is just a deflationary trend in retail nights. We've been going through that. Very simply stated is too much assortment out there too much goods not enough special. Not Enough unique. Lots of commodities Amazon certainly influenced a lot of this and that's life end so could add twenty or ten years ago because I always ask the question an I didn't know none of us knew about this while some people that Bill Gates I guess sold coming is what you do. Then you've named companies if solemn so didn't exist would you miss them and there was so many no. I will miss them if they weren't here anymore. Now what's happening is a lot of going away either. Unfortunately because they have no cash they're running out of cash in. They might be good at what they do and the rest. You just won't miss them and the balance sheet was week when you say their balance sheet was weak you mean they were heavily indebted right overly indebted or plus an I. Don't you know right now? Sitting with all these empty stores with huge Will push people over the edge if they might have survived longer than they probably would discount. It cleans up the landscape of Aqua Lung. Markdown companies and others who sadly will go away because you know maybe they just undercapitalized. And they might be run. Creatively have nice goods. The the report cards not in yet. I don't think it's close to being so if that's the question if if there are too many stores and I think you know there's one statistic that's you know frequently cited that there there's more store space in America. Her customer or per person than there is anywhere in the world by a long shot. So there's too many stores is too many malls. There's too much product There's too many brands. How did how did they all last this long? My first place you know. We'll explain that to me because I don't understand how that can happen. What the the answer. I always get free money out there for everyone. I'm not an economist. A merchandiser in what free money means as maybe lower interest rates are money plus a venture capital like. Oh here ten million years fifteen million. Let's think shot I kind of Bedding in dark half the time I. I sat in Venture Capital Office for my first year at J. crew and I visit with companies and it wasn't very hard to get money who's actually quite easy just to fancy. Dan Presentation Sound. Like you know what you're talking about a with great confidence have no experience. Oh we're going to invest in. You know what I've learned is if they hit one or two or three ten. They're very happy and don't says that they'll talk about it. But I'm not blaming venture capital maybe blaming too much cash around America to take a shot and when I look at the companies are known to be critical. I am like very few things impress. And I'm saying you kidding. You're going to invest in this when his so many of that but I think free money betting taking a shot. I guess in the two Twenty that the deal is makes it very attractive to buy company sell companies and it got us to place where we are in a to a degree. And you know you weren't looking at these with a sharp. I may be in my world in Tarot. It's amazing how people might evaluate opportunity without Kinda doing the surgery you know doing whatever before and money people are different than operate. There were very much different. They probably make more money in a sense because playing money in the not Clinton with and I don't think the playing vision and I don't think they're playing with a down. The road shot now. Drafting said is more start ups and I don't know what's GonNa Happen is my own personal opinion. All this is how many of them are actually going to survive. How many will make money? I'm used to and I started made. Well started old navy. A while I was running. It was a matter profit not a matter out big. Could you get how much volume two right? So basically what you're saying is there's been a lot of capital floating around cheap capital either in the form of debt. That's you know coming from. The capital markets are very low interest rates that enables big investors to take bets on an industry that they don't really understand and so they're artificially in a way propping up some of these retailers that without that kind of you know we talk about. Smart MONEY. Maybe we'll call it not smart money with that. Not Smart Money. It kind of it extends the life of these retailers. Maybe beyond what they would have had if they didn't have that money. And then the people taking ownership of these companies don't really know how to operate them a you. Just you just called yourself a merchandiser right. And I think that's a really important a role for everyone to understand because the role of the merchant as also kind of faded in the in the last few years. There's been a lot more merchandising by numbers and algorithms and data and less instinct and taste and differentiation. So when you walk into stores many of the department stores everything kind of looks the same not just within the store from brand to brand to brand but also between stores so talk to us more about the fundamental importance of the merchandiser and operator in making a fashion retailer successful. Well I do call myself a merchant and that's what I do for living in fact someone said to me the other day we have beautiful stornoway really love Alex meal and they said this ten of us and to people said what we need to work at. What you do is they said. Because you're working like you're you're looking at everything you're working at such a detailed level and don't want someone to help you. I said I'm doing the same thing and looking at every style for forty years. Why should it change now will older now than I was when I started running companies? But that's what I do for a living. I said I look at every style and actually like doing that and I look at every email and I look at every this. I am a huge micromanage. And if you're not a micro manager I don't think you're doing your.

