25 Burst results for "Vassar College"

"vassar college" Discussed on The Trish Regan Show

The Trish Regan Show

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"vassar college" Discussed on The Trish Regan Show

"So go get my friends there and legacy precious metals a call today. Again, legacy precious metals. Here's the whole clip from Scott pelley's interview on CBS News 60 minutes from Sunday Night. Mister president first Detroit Auto Show in three years. Yeah. Is the pandemic over? A pandemic is over. We still have a problem with COVID. We're still doing a lot of work on it. But the pandemic is over. If you notice, no one's wearing masks. Everybody seems to be in pretty good shape. So if everyone is in really good shape, then why are we spending so much on so many different welfare programs? There's a ton of money that got put into action back in March of 2020. And we're still feeling the effects of all that. I realized the president thinks inflation's up just an inch. Inflation rate month to month is just an inch hardly at all. You're not arguing that 8.3 is good news. No, I'm not saying it's good news, but it was 8.2 or 8.2 before. Actually, it's up over a percent from this time last year. As I predicted, by the way, it would, I said it over and over again right here on this show as far back as summer of 2020 that you couldn't have. This much fiscal and monetary policy working together and not run certain risks. Anyway, you have welfare benefits that have skyrocketed. Think about the millions of people that are still receiving food stamps because they expanded that program pretty dramatically. That was the national emergency, remember? You had a restriction or a lack of restriction, I should say, on state requirements for work, which meant more people were able to file for more benefits. States were not able to remove people, for example, from Medicaid roles, even if the people were no longer eligible for Medicaid, the prediction is that it's costing taxpayers according to a report in The Wall Street Journal about $16 billion a month. And then, of course, the Biden administration announced a 500 $1 billion plan, half a $1 trillion here to relieve people of their student debt. The entire generation is now saddled with unsustainable debt in exchange. So on a typical basis. Maybe didn't go to school. Where all those degrees in gender studies from Vassar college, I mean, come on. This makes literally no sense. But they're using yet again, March 2020 that emergency declaration to justify this from a legal perspective. It will face legal challenges, but this is what he's trying to do. In other words, he wants to have his cake and eat it too. He wants to spend, he wants these massive, massive programs that the left so loves and refuses literally refuses to recognize the inflationary effects. I mean, you have an administration right now that is still trying to pretend like we don't have any kind of recession. We actually are growing as an economy. Give me a break. Inflation is growing for sure. Certainly over where we were last year, and that's what the fed is trying to tame..

Scott pelley CBS News Sunday Night Biden administration Detroit The Wall Street Journal Vassar college fed
"vassar college" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"Universal truths and should that don't reflect your values. Andrea Kennedy author of kicking ass in a corset and serves a directive a doctoral program in educational leadership and it's an super professor at the Paul university in Chicago. Written in consultant areas of empowered leadership, feminist leadership, emotionally intelligent leadership, and internally referenced leadership, Andrew received their Bachelor of Arts degree from Vassar college, her massive education degree from Harvard graduate school of education and her JD degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Andrew welcome to the show. Oh, thank you so much for having me, Barry. With all the degrees, your parents got to be proud. They are very proud. And they remind me that they paid a lot of tuition as well. Exactly. Well, tell us about what do you think these universal true star or these shoulds are that we should start to reject now in a post COVID world? Well, I think in a post COVID world, especially where there is a shortage of people who maybe want to work for us. We need to make sure that there is meaning and there is purpose. And that what we're doing in our workplaces are resonant with the people who work with us and for us. Well, so how do we, you know, a lot of small business owners haven't had to come up with that meeting Andrew. The meeting was, well, here's $15 an hour. Here's $7.25 an hour. That's as far as the meaning got. And I totally agree with you. People really want to rally around a mission now or quite honestly, they're not going to show up to work or they're going to work for somebody else. That's so true. That's why, you know, one of my principles is about the importance of balance. And even in a small business where we need all hands on deck all the time, it's important to recognize that people are parents, people need some rest..

Andrea Kennedy Paul university Andrew Harvard graduate school of edu Vassar college University of Pennsylvania Chicago Barry
"vassar college" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Next episode. But i do want to talk about some some broad in the idea of tears as an external or interpersonal adaptation. Something that is. That serves a relational function and one piece of evidence that seemed somewhat convincing to me that tears serve an external and communicative purpose. Is that people just automatically. When they observed tears interpret them as conveying information about the emotional states of the person who's crying. And it's not just that you look at a person who's who's crying and you say that person is sad. The tears themselves seem to convey very important information and this was illustrated in some research. I was reading about in a two thousand ten. Npr article about allison aubrey called teary eyed. Evolution crying serves a purpose and this featured. An interview with the researcher named randolph cornelius. Who is a professor of psychology at vassar college I'm citing this research in particular because it came with what i thought was a very useful visual aid So so cornelius. The psychologist he he. He is arguing. That tears are useful because they convey information and his research did something pretty clever. It took photographs of people who were crying and then digitally manipulated them to remove the tears. So you'd have the same face with the same expression when the person is crying except without any tears visible in the is around the cheeks and what the study found is that People rated the same faces without tears as much more ambiguous People consistently interpret tearful faces as sad and they interpret them as having stronger emotional value but people have a lot more difficulty. Inferring the feelings of those same faces without tears. And so i'd quote from cornelius. As as cited in this article he says quote tears also narrow the range of emotions people think the models are experiencing tearful people are mostly seen is experiencing emotions in the sadness family sadness grief morning and so forth and rob i really once i looked at these images. It really hit home for me because yeah so it. It'll have to faces side by side. One is crying face and the other is the same exact face but photoshop to have the tears removed and the the faces without tears whereas there's like one in the middle of a man crying with tears rolling down his cheeks and he looks very sad and in the picture right next to him without the tears the same expression looks possibly kind of like smug or defiant. Yeah i thought kinda thing like without tears of the tears removed. He kind of looks like he's like he's thinking i'm just beat you up but in the first one it's clear. This man has been watching a sad football movie openly. There's one you shared above this of a child or i think it's child looking up and within tears moved. It seems like there perhaps just looking at a bird flying through the air but with the tears it's like they are looking up at a crucifixion. Yeah yeah the same face without the tears could be interpreted as kind of like I don't know maybe concerned but also displaying possibly creepy kind of interest in something Yeah at least to me. I immediately from these images can see the informational value of tears. They radically reduce the ambiguity in interpreting somebody else's facial expression and and suddenly you're not wondering what is this person thinking you immediately read them as like as kind of sad and vulnerable and helpless and not dangerous whereas the same face without the tears is like. I don't know what's up with this person now. Of course this is all this. This all becomes more complicated. When we think about some of the exceptions to this rule that pop up regarding point person could be teary eyed. Perhaps they have some sort of a tear gland situation going on more. Perhaps there is some sort of irritant in the air of something of that nature Perhaps their sinuses are bothering them or they just yawned. But if you're just looking at them you're you're going to instantly go to. That's something something powerful or bad has happened in. This person may need comforted. You know this. Got me thinking about Another way that tears might work. This is not something that i found. advocated in in any research that somebody might have put this forward and i haven't read about it yet but this would be The idea that what if tears are useful as an honest signal of emotions That could have evolved as a response to the evolution of deceit so so so what. I'm imagining here. is you know. Humans are complex. Social animals managing complex social relationships and human brains are complex enough that humans can lie about what they feel and they can lie about who and what they care about but because tears are difficult to fake. I wonder if maybe tears evolved as an honest signal of our true motivating feelings. Who and what we actually care about and how we feel about things and thus. I wonder if possibly in that way. They could be adaptive because they make us more trustworthy. A person who cries about something is less likely to be lying about what their feelings about that thing are. This of course makes my mind as they go to actors That kind of a whole discussion in of itself because you get into. How is the actress swimming. Tears are they engaging with with actual tearful memories or a deep reading the script and so forth but ultimately the result is when you watch a film and the actor is summoning tears it. It makes anything that's going on in the on the screen more believable no matter how poor the screenplay no matter how weird the lighting if the actor is is summoning actual tears in their performance. Like that that gives it a leg up. Yeah and i think it's worth noting that like most like some people can cry on command but most people would have a hard time doing that. It's not easy to do Unless you have that chunk of onion in europe incorrect grachev right. Is that the actress trip. Yeah i guess so so. Yeah maybe has something to do with the evolution of deceit but anyway th that's just sort of like a weird thought that popped into my head. Maybe that'll connect to some of the hypotheses that we that we discuss in more detail in the next part. But i i wanted to talk about another study. That was interesting about ways that tears might be a useful for interpersonal signaling and behavior manipulation. And this would be something. That's not focused on conveying information. That's perceived consciously like what we were talking about with looking at tears on people's faces a minute ago this would be operating at a subconscious level on the basis of chemical. Signaling or or chemo signaling. This next example is also good. Because from what i can tell this study that led to some maybe very misleading headlines in popular coverage But anyway so. Some studies in mice have found that behaviorally relevant chemosignals in tears So these would not be emotional tears because mice don't shed emotional tears. These would just be a regular basil or or reflex tears. These chemosignals in mice include pheromones that For example can do things like make male mice more attractive as mates or there can be chemosignals in juvenile mice that prevent adults from attempting unwanted mating behaviors with with those mice so that they can have kind of discouraging unwanted behaviors and other mice and picking up on that research There were some Scientists who in the year two thousand eleven looked into whether there could be similar chemosignals in human tears and so this led to a study by shani golstein at all published in science called. human tears. Contain a chemo signal now..

