23 Burst results for "Vassar College"

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 2 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Larry Larry Kramer Larry Aids Aids Vassar College Yale Manhattan United States Dr Fry Clement Fry Greenwich Village Unhappy College New York City Grace New Haven Hospital GM Marcus Aspirin
Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

Environment: NPR

07:11 min | 4 months ago

Human Life Is Literally Quieter Due To Coronavirus Lockdown

"Life on down inside our homes might be noisy outside. The streets and skies are noticeably quieter. And because there's less human sound out there. Many people are hearing more wildlife as invisible. Is Amy Wendell reports? The relationship between human noise and the rest of nature is often discordant. So is our quiet in this moment. Having any impact the Internet is humming with rumors of animals. Reclaiming cities and towns. Dolphins are allegedly swimming in Venetian canals. Black bears are supposedly rating trash cans in La and mountain. Goats have been seen descending the Welsh hills to stroll through town some of these quarantine silver lining stories have been debunked though for now at least the goats seem legit but other anecdotes about nature being more present in the absence of humans. Come from reliable sources. Npr's Eleanor Beardsley observed for the first time in years birds singing throughout Paris. But what really we've on is. I'm sitting by the San River right now on a sunny evening and I just heard a river bird like egrets on polls and stuff. Is that not wild? I have never heard that before. Yeah we can hear subtlety of life around us that we haven't heard in a long long time this is Bernie Krause. One of the founders of a field called soundscape ecology that studies. How all the sounds in an ecosystem interact with each other and with us. Crouse has been recording the natural world for more than fifty years and in that time he's observed lots of ways are noise is disruptive to wildlife to the fraud in Jeff. He tells this story of how back in the Nineteen Ninety S. He was recording thousands of frogs that gather in the spring at Mono Lake in California and Croke in unison Buddhist. Really big almost like all the little frogs have joined together to become one giant frog. It's actually a defense mechanism helps keep predators from locating and attacking individual frogs but cross says the military started doing test flights over mono basin and the roar of the jets would cause the frogs to fall out of sync. Say would take like forty five minutes before they could get in sync again and during that period of time we watched as a couple of great horned owls. Coyote came in and picked off a couple of frogs. Eventually this led to significant population decline. All because of a jet across says it's not just jets it's helicopters and chainsaws and tractors and traffic messages endless mounts of noise until now with billions of people stuck inside our noise. Sprint is dramatically quieter in Paris. For instance a group that monitors noise pollution saw as much as a ninety percent. Drop in human sounds since the city went on lockdown so how is this relative? Quiet impacting wildlife. There was a question trending on Google. Arbor D- singing louder. This is Megan goal. A sensory ecologist and professor at Vassar College. If anything I would actually guessed that the birds are not singing as loud. That's because goal says they aren't having to compete against human sound which could be a good thing for the birds for one thing. All explains noise has been shown to increase stress hormone responses in birds which affects immune function. So less noise right now might equal less illness plus birds living in bustling cities or even busy suburban neighborhoods. Have to expend a lot of energy singing louder so now that things are quieter she says the birds might have extra energy to us on different things like spending time foraging saving energy to feed your kids etc so possibly will see animals that have larger broods or healthier offspring. You might also get changes in how females are selecting meets now out of that speculation of course but I think there's a lot of really interesting things that could be happening while how this all plays out for wildlife is for the time being left to informed speculation one impact of our stillness is ringing clear as a bell so the earth is like literally humming underneath our feet that's right. Yep. Any for Seto is seismologist. Who recently observed along with colleagues in Brussels in California a huge drop in human caused vibrations on the Earth's crust it was impressive It was just a reminder that we as a civilization have a noticeable imprint on the world in ways that sometimes we don't appreciate I for one did not appreciate that. Humans rattle the earth like a tiny earthquake. But we do mostly from transportation automobiles planes trains even are walking registers on seismographs as a kind of constant static and now that static is way less noisy giving seismologists a unique opportunity to perhaps detect more subtle vibrations that usually get drowned out like the ones coming from inside volcanoes close to cities. I think it's an open question. How strong this changes? But it's something that I know. People in the seismology community are really interested in exploring and some scientists are attempting to measure this strange and profound sonic experiment above ground. The silent cities project is a call for scientists journalists artists. Really anyone with good enough audio equipment to record what they're hearing while stuck at home to me. It's very peaceful to walk and be able to hear liberty. Tiny sounds Amandine. Gas is a soundscape ecologist in France who helped create the project back insects moving in leaves for example. Does eating the flowers. Also it's spring right now so so increase also annoys the wildlife. Sounds you hear so far? Participants are recording one hundred and sixty one locations all over the world and the data an expected thirty five thousand dollars or more audio will be available for any researcher who wants to analyze it in the future. Listening to our new sound environment is not just for researchers though ecologist making gall says it can be for everyone one of potentially positive things that could come out of. This is that people are having a chance to interact with the world around them in a way that they may be having interacted with before and those interactions could lead people like eleanor. Beardsley to not only consider the wildlife around them now. The birds singing on the sun but help them keep it in mind as things get back to being noisier.