Mickey Drexler America merchandiser US founder and CEO J. Crew CEO Ahmed Venture Capital Office Aqua Lung Bill Gates London J. Crew Neiman Marcus New York
"venture capital office" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

11:31 min | 10 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"You figure out how to fix it now. It's not. It's not a business where you can get knocked down and like oh I had enough and by the way. I think. It's not a business for bureaucrats either because a bureaucrat doesn't really care that much in less as long as they're being taken care of financially and they will get the private jets us and you Never WanNa Kinda give up the private jet a but if you're an owner or if you're an owner or an emotional owner because I said to dawn when I don who cares more about this company than me. I know you want more stock than I do. But every single day I'm here to watch your ownership ship and mine and satisfied customers. There is an emotional ownership that you must feel a passion about what you do in my opinion to be successful and none of us are easy in terms of how we think I think we all run a little scared I think so. No one's done a book on the Psyche Of people who are responsible for companies. But I'm talking about the founders The emotional founders people who are there and feel like they own own everything in that company and I will show you a group of people. My guess that aren't that easy about an that. A lot of things complicated gated insecure to a degree so on and so forth. Now everything's guaranteed. They hit a wall now In my case I like to make a difference. Jay Crew has its missed the way it was. Because I don't know where you go to buy really nice clothes Very fair prices and good quality. Not a lot of choices at. I'm stunned at the prices of close today of Nice Corkwood nice clothes stunning. So I I heard you speak once years ago and you said something about if I could never run a public company I would do you think. A big part of it is the pressure from the public market This to the biggest pressure is self imposed public or private. It doesn't matter you care as much about it if it's public is just another element of the hassle pressure. Whatever but I don't know I never for cared less because we're private or because Republic of course public look when I was younger? Yeah I was a tortured soul when I was younger and friend Rand Public Company for the first time and all of a sudden they're writing about the stock and I wish I figured it out earlier in my life that it doesn't matter because long term it will be where it is I have learned One thing in terms of that the stock at some point in a fashion company will never be what it's worth when it's overpriced now that makes sense right but hit a wall people in tired of it and so on and so forth and everyone does hit a wall a cyclically now Some companies will grow forever but not many and if you look at the fashion landscape named companies that have been relevant relevant for a long time and is not a lot on that list. It depends on the leadership of those companies if they're fashion companies like Zara for example Fashion Company I know they're inexpensive goods but you know long time long success. Yeah say management and that's interesting so who you still own part of j I own part of the company. Yes who knows what's going to happen. Who knows what I'm curious about is so you? You are working on and and advising on Alex Mill. which is your son's business and that is in in some ways you know as a consumer I can see how it competes with J. Crew but it is also a different beast and I'm would love to hear more about kind of what you think? Alex milk can would what purpose. Alex Milk can serve in the retail landscape. And what that's been like because because this is the first company that does it it has funding from you and friends and family funding right whatever that means but what this is this is. You are actually the entrepreneur in this case. Not just the emotional I think The funding what that means is no one's going to tell you what to do in terms of funding Which is kind of Nice for me? But it's you know you write your own checks so it's kind of good Alex and I fund it and and at Alex's sister is the third funder it's truly a family business. which is you know tough in itself? Alex I try not to have worked for May AH BE WORKED FOR HIM BUT NOT EASY. You know it's not always a little complicated but I think and Somsak is now a CO founder. Okay well some sack left. He quit his old job A.. J. Crew and I became his agent. I got him other jobs. ABC's temporarily had a non compete. And then I felt I was getting a little like what am I going to do. It's hard to be an adviser as I was. I was on some boards. And you know I don't like to just advise most time. They don't get listened to so I was finding myself in a new position life. It was very tough being out the first year year and a half up saying what do I do. I kept busy like crazy but it wasn't things I was passionate was having fun with. You know like I'm on the board of war be and that's a great company. It's fun but you know it doesn't take a lot of time or outdoor voices doesn't take a lot of time time or whatever and then some sack was there And Alex was there with Alex Mill and I put them together and I figured now I can have a job which I thought there was a need in the marketplace. Everyone's calls this white space. You know made well didn't start with white space in fact It would never get funded made well if it had to start with the mission of the White Space But our mission was to very cool store that had the best genes assortment in the world for women only now they do men's And the only reason has the best genes assortment is talent in that company and Mary. The maven is our genes person. You know I call her Mary the maiden that's is not her last name it's a stage name but she But you know there's people who see it's only a matter of team so this Somsak who I admired didn't loved worked with him for fifteen years is Alex who has a business that was wholesale. Only men's only have really nice little cult following but not really going doing any place with to higher prices. I like I said I live in nineteen sixty dollars so I then said well. Let's get together I'll funded D- With Alex and that's what we did. We put a little team together. We have little office and then we start designing clothes and we had a sell. Oh Ho sale to get orders so We've been doing it together. Probably a year in two or three months now. And it's really interesting for me because because I think we're trying to dress people who It's kind of a certain vibe we have about you know clean clothes close simple nothing complicated. Nothing victim But close you're not gonNA throw away clothes that will stay in your closet and And and quality but not at the prices. I'm seeing out in the marketplace today. For the same thing kind of reminds me of my early days when we started gap up and I said I love Ralph Lauren. But it's prices are high and And that's how I