allison aubrey randolph cornelius cornelius vassar college Npr rob football swimming europe shani golstein
"vassar college" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello for wonder media network. I'm jenny kaplan and this is will manica. Welcome to season three. Those of you tuning in for the first time. Here's the deal every week day. We're talking about the women we should have learned about growing up but probably didn't so this month. Our theme is back to school or talking about amazing. Educators and intellectuals are women of the day today is someone who revolutionized higher education for women. She saw the bias built into the us college system and worked to make schooling more accessible today. Women who attend us universities still use many of the practices. She put in place probably without even knowing it. Let's talk about mary bunting. Mary was born in brooklyn in nineteen ten. She was one of four children. Born to marry shot. While ingram and henry ingram a couple that highly valued education. Mary shot will ingram are protagonists. Mother was president of the young women's christian association and a member of the new york city board of higher education. Henry was a lawyer and one of the co founders of long island college of medicine despite being the child of two educators and a future top educator herself. Mary didn't like school all that much growing up. She experienced a lot of sickness as a child and didn't attend classes regularly until high school even then she once said of school. I was glad to get rid of it in the afternoon and get back to something interesting. Even so mary went onto study well. Beyond high school. She received an undergraduate degree in physics at vassar college and a masters and doctorate in agricultural bacteriology at the university of wisconsin. There she also met her husband. Henry bunting through their common interests of hiking and birdwatching. Couple married in nineteen thirty seven and moved to connecticut where they raised four children together. Henry became faculty at yale. University and mary turned her own research on the effects of radiation on bacteria during this time mary remained invested in educational pursuits. She served on library and school boards over the years. Henry's health declined in nineteen fifty four. He died of brain cancer less than a year. After henry's death. Mary was offered a new opportunity to become dean of douglass college. The women's college of rutgers university where she was a professor in nineteen fifty eight. Mary was invited to a national. Science foundation. committee created to improve the nation's performance in the field of science in a series of tests designed to figure out what blocked strong students from continuing into careers in science. Mary saw a big problem of all of the sixteen to nineteen year olds who scored in the top ten percent on aptitude tests and then did not go onto college. Ninety eight percent were women. The time women had serious. Barriers to access college education endowments for women's colleges were much lower than those of their male counterparts. Perhaps most importantly curriculum requirements didn't accommodate the different societal expectations for women. For example many universities made it nearly impossible for students to attend part time as a result women who had to care for children during the day at home could not attend mary. It her mission to redesign the education system to accommodate and encourage women to study. She got her first chance at serious reform. When in nineteen sixty she became president of radcliffe college the undergraduate women's college at harvard university there. She saw the stark differences between the ways. Men and women were treated on the same campus. Women were given bunk beds in assigned rooms rather than harvard's how system and they were excluded from harvard's libraries and dining halls. Mary set about changing the campus. She organized the dorms into a house. System built radcliffe. Its own library and created search committees to go into low income neighborhoods and offer scholarships to potential students. She also created the radcliffe institute for independent study in nineteen sixty one. This was a historic shift in funding women's education. It supported research into women's studies and supported the work of female artists scientists and scholars regardless of their marital or familial responsibilities at home. Today we know what as the bunting institute mirror cultivated a connection to her students as well. She was a well known figure both for her strong attitudes on institutional change and for particularities. Some stories say she brought to unforgettable pets with her to radcliffe house a beehive and a cow. If her porch light was on it was a well known sign on campus. That mary's door was open. For study sessions heart to hearts and simple chaffetz in nineteen seventy-two. Mary successfully establish the co residency of purpose and radcliffe colleges. This meant women. Attending radcliffe could live on harvard's campus and men attending harvard. Do the same at radcliffe. Full integration between the two schools wouldn't occur until nineteen ninety nine after achieving residency. Mary retired as president in nineteen. Seventy two. She married her second husband. Dr clement ace smith a harvard faculty member in nineteen seventy nine. In her later years she went onto consultant. Princeton and on government advisory boards after six years of failing health. Mary died in nineteen ninety. Eight at the age of eighty seven. She forever changed the world of education all month. We're going back to school talking about women who are educators intellectuals around the world for more on why we're doing what we're doing. Check out our newsletter. We'll manica weekly. Follow us on facebook and instagram at will manica special thanks to liz. Caplan my favorite sister. Co-creator talk to you tomorrow. This month encyclopedia will manica is proudly supported by. Unc greensboro founded is a women's college in eighteen. Ninety one unc. Greensboro presents. She can we can beyond. The women's suffrage centennial through performances films lectures and concerts. Unc g. examines how the decisions from our past affect us today. Join the experience. Learn more at she can. We can dot. Unc g. dot edu..

Mary jenny kaplan manica mary bunting henry ingram ingram young women's christian associ new york city board of higher long island college of medicin Henry mary harvard Henry bunting douglass college women's college of rutgers uni Science foundation vassar college radcliffe college the undergra university of wisconsin
"vassar college" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Mary was born in new york city in nineteen. Oh six her father. Walter owned an insurance company in the family enjoyed the trappings of east coast. Upper class with summers in new hampshire in private school for grace grace came of age during an unusual time in american during the nineteen twenties and thirties. A relatively high number of women receiving doctorate degrees numbers that wouldn't be matched again until the nineteen eighties. This period of opportunity was immediately followed by world war two which ushered huge numbers of women into the workforce in one thousand nine hundred twenty grace graduated phi beta kappa from vassar college with degrees in mathematics and physics two years later. She earned a master's degree mathematics from yale grayson began teaching math at vaster while studying for her phd. Under computer pioneer howard angstrom in one thousand forty one pearl harbor was bombed the attack in which three hundred and fifty japanese warplanes from hawaiian naval base. True the us into world war two. It also inspired grace to join the war effort. Despite her unique set of skills she was initially rejected from the navy due to her age and small stature but grace brilliant and sharp-tongued persisted in nineteen forty-three three. She joined the naval reserve and was assigned to the bureau of ships computation project at harvard university at harvard. Grace work with howard aitken who had developed one of the first earliest electromechanical computers the ibm automatic sequence controlled calculator. Better known as mark. One grace was responsible for programming mark. One which took up an entire room and punching machine instructions into the tape before there was even much understanding about what the job entailed grace became. Where the first re- computer programmers in american history. She also wrote mark one's five hundred sixty one page user

lamonica kaylin torres jamie
Grace Hopper: The Queen of Code

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Grace Hopper: The Queen of Code

"Mary was born in new york city in nineteen. Oh six her father. Walter owned an insurance company in the family enjoyed the trappings of east coast. Upper class with summers in new hampshire in private school for grace grace came of age during an unusual time in american during the nineteen twenties and thirties. A relatively high number of women receiving doctorate degrees numbers that wouldn't be matched again until the nineteen eighties. This period of opportunity was immediately followed by world war two which ushered huge numbers of women into the workforce in one thousand nine hundred twenty grace graduated phi beta kappa from vassar college with degrees in mathematics and physics two years later. She earned a master's degree mathematics from yale grayson began teaching math at vaster while studying for her phd. Under computer pioneer howard angstrom in one thousand forty one pearl harbor was bombed the attack in which three hundred and fifty japanese warplanes from hawaiian naval base. True the us into world war two. It also inspired grace to join the war effort. Despite her unique set of skills she was initially rejected from the navy due to her age and small stature but grace brilliant and sharp-tongued persisted in nineteen forty-three three. She joined the naval reserve and was assigned to the bureau of ships computation project at harvard university at harvard. Grace work with howard aitken who had developed one of the first earliest electromechanical computers the ibm automatic sequence controlled calculator. Better known as mark. One grace was responsible for programming mark. One which took up an entire room and punching machine instructions into the tape before there was even much understanding about what the job entailed grace became. Where the first re- computer programmers in american history. She also wrote mark one's five hundred sixty one page user

Grace Grace Yale Grayson Howard Angstrom Nineteen Vassar College East Coast Walter New Hampshire New York City Mary Naval Reserve Bureau Of Ships Computation Pr Pearl Harbor Howard Aitken Harvard Navy Grace United States IBM
"vassar college" Discussed on Team Never Quit