Eleanor Beardsley Paris California Researcher Amy Wendell Bernie Krause Nineteen Ninety San River Mono Basin Mono Lake La And Mountain Vassar College Google Crouse Coyote NPR Megan Arbor Fraud Sprint
Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:00 min | 6 months ago

Why Cheap Solar Could Save the World

"So the other day Darius we took a little trip to a huge apartment complex in New York it is enormous one of the biggest biggest in the world. It spans like ten city blocks in New York houses around thirty thousand people. Yeah and it's known locally as stuyvesant town or Sta towns down a uh-huh cool village cat. It's like a bunch of giant brick towers sort of all identical in rows and we were there because because of an indicator an indicator given to us by Ben Ho. He's an economist at Vassar College. Yeah and Ben says this indicator is a big deal a milestone down and win this indicator hit this milestone. Ben said he was like Oh my God. I thought there should be parades and like people cheering and instead like there's a the articles and like the trade press and people haven't talked about much. I think it's a contender for the most important indicator of all time the most important indicator for all time at least for me. Ooh Okay make your case. This is fascinating. What is this indicator? Indicator is the cost of solar electricity specifically that the cost of solar electricity has been falling by a lot not falling by so much. It's actually now competitive with fossil fuels. It's gotten that cheap which brought us to the roof of a twenty storey brick building in February roof that has now covered in solar panels. And we were there. Because this roof is owned by one of the biggest baddest most profit focus companies on Wall Street in large large part because of Ben's indicator this is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Smith and we are on the roof of building. We're here twenty or so stories above these filaret colds today on the show the price of solar what changed and I've been thinks this so important. It's a little windy too. Beautiful View his beautiful this message comments from NPR sponsored show. Bonnie Haute made to taste just like milk. Doc It's creamy frothy and great with coffee and cookies but without the dairy because it's not milk it's almost milk new Shabani owed support also also comes from the capital. One saver card earned four percent cashback on dining and entertainment to percents at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases now. Now when you go out you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet? Terms apply back in two thousand six. Ben Ho was the lead energy economist. Missed under president. George W Bush and he was part of a team looking for energy alternatives economically viable energy alternative. Being the operative word there the energy source to beat was coal it was the cheapest source of energy and back then like solar was almost like a joke. At the time I was looking at the numbers and cost five cents ends or four cents per kilowatt hour natural gas also in that range and sold there was like a dollar per kilowatt hour. Oh Wow and you were just like this. This is never going to be cost effective. You heard that correctly recklessly. Solar Power was twenty times more expensive than coal solar was just never gonNA happen. It was a non starter. It was a punchline and then something changed changed actually a bunch of. Something's yeah a lot of small things that took the price down by five or ten percent so for one thing. Government subsidies on the state and federal level brought costs down for businesses and residents got more people to buy into solar which meant more companies started making solar panels and then companies that made solar panels started competing against each other tomake cheaper more efficient panels as a result. The panel's got nearly twice as efficient and the price dropped from about a thousand dollars per panel to around one hundred and fifty dollars per panel today. Hey It's a series of sort of small process improvements over the past ten fifteen years for the cost down like a magical amount of money a magical amount of money. The prices solar job by more than ninety ninety percent from one dollar per kilowatt hour fifteen years ago to four cents per kilowatt hour today and that is today's indicator four four cents per kilowatt hour. which makes the cheapest form of electricity in the US and also in the world cheaper than cheaper natural gas jubilant coal cheaper than coal? Oh my drop. Yes because when that happens is ben everything changed and then thinks this will take solar power from like a fringy source of energy to a major maybe even the main source of energy in