feel now. I love whoever but their prices. Due to high and I shop stores. I've been shopping stores a lot in the last month. I don't shop many stores. I'm stunned at the retail prices. They're all double markup goods meaning. It's not direct their goods that the manufacturer designer cells to store this to markups ups in two prophets and then go online you can buy half the brands at Tj Maxx. Yeah so we So we just kept at one markup when I'm making a lot the money in wholesale but that was our plan but it's really nice clothes. Cool clothes I think and And we WANNA become famous for certain in categories. Were working on it now and we got a lot of good press. The biggest problem we have is no one knows who we are so we opened the store in Green Street but four people that they walk. Why is not a great location but some Nice Store Nice store and nice goods and And I wear the stuff because I love the clothes and I need a place to buy clothes. Yeah so how do you you so nobody knows who we are how you fix that. You don't have a huge company to give you a bunch marketing and advertising and now costs so much money to to a choir customers online and all that stuff how do you I can see. See it in the fashion editor circle. I went to dinner with a bunch of fashion editors after Fashion Week and one of them had on a Henley and she said Oh. Alex Mills my new favorite brand. A lot of my friends are buying it. But that's also because they are connected to the industry they'll go to a press preview and then they get into it and there will be word of mouth but how do you get that you know year or two big bump that you've gotten at these other companies with all that financial financial backing. Well you know It's a really good question and I ask it all the time of ourselves and others so I think a lot of this Big Marketing money. It just is personal opinion because I see it on companies I look at because my first year out of a J. crew sitting in venture capital office office. The amount of money spent on digital marketing is like while the percentages these companies. A lot of them. Their budgets are twenty thirty eighty percent of sales on marketing The acquisition because I still like by the way word of mouth viral and I like creative marketing and to me the creative marketing creates a lot of demand. Because it gets out there. But how do you do it. You got to be a little patient. Which I'm not but but I met like this morning at Saint Ambrose uptown I I knew a woman I see her Alex Mill? I gave them a gift card. I said please tell all your friends. So that's three people more. No I do that. I think word will get out and we're GONNA we're pushing the creative button in the company was still some time one question is how do we fix the discount culture in the US. How how does the the discount culture is it ever going to go away or do you just should it be regulated by the government? No one that but we'll never fix it's never gonNA be fixed..

Alex Alex Mill. J. Crew Alex milk Somsak Alex Mills Rand Public Company US Jay Crew ABC Mary Tj Maxx Ralph Lauren Saint Ambrose CO founder editor Henley
"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"In the market place for products that were passed good for you meeting on toxic as well as being good for sensitive skin was just for employees to set up shop at the riveter in Los Angeles the call working office is named after the World War two icon Rosie the riveter and is marketed as a space for women I couldn't find where women were talking about what skills they were sharing their journey is Amy Nelson is the founder of the riveter a former attorney her journey mirrors many here for me the world really changed when I became pregnant with my first daughter I thought that people including my colleagues and bosses really perceived me differently when I told him I was pregnant shared work spaces have exploded in popularity the riveter welcomes man but most clients are female the space offers of the core focused on community and his programs for women entrepreneurs women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put now investors infinity now founders no record or was founded in twenty seventeen and just two years it's opened ten locations on the west coast making it one of the fastest growing call working companies in the country but the riveter isn't the only female focused co working space Hera hub offers mentoring in collaboration between women and the wind has an area where kids can play my mom's work I like the energy of being around other women as for Lou her tower twenty a beauty is growing and now selling on numerous websites she says a little thin finance is just what she needed to succeed wait an addict CBS news Los Angeles CBS radio and CBS news radio dot com last well it's the beginning of a brand new year and former president Barack Obama put on a list of all of his favorite music from two thousand nineteen read that he's kept alive since he left the White House there are some very interesting names on there it's a very comprehensive list that includes several different genres and names like listen Bruce Springsteen beyond say value Rogers young thug the highwaymen and many many more mama said quote from hip hop to country to the boss here are my soul here if you're looking for something to keep you company have a long drive for help you turn up a work out there's a track or two in here that does the trick end quote the playlist also includes some songs have appeared on his summer play lists like fiance's moved around and rose alley is called how to he even put the songs all together on this Spotify playlist last FM part of our network visitors radio on Facebook I man Marie green one in fifty nine eight your roles is on the autism spectrum for them air travel can be challenging airlines are trying to help take away their fear Chris van cleave has more six year old Nathan diamond will be walking on an airplane for the first time since he was a baby he has autism so the noise and activity of an airport can be overwhelming his parents Sonya and Jonathan are taking advantage of this special delta airlines program to get kids with autism ready to fly how's it going it was a it was a little nerve racking I think for us look for him he was taken the challenge download what's going on Nathan gets to experience check it security boarding and what it's like to be on a plane this is the hardest part for him sitting down these mail away you see that's the hardest part for him when you've seen a child have a meltdown that's on the spectrum it's scary captain Eric Reese leads the tours his son has autism what's it like for you would see in St the reaction from the kids when particularly when their their eyes light up it's just amazing and that it's doing good it's making family still in power and control I want to have the same with their children that I've had with mine delta offers these programs at its Atlanta and Minneapolis Hobbes airlines including Alaska American and jet blue have similar programs around the country has seen the captaincy from the.

