28 Burst results for "Vc Firm"

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"But saying the shift awesome mindsets in what is of value in it. And what is good for Stakeholders and not just shareholders. And do think it is a mindset shift to be thinking of helping communities of color and certainly not neglecting them and we've seen a lot of both that in this country but investing i ingenuity skin color investing to be able to create wells to grow wells and to grow wealth as you said for everyone to build that ecosystem also for people who are listening who've read about this Defined how did they get involved whether they can get involved as investors earth. They just say man. I want to know more about racial equity. Investing are wanted. I support this movement. But can they be doing. How did they educate themselves mass lily. Your education is is key. I would say the easiest way to sort of Or even jump into the deep end is to just start with where you are. What is your position today. In terms of influence in terms of power in terms of decision making in. Are there things that you can change as it relates to increasing representation increasing sort of who is in the room and you know who has voice around the issues that are important to you or your organization and then from there also taking a look at what has already been done. Oftentimes we talk about what's next and what's new. And these are issues that have been around for for years and years in decades and so thinking through also how do you collaborate or partner with organizations and entities. That have already been charting up half for some time now. I mean even with with our fund. We joke call it the the new old fund because it's new in some ways that people are just starting to really hear about us but it's old in some ways because to your point this has been five to six years in the making right on and so these these thoughts and ideas aren't necessarily fresh or novel but the ability to act on them into to also activate others beyond what are reached could could even touch because of limited resources the infrastructure that is new and so what i'd love for people to walk away with is filling empowered in feeling they had agency to actually do something within their wheelhouse around racial equity. And that's gonna play out in mean different things for different people and if you wanna join him with what we're doing specifically i would encourage you to reach out directly tests. Great though well thank you..

five six years today earth both
"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Impact in that you and your colleagues at the impact narco fund have ties to these communities in a youth portrayed world i think and we've heard often about we're venture capitalist very much a game about relationships who do you know. How do you connects. Do i have confidence in this. In this entrepreneur. I think i can work with the entrepreneur I understanding the entrepreneurs vision. And so i'm wondering. I imagine listeners thinking this is fantastic. I love with this fund is doing so glad they exist. Jeez only venture capital funds of of color can make this kind of difference you know and then thinking through the implications do we have to have funds for for every different group every different communities. We already have having to think about these questions. I'm sure i'm not. The first person did to to raise the question with the goal isn't to you to start to create a niche ray on that then create silos that because we already have that and what we need is is is more expanded. Networks that overlap and intersect in various interesting ways. Because again you know. We're really starting at this. This idea of this system that we currently operate in the system that you know has racist tendencies if you wanna be honest about it has also created these inefficiencies in every aspect of our life including markets and if we can figure out how to deploy capital and reshape venture capital in a way that addresses that that notion. Then i think we're all more well off and part of it also means that we have to some of us because again we're not looking at this as impact. America funding the end. All be off for solving racial equity but within venture capital specifically. We believe that our fund is set up to start at the start at the outside. Start with the outliers. That people aren't looking at because we understand the these folks these opportunities and by helping the entrepreneurs be able to grow in a thoughtful way in a way that shows that they can be.

first person America
"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

05:22 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Institutions. There would have been roles for you in larger institutions by the path of your own an urban of your own rifles out. Yeah and it's it's it's so funny acts there's actually a case study of business case. Study there that acts is very question of our fund. Should we continue to be independent or should we go in house and it's always been every year whereas students in college look at. This would say they need to remain independent right and this is something that we've always believed because again to your point coming from the traditional coming from corporate america. We saw the status quo. 'was me working in a large soda. Bulge bracket financial institution saying how money flow but not seeing directly trickled. Down to i'm community trickle. Down to smb's and trickle down to enterprise and initiative that were Sort of at the core of what. A lotta these communities need it. I felt that there needed to be another way outside of that system to be able to get at the heart of of what was lacking and it was a ripe opportunity for us to combine our privilege to be quite. Frank had the privilege of working in corporate. We had the privilege of having these personal networks that we built out. We had the privilege of understanding business. And having that acumen we could speak the language and also translate. What we knew was happening at the ground level and being able to articulate in a way that i'm framed it as a real business opportunity and so we knew that in order to get that done it had to happen outside of again the traditional and yeah it was a very hard road but i think looking back even if we hadn't raised a fun to ride and even if we weren't able to attract the dollars that we're attracting today i think it still would have been worth it right because again. This is a long-term mission where it's not just about our fund in what we can do but it's about being a model for others who are not only existing with us today but our futures to come in. So that's what. I hope you know at love. Our companies to continue to exit. We already have to continue to thrive continue to employ folks and continue to make a difference..

Frank today america
"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:39 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"How did you get to this place of success in this significant fundraise. Yeah absolutely yet. Twenty twenty was a year of all years in many ways and one of that was for us. You know a tremendous milestone reaching fifty five million on a u. m. Fun to in for kisha i think it was an incredible milestone to be able to look back on through where she started in where we all began. I'm trying to prove this out. Through demonstration portfolio that entrepreneurs of color on actually can scale businesses. That can be high growth and also be impactful to their communities. And so you know when. I think about where we begin. There wasn't this language around racial equity investing in social justice investing. But there was this notion about the need to have a racial lands applied to investing and to think through what it means to be more equitable around how capital is allocated in how it flows. I started with the fund About six months after it launched where she had this species around. Let's take what we know from. The demonstration portfolio investing in minority entrepreneurs and. Let's use it to to really sharpen you know our lands around what it means to scale these up leveraging technology if you have software intact literally eating in the world and you know that the future of business is means that companies will have to be tech enabled or tech as core. How do you start to construct Ways of going about investing and betting on these early founders that reflects which you believe is going to be that longer term vision of the future and so impact. America fund was born through that you know we took our own experiences of being system navigators to be able to be thoughtful around like who where investing in as well as what it needs to to think about. What's good for community And you know it literally was one relationship at a time really. Educating folks really beating the pavement and then having early movers which were our initial a limited partner base or investors that took a real chance on us and so getting the funds to really required us to not only Experiment in test this thesis that we had but to also been figure out how do we create an actual system in process in. How does that grow. Beyond just our portfolio to the broader acres ecosystem whether it's co working spaces or data scientists than analysts that are actually reporting and tracking these numbers. Or its other coinvestors right. Who actually want to invest alongside us in these companies and even in entrepreneurs who finally have the language in also understand you know the overall value round inherent impact who not only wanna build as an organization that is high growth for the sake of that but really are saying how can this be purposeful endeavour endeavor that is beyond just the financial bottom line. How can it be something that is is also again getting back to the heart of the matter getting back to where i come from in my community and solving for real issues that again is incredibly significant and transformation in all four. The people community.