the world but at this point solar energy still only accounts for about two percent of the energy in the US I think that's totally changes. At least how icy climate change right so before when like solar and renewables more expensive it was all about sort of getting people to like sacrifice to do the right thing And now it's actually just getting people to save money. I mean if we're looking at pure economics though I mean if solar is only two percent and we have these huge entrenched energy can companies from the biggest companies in the world. That have a lot of money. A lot of jobs tied up in traditional like fossil fuels and those kinds of energies. Like how I mean. That seems like some daunting economics to overcome right. I think I'm a big believer in the markets. Now the soldiers act cheaper. Actually think that the market and capitalist pretty powerful driving force to move people torward the cheapest form of energy and you see that happening right So they just had the biggest year in history in the United States because of just the fallen costs companies like facebook book and Microsoft have started investing millions of dollars in solar energy and so has blackstone blackstone in case. You haven't heard them a giant Wall Street private equity firm Um and Hedge Fund. Basically they deal with money. Enormous amounts so much money. They manage hundreds of billions of dollars yep blackstone definitely really not like a hippy. dippy let's all try to save the Planet Company. No no no. This is not like reusable tote bag Greenpeace canvasser type company. They care about the bottom line and blackstone has started investing millions in Solar Power Blackstone owns the company that manages Stuy town the apartment complex in New York with all the solar panels and Kelly vaas is the CEO of that division of the company. And he oversaw this big solar project and he took us out to the roof to check out the solar panels firsthand. We're standing standing on the rooftop status in town and you're looking at a few of the nine thousand six hundred seventy one solar panels that we put on rooftops to be precise and isn't isn't the that's for size. Nine thousand six hundred and seventy one solar panels on building after building just spanning ten. The city blocks just laid out before us. All these buildings like as far as we can buildings so as you can see like how many square feet of roof twenty two acres does that have to do the math on the square feet on that. We did the math. We did the math and it is almost a million square feet of roof all painted white and all covered in shiny black glass solar solar panels all about the size of a foosball table. Kellyanne is team installed the panels last year and they estimated it will reduce Stuy town carbon footprint by about sixteen percent so the project cost of eleven million. That's a lot. Will you lose money on it as a cost neutral we make a little money we we we will have a return on investment. It's not significant. It's it's not a lot of money but it is definitely not a loss if it had been a loss Kelly. They couldn't have really considered going solar now that they have these panels up and running. Kelly says lots of other building managers and businesses have been taking exactly this tour that we took asking about how they might go solar as well. What's the biggest this question that you get from people who are considering doing it? Did you make money on it. They want to know. Is there a return on it. Is it affordable all of those things and in the answer for I was yes blackstone was so jazzed about the results of its Stuy town project it is investing another eight hundred and fifty million dollars and solar and this says Ben is exactly clear why he thinks the cheapness of solar is the most important indicator of all time on this sort of problem of climate change. I think yeah I've optimism. I think in part because a lot of the stories you hear about climate change all assume that coal-based future I mean listen. Climate change is not over as a problem Ben Points out. There is still significant obstacles to overcome if solar is to become a major energy source for the world. I mean for one thing. It only works when the sun is out. That's a problem battery technology that could store. Solar Energy is in great right now also the panels would need to get more efficient for all of STA towns. Nine thousand Rosen odd solar panels. Solarte will still only supply about six percent of the energy for the apartment complex. Still says now that economics is on its side. Now that the mathworks he thinks solar has a bright view. Now now biggest hurdles past right. I think it's for me. Is the most exciting indicator. It makes me optimistic about the future.