Team Never Quit

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Team Never Quit

"$5,000 a month for their entire career just to teach young people cuz I'm telling you right now when it comes to school violence, if you put a Navy SEAL, teach in Earth Science in college on that shooting stops in the hallway. If you want, people that are being taken advantage of in a school, you put a drill sergeant in charge of math, and there will be no bullying in that classroom. You will have discipline, but more importantly, you will see that those kids are going to see themselves in those veterans. They're from the same neighborhoods, they look the same, you know, both have the same background. And now we're telling people you want to go to Vassar College and get a degree in basket, weaving and get $70,000 in debt, or do you want to control your own destiny? So long To me, I think the future is having Veterans as phds. You're not supposed to have a doctorate as a vet, your supposed to be drinking beer and collecting a pension wage. The mindset is our service is one aspect of our life. What we do, we get out, that's what changes the world, and I want to be a part of the, the vents now. I would join up in our and throw that uniform on and our country. Yeah. Does that to teach us? And when we come back we we pay it back, right? We, that's what we give back to our community and literally The Edge between being a criminal and being courageous is is the uniform, right? I mean it's we we sign up and they take all those skills and assets that we have that that either could have been debilitating or good for us back and push it in a positive direction, man. But David man, we gotta wrap this up, bro. I sit here in this to you all day cuz if you could just tell us how people can follow you and find you and what you got coming up, that would be great job. You know, I'm just going to every if your son and daughter's in phase of training I would probably at that graduation and ROTC and everything else. I'm just run around with the Army. I don't need social media thing because you know I'm just I'm just focused on this right now. So yeah you can go to do any first, it's Duty 1 St, that's our website, and we're just trying to get out there and talk to as many young people as possible and get out the schools and remind people that there are still good guys out there and they're all in the military. Nice wage were what we're doing the best for Freedom tour. We stop by those schools. Yeah, I enjoyed that man. And you're right. They listed a little differently when we walked in. Yeah. All right brother, man. Hey, good job on that. On your metal. I know it's heavy but you're a, you're the man that can carry it. So, keep doing what you're doing and we love you. God bless you man. Pass the best of the family grade made your brother. Finally, I love you to Marcus and I'm super proud of wage. Ben do when what you continue to do Morgan?.

Vassar College ROTC David Army Marcus Ben Morgan
"vassar college" Discussed on Questlove Supreme

Questlove Supreme

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Questlove Supreme

"I was like wait a minute you bet right yeah exactly right exactly Okay so would you. Would you say your first steady client was saigon. He was the first Like i guess. Rapper there's a rappers From from my school. Like i went to vassar college for one year And there was rappers up there who i worked with loading ear lovely guys and then i came back to the city and so when introduced me to saigon so he was like the first person who was like over my house and actually gianforte as well at the time as good friends with john and we had this weird production duo called epstein and sons. I have no idea why as seen in sons and We he would be over at my place all the time and so yeah and then a gun sometimes. Bring down like steak and m one from de president. I remember very obvious. Reason being like very nervous when they over. I don't know what they're gonna think of me and then also being slightly disappointed when they weren't like horrible to me like almost like standing in the sitting in front row of don rickles concert. He doesn't insult what's going on paid for they were. They were a very very cool and patient with me. Because i really know now that. I didn't know what the fuck i was doing. But the person that really plucked me from like just anna nitty like just kinda. Dj was like dj. The parties was our friend dominick. And so tell the story of how that morphs into you can. I say that is is nicot like your first. Like major car worked as a producer. Nick i of course by a country mile ashore. Okay wow so we. I'd i worked on your first production. I was like. Yeah i i so fucking laugh about that like the first time we go into the studio. It's like i've been in the studio. It's like you and pino jane. Somebody was just saying i don't get used to this like i remember that. Real yeah this. This is one of those legendary moments. Where where you know like a ladies just gonna be just an open house of whoever comes in and you know it's it's not it's not normal for person to be generous inlet like usually like if someone finds a good sound good room or whatever they like. Lock it down. And they're like no one else goes in this room but us but it was almost like you know. Obviously if i say three. Pm i'll be here at seven or eight pm so whatever y'all do daytime is cool me as long as you know once i get there so we would just take advantage of all those early hours and work on other things feel like that album needs to be re released in a way because i feel like people don't understand nick akasa kilt dash it and then drop them out. It was the twentieth anniversary like last weekend. I was like nietzsche. Doesn't get you know a lot of other people anytime. That song comes on people like. Oh yeah fuck i love. That song was my my fiance partner. Whatever included like people because it was in the hilfiger commercial. An angry ended up the. Yeah so have offer you. That was my favorite show on that record. Sola yeah no she she really..

anna nitty vassar college nicot don rickles pino jane epstein dominick john Nick nick akasa nietzsche hilfiger Sola
"vassar college" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Pretty much hit it on the and it's It's it's you know it's devastating as everybody's dated. I mean you know. I've seen people all the commentary on social media executive i can. Actually i can actually read the comments to our company accounts going you know and see what people have been talking about. They have every right to you. Know it's just like a fans in baseball man you know that's part of the thing yet you know the social media course kind of equates to fans yelling guys and and and going after people and that's it'd be expected You know you get something like this In the biggest event and You know it it's Is everybody you said. It's just sickening. And it's it's devastating You know my personal perspective You know i've been following the game since the seventies this is you know for me you know i went to good. Schools graduated from vassar college. An art history degree. And i told my mom after. She invested all my education that i was going to go into racing business and this was when i graduated to and she was just so.

vassar college seventies
"vassar college" Discussed on Papo no Auge!

Papo no Auge!

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Papo no Auge!

"Killing guys made tonight the day at the main eddie. Se ludicrous if as the net alien vault Nobody gallup is our physiology Faster safety Mood it civil that it won't turn you. They fought the radio zoo Sheet the make a File faisal nasal in that respect to you. If there was sufficient Gave up right through the z. Mit mad phases of genes. Available to go sally Game on thiamine and don owned by like nina who Possibility i've assisted Chevy the illinois. Acitivity facial k it'll be good facilitated in the face of a designated That nobody Both disney to not the sl. Diana disaffected atypical. Fuzzy has been. I made me. I'm gonna wash. That is something do does he. Done on demand to vasa. When does she follow. The would do job catching to follow the netbook. You'll bring kind. Don brush be sewage Cries competitors lewd bat and ashby. Sewage will eat them remade alone. Allowable declare logistical at to the kitchen. Bitchy ones continue that Thrice net is but as the stylish E company dane. Don't lose a win by moody's Muzy executing fica is see activating in seat not equality Dries for key. You dot com bain Skull being as nat- vici elmo maintain he will sit the sequel neck. Donald e as your for my not without sack am hopeless. Have been cut and divest meeting gajate sewage. The making of you don't accepted as as Look at each project proposal analysis at the post z. Home he acapella song. Dan as pursuade net ese Sony Agra dive who named they'll go if the depositing guy go mukhi neck. Animal made the fini Facility style lia equality Discipline to this style need Sacked as to shake will sewage. Yakuza is usually loses. His solution me team was gina. Mika because aid is this is so elementary skew. Five what is said is he is no esotique a momentum it's woolliness Often vein. vein cookbook adding over the poster. But as Said that he should face the ad multiple bring jeff dancer fiancee shaft. ludicrously That is ethan Made as akiko babu who doesn't Today do now back Bain does Busy as acceptable ocean. It is your semi jeopardizing jamais to each At soins bill is passed. Thought any Missile kick up his viseu cheek. Louise taylor. Avenue to avenue elevated at vassar college. Yoga housing is how that is if you the avium within each profile is overeating e This is each team. Who's gonna do no celebrate bill for the base on this illusion as yet. They still get emotional. He as will decide A battle lozad live lou today decisions. We mean strategy aid to set of it on you. Vogue interview died Just as g. c. g. Nadal defies eighth Though as she tries not sell Dot h police seen dna Bodyshop as mchugh is only that not subpoena jokes getting seen him. He decorated office sola zola. Go casual seen Oakland guys man Heckling the guy don't it. Seattle discipline Frightening vocal mayes Nokia tackled this cynical A deluded jag nausea. No kavak separate from banner so squeezes my so Anything they'll get back to santa kellyanne some there. You keep rajabi to see neck on the say a three that you saw as z. new sofas achille Jim was so Both out decision though the mood keith. Arenas e disease he that he ban Logical yeah he ain't dodgers ichi element that as such so enemy buys feed it to the gene. See zen that. Russia maxine is a sad any king vision shapur african downpour mayes. I ability that switch facility.