fifty five million one Twenty twenty About six months after one relationship America four
"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:31 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Helen audio soon actually Recently featured as i'm a fortune forty under forty to look out for on intact and what she's built is platform that provides a way for these small agencies to stay up to date on compliance standards. That by the way you know are different. Depending on what state you're agency is in but it also ties directly to how the workers in these agencies which are these low income caregivers are trained right and so that inherent on know tying of sort of what these agencies are small businesses need with how that shows up in quality of training and skill development for the workers is something that we see as inherent impact in the company and so as she's able to scale up bring on more of these agencies have combined issue but then able to tie that to better standards around training and upscaling workers on. We're seeing a huge opportunity for her but we're also seeing how she's on half to be able to train a million caregivers in a labor market where sixty percent of those workers are. Actually i'm low income women of color. It's great example. Thank you i. I'm intrigued what. You said about founders. Who come from these communities. Founders of color founders. Who knows this market that they want to serve. And i'm wondering about the analog for you and your team at impacts america so is it important that you have a connection to these marginalized communities that you have a relationship with these founders and this add something distinctive and difficult four many venture capital funds to attempt. Yeah me like every funds has their own play and their on approach right. Thumb will will invest in a small group of companies and go really deep and be very hands on on. it can depend on stage as well. I'm usually earlier. That more that is required on others will sort of invest in a ton of companies right and see which ones emerge as winners think for us. We're really looking at carefully crafting. That again reflects our thesis but also allows us to be able to work. Together with our founders. We think that in order to succeed in really prove this out it has to be a collaborative effort. It can't just be a check in so we think about our value. Add around supporting them through the different chasms of growth on how to navigate in terms of finding financing. That is not just dollars dollar steak but is money that is suitable for where they are and what they're attempting to do. And i think you know for for us as a fine. If you look at our team you know. This is the impact. America funds story is really a story told from inside the circle. And what i mean by that is they're people Myself my colleagues kisha. Who is the general partner and founder of the organization who have lived experience and many of these areas and so taking that lived experience and looking at it through an end a lens around You know what does the future of venture capital needs to look like a wet should look like when we're talking about on vive inequities that communes of color face and that's really something that has resonated with a lot of founders and we find it to be the best way for us to defy on companies that really reflects our mission but are also committed to that sort of long road and long journey of really proving that out not just around profitability and competitiveness. But really around what it means to transform communities with thoughtful and conscious business leadership and the impact. America fund is You know his gained notoriety for a variety of reasons. But i know that you've recently closed. Fifty five million dollar fund raise making this the largest fundraise or one of the largest By a black female general partner though. How has that happened. How has how have you all achieve this in an industry that is an hour the venture capital community that so dominated by by white men..

sixty percent Helen Fifty five million dollar fortune america one half a million venture capital funds forty under forty companies America
"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:46 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Welcome two dollars and change. I'm katherine klein. I'm the vice dean for social impact award in school. And i'm delighted to be talking today with stepney. Thomas who is the head of investments at the impact america fund that. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me fantastic to be here with you today. Stephanie always happy to welcome worden alumni and at eager to hear about the impact america fund. So let's start off with. Tell us about the impact. America fund when it is what it does and while you're excited about this work yeah absolutely style Impact america fund. We are set up as a traditional venture capital fund. I like to call us a boutique. Fine because we're small but mighty with a real focus on impact as it relates to communities of color and so we think about in terms of our work is. How do we deploy capital to budding entrepreneurs that are exceptional business. Savvy. they're innovative. I'm looking to disrupt markets. That are pretty sizable as well and to to grow fast and to grow large but in doing that really being thoughtful intentional about scaling up impact to communities that we care about these particularly being low to moderate income communities of color and in terms of that impact thinking about what does it mean in terms of economic agency and economic opportunity. Let's dig in a little bit more into what you mean by impact and when you see a company you know you've i know many of the companies you invested in our led by founders of color So that might be a starting point as you think about impacts and a company that has the kind of impact you want. What are you looking for. How do you know that Is it enough to be a founder colors found collar plus at how do you think about it. So in terms of impact we actually start with the end in mind right. We look at the long game. In terms of the outcomes we wanna see for again communities of color typically low income groups in the us and then from there. We're really teasing out. Whether not that business model if it can be successful at scale can really sort of manifest realize those outcomes. Those outcomes could be a maryetta spectrum as relates to sort of how someone shows up in the economy whether it's a consumer looking to access affordable goods and services. Or you're a vendor that's part of a larger sort of supply chain or you're a worker in an organization or even an owner right That is at the helm of a budding and growing business and so thinking through that spectrum. We want people have agency and so we think about. How does this business at the end of the day Needle that that that thread around Being able to be profitable in competitive in their market but also being able to show that if we exist it it means better for community. Let's talk about some of the portfolio companies that you all have invested in to give us some examples of these companies look like that have this growth potential and are making a difference in marginalized communities. Yeah absolutely we believe that capital in itself you know needs to to start shifting towards being very community centric. i'm thinking about marginalized populations thinking about folks who been overlooked and undervalued. And you know that that also plays into how we look at founders who are leading these companies driving innovation that impact and so organically. Because we're focused on these community outcomes which you'll find. Is that the entrepreneur that sort of rise to the top that we believe end up being the best suited to solve..

katherine klein Stephanie Thomas stepney two dollars today America fund impact america fund Impact america fund Needle
"vc firm" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:57 min | 2 months ago

"vc firm" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Into that direction. Just because of the forces of you know the economy and of what of what people wanted and what investors wanted you to do. And What you thought was gonna work? E mean, Not only was it not a lot of the values that just wasn't gonna succeed like it was just not that different or interesting of a product and So yet on both fronts, I was frustrated, and I remember who's around Thanksgiving that year is around 2015. I was headed home for Thanksgiving is about to fly back home to Kentucky and I have lunch right before I left with Katie Hunt. Who is our chief brand officer, and she and I sat down and I was just like Katie, like I just want to tear this whole thing down. Start over like I think I'm just like done. And she looked at me and she was just like what's stopping you and I pause and I obviously nothing is stopping me What is stopping me? Okay, So what? When you did go ahead and can do the relaunch of hinge in 2016 head. How did it get like how was received? Well, I mean, it was not a breakout success like when we did the reelection 2013. We got off to a rocky start, but the numbers started to look really interesting and really promising And so My first instinct was obviously to like, keep this thing going and to raise money. So I was back out in the fundraising game flying all over the country, talking toe, every VC and now I could get in the door of anywhere, right? I mean, any VC firm would at least take my meeting. Yeah, but no one would give me money. Wow. And I had this like one investor that was really holding out for And I remember the partner of the VC firm called me and she was like, you know. We've never seen.

Katie Hunt Kentucky 2016 Katie both fronts Thanksgiving one investor first instinct 2015 reelection 2013
30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

Cyber Security Headlines

02:55 min | 3 months ago

30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

"Silver sparrow. Malware found on thirty thousand. Max has security pros stumped. Researchers have yet to observe delivery of any payload from new malware dubbed silver sparrow. Leaving its purpose still unknown. This suggests that it may spring into action once a certain condition is met. Silver comes with a mechanism to completely remove itself. A capability typically reserved for high stealth operations and it runs natively on the new. M one chip. It also uses the mac. os installer javascript. Api execute commands. Which makes it difficult to analyze found in one hundred and fifty three countries with concentrations in the us the uk. Canada france and germany researchers are watching carefully for further developments. Solar winds hackers stole source. Code from microsoft azure exchange and into microsoft on thursday said it concluded its probe into the solar winds hack finding that. The attackers stole some source code but confirmed. There's no evidence that they abused. Its internal systems to target other companies or gain access to production services or customer data it said cases involved downloading component source code related to a small subset of as you're into nine exchange components and that the entire attack is a quote moment of reckoning and furthering the need to proactively embrace a zero. Trust mentality new hack. Let's attackers bypass mastercard pin by using it as a visa card research published by academics from e. t. h. zurich building on an earlier pin bypass attack study shows how to leverage victims stolen or lost a visa. Emv enabled credit card without knowledge of the pin uneven fool the terminal into accepting inauthentic offline card transactions the attack dubbed card brand mix up takes advantage of the fact a contact lists point of sale terminal does not properly authenticated cards application. Id to the payment terminal making it possible to deceive the terminal and simultaneously perform a visa and mastercard transaction with the one card in response. Mastercard has already rolled out. Contra measures sequoia capital one of silicon valley's most notable. Vc firms told investors it has been hacked. Sequoia capital told its investors on friday that some personal and financial information may have access by a third party after one of its employees fell victim to a successful phishing attack although it has not yet seen any evidence of compromised information being traded or exploited on the dark web the company did not provide a date for the attack describing it only as quote recent and quote sequoia capital has more than thirty eight billion dollars in assets under management and in the past has invested in airbnb door dash twenty three and me fire i and carbon black it does not appear that the hack was connected in any way to solar winds