BEN Solar Power Blackstone Ben Ho Stuy New York United States Kelly Vaas Blackstone Vassar College Blackstone Blackstone Darius Stacey Smith NPR
Central Park Five prosecutor under fire after new Netflix series

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Central Park Five prosecutor under fire after new Netflix series

"Former prosecutor at the center of New York's famous central park five case now facing backlash after a recent. Netflix series is highlighting the case. Linda fairstein was Manhattan's top sex crime prosecutor when five teenagers were all wrongfully convicted in nineteen eighty nine attack on a female jogger in the wake of the mini series release fairstein has resigned from Vassar colleges board of trustees as well as the board of the victim service agency safe horizon. In a letter. To the agency's chairman. She says the show depicts me in a fictionalized version of events in grossly maliciously inaccurate manner. I think impart, why this is directed. More. Linda scene is she has remained steadfast in her belief in the guilt of the central park

Linda Fairstein Prosecutor Netflix Chairman Vassar New York Manhattan
"vassar college" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"I really realize racism soldier, nece, unsee LGBT. Plus, he's just everything I really detest the president's next stop on his overseas trip is Ireland wins news time, eight fifty Virginia's governor says he's calling for votes and laws. Not thoughts and prayers in the wake of last week's mass shooting that left. Twelve people dead governor Ralph Northam has some lawmakers back to the state capital to vote on gun control package tragedy, as well as the tragedy had happened every day across Virginia. Must instill in us a new level of urgency to act if we can save one life because we acted now it worse than north homes. Bills include a ban on silencers and high capacity magazines. Former Manhattan sex crimes prosecutor, Linda fairstein has resigned from her positions at Vassar college, and God's love. We deliver amid trending outrage in the wake of the Netflix miniseries, when they see us about the central park, jogger case in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine that's according to the daily news, which says Vassar president cited the backlash against fairstein since the series debuted on Friday, fairstein continues to stand behind the prosecution of the five black, and Hispanic teenagers who were convicted in the rape of a white jogger convictions that were later thrown out in the city paying millions of dollars in a settlement wins news time, eight fifty one. From the ram trucks, traffic.

Linda fairstein president Virginia Vassar college Ralph Northam Netflix Ireland rape Manhattan prosecutor
Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris And Notre Dom discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris And Notre Dom discussed on WBZ Morning News

"Money continues to pile up from around the world in hopes of quickly rebuilding Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. French officials are pushing for it to be good as new and five years. Dozens of investigators have now begun interviewing workers from five companies hire. Renovate the medieval church, we have more from ABC's. Tom rivers in Paris. Macron's culture and heritage on voice says it's realistic to aim to reopen Notre Dame cathedral to the public and five years, Stefan. Burn says the big prize is to allow visitors coming for the twenty twenty four Olympic Games in Paris division. A renovated Notre Dom many Dale questions concerning things like materials to be used will be answered later as to the new spire that design will come out of an international architecture competition. Tom rivers, ABC news Paris. Notre Dame is expected to be closed for years during the rebuilding and experts doing that work may look for help from two unique. Sources one is an architecture historian Vassar college took detail three d scans of Notre Dom to create a digital reconstruction as he studied its design and artists of the video game assassin's creed unity spent years digitally, recreating the cathedral as well. Those three D renderings could help in the reconstruction

Notre Dame Cathedral Paris Notre Dom Tom Rivers Vassar College ABC Macron Stefan Dale Five Years
"vassar college" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Little Atoms