Louise taylor sola zola today Nokia Seattle Mika Oakland Bain Nadal Yakuza achille Jim Today vassar college eighth tonight nina Diana each profile Sony each team
"vassar college" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Welcome to pg pine cassie podcast that saves physical therapist for missing out on amazing insight remarkable ideas and motivational stories in the world of physical therapy. I'm doing mckay. I'm your host Where are you watching him. A livestream at pt podcasts. And all the social media channels. Where where are you watching from our if you watch them a livestream just kind of dropped live and where you are geographically. I'm just curious where you guys watch this thing from. Its low weird record in my living room like. Oh yeah other people actually watch and listen to this thing if you're watching the replay as well Just let us know there. I'm just always curious. Let us know where you are. Loved doing that thing We've got a great show for you tonight. Before that a special celebrity cameos judge. I can hear you. I think it's a filter it and they don't know how to remove it. I'm here live. Not i'm not a cab i can. I can see that. He's not a cat. Sometimes you hit a button and you're a cat. We're how did that happen. I have no idea if you have no idea. What the references on what we just played it was court proceedings. That was a lawyer who somehow hit a button on his computer. Brought a zooms snapchat filter virtual court as a cat and he couldn't figure out how to get rid of that thing as you can see judge. I am here. i'm not a cat. Yes yes we know. You're not a cat so thanks so much all right. Let's got that of our system Our guest tonight. A registered dietitian and sports nutrition consultant for the kansas city chiefs chiefs For the d program at the university of pittsburgh and founder of her blog active eating advice also co founder of a sports nutrition. Consulting group called performance sixty five. Let's bring in our guest tonight. Leslie bonzi leslie. Welcome to the show. Thank you so my i don't have. I have filter because that would be casper for many now coming up i love it. You bring the puns. I'll bring the facebook Snatching i saw thing. And i was like you know what. At least we got a little levity in the world today. Courtesy that the thing that confused me. I showed just the screen that the guy with the filter is how the other two guys not lose their minds because people just don't have a sense of humor i mean honestly they don't buy hysterical and i thought i could hear the judge off camera. He wasn't even he was like okay. I think this is a filter and poor. Poor lawyer guy was like. I don't know how to do this. You could see his eyes darting around the filter. So i kind of felt bad but you know what if that's fifteen seconds of us to get us to laugh. I will take it right now. You got it every day. We have to find the humor. I believe in that strongly in your intro. Registered dieticians sports nutrition consult for the kansas city chiefs. Congratulations unfortunately lost in the big game. But i mean heck run right win. It last year doing fantastic. I mean i. i don't want to go on a limb here. But i think the future is bright for that franchise With some of those players. I have absolutely no doubt. And there's only gonna be one winner and sometimes you bring your a game and sometimes the other team does that the way it was then by the team is so talented and not only will they be back. And hopefully they'll be back without having to be in trouble into the atlantic and that in itself was absolutely masterful that we're able to orchestrate an entire season with minimal problem. Let me tell me. He's not an nba bubble of a few. It is an nfl bubble of several. The first round is on owens. Recovery science owens recovery science is a single source seeking certification personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training. Find out more. And get certified owens recovery. Science com art leslie. I we always get the hard questions out of the way early in the show. Who wants that first. Question is always the hardest. What are we drinking tonight. Drinking a hip hip rosette so there we go said leslie. You bring the puns. I'll bring the facebook I i've got a juice baum. Ipo from sloops. A cheers to leslie for coming here. We go all right so What's your superhero backstory registered dietitian so obviously nutrition and how that affects the human whether they're going for performance whether they're going for lifestyle. They're trying to You know Live with chronic ailment. Why did you decide to get into that profession. What about drian. yes. So i actually started out and field of biotechnology and went to vassar college. I hated so now and my parents are now what and so. It was either medical school or public. Health wasn't really sure. I wanna do went to graduate school of public out and literally. The first class was a nutrition and child nutrition women women and it was. Oh my god. That's it as china's at sound. It was the proverbial lightbulb at that time it. This is what i wanna do that. The professor this is what i wanna do. She said you're not an rda. We'll deal with that and we with that so it was working fulltime graduate school. The undergrad courses that i needed an incredibly supportive husband and there were no jobs pennsylvania. So when's the west. Virginia i worked in wheeling and had the opportunity to work with sports medicine. Docs and also exercise physiologist. And said are week with this all together with cardiac asians with pt patients with pulmonary rehab asians and not either or is that beautiful bland. You got all these people around the table. Become his court system for that patient to help that patient achieve the goals and that it kind of started erique back to pittsburgh called the department of athletics. And you need somebody to work with your athletes. They said just by the crap. Now watch upto. I work with athletes and then got a call from john who was the trainer or the steelers he said. Would you like to work with the steelers. Like yeah kinda winter. There's is that twenty four years with the steelers. this is now year. Eight for me with the I've worked in. Mlb weren't in nhl word with the wnba were with ballet and all along pt's and hec. They've been my group they they really. I have a son and daughter-in-law now or my sister-in-law with an at and just you know it either or you work together and really hoping reconstructing in rebuilding somebody and nourishing that individuals so that everybody get the best outcome we make each other look. Good yeah and and you can and you can look at it as a turf. This is mine. This is yours and you're not gonna get any effective results that way because you're dealing with a human humans are turf. Well let me ask you this working at a level like that you know. Nfl mlb wnba How can a physical therapist improve themselves to make themselves a better partner to working with. Rd's or a tease like. What can we be better. How can we be a better team. Player what advice. I'm sure you've seen t people do it really. Well maybe you've seen a culpable not. Do it well. What are some things.

twenty four years pennsylvania last year two guys Virginia john facebook Leslie bonzi vassar college snapchat fifteen seconds today first round tonight kansas one winner Eight atlantic first first class
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 1 year ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport as NPR's Joe Parker reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country. And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be a fact, if for one thing they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for stars and so that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China. Caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Hopeless. He's nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the with the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives. A vaccine. Made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca's also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in several countries, including India. That country is also likely to have a vaccine candidate that will be inexpensive and widely available. But Judith Twigg says there's already another major entrant into the international vaccine arena. Back on August 11th the Russian government with great stand, Fehr announced the first in the world registration of a vaccine against Cove It twig is at Virginia Commonwealth University, and she follows Russian health policy closely. The Russian vaccine is what's known as a viral vector vaccine somewhat newer technology than the two leading Chinese vaccines. The Russians chose Sputnik V is the name for their vaccine. Tweak says They did that for a reason. They're very deliberately invoking imagery of Russia re emerging is great power status. We're back. We're at the scientific and technological top of the world, and we're ready to start sharing our technology with everyone. The problem there is that they had not only barely Started phase three clinical trials, They had barely started ramping up productions that was back in August. Twigg says production has ramped up and Russia now claims its vaccine is more than 90% effective, although data for that claim haven't been published yet for other scientists to scrutinize Several countries are ready to try the vaccine, including Argentina, Mexico and India. One thing is clear the world is going to need a number of vaccines to work if the global pandemic is really going to be brought under control. Joe

China Joe Parker Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Vassar College NPR J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Russia U. Polio Sars Judith Twigg International Vaccine Arena Russian Government Center For Strategic And Inter Indonesia Brazil
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

02:57 min | 1 year ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Thank you. And the Corona virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport. As NPR's Joe Packer reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country, And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be If active for one thing, they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for SARS. So that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Copeland sees nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the With the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives of vaccine made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca is also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in