Mastercard Microsoft Sequoia Capital MAX Germany France Zurich Canada UK Vc Firms United States Contra Silicon Valley
How Jessica Lessin got people to pay for The Information

Recode Media

07:18 min | 4 months ago

How Jessica Lessin got people to pay for The Information

"I wanna start off by talking about something you right you have. Yuba weekly column comes on saturday. It's one of my favorite reads I recommend it to everyone and either this week or the last week you had big tech and media making up your argument was that. They'd been at loggerheads for a while. And now things seem to be have patched patched up but since then rupert murdoch has come out with a screed yelling about social media His new york post ran a screed from josh hawley complaining. That he was being censored by by big tech and social media. andriessen horowitz. One of the premier maybe the most powerful of vc firm in the valley announced that they are going to start their own publication which is quite clearly an end run around publications like yours. And the one. I work for so. Do we still think that big tech and media. I made i mean. I don't think so what i was reading about in that piece was i think a sort of detente between basically the big tech platforms and big publications. Like the new york times like the wall street journal that have for years in. You've been leading the documentation of this wanted more money for their content from the tech platforms. And i think it's notable that in many cases the tech companies are paying out those sums. You know facebook has new news tabs that is significant enough to the new york times that they mentioned it in their earnings report says contributing to revenues so rupert murdoch's company held a big event with face work announcing announcing the payments. That mark zuckerberg was going to hand him. The wall street journal has a multi year error apple news. Deal that who knows if it makes sense for either side but What happened and is that the tech companies have realized. It's better to have sometimes these publications on your side than against you and and these aren't hugely meaningful sums to them so i think that part has changed and it's worth noting because three years ago we would have been here talking about how acrimonious it was. I think you're absolutely right though. There's so that's on the business side of the relationship right the editorial side do you think side. I think thankfully. I think publications are still coming out. Swinging against which i think is very important thing. It's one of the reasons. I started the information seven years ago. You didn't see a lot of that. You saw a lot of hype. He saw a look. How much founders worth. So you know. Reporters and their editors aren't going to back off and they shouldn't in that's very healthy for the business. It's leading to something you mentioned which. I'm really noodling on right now. Though which is more of these senior powerful leaders intact wanting to do an end. Run around the press whether it's chitchatting all day on clubhouse war injuries and horwitz cases launching. Is we broken the information a new media publication where they're hiring you know i. I suspect dozens of staff to the go to source for news. And so yeah. I think we in the media have to be very vigilant about what Leaders particularly intact. Who are very tech. Savvy are doing To get their own message out right now. Want to back up for one second. You said You said tech is coming in. The press is coming out swinging against big tech. And that's good. And i'm sure it will people listen to this. Podcast see con. We've confirmed another another bit of confirmation that the the media is biased against tech with. They're angry about tech they cover tech but they don't like it. I'm generally not very interested in this. I think it's kind of a fake feud but do you have any sympathy for for tech folks. Who do feel like they are. They have been unfairly targetted over x. Lasted for years. Five years. Absolutely not not in sympathy. No because i think the issues and challenges that these companies in their growing power present. Our major i do think the one area i am sympathetic to the grousing tech. Exac is the lack of coverage the sort of narrow scope of coverage right. I think there's a lot happening in the world of technology that is interesting that is important. That is hard to understand and not being written about. And so i would love more of that. I'm sitting down to interview sam altman. Who's running open. A and i'm preparing my questions for him. And it's a range of focusing in on the challenges of ai. But i'm actually inherently curious about all these things. I haven't thought about that. Maybe i could help as well. And so i think we need more of that but but in no way do we need to. To pull back. And i am frankly a little tired of it too and of of the grousing. But but it's it's accelerating in. It's getting louder and technology is giving a bigger mouthpiece to people who feel a real animosity towards the press and i think the environment during the trump administration has empowered that in and we have to be vigilant. So i don't like the peter thiel bankrupt being Gawker a especially Doing it Anonymously for some period of time And there's all sorts of problems with this sort of trump fake news argument but if Vc's or anybody else want to start their own publication to get their own message out and it'll be somewhere in between useful and pravda. What's the problem with. You know. I think if you think of it as like their content marketing arm shore remain. I have the d problem with it. I want hire all the best journalists in the world. I do not want them to go. Work for injuries. And horowitz so Practically speaking i think it's important that talented journalists get opportunities to do real journalism. And so i worry about that a tweet that said it's a call to arms to do this in reference to the andriessen horwitz publication which doesn't exist it. Come out. i think this summer is a called arms to do what we do. Better than ever to show readers. White journalism was must always be independent. And just to play devil's advocate. I don't wanna go work for injuries. And horowitz either you know so. What if they they had. They have twitter forever. They'd had they used to blog a lot Mark injuries and can go on any stage. He wants whenever he wants And talk at length. What's the problem with. Why is this a in any way something we should spend much. It's interesting but why should we spend much time carry about it as journalists welfare. They're hiring just to go back to. I think that is a big deal and they could potentially hire a lot of them. And i think the experience of journalists working in that publications could be very different. Could you write learn about some interesting technologies. Yes but i think we need journalists asking the tough questions and pushing back on power not being a mouthpiece for it and i have learned so much from reading blogs from smart investors about technology. I'm pro that but to say as they did that. They wanna be the go to source. I think misleads the public around. What should be the standard for information for understanding companies and it shouldn't be from the companies themselves

Yuba Weekly His New York Post Rupert Murdoch Josh Hawley Andriessen Horowitz The Wall Street Journal The New York Times Mark Zuckerberg Sam Altman Horwitz Facebook Apple Peter Thiel Horowitz Gawker Twitter
Three neat venture rounds, and Alibaba’s latest