"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"On community and his programs for women entrepreneurs women only get two percent adventure capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put now investors and frankly not founders no record or was founded in twenty seventeen in just two years it's opened cannot locations on the west coast making it one of the fastest growing call working companies in the country but the riveter isn't the only female focused co working space Hera hub offers mentoring and collaboration between women and the wind has an area where kids can play my mom's work I like the energy of being around other women as for Lou her tower twenty a beauty is growing and now selling on numerous websites she says a little thin finance is just what she needed to succeed join Benedict CBS news Los Angeles the only radio news apps for breaking news CBS news radio hi all with Larry magnet as I was leaving Las Vegas after attending the giant C. E. S. tech show I thought about how tech is evolving like the evolution of fitness devices into full fledged health technology including the ability to flag potential problems like last year there were plenty of autonomous vehicles but now it's not just the concept there are real trials to prove the car if you can safely drive himself last year we saw a prototype of foldable phones but now Sam sung actually sells one Lenovo is about to release a folding laptop and L. G. will ship a TV set that rolls off my C. F. wrap up it is Larry's world dot com news when you go to CBS news radio I'm in marine green one in fifty nine eight your roles is on the autism spectrum for them air travel can be challenging airlines are trying to help take away their fear because frankly has more six year old Nathan diamond will be walking on an airplane for the first time since he was a baby he has autism so the noise and activity of an airport can be overwhelming his parents Sonya and Jonathan are taking advantage of this special delta airlines program to get kids with autism ready to fly how's it going it was a it was a little nerve racking I think for us look for him he was taken the challenge download what's going on Nathan gets to experience check it security boarding and what it's like to be on a plane this is the hardest part for him sitting down these mail away see that's the hardest part for him when you've seen a child have a meltdown is on the spectrum it's scary captain Eric Reese leads the tours his son has autism what's it like for you will see in say the reaction from the kids when particularly when their their eyes light up it's just amazing and that it's doing good and it's making families feel empowered incompetent comical I want to have the same as with their children that I've had with mine delta offers these programs at its Atlanta and Minneapolis Hobbes airlines including Alaska American and jet blue have similar programs around the country has seen the captaincy from the looks of Nathan in the cockpit just about ready for take off Cleve CBS Atlanta yes news on the hour I'm but Michigan this weekend's deadly and dangerous weather across the south has claimed three more lives it happened in Pickens county Alabama the Alabama emergency management agency says the.

"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:02 min | 11 months ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Office is named after the World War two icon Rosie the riveter and is marketed as a space for women I couldn't find where women were talking about what skills they were sharing their journey is Amy Nelson is the founder of the riveter a former attorney her journey mirrors many here for me the world really changed when I became pregnant with my first daughter I thought that people at the my colleagues in Boston's really perceived me differently when I told him I was pregnant share of work spaces have exploded in popularity the riveter welcomes men but most clients are female the space offers of the core focused on community and his programs for women entrepreneurs the women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put now investors infinity now founders no record or was founded in twenty seventeen in just two years it's opened cannot locations on the west coast making it one of the fastest growing call working companies in the country but the riveter isn't the only female focused co working space Hera hub offers mentoring and collaboration between women and the wind has an area where kids can play my mom's work I like the energy of being around other women as for Lou her tower twenty a beauty is growing and now selling on numerous websites she says a little film finance is just what she needed to succeed join Benedict CBS news Los Angeles when you need to know turn to CBS news radio to get to the world the sound bite and I'm Jenn got a passport if not they'll get one and then had to everything the world has to offer with visa missed a possible it's not a simple document every country has its own rules and requirements for the visitor visas and it's up to you should know exactly what's expected before you get off the plane the Islamist gives you accurate up to date these are information to every country.

riveter Amy Nelson founder Boston Lou Los Angeles Jenn attorney Benedict CBS CBS
"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Gonna fit next traffic reported three fifty five I'm Tim green wood with more traffic reports more often can extend seventy newsradio we will continue to cool down as we head into the afternoon but we are bracing for two more big Santa Ana wind events the first one should be making its way here to southern California by later tonight and then the second one by the middle of the week highs today eighty eight for LA in Orange County metro ninety two for the valleys eighty four for the coast sixties for the mountains eighty seven today for the desert seventy five for the Inland Empire red flag warning goes into effect later this morning and then staying with us through Monday as those Santa Ana winds start to really develop not only will it dry out the atmosphere but we're looking at temperatures staying a little bit cooler than normal that means roughly in the mid to low seventies starting Monday and then we stay in the seventies through the end of the week southern California's most accurate dependable forecasts of CVS to what we've urologist amber Lee for KNX ten seventy newsradio sixty three in San Clemente sixty six of like force at three forty eight the company we work perhaps the best known example of entrepreneurs creating nontraditional work spaces some women have the same idea more and more shared work spaces are targeting women and successfully the riveter is the name of one company that targets women like Amy loose CEO and founder of tower twenty a beauty it was just what she was looking for I like the energy of being around other women reviewer founder Aimee Nelson says the company welcomes men but focuses on women women only get two percent a venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put Maryland asters infinity now founders other women focused work spaces include Hera hub which promotes collaboration and mentoring of women.