China Joe Packer Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Sars NPR U. Vassar College Russia Polio Copeland J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Indonesia Brazil Turkey Center For Strategic And Inter Oxford University
"vassar college" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The Bible, Finding Grace, Beauty and meaning. Kate is a graduate of Vassar College, where she was given the Sarah Caitlin Award for religious leadership. And Virginia Theological Seminary, where she received the Harris Award for academic excellence and Leadership ability. She was also a carpenter scholar at Yale Divinity School. Hey, thanks for being with us again. And Merry Christmas. Merry Christmas. Last week, You brought us up to speed about ST John's Cathedral in downtown Jacksonville In the past year, you've ramped up your online offerings, including courses of study. As well as worship opportunities. Tell us about some of those offerings. Oh, we've had some wonderful things. We've been looking at the history of our own stained glass windows, which I think is Feeding people because they missed the sanctuary. We've had some wonderful discussions about race using a national curriculum called Sacred Ground. We've had classes on saints of the past. Icons, lots of things going on, and lots of worship to Com Plain and morning prayers. You have a new book out Angels of the Bible from forward movement Publishers, which we talked about last week. And you did a zoom conversation with the Episcopal Booksellers Association about the book, which I understand was quite successful. You spoke of the continued existence of angels. How did they exist? And how can we become more aware of their work in the world? One of the fascinating things about this time, Peter is that I think we are becoming more aware of mystical things, things that are present but beyond our perception Um, I think it's partly because human beings are now linked through in the virtual world, and we don't really see how that happens. But nevertheless we find each other there, so the reality of the celestial realm is quite significant. In fact, There's been a lot of work done through the ages of many levels of angels, many different types and species. In a sense on def, you look at the scripture they do break down in tow. Lots of different kinds, So it's It's a very complex and diverse group. Believe it or not. Last time you were here, we talked about another book of yours called Healed How Mary Magdelin was made well from church publishing. It's a biblical and theological perspective on mental illness. How do you make the connection between Mary and mental illness in that book? Well, Mary Magdelin we know from the Gospel of Luke had what is called seven demons and in Jesus's time, demons were simply when people were afflicted with things that no one could see. So, for example, let's take Epilepsy. Epilepsy would have been called a demon because all of a sudden the person out of nowhere starts falling on the ground and foaming at the mouth and their body is writhing around. Well, that looks like possession, Tonto. The people who are unscientific, so demons ranged. It's really a broad umbrella concept, everything from cutting yourself to hearing voices, too. More physical ailments like epilepsy or anorexia, things that would happen to a person that no one could explain where it looked like something was happening that they weren't in control of Those were all called demons. So if Mary Magdalene had seven, that means that people have been watching her, and there were seven different manifestations several different kinds of behaviors that she was She was acting out. So this this, um legend about her being a prostitute is completely inaccurate. Number one. There's not even a word for prostitute in the Gospels, but Number to someone who behaved in that manner would have been considered pretty much untouchable. Homeless. Most likely most of the Damani acts in the Gospels live in graveyards because they have nowhere to be. No one wants to be around them. They find them scary. So my hope and writing that book was too Give people who struggle with any kind of mental health issue, which is really all of us. Mental health is a spectrum. It's like physical health. You know, when you go to the doctor, the doctor doesn't say you're perfect. They always tell you have to work on something. You know you your way a little too much, or Sugar is too high or whatever. Usually, doctors don't say you're perfect. Same with mental health. We always have things we need to work on. But it was my hope that Mary Magdalene who has been so misunderstood Could become a role model a saint. For those who struggle with any kind of mental health issue from anxiety to depression. Whatever it is Because she was chosen by Jesus to be the first witness to the resurrection. And there's so much shame associated with mental health issues these days, But yet Jesus honors her above everyone else. So obviously he wasn't ashamed of her s O. I think it's really important that we reconsider. Who? Mary Magdalene Woz and really, just using the biblical fax get away from this concept of her being some kind of prostitute and understand her is being broken in ways that so many people are And then when she's healed by Jesus, and when she becomes the greatest disciple on the first creature. It means so much more. It gives hope to people that may feel like there is no hope. Hey, you are a priest, A dean and author and so much more. How did you experience your calling to the ministry? Well, you know, like like in most lives that calling sort of grows throughout your lifetime, and I was born into a very devout household. My parents they're just amazing people, beautiful people. Um, my dad did struggle with a lot of clinical depression, which no one knew what to do with at the time and there were times when he could not work. He just stayed in bed. But he was very clear that God Ah kept him going. So as a little girl, I started praying probably in a more intense way than most, and I went to church and church for me was a very loving place. My mother was a concert pianist in a composer. She would play the organ and the chancel area and turn on the lights in that area, and I would get to play and slide down the aisles and my socks and hide in the pews. This is a beautiful old Gothic church in New Haven, Connecticut, where I grew up. S o. I found it to be a place of great beauty of felt the presence of this awesome sense of God and of peace. Also a place of really stability grown ups who seemed always be there and who Love me even when I didn't show up for months at a time, But I thought I wanted to be Meryl Streep. Actually, I wanted to be an actress. And I went to Vassar because that's where Meryl Streep went. But I ended up being fascinated with religion, studied Russian Orthodox Christianity and minored in the Russian language. And all of that gradually led to a practice of regular prayer, which gradually Like pieces of a puzzle coming together. I realized that God had been equipping meat for the ministry. Throughout the years, all the public speaking work that I did. A lot of singing was a resident advisor Did love counseling. All these things were God shaping me for the priesthood s o. I was one of the youngest people to go to seminary Youngest women. There were a lot of Older women in my generation who had other careers or had raised Children. But I was, I think, even in my third year of seminary was the youngest woman in the seminary. Okayed as we celebrate the first Sunday after Christmas here, sermon focuses on the Gospel of John Chapter one. Would you read the text Force? I'd love to. In the beginning was the word. And the word was with God. And the word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through him. And without him, not one thing came into being What has come into being in him was life and the life was the light of all people. The light shines in the darkness. And the darkness did not overcome it. This is part of the beautiful opening of John's gospel proclaiming the word Jesus is the light of all people shining in the darkness. What strikes you as you read this? Well, this is often called us. As you know, the logos him. We believe it may have been sung and it really has a cosmic quality. It's such a unique way to open the gospel. The other three gospels begin with, you know. Well. Two of them begin with the birth of Christ and one begins at John the Baptist preaching, but this one begins at the beginning of all time. It's just so cosmic and so glorious. The notion that Christ is not just the human Jesus, who walked the Earth, the incarnation but also since the beginning of time, all communication that comes from God is the Christ..

Jesus Mary Magdalene Epilepsy Mary Magdelin Virginia Theological Seminary Meryl Streep Yale Divinity School Vassar College Mary Magdalene Woz ST John's Cathedral Jacksonville Mary Kate Sarah Caitlin Episcopal Booksellers Associat John New Haven Peter
"vassar college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He is an English professor at Vassar College as well. But for purposes today he is an oasis superfan cua. Welcome to all of it. Really happy to be here. So let's go back to 1995. What was the music scene when Oasis started to emerge, and why did they break through? You know, in the mid nineties, there's a lot of excitement about rock music in England, even though they were actually arguably more interesting things going on in dance, music and other scenes. A lot of music and really coalesce around the identity of Britpop. And I think circuit 1995 1996. People were just really curious Which band would really break through and maybe find an audience beyond beyond England And you know, there were bands that were Or clever, bit more sarcastic, maybe a bit more socially aware, but you know, Oasis for the ones that really went out. Tell people where they were from and how the sort of Pugilistic brothers of Liam and Noel Gallagher came to form a band. I think part of their success really had to do with their backstory. There were these brothers as you mentioned, they really seemed to both like deeply love and deeply deeply hate one another. So even before they were remotely successful in the early nineties, you know stories of them just you know, breaking out. Fistfight during rehearsals were pre famous. They came out of Manchester in the early nineties they born and raised in the Council of State. I think a story goes that a rather abusive father and I think music was just really one of their only weighs envisioning a better future. Noelle was a roadie her for mildly. Successful bands, but he always dreamed of being a rock star himself. And I think Part of what made the brothers such interesting pop culture duo was the fact that Liam, the singer was clearly like more charismatic one. But no one was the one who Actually, you know, write really memorable tunes and conjure up some of the feelings that they were going for the band. What's the story? Morning Glory was the band's actually their second album. The first, definitely maybe was released just a year earlier. What was going on for them during that year. And why do you think the second one is the one that sort of really helped them? You know, kind of was really cement their status. Yeah, You know, I don't I I still don't quite understand. I mean, I introduced me as a super fan like I remember being incredibly invest in their first album. Definitely. Maybe On DH. Part of it is just that they've always been so good at talking about what it is they're doing as they're doing it. I think when musicians do that often, it feels like super self serving annoying, but You know the way they would talk about what they're trying to do. They describe their first album is like songs about being alive, being young and having a good time being sad, but knowing that it could get better. And I think there's this this really incredible tenderness. That first album I think, by the time they record the second album, you know it's full of these anthem like you played Wonderwall. Don't look back in anger. But In a way, like the songs don't actually make sense, like they're They're kind of so big and capacious that If you actually listened the lyrics. It's easy to sing along, but it's It's also easy to sort of insert yourself into them because it's not entirely clear sometimes what the song's about You mention Don't look back in anger. Let's play it. Ah, this is from what's the story? Morning glory. This is Oasis. Gotta play probably one hotel Tuesday. I don't like this before. This is from others by the way. Slip inside. But things that That was so interesting because that was actually him. Noel.

Oasis professor Noel Gallagher England Liam Noelle Vassar College Manchester Pugilistic Council of State
"vassar college" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Hour Long June July twenty first interview with Schmidt is a first in a series of social justice leaders featured conducted by self-described anti-fascist and old time buddy of Schmidt social media personality awkward. Awkward Leads for ten demands for Justice Movement, a roadmap defunding, and in full abolition of police and prisons. Before Schmidt was sworn in as secretary of Sudan's district. Attorney for Multnomah, County Oregon he video chatted with awkward to discuss his priorities as incoming chief prosecutor. Twenty year old friendship began at Vassar College. Of course, it came from a college, I in the in the UK a lot of the you know, wha hobbyists in these terrorists Muslims radicalized in prison on the US these leftist radicalize in college. In New York Donald by what General Society with demons radicals who made who made Voodoo Oh look like conservatives as DA people probably assume that your mission is to put people in jail offer previous I. Know That's not what you do. He added so very got like That's the thing too about like you could tell if an interview is bullshit where not it will I not only does a person like doing know each other but secondly. When they preface a question like if you look at Alex Jones is interview with trump right? He's like look you know you've been right about so much in any ask a question it's like. Well, look you're. You're you're asking softball question well, kissing his ass At, the same time. so dss all a farce. Shit.