Equity

04:45 min | 8 months ago

Three neat venture rounds, and Alibaba’s latest

"All right. So talking about the weekend well, here's what's up as the American election looms and the holidays beckon things kind of slowed down this weekend. Now, it's a little bit soon to say that this is the new normal, but certainly, it felt more like a traditional late October weekend if that makes sense. So posts covering new rounds where little bit light there wasn't a lot of news. There wasn't a big acquisition that drove the Monday morning chat cycle so here. Are Some things that did happen that really do matter but I think we can all exhale just a little bit as we head into the second half of October. So according to TECH WRENCH DOT com, you may have heard of it. alibaba group is going to spend about three point six dollars to take a controlling stake in Sun art. One of China's largest big box supermarket chains after transaction is complete, alibaba will own about seventy two percent of art this calm i. Because the Amazon wholefoods I, mean this seems to be relatively similar. What's interesting is Alibaba actually invest in son are back in two, thousand, seventeen million just under three billion for just over a third of the company. Now, this matters because that's part of Alibaba's quote new retail strategy new retail kind of blurs the lines between online and offline commerce. This should sound pretty familiar to all of us have seen Amazon, to this inside of its now big buck stores and other people are trying to do curbside pickup even small businesses it appears. That like this e commerce world that we all think everything's going to become we'll still have a larger physical footprint than we probably anticipated. So Fun to see what China is doing. Think about, what happens our marcus down the road Alibaba out a lot of money even during relatively bad economic times worth catching up on and it kind of good news this morning space x fired another sixty satellites into the sky as part of its starlink project to speak at all really moved the boonies when Musk and company done bring internet? Everywhere. So turn to funding around this morning, our bread and butter I found a few really really cool ones despite the talk of a slowing new cycle anyways in no particular. Here are three start ups that are funny runs out that are worth checking into if you have the time. We're GONNA START WITH API, which is a I F I. M printers pronounced eight five new they have announced a fourteen point five million dollar round this morning the company is calling this a pre series b according to crunch base news, which sounds like a series a. plus maybe a series B. minus or really just called a series B.. It's fourteen point five, million dollars any investors in the round include qualcomm ventures, serve ventures, translink capital, and a new investor clinic quench base news called Plum. I never heard of plum alley or serve adventures just goes to show how many theses firms there are out there right now, all that. Aside, what does if I do? Well, they build checkout free experiences for consumers. Essentially, they allow other folks to build and operate autonomous stores. So my read is like this Amazon go but for everybody crunch news post up on this, according to that article, fourteen stores from a fire in the market lots more coming off of capital here. Exciting to see the Sir Technology Spread more broadly I'm not entirely sold on it yet. But of course, always hard to know what's going to be the future and a lot of people are betting that this is that next up, we have law Maddox, a San, Diego based startup that is building software for lawyers kind of marketing crm. Suffer Lawyers. It has raised two point, five million dollars in seed funding always nice seen actually seed funding sized seed round very rare in twenty twenty. Why do we care about this? Well, we've known that for a couple of years vertical sats, which is software aimed at one particular slice of the market one particular. Law or like gardening has been pretty hot for a while. So why not this lawyers have money target them take some of that money gee-gee funding round was led by any act ventures forefront venture partners, and then of course, rebel ventures and bridge venture partners took part I know about half of those firms again. So many VC firms out there kind of crazy according to TC. A big part of what law maddox wants to do was help automate marketing tasks for law firms to big part of their business of nurture clients to the backslapping handshaking. Stuff really does matter even in the digital realm and like you said, alerts have money. So this round probably GonNa work out pretty well law maddox. And for a third run, we're GONNA leave the US and talk about cheaper which raised twelve million dollars. Now I try to proud correctly on the show because it's respectful. In this case, it's H. I. E. R., which is not chipper nor is it Go cheaper best shot. anyways. This is an ECOMMERCE platform for merchants in Latin America it series a was raised from wind ventures and two groups called Montes and Kosic ventures. The startup claims his built quote, the largest brand never of digitized corner stores in Latin

Alibaba Group Maddox Amazon China Qualcomm Ventures Kosic Ventures United States Sun Art Latin America Latin Translink Capital Musk Montes Diego
VC firm First Round is guaranteeing some startups it will reinvest

Equity

01:52 min | 1 year ago

VC firm First Round is guaranteeing some startups it will reinvest

"First round capital. Last Friday Came out with this program called the second round guarantee that saying that if they invest in you in your first round. They'll definitely invest with you in your second round up to three million in pro rata. The the story with is that this isn't new from first round. It's just the first time they're an announcing it externally and I think that's where signaling comes in and Danny would love for you to weigh in on this. I think that that's Louise Care. A lot about signaling. For reasons that are still unclear to me. It's basically eight game theory. You know you have a group of people you know the existing investors on the CAP table. Who Know The company intimately? They've followed the company. They've been with the company for a while and any decision that they make is magnified right so they're not investing in the next round. It must say something that you don't know about the underlying company. They have information that you can't see it similar to an insurance company trying to do underwriting right someone comes to the front door and says. I Want Renter's insurance and you're like well. How do I know that you're not the bad person you know more about your rental situation than I do? And that's one of the reasons we have really intense regulation around insurance markets but VC's don't care a about signaling their care about adverse selection the Karabakh hazard. You know the the reality is I. I used to say in the last like but in two thousand eighteen two thousand nineteen that's signaling became less important rounds got more competitive. Just everyone was moving really quickly. I think signaling has really jumped imports with Bob. At least what I've heard over the last couple of weeks. It's definitely back. The fact of the matter is everyone knows everyone's triaging and so if firms are doubling down that probably means the companies in the top twenty percent thirty percent of the portfolio. If they're not triaging and they're not kind of investing in that that next round it's a really strong signal. The the firm doesn't see that as like a viable company or one. That's in you know their top kind of core tile and so I think the signaling is both stronger from existing VC's and other VC's are paying more close attention to today.

Louise Care First Round Capital Danny BOB
VCs are leaving trillions on the table by bypassing diverse leaders, study says

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:44 min | 1 year ago

VCs are leaving trillions on the table by bypassing diverse leaders, study says

"This marketplace podcast is supported by pager duty in an always on world teams trust pager duty to help them deliver a perfect digital experience to their customers every time with pager duty t there's no question that limited partners have power in this equation to also move the needle with the distribution of capital two women and multiple public media this is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy I'm Ali would Carla Harris is vice chairman of Global Wealth Management and head of multicultural client strategy at Morgan Stanley the M dot com if you could make trillions of dollars investing in more diverse founders why wouldn't you from American value of companies that have more women internally or the performance of women lead founders or the success is multicultural missing out on as much as four trillion dollars in value by not investing in more diverse founders trillion Carla Harris is vice chairman of especially when you're driven by returns I want to move up the money chain when you put out a report like this from Morgan Stanley are you speaking not just a venture capitalist must eighty percent of those men are white probably because ninety percent of venture capitalists are men mostly white but new data shows that BBC's are leaving a lot of money on the table by only investing in people who look like them Morgan Stanley put out new information just this week that says venture capital as an industry could be that's where the ultimately the change has to come from like if LP's Al- suddenly introduced you know diversity riders if every pension fund that was going to put some money into venture capital said entrepeneurship no question and you absolutely started to see some of that in the private equity industry where LP's calpers and Kosters certainly did we to invest more broadly but that doesn't make sense right well let's talk for a moment about how venture capital firms make money and why I suspect it is their investor that should be enough evidence right we should suddenly I'm sure that in the next year we will see a flood of new investment when multicultural founders right well things have been bumping along you know in fine form and there was nothing to counter that argument there was not necessarily a motivation on instigation to change it hey my pensioners want you to do the best you possibly can in that means investing broadly is that what it's GonNa take well I'll tell you I do think that that would be powerful double wealth management at Morgan Stanley and she says the numbers are getting hard to ignore I think in the last few years there's been a lot of data that has been released that talks about the entrepreneurs so now I think there's far more data out there that is supportive of the argument that in fact there is something to miss but I think stop me if you've heard this before ninety one percent of venture capital investment goes to men but also to their investors limited partners who arguably are the ones who are holding the purse strings we hope Somali part of what we're trying to do is to say not only are UVS's missing it but perhaps if you're missing it you may be leaving some money on the table for your limited partners and I wonder do you think and now some related links we've got a link to the latest Morgan Stanley data and the survey of two hundred venture capitalists released earlier this week over at our website could difference though I think the same could apply here that's very reasonable right the survey says that women earn seventy eight cents per dollar invested men only earned thirty one cents I won't necessarily say it would be a flood but I'll tell you we would be very happy to see that happen if this one report made that kind of difference in the industry we'll take that all day long eighth marketplace Tech Dot Org one interesting result of the survey data is that sixty percent NBC's say there aren't enough women or multicultural founders in their portfolio the Wall Street Journal tried to break it down a year or so ago but investors are putting tons of money into venture capital and private equity right now because stocks and bonds are kind of flattening out I would have to demand major change. VC firms make money by charging a fee for managing money that's about a two and a half percent of the amount they raise says apm this marketplace podcast is brought to you by entercom intercom what's more of the Nice people visiting your website to give you money so they took a little chat bubble in the corner Google's so that even if everyone is doing fine right now why not at least try to do better Matt Pretty and Stephanie Hughes Produced Marketplace Tech Jody on customer unity got forty five percent more loyal users with intercom in just twelve months go to intercom dot com slash podcast to start making money from real time chat