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Report at one fifty five I'm Tim green wood with more traffic reports more often Kagan extend seventy newsradio good morning and happy Sunday we had a break from the wind as that on shore push started to allow things to cool down yesterday but as we head into this afternoon temperatures remain cooler than the end of the week however were waiting for this next Santa Ana wind event to really pick up as we head into the latter part of the afternoon and also into the early part of the evening this next system will be a colder system but it will generate from some very gusty winds and drop the humidity levels back down to five to ten percent so red flag warning starts today and staying with us through Monday this is the first of two Santana when events and they were looking at a second St into an event making its way closer to us here in southern California by the middle of the week southern California's most accurate dependable four Qassam CBS to what we've urologist Amberley from KNX ten seventy newsradio sixty seven in Lake Forest sixty four single many it's one forty seven the company we work perhaps the best known example of entrepreneurs creating nontraditional work spaces and some women have the same idea more and more shared work spaces are targeting women and successfully the riveter is the name of one company that targets women like Amy Liu C. E. O. and founder of tower twenty a beauty it was just what she was looking for I like the energy of being around other women the riveter founder Aimee Nelson says that the company welcomes men but focuses on women women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put Maryland asters infinity now founders other women focused work spaces include Hera hub which promotes collaboration and mentoring of women.

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Around other women the riveter founder Aimee Nelson says that the company welcomes men but focuses on women women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put Maryland asters infinity now founders other women focused work spaces include Hera hub which promotes collaboration and mentoring of women and the week which has an area where kids can play while their mothers work Facebook is committing a billion dollars to help with California's affordable housing crisis the goal is to create of twenty thousand new homes to help teachers nurses and first responders live closer to the communities where they work governor Gavin Newsom says the company is taking the initiative when the state needs they didn't have to do this they did the right thing I applaud that investment other companies I anticipate will be doing similar investments in this is very encouraging according to Newsome the state has already identified parcels that they can use for housing projects Facebook's announcement comes months after Google made a pledge to bill twenty thousand homes in the bay area hello Kelly supervisors plan to put millions of dollars from a legal settlement to use to remove lead based paint from thousands of home the county is receiving about one hundred thirty four million dollars as a result of the settlement with several paint manufacturers the board voted to authorize the public health department to implement a lead paint hazard mitigation program with a focus on certain regions where there's a lot of housing that is built before nineteen fifty one where there's a high prevalence of low income families and a significant population of children under the age of six that's public health director Dr barber for rare the program will also include education and outreach with plans to offer job opportunities related to the program to those experiencing homelessness supervisor Katherine Barker one of the barriers to employment is the fact that they have been homeless so we need to provide them with an opportunity to get back on their feet over the next eight years it's anticipated that lead paint hazards will be mitigated in approximately four to five thousand homes around the county with the hope of starting to enroll households at the beginning of twenty twenty in downtown LA Margaret Carrero KNX ten seventy eight news radio to horseback riders were hurt the horses they were riding killed hit by a vehicle in lake view terrace after the collision on foothill Boulevard the driver ran away but LAPD caught up with him Saturday morning he's been identified as Rolando Garcia and is being held on fifty thousand dollars bail its one fifty five PM on this year's railroads slump is getting worse as a slowdown in manufacturing threatens to herd the larger US economy been hard for it is an analyst with Robert W. Baird in company third quarter rail car world they were down a little over four percent relative to a year ago and that rate of decline had worsened from the second quarter shipments are down for autos cold rain chemicals in consumer goods crude oil was the only bright spot the rail downturn underscores the damage from the US China trade war which is making shippers more cautious and hurting freight the uncertainty around trade in trade policy is playing a roll one railroad slump doesn't necessarily mean the economy at large is headed into a recession Hartford says it can't be ignored I can this point in time is one of the manufacturing or industrial related weakness that we think globally and certainly has become I had one here in the US during twenty nineteen whether that believes over into the retail consumer sector we check your money at twenty and fifty after each hour I'm Bloomberg's ed Corey for KNX ten seventy newsradio for breaking news push alerts plus podcast like mo take on money and KNX.