Schmidt Vassar College Justice Movement trump softball New York Donald Sudan County Oregon secretary Alex Jones prosecutor US Attorney UK General Society
"vassar college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The conversations were having right now in this country about race and racism in the wake of the killing of George Floyd our first of all over jail and also hard depending on who you are but we're having them a lot of them and Hollywood has noticed a couple of big documentary projects about civil rights in America have been green lighted and are getting funded market place's jasmine guards reports documentary films have always had a hard time getting funded they just don't easily translate into box office hits professor mia mask with Vassar College says when it comes to investment filmmakers of color have an even more difficult time certainly there are out liars Spike Lee and obviously if they do Bernays thirteenth and and her wonderful work but there are many filmmakers of color black and Latino in particular who really struggle Hollywood has been vocally supportive of the on going protests demanding racial justice there's been a lot of talk about the need for more diverse writers rooms but artists and activists say tinsel town needs to put its money where its mouth is fond of more diverse projects where she draws with the nonprofit color of change says it's time to look into the question of resources and power the decision about what gets green lake and what does it what gets more marketing budget and what does it mean often those things are are kind of paints racial lines and often it is a very black and white issue something is happening just not entirely through Hollywood money NBA stars lebron James and Russell Westbrook have taken matters into their own hands producing various films about the Tulsa race massacre of nineteen twenty one in which hundreds of African Americans were killed and injured by white residents in Oklahoma professor Jason E. squire from the university of southern California says there is an audience your documentaries back in the day had a reputation of whole it's going to be very preachy and chichi I don't know if I'm going to go see it and that's changed the public appetite for documentaries has just increased exponentially if he gets made people will watch now more than ever I'm jasmine Garst for market place when something like this pandemic happens a global crisis it.

professor jasmine Garst university of southern Califor Oklahoma Tulsa Russell Westbrook lebron James NBA Spike Lee George Floyd Jason E. squire green lake Bernays Vassar College America Hollywood
"vassar college" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KCRW

"The conversations were having right now in this country about race and racism in the wake of the killing of George Floyd our first of all over jail and also hard depending on who you are but we're having them a lot of them and Hollywood has noticed a couple of big documentary projects about civil rights in America have been green lighted and are getting funded market place's jasmine guards reports documentary films have always had a hard time getting funded they just don't easily translate into box office hits professor mia mask with Vassar College says when it comes to investment filmmakers of color have an even more difficult time certainly there are out liars Spike Lee and obviously able to Bernays thirteenth and and her wonderful work but there are many filmmakers of color black and Latino in particular who really struggle Hollywood has been vocally supportive of the ongoing protests demanding racial justice there's been a lot of talk about the need for more diverse writers rooms but artists and activists say tinsel town needs to put its money where its mouth is fond of more diverse projects where she draws with the nonprofit color of change says it's time to look into the question of resources and power the decision about what gets green lit and what does it what gets more marketing budget and what doesn't and often those things are are kind of change racial lines and often it is a very black and white issue funding is happening just not entirely through Hollywood money NBA stars lebron James and Russell Westbrook have taken matters into their own hands you're producing various films about the Tulsa race massacre of nineteen twenty one in which hundreds of African Americans were killed and injured by white residents in Oklahoma professor Jason E. squire from the university of southern California says there is an audience your documentaries back in the day had a reputation of soul it's going to be very preachy and chichi I don't know if I'm going to go see it and that's changed the public appetite for documentaries has just increased exponentially if he gets made people will watch now more than ever I'm jasmine Garst for market place when something like this pandemic happens a global crisis.

Spike Lee jasmine Garst university of southern Califor Oklahoma Tulsa Russell Westbrook lebron James NBA Bernays George Floyd professor Jason E. squire Vassar College America Hollywood
Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 2 years ago

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Larry Larry Kramer Larry Aids Aids Vassar College Yale Manhattan United States Dr Fry Clement Fry Greenwich Village Unhappy College New York City Grace New Haven Hospital GM Marcus Aspirin
"vassar college" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Me tell you about our guest bathroom helper attended Vassar College of the north London university where he graduated with a bachelor's degree in philosophy now he has worked as a history teacher in the Brooklyn projects a tutor in the Philippines elektrische in in England a truck smuggler in central Africa and has produced a screenwriter in Germany he returned to New York City to write what he considers his life work which he did several years ago the god part of the brain here is back on coast to coast Matthew how are you Sir I'm alive so that's a plus that is a plus your breathing well you're into your current you I am I am I mean what what I call Death Valley no my gosh it's it's it's a tense situation to be sure are you able to get out at all or what's the situation yeah I mean we pretty much have the freedom to do what we want there's no you know there's no mandatory locked down or anything no people are people are staying safe people are being smart in the city you know most of wearing masks except the joggers who for some reason don't think that they are Aries bad though but everyone else's wearing maelstrom you know staying home and keeping their their six feet distance in there's a line to get into some of the supermarkets in into the post office everyone's keeping their distance but yeah you know we're all just trying to do our part to to the flatten the curve in and survive yeah let's hope it dies down quickly and we can slowly start getting back to whatever normal might be after this method or when you wrote the god part of the brain several years ago what was it that got you going and what compelled you to write well you know after a lifetime of questioning what is the nature of my reality more or less and my a spiritual being or am I a physical being when I die in my ashes to ashes dust to dust or is there some cereal sold full you know element within me that will live forever you know that was sort of one of the as it as it is with many of us it was one of the driving questions in my life and I've read a lot of studied a lot of philosophy a lot of science and when I you know just so happened I was in Germany at the time working for a film company and I sort of had an epiphany and came up with this solution and once I did I realize I was on to something novel that is sort of a culmination of of what I'd been searching for so I was motivated to come back to New York and they took off for few years and and and wrote it but but you know that was the motivation was that I felt that I had stumbled on to something that no one else would really come up with that as of yet so so yeah I felt I needed to do this and the god part of the brain is it's controversial because you know there are a lot of people who will say if there is a god and we'll get into your reasons why you don't think there is but we'll talk about the with the wiring of the brain but it is it is controversial did over the years now over the last several years that it's been our what what what has been the response but I mean it it's it's been selling well but I mean are people sending you hate emails you get favorable emails what happens well short when you're telling the world that you know that there's a neuroscience that can prove there is no spiritual reality that there is no god but all the religions they believe in our fictitious are that there is no soul there is no after life but certainly you know annoys a few people and and yes I've gotten I've gotten death threats I've gotten hate mail death threats that's that's the range you know for the most part at least from the scientific community and from the secular community from academics it cetera I've received you know nothing but high praise but certainly for the you know people who are entrenched in their beliefs they take offense to what I write so yeah I've gotten some angry some angry bitter stuff and then some other people whom you know took a lighter approach and we're like you know we pray for your soul and hope that you find the light of god and don't burn in hell so you know goes both ways well in the end the only death threats uncalled for with just about anything but my god these are your view as well yeah you would think I mean they're your views whether we agree with you or not is not the point but you don't you know go after somebody and try to get threatened to kill them because you don't agree with them my gosh right well that's a nice thought that one wouldn't but what if we if all we have to do is you know open any given history book to see that the history of man is you know is is spotted with religious wars with crusades with inquisitions with with jihad I mean you know from the beginning and that's part of what I write about the destructive you know influence of this of this instinct in us that it it it it riles us up to fanaticism to the point that we're willing to strap of dust on ourselves and walk into a supermarket in the name of our god so I'm not the first person who's who's felt the wrath of an angry religious person and sadly you won't be the last correct what was that aha moment for for for you when you started putting together the guard part of the brain was there some episode that occurred in your life it's a good question it wasn't an episode it was it was and there was an aha moment so you know I I was living in Germany I was working for a film company I had sold the screenplay to this European film company and they offered me a job and I was contemplating working there and moving there and I you know first second I thought you know what you know I studied philosophy always very entrenched in science and philosophy when I was younger and I felt like all right I'm I'm about to take a job you know I'm giving up the life of you know putting down my toga and you know giving up the philosophical realm to embrace the material world and take the job and accept the salary and I felt a little saddened by that that I kind of felt like I would be putting my philosophical self aside and you know one has to feed themselves and keep a roof on their head and I said you know what fine I'm gonna have to live my life and that's that's the way it is but I don't you know what every once every five years just for the heck of it to revisit the question and I said before I tell them yes that I'm to take this job I just already all revisited now I close the script that I was working on and I literally I typed out on to the screen I was like well I'll I'll read dress the question once more I haven't really thought about these things in a while but like so in the last years since I've last fought about any of this you know has anything changed I've I've witnessed any miracle have I seen anything that you know has has changed my my outlook on life that I see things differently that I believe that maybe I've witnessed something that has given me a sense of faith but maybe there is some spiritual reality and I was like no no no colors you know nothing's happened right I have had no look at the knees you know so I typed on the computer might in the last years have I come across anything that has given me any reason to believe that I could say I have absolute knowledge of god for certain knowledge of a god hello why you know hello like no you know there's there's there's nothing and then I had my epiphany I was like huh like there actually is something I can say with certain knowledge of god I was like this isn't the colonel that I was kind of hoping for but sometimes things taken and you know unexpected and strange angle that you weren't for singing I was gonna say it's sometimes god works in mysterious ways lastly but sometimes god works in mysterious ways so I was like there actually is something I can say with certainty of god it's sitting on the computer screen in front of me it's a word I was like it's a tangible thing if I say it I can hear it in braille I can touch it god is the word of like okay that's interesting wasn't expecting to go there but I was like okay so we've all the science and I study what does science say about words well it's the union convention it's a human contrivance it originates from the brain because we are linguistic animal and we have parts of our brain that generate our linguistic abilities so like okay interesting so guarded the word words come from the Yuma in brain moreover I said it's an it's a word that exists in every culture that I've ever studied anthropological you speaking every culture has believed in some form of a god every culture has had a word for soul or spirit in their vocabulary so I was like well what does science say about universal behavioral patterns and what science says about universal behavioral patterns is that they are wired into us the fact that all dogs barking cats meowing beavers build dams where humans have language it's not an accident it's not a coincidence it's because it's wired into our brains there are parts of our brain intact here's what we could call the me out part of its bringing a specific region responsible for generating back specific behavior in humans every culture's had language again not an accident it's because it's wired into our brains and with the help of neuroscience we now know about the Wernicke's area in the broke and the angular gyrus parts of the brain that are specific to our language capacities if you damage one of those parts still suffer what's called the linguistic aphasia the loss of an impairment of some aspect of your ability to either comprehend language or to communicate it so I suddenly realized one could apply that to the fact that every human culture no matter how isolated as believed in some form of a spiritual reality suggesting that Youmans are genetically predisposed that there we are hard wired that there must be parts of the brain that compel us to perceive reality from this particular bent but if if for hard wired little graphic if for hard wired dole there are people who don't believe atheists you don't believe what happened to the wiring and you let me refer you to chapter eleven why are there easiest is a chapter in my right all right and it and and yeah and it's it's it's an excellent question so much so that it prompted me to write a chapter on it and I'll give you the answer that I came up with okay which is not which is now an established part of cognitive science so for every cognitive traits we possess we form to a bell curve for every physical trait that we possess so if you take a population of any given thousand people and you measured let's just say some physical characteristics like height you would find that they would form to a bell curve but basically the book to the average person would fall into the range of what we would call average height the belt you know the the the home of the bell curve but on the tapering extremes there would be a certain sub section of people a minority on one end to work effectively short and on one end to work such that we pull right lower than the means shorter than the mean well the same thing as the holds true for cognitive traits so for instance humans are a musical animals were inherently musical are you able to any culture in the world they will bang on things to make music hello people will thing however it's a cognitive trade because of you men variation genetic variants we all come out a little bit different so if we were to look at the bell curve of musicality we would find that the average person possessive what we possess is what we could call average musical potential and on the tapering extremes however there's a smaller cross section of individuals from any given society.