Google Matt Pretty Stephanie Hughes Four Trillion Dollars Forty Five Percent Ninety One Percent Eighty Percent Ninety Percent Sixty Percent Twelve Months

How I Built This

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:53 min | 1 year ago

With all of Silicon Valley's startup money, where's the investment in climate tech?

"In our climate tech series how we survive. We're in the heart of the tech industry this week. Silicon Valley which which is also the home of the venture capital funds that back a lot of the innovation here and those are concentrated in a quiet office park on one little street called Sandhill road. So what are they doing to invest in climb attack. It's not an area that we've spent a Lotta time in Scott Cooper as a managing partner at andriessen Horowitz it is is a big name firm it helped kick start skype twitter facebook and AIRBNB and Cooper says the VC community is a little shy about climate tek lots lots of them invested heavily in solar and other renewable energy ten or fifteen years ago and lost a lot of money when a bunch of those companies went under I think a lot of the old models unfortunately fortunately assumed or dependent on government subsidies to make the businesses work and given how fickle those are with political climates. There was a lot of heartache when some of those things went way and then fast forward to today. Even if you want to put money into cleantech the scientific innovations you might need for a cool new climate tech solution might not even exist public-address is with S. K. ventures. It's kind of heartbreaking as an investor because it's an area where we'd all like to be much more active but it's not obvious what a large check do that would generate a return within time horizon of a venture fund which is less than ten years basically. It's a lot easier to fund products that are purely digital like APPs or social networks than it is to get into super tricky real world tech like batteries are storage or heaven forbid infrastructure the physical world atoms are a pain in the ass us having to actually work with the physical world slows everything down dramatically these days sandhill road does have some venture capital funds that are investing in sustainability. We we look for mission oriented entrepreneurs that are going after really big problems in big markets reporter is with G to VP cleantech venture fund. That is a spin off from the legendary. VC firm Kleiner Perkins Kleiner decided not to keep green investment in the core fund after all those failures a decade or so ago and Porter says G. Tube EP has a broad definition of sustainability so we're not just investing in clean renewable energy we're investing in Three D. printing wanting and new ways of approaching manufacturing and logistics and collapsing supply chains and food to bring producers and consumers closer together. GDP invest in everything anything from electric buses to buying and selling used cars so long plays toward a greener world but nothing that's obviously going to save us and and then there are a handful of investors who wanna make much bigger faster moves. I think the opportunity is incredibly massive. This is Seth Bannon founding partner at the small venture capital. Oh firm fifty years based in San Francisco. We want people to realize that the technologies to mitigate adapt to the climate crisis can create trillions of dollars worth of wealth fifty years is is investing about fifty million dollars compared to about three hundred and fifty million dollars at G. TO VP. Now the biggest name of the game is breakthrough energy ventures it was launched by Bill Gates and other investors in two thousand sixteen to invest over a billion dollars specifically in clean energy but Bannon says the entire tech industry it needs to step up its super frustrating to me when I see people that control hundreds of millions of dollars and determine what companies ISG funded companies don't tweeting about the next e Gaming Unicorn that they're chasing when you have millions of people people who are being forced to migrate all because of a crisis that technology can solve so when it comes to funding tack to help us adapt to climate change the venture capital. It'll industry that gave us the semiconductor and personal computers and smartphones and social media is still mostly in the shallow end of the

Seth Bannon VP Silicon Valley Scott Cooper Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Bill Gates S. K. Ventures San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz Managing Partner Facebook ISG VC Reporter Founding Partner
"vc firm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Didn't know what the answer was I had a plan on how I was planning to figure out the answer note that although Shelly is always following a master plan that does not mean she allows herself to be limited by for some people a plan is like a childhood comforter having it in hand is reassuring but if you're tossed overboard in keep clinging that comforter as it becomes way down with water he will track you down with while Zappos platform was salvageable the company name was tarnished beyond repair here's what show is planned to ensure the backing of a big VC firm paid off I couldn't just go raise money because that was tainted we need to do something different so the node identified a company called metric stream which was smaller than us and they were really doing operational compliance but was close enough and they were apps people right so we put the two companies together took metric stream much better name in support for the enterprise and with that configuration any new business model and plan we then raise money with Kleiner is our lead and basically we did the company a merger is never simple Shelley's plan was fraught with risks top of the list was the potential of clashing with the note the node wants me to do it one way and I think we ought to do it differently so tell my husband may have a job when I come over this meeting so going to the meeting I save a node I know you want this to sound a lot of time we're gonna do this here's why I've got a.

Shelly Kleiner Shelley Zappos
"vc firm" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"I liked that i liked the idea of kind of putting your money where your mouth is and actually saying there are people out there building really great solutions to these problems so let's invest that way i think that's pretty cool so i kind of obsessed with the future tax i know that you always quite open whereas you know where you been dead and you know what you're there looks like looking at data from twenty sixteen and a predominantly you know we saw fintech company stopped companies you mentioned some of your projects in the tech space what are the sort of vertical or trends that you are really excited about and seed kansas investing in it i mean absolutely i think you machines machines the at high impact across organizations particularly see that you see that with you i pop but i think you i pass has become come increasingly a platform business and were seeing all kinds of of startups within the realm also also common where investing in in some of those so i think thinking about how machines can work with with humans especially in the professional sphere a work in progress i think but you know the that area i mentioned already personal issues incorporated into work tightened the future work to you know it it's changing dramatically and then i mean there's just such destruction across society eddie and what we should have you know have society should function it isn't what work needs to pay for and and what individuals pay for and so forth i think that's a pretty massive changes the society and work kind of coming coming together were investing in not also ties a little bit too but it's all it's all on its own personal life health we made a number of investments in in personal life health we think that's the biggest opportunity humanities had 'em industrial revolution fintech i mean the third grade but health is it you know it's ever changing today's health is not the famous he puts out obviously science tells you not all the same so you need personalized solution so we believe a lot not and so were investing in in not you know certainly fintech continues we've we took some a low hanging fruit kind of that sort investments in twenty twenty eleven twenty sixteen twenty seventeen were going deeper and the stock now we think the banking will change so dramatically in in the future so yeah those are all areas also think you were joel we vr and kind of crypto were were investing more in the mix and shovels of crypto rather than than really you know crypto in indy ended up itself basically so those are two different area that's amazing other any personalized health products that you could recommend art community checkout yes i've been here in the uk so far now it's it's thrive lost the you do eight a blood every quarter you know i think we think of them as a eight p i for blood and so whether you know if that changes joe weekly measurement or daily even i think they they move into that direction right but if you're gonna monitor you're blood or aspects about about you're held more regularly you in again you could just be much more preventative 'em then all the massive cost space it takes to secure right and so so so drivers and example sinoe genetics they're gonna be offering genetic kids soon thinking knockout energy you know and i think the other thing is i'm payments like none of you know all of this used.