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Like the energy of being around other women riveter founder Aimee Nelson says a company welcomes men but focuses on women women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put Maryland asters infinity now founders other women focused work spaces include Hannah hub which promotes collaboration and mentoring of women and the wing which has an area where kids can play while their mothers work mark Austin Thomas can extend seventy newsradio Facebook is committing a billion dollars to help with California's affordable housing crisis the goal was to create up to twenty thousand new homes help teachers nurses and first responders live closer to the communities where they work California governor Gavin Newsom says company is taking the initiative when the state needs they didn't have to do this they did the right thing I applaud that investment other companies I anticipate will be doing similar investments in this is very encouraging according to some the stands already identified parcels that they can use for the housing projects Facebook's announcement comes months after Google made a pledge to build twenty thousand homes in the bay area essential Scott is one millions of dollars in legal settlement with paint manufactures the Los Angeles County Board of supervisors plans to use the money to fund the lead based a cleanup effort the program will prioritize homes built before nineteen fifty one in low income areas with a large number of children under the age of six supervisor mark Ridley Thomas home should make you sick according to Ellie county public health almost three thousand children are diagnosed with lead poisoning county wide each year which is why households where kids have elevated blood lead levels will also be a priority it's anticipated that lead paint hazards will be mitigated in four to five thousand homes over the next eight years public health director Dr barber Ferrer this is going to be the biggest or mediation effort this county is ever see right now the board also approved a plan to hire homeless people for up to fifteen percent of jobs related to the program the hope is to begin in rolling households in early twenty twenty in downtown LA Margaret Carrero can extend seventy news radio two horses killed the riders injured when they were hit by a vehicle and like to terrace on Friday night driver bailed ran away he was arrested Saturday morning at about nine thirty on foothill Boulevard LAPD says longer season custody held on fifty grand bail to one fifty.

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Report at eleven fifty five I'm Tim green wood with more traffic reports more often okay next ten seventy newsradio colder weather today thanks to a low pressure system to the north of us in the on shore wind but we are gearing up for two more a scene and a wind events as we head into the rest of the week so the first is them should be working its way to us here in southern California by the time we head into Sunday afternoon and then this really strong winds returning Sunday night into Monday where we have a red flag warning that goes into play tomorrow morning and then those temperatures will stay a little bit cooler than normal from Monday on through the end of the week but tomorrow we're looking at highs in the upper eighties for LA in Orange County metro ninety two for the valleys eighty four for the coast sixties for the mountains eighty seven for the desert and seventy five for the Inland Empire southern California's most accurate dependable forecasts and CVS to what meteorologists Amberley for KNX ten seventy newsradio sixty seven in Chatsworth in Anaheim it's sixty six sixty five in Santa Monica a Long Beach slow warmer at sixty nine degrees eleven forty seven the company we work is perhaps the best known example of entrepreneurs creating nontraditional work space some women have the same idea more and more shared work spaces are targeting women and successfully the river is the name of one company that targets women like Amy Liu C. E. O. and founder of tower twenty a beauty it was just what she was looking for I like the energy of being around other women riveter founder Aimee Nelson says a company welcomes men but focuses on women women only get two percent of venture capital funding so we have things like venture capital office hours where we put Maryland asters infinity now founders other women focused work spaces include Hannah hub which promotes collaboration and mentoring of women and.

"venture capital office" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

"Scott lincoln south winds and fails okay so my win is vip owes of the real real an revolve yeah revolver a how many why it's nice see well it's nice to see a couple ecommerce companies punching through the real real is is a fantastic example of organic intelligence and that is using highly trained individuals it or i don't know if they're well pay but i think they're adequately pay they come into your house assessor you're closet and it's a luxury positioning in this there's a theme in ecommerce that's working whether it's cheerleaders and lando it's going after the brands that don't want using amazon distribution so the real real is this essentially incredible company that takes advantage management other trend in that is monetize ing fallow assets carter utilized only four percent of the time so movers stepped into that void era bnb stepped into the void of apartments monetize ing then when you're not there in real real is figured out a way to monetize they're probably hundreds of billions of dollars dollars of knowledge is closed but high and so it's interesting 'cause i i posted a the email julie wainwright who i've known since she covered real dot com i think i knew at berkeley systems she's been through a lot of failed coming through the berkeley system and then real dot com which i love watching company which had the right idea at the wrong time and then obviously pets dot com which had the right idea at the wrong time and she you know she took that public was a big mess and then she kind of was on the outs and i remember seeing her right after she was quite like oh what a mess and then came up with this idea and sent me an email about it in two thousand eleven and i thought it was a brilliant idea at the time you know you know how many clothes everywhere but she's really they really take it at this idea and and you're right fallow things even more so besides reusing these these beautiful clothing this is often very high level jewelry clothing is i just with a bunch of money on women and they all rent they're closed now especially the nice ones but all of them and they're very getting into the idea of renting their client like ticket for five out pretending it's rent the runway has this new young where you could pay for it i think that's fascinating renting of everything pretty much yeah it is it's overcoming this the traditional kind of used to be sort of her bodmer out of fat in the notion of wearing someone else's closed so people are getting over that and and you got about sixty percent i think or maybe it's a little more if you take store credit the stock pops forty percent on the first day and also thank you for bringing up julie because i think there's a lesson here and that is if you have a failure like pets dot com it's pretty easily get stuck in never recover from an she kind of success is really a result you know you're perseverance sylvia failure or the other way you're resilience and clearly this woman individual has a lot of resilience because she must have been laughed out of a lot of venture capital offices high showing up and saying hi i'm the former ceo of pets dot com so good for her because that that it's an incredible company revolve the other one doesn't really answering job would private label at.