"People's perceptions of everything from Woody Allen to friends to Mesa's Mazel softly, which is classic trouble. What you've what you've described as the Jewish American Princess. Really a Princess she's working hard jobs during the day. She worked at a department store and being abused by her bosses, etcetera and nights, she's doing the comedy routine. So I wouldn't I don't know. I guess the character start so again for life. But kind of the stunts again such familiar thing for so many people I known Jewish people got something you can actually fall into is. You know, that old thing where, you know, something better than culture that we we become insensitive. Yes, look, if you went to look at the student body at Wellesley, college or Vassar college to women than women's colleges Wellesley still Lewin's college of the, you know, a seven sisters the Ivy league so to speak, the the feminine the female variant of this at the Ivy league in those years, you would find princesses except they will white Anglo-Saxon Protestant princesses. You might have found a couple of Catholics, but mainly white Anglo-Saxon Protestant living on daddy's money, very comfortable looking for the right man to marry who would give them status, and they go to the country club and at cetera et cetera. But it doesn't carry the same. Negative stereotypes is when it comes to Jews. You know, if you went to look in certain industries, the white shoe law firms as they were called, you would find successful lawyers every place up and down or you went to certain hospitals, where Jews would not could not get residencies could not get appointments full of white Anglo, Saxon Protestants, white Anglo-Saxon, Catholics and certain sense. But might be a contradiction in terms this. But when it's the Jews than it takes on in the fairy is kind of way, the biggest banking houses in New York. The biggest successful Wall Street firms were not Jewish Wall Street firms until recent and what is Jewish Wall Street firm. You know, it has at its edits head people who happened to be Jews. But I don't have any, you know, they say Jews control the banks will I'd like my ATM machine. I'd like my I haven't gotten it. So no, no one ever says Dutch wills right or Scottish, Wall Street firm or you can apply. Racism to take another stereotype people say, oh, the single mothers on welfare milking, the welfare system, generally that has racist kind of or used in relation to blacks, not pulling their weight or whatever the truth a matter in the United States, most of the recipients of welfare a white single mothers. So, you know, but it takes on that negative. Stereotype, you take that negative stereotype and apply it to the particular group. So with Jews it's for their success. You know, I remembered the inverse why wasn't there, but the university.

Vassar college Jewish American Princess Ivy league Mesa Woody Allen United States New York Lewin
Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata thirty million whitetail deer. Now live in North America. That's a lot of deer Meghan goal. A sensory colleges at Vassar college in poughkeepsie New York in her Hudson valley locale, there is a recent estimates here that you could have somewhere between twenty and forty deer per square mile. These prolific grazers have been blamed for many things munching on baby trees, and that's a big problem because they are going to prevent forest regeneration. They also changed the structure of the forest under story, which is no good for birds that lived there for small road and set live there, and they contribute to the lime disease problem as tick hosts to all that we can now at a new accusation that deer or altering the very acoustics of the forest by pruning, trees and changing. The way sounds like bird calls travel through the trees gaulan her team investigated plots of forest where deer graze and others where they were. -cluded in each thirty by thirty foot plot they placed a speaker at one end playing white noise. Tones. Trills? And recorded it all with a microphone in the opposite corner. Then they use software to analyze the recorded sounds. They found that while there was no difference in the loudness of the captured sounds among the plots the recordings captured in the grazed upon plots did have higher sound fidelity. Meaning they were closer in quality to the original playback tracks now on the face of it that might sound like a good thing. But as gall explains if your sound has better fidelity, it's going to be able to be picked up by more individuals. And so if you're a territorial animal, you might get into more fights if you are worried about predators. Predators might have an easier time hearing him and so higher. Fidelity is not always better. The results are in the journal, plus one and be clear. The researchers are not arguing for any specific intervention here. Yeah. I mean, the deer situation it sits a little bit of a minefield people have. And I don't know how much I want to weigh in on it. But the findings might give advocates for increased deer management a bit more ammunition. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata? Oh.