"vc firm" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Mm hey everyone it's abbott jesse your host of product on radio where i'm joined by the founder investors makers that are shaping the future us tax today i'm joined by russia mosa honey she's the co founder of seed count the priest series they fund based out of london i've been following work closely i know many of the team if what a close relationship with a product on an angel it and we cover a lot in this episode what she's learned in the twelve years building her fund the future attack from personalized healthcare to managing fina career path in the venture and how you've been developed in the industry and of course her favorite products and how teams did productive but first let's hear from our sponsor so i know that many of our listeners spend most of their day in g mail and google calendar and drive pretty typical stuff and typically you're managing relationships with anyone from freelancers clients to investors to vendors partners customers you get the idea it's a lot but what if there's a way to remember every name instantly instantly find every email thread even from weeks ago and never forget the follow up on anything again cause let's face it who has the time for that that's what coppers for its you're designated relationship manager built to look and feel like the g suite apps you know and love actually it's recommended free g suite by google cloud plus it let's every team sales marketing customer success and even product talk

co founder google founder us russia relationship manager twelve years
"vc firm" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"Well, I'll tell you when, when I had legendary, you know, and you're making movies a hundred percent. I look back at some of my biggest mistakes were movies that you put together, for example, that you got the director, you wanted you gotta released a got cast. But the script isn't coming together. For whatever reason, you just kind of feel it that, it's, it's just not there. But because you've worked so hard. And now there are a bunch of people that are counting on it. And, and there's a momentum to it in the, you know, all the, the agencies everybody involved in the ecosystem now is a stakeholder and you just kinda it's, it's, it's tough to put the brakes on. So I think about that often that whole business is one of the more nuanced businesses. I've, I've ever been around or involved in see left, the VC firm is a partner you started legendary. Yeah. They're gonna get into legendary. Yeah. So, so, yeah, basically, what happened? There is around two thousand three I became fascinated with the media business. But, but in particular, with movies, I think at the time it was a thirty billion dollar industry. It was I, I believe the, the country's second. Biggest export. I I'm not sure what it is today. And, you know, there are a couple of trends that I thought were really interesting at that time, there was global expansion. You had this unbelievable business called DVD's that a lot of the big box retailers were using a loss leader, great margins, and I believed very deeply in the ownership of intellectual property, and especially, you know, sort of premium great egg, global intellectual property. And, you know, the thing that struck me as usually with an industry of that size, you will see sort of a institutional capital, in and around and among it right large private equity, or whatever it might be, and in the movie industry, certainly, if you had if you own Disney stock, or NewsCorp stock that's available, but. For an industry that size. There was no adjacent capital system. And I thought that, that would be an opportunity. So I looked very deeply at the data, you know, the previous ten years of, of studio ultimate, which was the accounting from the movies and ask myself the following question, if you hit your plan, and your successful has any money to be made, and I had a bunch of friends that almost had sort of an intervention with me and said, look you've never been in the media industry. You don't know anything about this. You're going to go out to Los Angeles and just get destroyed on this thing. And you know, I I really had conviction because I had looked. At the economics and felt like if you could build it in a different way, you know, in decided very early, I didn't wanna have distribution. I was fortunate enough to partner with Warner Brothers have them distribute. And if you could sort of have the right structure in draft off of that global infrastructure that you could you could build a, a nice business, and then like with anything else that, you know, there's certainly lock involved. I mean met a young guy at the time named Chris Nolan and with our first movie was Batman begins. Obviously, he's an incredible generational talent. And you know, but there were a lot of things along the way both. You know, things that worked out, remarkably well, and then things that just have so much of a human element in a motion around a business that it's, it's in retrospect, really fascinating..

partner Chris Nolan director Batman Warner Brothers Disney Los Angeles NewsCorp thirty billion dollar hundred percent ten years
The Tech Startup Story Behind Ansarada's AI Powered Platform

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:08 min | 2 years ago

The Tech Startup Story Behind Ansarada's AI Powered Platform

"We got some Raleigh. The CEO of answer. Order on the show and answer oughta is a company helping and VC firms large corporations small companies that advisors and everything in between manage their business critical events, which is I chose and mergers and acquisitions funding, property management, etc. And answer as over thirty five million in revenue and harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to apply data, I'm learnings over twenty K deals taking. Place on its platform to put the outcome of deals, and they're also working with big big names, which is Google JP Morgan Deloitte's minister, Alison Sony, pivotal. And so many other big names. However, as many of you know, I do get frustrated with the modern way of judging everyone by their success right now because everyone wants to be at Sharon, LeBron or beyond say is Gary vein at you always says very seldom do we hear about those ten years of getting or put five AM every morning with lower. No reward a nothing, but challenges to overcome this is where the real value is. And this is why the winning is doom and Sam from Anson Audra is a born entrepreneur, and he started out by buying and selling light bulbs for just a small profit to his neighbors age only seven and then he progressed to organizing neighborhood car washes, a teenager in Australia's Blue Mountains, and from there he began bootstrapping on sonar from the ground up to two hundred plus person international company that is. to two hundred plus person international company that is today, but before we delve into that and the technology that you're leveraging to make a success. I want to spend just a few. Minnie's on your inspirational backstory because you are born entrepreneur. So can you tell me a little bit more about your journey that began by buying and selling light bulbs for small profit to your neighbors at the age of only seven to organizing neighborhood, car washes, a teenager in Australia's Blue Mountains to actually bootstrapping and sonata from the ground up to that company is today. A fantastic stop story. Isn't it for anybody listening and hostile that? You've got the mummy of Gary vein took where you always talks about abseiling baseball cards at call boots. And something that you still does today. Yeah. Well, it's funny. If you wanna sit. Been gifted with it skill or talent, you know, like he just you know, you you are. And then other things I think that's really maybe what more daughter used for nominal music ability and playing the piano off can't even play like, a triangle income on say, you know, I'm really am. I the death 'cause I just have no gifting there at all. But, but yes, I remember my mother my mother's till stories about when all is in kindergarten, and they gave us a simple commerce exercise where you know, you have to boys and lowly to fifty cents and then villa bag of them her dollar, and and no one in the class could do it because the key Magadan keep the dollar was a lot of money, then they didn't know him wanting to pay it. What all I did was open the bag and within Molly than our sold them for ten cents h and you know, people could afford ten cents and I ended up selling them. Anyway. No, the person that did all I just. Away. It's a barrier will what what could what could be done here and tough while that my father anything missile over more off lofted growing up around that. And I think

Gary Vein Blue Mountains Australia CEO Raleigh Abseiling Lebron Jp Morgan Deloitte Google Alison Sony Minnie Anson Audra Molly SAM Ten Years Twenty K
An unmatched, AI-powered intelligent information platform