Scott lincoln forty percent sixty percent four percent
"venture capital office" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Tracy Taylor. In focus. Oh, get to that. Gym class story teaching oppression in just a bit at first is you're actually method for putting up kids who have a good path to success. Joining us live is Esther, which isky known as the godmother of godmother Silicon Valley. She's the author of a book called how to raise successful people. Incidentally, she also taught this cat named Steve Jobs, and she's a nationally renowned professor of journalism. She's a mother of to the CEO of YouTube, and Twenty-three me and she'll be speaking at townhall Seattle tonight, seven thirty. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much. I'm honored to be here. Ursula was just chatting Esther up and she's like my son is graduating. This is what I always say lead with compassion. So don't worry. We were having a big discussions about that. But Esther I think we want to start with how do you define success success means that you feel empowered to do pretty much anything that you want to do in life, that somehow makes the world, a better place? So. But it doesn't okay. Some people say, maybe they don't wanna make the world a better place. But if you think about all these companies out here, they all make our world better place, really. Well, most of them, do you know the ones the garbage. Right. Even like Amazon Amazon territory here. Like I just want to say too much, but shop on, I shop every day, the change my life. I don't have to go to the store anymore, right? I'm with you. I totally understand that one thing, you do mention in your book, her book is how to raise successful, people parental anxiety. I am apparent nine five year old at home. I've two of these things explained parental anxiety. The parents are always worried that they're not doing the right thing because the word that their kid is going to not be able to not on this perfect path to success, and so they check the internet. And they're like, Ooh, I see something else over here. I see something else over there. So now you have access to so much information, and then you can see what's going. On your neighbor's house and so forth. And you're like you're comparing your kid all the time, and this nonstop comparison, guess what it does to the parents makes you anxious so you need to stop doing that. Your kid is going to be just fine. She's looking right at me. Telling me doing I can feel the relief. Stop. So let me ask you this, because you're nicknamed, the godmother of Silicon Valley, I this weird experience growing up where I just got thrust into salt on valley. So a lot of hard luck a lot of hard work lot of luck. But I noticed this difference that, that kids raised in that area. I think they, they grow up with boundless nece. I mean, you've got a particle collider up the street from you outside of a side of the venture capital offices. You see that you see this boundless nece some folks, grow up, like I did in a small town. And I think it put a cap on my thinking as to what I could do. Do you think that there's a way to lift the sort of self capped idea of success or the or to create a boundless idea of what one can do? In other words, you don't have to be from Silicon Valley to go out and be really successful tight. You don't as matter of fact, you can see all kinds of people that are doing things and they're not from Silicon Valley. So we have the advantage of what is called a member of the internet. And so we all social media. Is everywhere. Everybody sees what everybody else is doing so kids need to know that whether they come from a small town in Iowa. They come from a big town near San Francisco. The opportunities are open to them, but the problem with most today is that they think that the way to be successful is to follow all the rules. And the reason they think that is because what a school teaching us to do. Follow all the rules. The most successful kids are the ones that follow all the rules and okay. Well, I think we should follow some of the rules, right? It's always important to have some, you know, organization is but how about one hundred percent of the time for twelve years. All you're doing is following the rules there has to be an opportunity for kids to think independently do things that they want to do, which is why I'm creating this twenty percent time twenty percent of the time in the school day, not after school. The school day should be devoted to projects that kids think up that they want to work on together with their friends. It empowers them gives them an opportunity. City of being creative critical thinking collaborative and communication now wasn't enforced. Sees you one thing that you say in your book trick. T R, I C K trust respect independence, collaboration and kindness. And he just mentioned collaboration in this last to really stood out to me. Start with collaboration when it comes to parenting, would you mean by that was it looked like just for example? What are we doing this weekend? Well, let's say who normally makes the decision me. Yeah. You totally, well how about asking your kid to have some input. What would you like to do this weekend? As a matter of fact, here's a good way to use the internet. Why don't you go online and see what kinds of activities or available in our town that you might be interested in doing and let's talk about it. You and me and whoever else in the family, we can talk about, like, what do we want to do together this weekend? We never do that with our kids. Do we tell them where they're going right? Okay. Because on the schedule keeper, so I know where everyone else has to be. Here's our whole. Well, maybe, right. But isn't that the way most run run the house, like, hey, this is the whole we have to fill its four hours? All right. We can do this. We could do this. We could do this. And then that's kind of the way that you fill in the holes of the weekend. That's right. But maybe they can come up with ideas, maybe they're give them an opportunity to do that, once just try at one time estrogen the weekend off. Did you hear that? Don't do anything. That's right. You know, back in the old days. Let me tell you what the kids did on the weekend. You know. And it was nothing structured play in the woods. That's, that's this is another thing s