Vassar College north London university Brooklyn England Africa Germany New York City Philippines
Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

Environment: NPR

07:11 min | 2 years ago

Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

"Life on down inside our homes might be noisy outside. The streets and skies are noticeably quieter. And because there's less human sound out there. Many people are hearing more wildlife as invisible. Is Amy Wendell reports? The relationship between human noise and the rest of nature is often discordant. So is our quiet in this moment. Having any impact the Internet is humming with rumors of animals. Reclaiming cities and towns. Dolphins are allegedly swimming in Venetian canals. Black bears are supposedly rating trash cans in La and mountain. Goats have been seen descending the Welsh hills to stroll through town some of these quarantine silver lining stories have been debunked though for now at least the goats seem legit but other anecdotes about nature being more present in the absence of humans. Come from reliable sources. Npr's Eleanor Beardsley observed for the first time in years birds singing throughout Paris. But what really we've on is. I'm sitting by the San River right now on a sunny evening and I just heard a river bird like egrets on polls and stuff. Is that not wild? I have never heard that before. Yeah we can hear subtlety of life around us that we haven't heard in a long long time this is Bernie Krause. One of the founders of a field called soundscape ecology that studies. How all the sounds in an ecosystem interact with each other and with us. Crouse has been recording the natural world for more than fifty years and in that time he's observed lots of ways are noise is disruptive to wildlife to the fraud in Jeff. He tells this story of how back in the Nineteen Ninety S. He was recording thousands of frogs that gather in the spring at Mono Lake in California and Croke in unison Buddhist. Really big almost like all the little frogs have joined together to become one giant frog. It's actually a defense mechanism helps keep predators from locating and attacking individual frogs but cross says the military started doing test flights over mono basin and the roar of the jets would cause the frogs to fall out of sync. Say would take like forty five minutes before they could get in sync again and during that period of time we watched as a couple of great horned owls. Coyote came in and picked off a couple of frogs. Eventually this led to significant population decline. All because of a jet across says it's not just jets it's helicopters and chainsaws and tractors and traffic messages endless mounts of noise until now with billions of people stuck inside our noise. Sprint is dramatically quieter in Paris. For instance a group that monitors noise pollution saw as much as a ninety percent. Drop in human sounds since the city went on lockdown so how is this relative? Quiet impacting wildlife. There was a question trending on Google. Arbor D- singing louder. This is Megan goal. A sensory ecologist and professor at Vassar College. If anything I would actually guessed that the birds are not singing as loud. That's because goal says they aren't having to compete against human sound which could be a good thing for the birds for one thing. All explains noise has been shown to increase stress hormone responses in birds which affects immune function. So less noise right now might equal less illness plus birds living in bustling cities or even busy suburban neighborhoods. Have to expend a lot of energy singing louder so now that things are quieter she says the birds might have extra energy to us on different things like spending time foraging saving energy to feed your kids etc so possibly will see animals that have larger broods or healthier offspring. You might also get changes in how females are selecting meets now out of that speculation of course but I think there's a lot of really interesting things that could be happening while how this all plays out for wildlife is for the time being left to informed speculation one impact of our stillness is ringing clear as a bell so the earth is like literally humming underneath our feet that's right. Yep. Any for Seto is seismologist. Who recently observed along with colleagues in Brussels in California a huge drop in human caused vibrations on the Earth's crust it was impressive It was just a reminder that we as a civilization have a noticeable imprint on the world in ways that sometimes we don't appreciate I for one did not appreciate that. Humans rattle the earth like a tiny earthquake. But we do mostly from transportation automobiles planes trains even are walking registers on seismographs as a kind of constant static and now that static is way less noisy giving seismologists a unique opportunity to perhaps detect more subtle vibrations that usually get drowned out like the ones coming from inside volcanoes close to cities. I think it's an open question. How strong this changes? But it's something that I know. People in the seismology community are really interested in exploring and some scientists are attempting to measure this strange and profound sonic experiment above ground. The silent cities project is a call for scientists journalists artists. Really anyone with good enough audio equipment to record what they're hearing while stuck at home to me. It's very peaceful to walk and be able to hear liberty. Tiny sounds Amandine. Gas is a soundscape ecologist in France who helped create the project back insects moving in leaves for example. Does eating the flowers. Also it's spring right now so so increase also annoys the wildlife. Sounds you hear so far? Participants are recording one hundred and sixty one locations all over the world and the data an expected thirty five thousand dollars or more audio will be available for any researcher who wants to analyze it in the future. Listening to our new sound environment is not just for researchers though ecologist making gall says it can be for everyone one of potentially positive things that could come out of. This is that people are having a chance to interact with the world around them in a way that they may be having interacted with before and those interactions could lead people like eleanor. Beardsley to not only consider the wildlife around them now. The birds singing on the sun but help them keep it in mind as things get back to being noisier.

Eleanor Beardsley Paris California Researcher Amy Wendell Bernie Krause Nineteen Ninety San River Mono Basin Mono Lake La And Mountain Vassar College Google Crouse Coyote NPR Megan Arbor Fraud Sprint
Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:00 min | 2 years ago

Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

"So the other day Darius we took a little trip to a huge apartment complex in New York it is enormous one of the biggest biggest in the world. It spans like ten city blocks in New York houses around thirty thousand people. Yeah and it's known locally as stuyvesant town or Sta towns down a uh-huh cool village cat. It's like a bunch of giant brick towers sort of all identical in rows and we were there because because of an indicator an indicator given to us by Ben Ho. He's an economist at Vassar College. Yeah and Ben says this indicator is a big deal a milestone down and win this indicator hit this milestone. Ben said he was like Oh my God. I thought there should be parades and like people cheering and instead like there's a the articles and like the trade press and people haven't talked about much. I think it's a contender for the most important indicator of all time the most important indicator for all time at least for me. Ooh Okay make your case. This is fascinating. What is this indicator? Indicator is the cost of solar electricity specifically that the cost of solar electricity has been falling by a lot not falling by so much. It's actually now competitive with fossil fuels. It's gotten that cheap which brought us to the roof of a twenty storey brick building in February roof that has now covered in solar panels. And we were there. Because this roof is owned by one of the biggest baddest most profit focus companies on Wall Street in large large part because of Ben's indicator this is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Smith and we are on the roof of building. We're here twenty or so stories above these filaret colds today on the show the price of solar what changed and I've been thinks this so important. It's a little windy too. Beautiful View his beautiful this message comments from NPR sponsored show. Bonnie Haute made to taste just like milk. Doc It's creamy frothy and great with coffee and cookies but without the dairy because it's not milk it's almost milk new Shabani owed support also also comes from the capital. One saver card earned four percent cashback on dining and entertainment to percents at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases now. Now when you go out you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet? Terms apply back in two thousand six. Ben Ho was the lead energy economist. Missed under president. George W Bush and he was part of a team looking for energy alternatives economically viable energy alternative. Being the operative word there the energy source to beat was coal it was the cheapest source of energy and back then like solar was almost like a joke. At the time I was looking at the numbers and cost five cents ends or four cents per kilowatt hour natural gas also in that range and sold there was like a dollar per kilowatt hour. Oh Wow and you were just like this. This is never going to be cost effective. You heard that correctly recklessly. Solar Power was twenty times more expensive than coal solar was just never gonNA happen. It was a non starter. It was a punchline and then something changed changed actually a bunch of. Something's yeah a lot of small things that took the price down by five or ten percent so for one thing. Government subsidies on the state and federal level brought costs down for businesses and residents got more people to buy into solar which meant more companies started making solar panels and then companies that made solar panels started competing against each other tomake cheaper more efficient panels as a result. The panel's got nearly twice as efficient and the price dropped from about a thousand dollars per panel to around one hundred and fifty dollars per panel today. Hey It's a series of sort of small process improvements over the past ten fifteen years for the cost down like a magical amount of money a magical amount of money. The prices solar job by more than ninety ninety percent from one dollar per kilowatt hour fifteen years ago to four cents per kilowatt hour today and that is today's indicator four four cents per kilowatt hour. which makes the cheapest form of electricity in the US and also in the world cheaper than cheaper natural gas jubilant coal cheaper than coal? Oh my drop. Yes because when that happens is ben everything changed and then thinks this will take solar power from like a fringy source of energy to a major maybe even the main source of energy in the world but at this point solar energy still only accounts for about two percent of the energy in the US I think that's totally changes. At least how icy climate change right so before when like solar and renewables more expensive it was all about sort of getting people to like sacrifice to do the right thing And now it's actually just getting people to save money. I mean if we're looking at pure economics though I mean if solar is only two percent and we have these huge entrenched energy can companies from the biggest companies in the world. That have a lot of money. A lot of jobs tied up in traditional like fossil fuels and those kinds of energies. Like how I mean. That seems like some daunting economics to overcome right. I think I'm a big believer in the markets. Now the soldiers act cheaper. Actually think that the market and capitalist pretty powerful driving force to move people torward the cheapest form of energy and you see that happening right So they just had the biggest year in history in the United States because of just the fallen costs companies like facebook book and Microsoft have started investing millions of dollars in solar energy and so has blackstone blackstone in case. You haven't heard them a giant Wall Street private equity firm Um and Hedge Fund. Basically they deal with money. Enormous amounts so much money. They manage hundreds of billions of dollars yep blackstone definitely really not like a hippy. dippy let's all try to save the Planet Company. No no no. This is not like reusable tote bag Greenpeace canvasser type company. They care about the bottom line and blackstone has started investing millions in Solar Power Blackstone owns the company that manages Stuy town the apartment complex in New York with all the solar panels and Kelly vaas is the CEO of that division of the company. And he oversaw this big solar project and he took us out to the roof to check out the solar panels firsthand. We're standing standing on the rooftop status in town and you're looking at a few of the nine thousand six hundred seventy one solar panels that we put on rooftops to be precise and isn't isn't the that's for size. Nine thousand six hundred and seventy one solar panels on building after building just spanning ten. The city blocks just laid out before us. All these buildings like as far as we can buildings so as you can see like how many square feet of roof twenty two acres does that have to do the math on the square feet on that. We did the math. We did the math and it is almost a million square feet of roof all painted white and all covered in shiny black glass solar solar panels all about the size of a foosball table. Kellyanne is team installed the panels last year and they estimated it will reduce Stuy town carbon footprint by about sixteen percent so the project cost of eleven million. That's a lot. Will you lose money on it as a cost neutral we make a little money we we we will have a return on investment. It's not significant. It's it's not a lot of money but it is definitely not a loss if it had been a loss Kelly. They couldn't have really considered going solar now that they have these panels up and running. Kelly says lots of other building managers and businesses have been taking exactly this tour that we took asking about how they might go solar as well. What's the biggest this question that you get from people who are considering doing it? Did you make money on it. They want to know. Is there a return on it. Is it affordable all of those things and in the answer for I was yes blackstone was so jazzed about the results of its Stuy town project it is investing another eight hundred and fifty million dollars and solar and this says Ben is exactly clear why he thinks the cheapness of solar is the most important indicator of all time on this sort of problem of climate change. I think yeah I've optimism. I think in part because a lot of the stories you hear about climate change all assume that coal-based future I mean listen. Climate change is not over as a problem Ben Points out. There is still significant obstacles to overcome if solar is to become a major energy source for the world. I mean for one thing. It only works when the sun is out. That's a problem battery technology that could store. Solar Energy is in great right now also the panels would need to get more efficient for all of STA towns. Nine thousand Rosen odd solar panels. Solarte will still only supply about six percent of the energy for the apartment complex. Still says now that economics is on its side. Now that the mathworks he thinks solar has a bright view. Now now biggest hurdles past right. I think it's for me. Is the most exciting indicator. It makes me optimistic about the future.

BEN Solar Power Blackstone Ben Ho Stuy New York United States Kelly Vaas Blackstone Vassar College Blackstone Blackstone Darius Stacey Smith NPR
"vassar college" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"From NPR this is hidden brain. I'm Sean Covey Danton. In the spring of Nineteen eighty-five Bill. Maura was wrapping up his high school education. And Getting Ready to move to Poughkeepsie. New York. Come fall he'd be starting his freshman year at Vassar. College like many incoming college students bill. Who was concerned about how he would pay for his education? My financial aid package in my freshman year was basically a combination of of student loans and work study but but at the end of bills sophomore year. He received an unexpected letter in the mail. I get this letter congratulating me for receiving something called the Hager Scholars Award and This the letter explained that the award would take the place in my financial aid package of my student loan. And and here's what it's sad. This is an interest free loan with a moral obligation to repay and I was like what like. What does that mean? Okay I will take the money like I think my young self was like I will take the money and I don't have to have a suit loaning more. Thank you very much. It wasn't that simple though the phrase moral obligation to repay stock with bill and made him think so. So you know the time I was like what is that. I don't know what this show my mom. She's like. Yeah it's just a grant you're fine. Just take the money but you know I graduated. I went to graduate school. I became a professor. I paid off all my actual student loans and when I had done so I thought to myself. Oh wait. I'm not done yet. There's that Hager Award and so I go online. Look it up and I'm like yeah there it is like I have a moral obligation to repay. Aw I better start repaying this thing and that letter that line that thing about how you know you have a moral obligation. It caught me at grabbed me and pulled me right in. The award made explicit. Something that's often overlooked in the way we think about money at its core. Money is about human relationships and at a macro level loans and gifts and paychecks and the dollars have come out of. ATM'S ARE CLUES was to a culture even the structure of nation to cash. Is Nicholson Awesome. I'll have too many quarters. Please thank you so much on a good day. It's about a half a million dollars shuttle theory if they're giving you you can go out and get yourself whatever I just wanted to let you know that I'm GonNa win the million dollars this week on hidden brain. We examined the intangible elements of cold hard cash coins and currency tokens of economic value. But markers of emotional connection and shared history.

Sean Covey Danton Hager Award Maura NPR Poughkeepsie New York professor
Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris And Notre Dom discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

01:20 min | 3 years ago

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris And Notre Dom discussed on WBZ Morning News

"Money continues to pile up from around the world in hopes of quickly rebuilding Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. French officials are pushing for it to be good as new and five years. Dozens of investigators have now begun interviewing workers from five companies hire. Renovate the medieval church, we have more from ABC's. Tom rivers in Paris. Macron's culture and heritage on voice says it's realistic to aim to reopen Notre Dame cathedral to the public and five years, Stefan. Burn says the big prize is to allow visitors coming for the twenty twenty four Olympic Games in Paris division. A renovated Notre Dom many Dale questions concerning things like materials to be used will be answered later as to the new spire that design will come out of an international architecture competition. Tom rivers, ABC news Paris. Notre Dame is expected to be closed for years during the rebuilding and experts doing that work may look for help from two unique. Sources one is an architecture historian Vassar college took detail three d scans of Notre Dom to create a digital reconstruction as he studied its design and artists of the video game assassin's creed unity spent years digitally, recreating the cathedral as well. Those three D renderings could help in the reconstruction

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Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 3 years ago

Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata thirty million whitetail deer. Now live in North America. That's a lot of deer Meghan goal. A sensory colleges at Vassar college in poughkeepsie New York in her Hudson valley locale, there is a recent estimates here that you could have somewhere between twenty and forty deer per square mile. These prolific grazers have been blamed for many things munching on baby trees, and that's a big problem because they are going to prevent forest regeneration. They also changed the structure of the forest under story, which is no good for birds that lived there for small road and set live there, and they contribute to the lime disease problem as tick hosts to all that we can now at a new accusation that deer or altering the very acoustics of the forest by pruning, trees and changing. The way sounds like bird calls travel through the trees gaulan her team investigated plots of forest where deer graze and others where they were. -cluded in each thirty by thirty foot plot they placed a speaker at one end playing white noise. Tones. Trills? And recorded it all with a microphone in the opposite corner. Then they use software to analyze the recorded sounds. They found that while there was no difference in the loudness of the captured sounds among the plots the recordings captured in the grazed upon plots did have higher sound fidelity. Meaning they were closer in quality to the original playback tracks now on the face of it that might sound like a good thing. But as gall explains if your sound has better fidelity, it's going to be able to be picked up by more individuals. And so if you're a territorial animal, you might get into more fights if you are worried about predators. Predators might have an easier time hearing him and so higher. Fidelity is not always better. The results are in the journal, plus one and be clear. The researchers are not arguing for any specific intervention here. Yeah. I mean, the deer situation it sits a little bit of a minefield people have. And I don't know how much I want to weigh in on it. But the findings might give advocates for increased deer management a bit more ammunition. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata? Oh.

Christopher Dodd Gall Vassar College Christopher Don North America Poughkeepsie Hudson Valley New York Sixty Seconds Thirty Foot