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:42 min | 2 years ago

An unmatched, AI-powered intelligent information platform

"We got some Raleigh. The CEO of answer. Order on the show and answer oughta is a company helping and VC firms large corporations small companies that advisors and everything in between manage their business critical events, which is I chose and mergers and acquisitions funding, property management, etc. And answer as over thirty five million in revenue and harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to apply data, I'm learnings over twenty K deals taking. Place on its platform to put the outcome of deals, and they're also working with big big names, which is Google JP Morgan Deloitte's minister, Alison Sony, pivotal. And so many other big names. However, as many of you know, I do get frustrated with the modern way of judging everyone by their success right now because everyone wants to be at Sharon, LeBron or beyond say is Gary vein at you always says very seldom do we hear about those ten years of getting or put five AM every morning with lower. No reward a nothing, but challenges to overcome this is where the real value is. And this is why the winning is doom and Sam from Anson Audra is a born entrepreneur, and he started out by buying and selling light bulbs for just a small profit to his neighbors age only seven and then he progressed to organizing neighborhood car washes, a teenager in Australia's Blue Mountains, and from there he began bootstrapping on sonar from the ground up to two hundred plus person international company that is. to two hundred plus person international company that is today, but before we delve into that and the technology that you're leveraging to make a success. I want to spend just a few. Minnie's on your inspirational backstory because you are born entrepreneur. So can you tell me a little bit more about your journey that began by buying and selling light bulbs for small profit to your neighbors at the age of only seven to organizing neighborhood, car washes, a teenager in Australia's Blue Mountains to actually bootstrapping and sonata from the ground up to that company is today. A fantastic stop story. Isn't it for anybody listening and hostile that? You've got the mummy of Gary vein took where you always talks about abseiling baseball cards at call boots. And something that you still does today. Yeah. Well, it's funny. If you wanna sit. Been gifted with it skill or talent, you know, like he just you know, you you are. And then other things I think that's really maybe what more daughter used for nominal music ability and playing the piano off can't even play like, a triangle income on say, you know, I'm really am. I the death 'cause I just have no gifting there at all. But, but yes, I remember my mother my mother's till stories about when all is in kindergarten, and they gave us a simple commerce exercise where you know, you have to boys and lowly to fifty cents and then villa bag of them her dollar, and and no one in the class could do it because the key Magadan keep the dollar was a lot of money, then they didn't know him wanting to pay it. What all I did was open the bag and within Molly than our sold them for ten cents h and you know, people could afford ten cents and I ended up selling them. Anyway. No, the person that did all I just. Away. It's a barrier will what what could what could be done here and tough while that my father anything missile over more off lofted growing up around that. And I think one of the things that influences, the fathers fickleness, and you know, remember are never go much price daddy fit if you were doing something to do with the business. So it's going to like to get beds, attention and recognition. If you helping balancing general ledger or did some cash reconcilliation, but were hopes we'd some banking or this something with the business or anything. You know, you need get the recognition and trade comes from. So I think maybe consciously that influences somebody

Gary Vein Blue Mountains Australia CEO Raleigh Abseiling Lebron Google Jp Morgan Deloitte Minnie Alison Sony Anson Audra Molly SAM Ten Years Twenty K
"vc firm" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Venture Stories

"They went to college with five, they work with and then they're surprised that there's not that much transfer ability or generalized ability in those conversations, but they're probably talking to wait to few people if they were talking to one hundred PM's would they actually feel this way over? They actually realized that they start to feel what is the shape of companies that is similar to theirs, even if not competitors, kind of one of those conversations that are useful and in general, I think that this team is probably consistent across a bunch of mentions right by even people talking about joining companies. You know, one of the things that has always had baffled bemused knee is that I talked to a lot of people who are thinking about joining companies as they've spent time diligence in the company than ice then diligently companies that we invested in venture Ryan, and that's always been punishment. Because VC firm does a lot about its investment, but for an individual that you know you're committing to five plus years of your life with no other companies you're working with a company that seems like a way more important decision with way less diligence done. And so I think that you know, like when I look at samples like that, I think that that that does push on this question which is everybody talking is everybody talking to an order of magnitude less people than they should be spending an order of magnitude less time thinking about, you know, their their companies in they should be because we've kind of normalized that there are just these things that are kind of these constraints are normal, right? And there's no, there's no solution to them when in reality, you know, as with all kind of loose, I think one thing that's very hard to tell is at each place in it to know you are. Mm strains unique to have accurate benchmark, and it's hard to have a benchmark often, but you need to figure out what is approximate you can use for that and you know, this is not blocking one prostate is, is, is this is this case, right? Which is, hey, is it? It's this is, you know, if you look at a VC firm VC firm is doing way more diligence on on something that actually relatively matters less to them than than this matters to you that that's a reasonable benchmark goes, hey, could like what of that could you do? The diligence might not be the same, but you know, if you look at your interviewing process as venture by what of those things could you actually do? What of those things should you do that you're not doing? And, and I think that that actually with that as a benchmark, I think we'd probably realize that there is a lot more that that that could have should be done. Than that most will do an example at one right is you know, I think that that again with this delta we have is we have companies actor how individuals is for companies are VC firms. You know, we would say that they should be way more active about sourcing and who are all the companies are talking to and what are the things that are causing others to kind of to to find them at the inbound? What is the album's they're doing? What is the things that make people in their networks kind of understands what they're looking for and what are the companies that they would want to invest in, introducing them to them. And then I think we look at, you know, people running job search and they are way more passive about it. Right. You know, I think that is in question. By even at the simplest form is you thought about those three channels and optimizing them, what would it looked like? One simple thing of it is if you just made lists explicit Google of all the companies you are interested in or talking to and you shared that what your friends would they actually have useful input or introductions or knowledge about those companies..

Google Ryan
"vc firm" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"So the fact that maker is leaving is a little bit inside baseball, probably for a lot of folks who don't really care who works at what VC firm, but she's been there a long time and arguably sort of their superstar these days while and she was a superstar before she went to Kleiner Perkins. It was considered to be a coup for Kleiner Perkins to get her and sort of burnished their reputation because by two thousand ten Kleiner Perkins was no longer the dot com VC firm and the sort of put to rest like, oh, they're still relevant. Even in two thousand ten, looking them snapping up Mary meeker, Mary meeker I feel like has outgrown Kleiner Perkins. Maybe that Kleiner Perkins Caufield and buyers should have had a meeker in it, and they would have kept her because it looks like. From what? From the tea leaves. I've read particularly the Recode story. It seems like meeker wants to do things her way. Kleiner didn't really love that or or or at least they keep wanted to keep things doing things their way. And so they decided to part ways and publicly, they're all being very amicable. Oh about it. So there's no reason to think it's anything, but it may just be a difference in opinion. And the thing that meeker is is gambling is that she will be able to continue to be as influential as she has been at Kleiner because she's Mary meeker, and I think that's a good bet. Yeah. I mean, this is not unlike a somebody working at a at eight eight established tech firm, right? And he go, like your job is so good. You know, what do you care? It's it's, it's all it's all gravy, right? But this is this is what happens, especially when firms that give companies money to create a technology that we all use, get long in the tooth, things change. People start new firms and if you're out there going like, wait, who's Mary meeker again, it's the internet trends report. We talk about it every year because it is usually spot on if for no other reason that it summarizes exactly what hot right now, but also does a great job of pointing out. These are the things you want to keep an eye on for the next year or so. And I, it's a slide show. She's been doing at the code conference for the last few years, but she's been she's she was doing it a web twitting together? Yes, for doing it Stanley. She was doing. Before she went to Morgan Stanley, she's been doing that slide show since the nineties. I think. So so anyway, meeker standalone and don't need nobody else. I'll be curious if the new VC firm has like a funky cool name or it's just a person named with maker's name in the in in Koper happen. Yeah, yeah, exactly. Well, moving on and video has a new tool called NVIDIA scanner available for the RT x twenty eighty.