for, which is he's with us. She's at Seattle's townhall tonight, seven thirty. We can make you can get tickets with it on the social channel. You mentioned rule-breakers. I believe Steve Jobs as a rule breaker showed up to what the job interviews with no shoes. So there's a rubric impartial. This is also a risk taking quotient, isn't there isn't part of unstructured play kids, having time to take risks calculated risk, and to learn sort of their boundaries of comforting to go pass that, yes, they want to take risks, you want to have them take risks all the kids are afraid of taking a risk today. It's really sad. You know, the comes clo-, and I mean, they're in the tenth grade, and they're afraid to take risk, why because of trained that way. There's all these penalties for risk-taking and the penalties have got to stop. It's ridiculous. You know, all this risk taking its creativity, and so we're educating creativity out of the kids, because there are so fearful of getting a bad grade. You know, parents are worried because their kid gets an a minus what am I know? Really? Yeah. Who got the eight they say one of my favorite examples from this week at teacher had posted this online, and it was, you know, write a synopsis of a movie that you really enjoyed and explain the characters and why the plot was so monumental. And what she had written was first rule fight club is you don't talk about fight club and the teacher was like a plus you did it. That was it. That was all I needed a plus and that's a risk. That is a risk, but it was great because that's exactly what the assignment was. And she didn't in what nine words it was perfect. Yes. Need to give kids an opportunity to do things like that, constantly giving them an opportunity to think about what they wanna do themselves. So one of the assignments I was doing beginning journalism, and I can tell you this is a really popular assignment pick apps on the computer or on your phone, and then you get to write an apper view, which one is the best and why and publish it. Everybody wants to do it. They wanted to as matter of fact, can we do another view another review or how about a game review? Oh, yeah. We'll do game reviews. Oh food reviews. Oh, yeah. We're going to do that, too. I'm telling you, you want to give them things that relate to their lives. What's my hidden agenda there? Can you? Right. Yeah, it is. So the shuttle, townhall tonight, just going to be speaking, there, she's godmother a Silicon Valley, you can learn about our book. We'll, we'll tweet out the way to get tickets esters to a heavy on. Thank you for all you're doing. Thank you. Appreciate being here. We'll come back as gym class now teaching oppression with a certain activity. I took a quick poll of young people. I know the results are split, but the feelings are passionate. We'll get to that. We'll get now a traffic.

Silicon Valley Esther Steve Jobs Seattle Amazon Tracy Taylor YouTube professor of journalism CEO Ursula San Francisco Iowa twenty percent one hundred percent nine five year twelve years four hours
"venture capital office" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"venture capital office" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"If you look around horizontally you look at your peers you can put your resources together and that's what we did with technology mafia were like we're going to we're going to there was nothing revolutionary about as literally an email a serve or like we are going to share resources we are going to share salary information we are going to share information about jobs we have a men's auxiliary they plan our picnic every year and then they give salary advice like what do i need a dude for in tech i was told me how much money you make i'm not trying to figure out how much these other ladies are just being just as underpaid as me you know and and i think that for for all of its success it's actually very simple it's like if you don't accept the mentality of scar city and you don't accept when you are marginalized person or a minority that anybody who looks like you in the workplace as your competition and this is highlander can only be one of you you're actually going to get very far because i'm like this these are messages that capitalism and patriarchy until you over and over again there's only room for one of you you're supposed to like compete with each other and while you're competing for the scraps other people are like building wealth they're building the future they're doing amazing things and if you just look around and just say like actually if we hunt in a pack we are stronger which i think so true for women you will get to where you're trying to get to so much faster can you share some of your early guerrilla promotion tactics and how you grew tech lady mafia early on my favorite one that we does we we have these cards but sad joined the mafia and we would leave them in in the bathroom the women's bathrooms at tech onference as and like tech offices and venture capital offices and nothing made me happier than when somebody gave me one they were like you have to join most group and i was like yes thank you so a lot of our recruiting honestly was like that informally also everybody in the group is referred by somebody so everybody knows someone because we're very much like if there are other women in your office whether other women in your lives or you go to conference and there's only to review like find that person and bring them into the fold talk about the bragg section of tech lady mafia we ask people to tell us what they're working on what they're proud of i think a lot of women are really conditioned to be meek about their work and to even the word brag ding has such a negative connotation and the truth is if you actually look at a lot of studies about this when men get together they talk about work constantly i'm like this is why they're always just like they know where all the jobs are or whatever is and when women get together which was like how can i help you how can i how like how can i tend to you and i think that we were deeply conditioned to feel shame about success around work and let me think that is i think that it's a lot of things it's that bragging bragging his bad and also you're not supposed to take credit for your work i think that that's a thing that a lot of women struggle with.