Mary meeker Kleiner Perkins Kleiner Perkins Caufield baseball Koper Morgan Stanley
Kleiner partner Mary Meeker leaving to start her own venture firm

Daily Tech News Show

03:14 min | 2 years ago

Kleiner partner Mary Meeker leaving to start her own venture firm

"Mary meakers annual internet trends reports are hailed as one of the best evaluations of the industry. She's been doing them or something along those lines for decades now. But Mary meeker will no longer be doing from Kleiner Perkins Gulf field. I'm buyers because meeker joined the VC firm back in two thousand ten, but is now leaving three others to form a new firm. Now, I have to say before I'd looked up who the other three people were. I was like, yeah, women firm, it's not, but that's okay. It's. The street kind of reminds me Tom of our conversation from yesterday about how Microsoft at one point was, you know, all anybody could talk about was sort of antitrust because things do change and Kleiner Perkins is one of the oldest VC firms really of the first dot com. Boom.

Google Microsoft Mary Meeker Mary Meakers Kleiner Perkins Gulf Field Kleiner Perkins Facebook L. Apple Shannon Loeb New York Paris TOM
Samsung, LG and Mary Meakers discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

Daily Tech Headlines

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Samsung, LG and Mary Meakers discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

"Mary meakers annual internet trends report is hailed as one of the best evaluations of the industry, and she's been doing them for something like a few decades, but she'll no longer be doing them at Kleiner, Perkins Caufield, and buyers. Meeker joined the VC firm in two thousand ten, but will now leave with three others to form a new firm.

Samsung LG Mary Meakers Perkins Caufield Meeker IDC Tober Apple Ryan Keith
"vc firm" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on Acquired

"Exactly it was like a commerce software solution for selling things online and one of the i ended up hugh so i think that was the mid nineties when when he started that and his co founder was was robert robert morris and so they started up in boston and ends up getting acquired by yahu in nineteen ninety eight for about fifty million dollars and then trevor trevor blackwell had worked for them at via web and so when when yahoo acquired the company trevor moves out to silicon valley goes to work for yahoo robert wealth pg bounces around a bunch robert is actually a professor at mit professor computer science in addition to being co founder of multiple companies he stays in cambridge paul eventually comes back to cambridge he's living in cambridge and he starts he starts dating jessica and jessica is working in marketing at an investment bank in boston and she's not super happy with banking i know how that goes and the culture there and so she she starts interviewing at vc firms about coming on and being won't be particular about being the director of marketing at the vc firm and one night paul and jessica are out at dinner and they're talking about jessica's interview process and the vc firm in typical vc firm fashion is like taking forever to get back to her totally dragging their feet the process is super opaque and one thing about pd that anybody who certainly has read any of his essays or knows of his reputation he's he's kind of nothing if not opinionated as they're walking back from dinner and he goes off on visa in general and their practices and how they operate remember this is two thousand five so like the concept of quote unquote founder friendly is still years away at this point on the on the side and he says you know what screw it let's start our own vc firm and he's a he's been thinking about this for a while he's ever since he he writes about this ever since the.

co founder boston trevor trevor blackwell yahoo professor cambridge jessica paul founder hugh robert robert morris mit director of marketing fifty million dollars
"vc firm" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on No Agenda

"I got turned off immediately by their bowl this test report was just a crock and i'm sorry i had any i put it in there but i'm also sorry that we got this information from our own people which is like can't you read between the lines here's the clip there really want to explain what what it is is is senior executive services which is a an operation that was started in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine that was is the way i see it even though i have a couple of people that worked there or worked under them who sent notes which i'll read but i see it as just a giant executive temp service and i've reminds me of a venture capitalist who use have the in house the would go to ceo they have some guy who's always of a ceo at the vc firm that is used as the designated ceo of something falls apart and they had to fire somebody they put this guy in right and he takes over the place and he's just a generalist thinking he knows how to be an executive and that's what he does and that's what this operation is and it turns out this operation was formed at right after the gerald ford administration and because ford had gone through a number of firings similar way trump is doing it because once he took over and it caused a vacuum in leadership in the government just didn't have enough people to fill these slots.

ceo executive senior executive gerald ford
"vc firm" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"And was privatelyowned until it without you but by gugel about five years ago and then and then that she sold to a japanese vc firm spot mini is probably the seventh race that's been designed belts and put into the public domain so we know about the maybe lot's going on in their labs what's eight is is a full thing that looks like bit like a dog to foot tie dog and it's got a nominates in the on can have various contraptions on it it's about eighty centimetres high weighs about thirty kilos it's fully electric some of the earlier ones had little diesel engines on both regret noisy it has three division it can carry about fourteen kilos it's got seventeen joints that should be compared with the three hundred and sixty our joints of the human body should run for about ninety minutes and in this particular video that some online advice places the first baked shows that the this sport meaney being attacked unfortunately by a few minutes with a hockey stick trying to stop it opening a door and eventually the human pools the thing back with some leading the back and pull the wave of finding given goes away uncertainty source the door and then finds the handle an monroe tastes to handle than put say foot ram opens the door which is already quite strongly spring loaded so it's pretty impressive yes so even with all of this interference it keeps going isis is still and i've seen the video this robot dog is pretty ripe say how does it work and how is able to stay so focused on this task well the speculation online and it's not clear from the video of shipping quite coy about to because it's a commercial secret the may will be in probably as somebody off camera that's controlling its move backwards and forwards however the actually at me the door is probably not possible to do by the human switch probably either being taught or all the spook lee has learned to open the door if pick impressive as the fantasy balance as it moves around 'cause i must be something quite difficult to do this idea of balance in general but i mean why make these types of robots in the.

meaney lee hockey eighty centimetres fourteen kilos ninety minutes thirty kilos five years
"vc firm" Discussed on The Pitch

The Pitch

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"vc firm" Discussed on The Pitch

"Kim known as someone who could find their way around almost any industry will eventually gillian started her own personal angel fund and at this point she was able to leverage the incredible rolodex of people she was connected to for every company she was invested in she could introduce the founders to powerful players potential customers as strategic partners in 2013 she joined structure capital a vc firm or gillian is now managing partner she brings to startups not only her branding expertise but also her formidable network at this point when gillian invests in your company it's like getting an oprah stamp on the front of your book some time to eight blame me it away that that i can get to all these people went beyond politics and finance in media i give being in the corporate well rather be a chemical company fashion company out of i mean it really incredible i apprised my i'm saying that with humility i really surprised myself who i can pick up the phone and call at this point in my life partly because i'm older uh so you know you build a heart a huge network but that's the value and i what i say to people is i don't care how good your product is okay because that's not what business is built on business is built on a relationship that would build mrs bill built on with that girl who you were when you growing up be surprised that were julian his today.

Kim gillian managing partner oprah julian