Christopher Dodd Gall Vassar College Christopher Don North America Poughkeepsie Hudson Valley New York Sixty Seconds Thirty Foot
"vassar college" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"vassar college" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"A little slide view. That's awful Bill. Thanks for you. Okay. No. You were sweat on. But Pete Townsend. Townsend sweated on. Puked? I know that's a lot lot worse. That's far more intimate. Not a lot of people say that. Oh, man. Yeah. UD in cinnaminson. You're on New Jersey one. Oh, one point five. Hey, judy. What was your worst concert? Well, it was j dial ban in the mid seventies. And it was at Vassar college. And at friends from out of town really wanted to go see, and I was not feeling that. Well, but I like obligated because they had no idea where the place was or anything, right? And we go to the concert and take off. In the middle of it. They turn all the lights because somebody who was tripping had. Fingers and they had to find the. Hot. About ten minutes because we around Bleacher, they you know it. Okay, buddy wanted to say after that excuse me. I'm sorry for laughing. It was just so bizarre. And they did find it though, they find they found this person's finger. Yeah. And you know, they got him out of their thing. And then they turn the lights down and started again. But. No does Peter wolf make a statement from stage as to what's going on. Or did. They just have a PA say, ladies and gentlemen, if you if you find a finger, please raise your hand, they had they had people going, you know, because you couldn't get the bleachers. You know, it was in an auditorium that how how did the person who was all tripping out? I guess on acid. It was. But how do they cut their finger off? What are they use? I don't know accident, you probably don't know. Yeah. That was. That was pretty insane. Yeah. That would be different. Yikes. That would be different Judy. Thanks for your call. We're gonna have a brief intermission. Now, we're looking for a human severed finger no-one panic, but if you see as finger lying. Don't step on it. All right. You don't have to stop that. When we're talking about the worst concert you ever attended. What was yours? One eight hundred zero eight three one point five US. Attorney.

Pete Townsend judy cinnaminson Vassar college New Jersey Peter wolf Attorney ten minutes
"vassar college" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Bacon didn't, have the money for Alice to be educated. In that fashion at this point, however STA Matsu and she gay and STA STA Matsu analysis have become a letter companions they write each other all the time That's right especially after it goes back to. Tokyo so we have. This group here in New Haven and we have to follow, our third heroine is going to become extremely important in the history of Japan she's with. The landmines and, you, right at one point that she learns how to be snobby what does she how. Does how is your life and Georgetown Well it's very much the the life of, a of a pamper Georgetown girl she is there from age seven till just about the, age of eighteen she loses all of her Japanese she no longer speak Japanese when she turns. And heads back to Japan she absorbs all. Of the attitudes of an American rather well well off girl she including the pretensions. When she. When she turns and heads for home. Her letters are sound remarkably like you would expect, the letters to sound of rather spoiled but determined young woman heading out to be a missionary somewhere in. The in the benighted east she doesn't sound like someone who's going home she sounds like someone. Who is determined? To bring light to the to the dark It's a real paradox listening to her yes and. They all three of them lose their Japanese to some extent either the ability to speak it, write it read it and, that that will be a disability. When, they get back home we have to mention that Rio and Tae left. Very early they were too young is that the concern they were homesick. They couldn't adapt actually they were. The oldest of the five. I think they were possibly a little bit, too old to be enough to mold themselves to this extraordinary. Mandate, they've been, given to stay in the United States let's go to Vassar college and, the eighteen seventies with STA Matsu and she the ambassadors of Japan to learn the way, of America and take it home to educate young women in Japan.

STA Matsu Japan Georgetown Alice Rio Bacon Vassar college Tokyo New Haven Tae left United States America
"vassar college" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"In times of real stress my dad was there in spirit with me and i began to wonder i just began to doubt things i'd always taken as verbatim truth about who i was and this is this is it's an important lesson because you know we have this discussion about jobs and in the first instance jobs are essential in order to pay the bills and and take care of your family and and so on but there's this other dimension which is it's how we define ourselves it's you know it's about dignity and self worth and and identity in very primal way it's you know how we relate to our families and how our children are loved ones in every sense it was it was a again very challenging but also again i did even get past about it i did still for most of that time feel that i was gonna come through it and i felt that level of confidence even when i began doubt myself there was something in there that was you know again my my mother was my mother was five foot and both my sisters like five one we always would ask how taller your your big man six two before i started shrinking and but everyone we give everybody the benefit i love being an academic environment but anyway the the that that indomitable my mother being this short determined woman who'd gotten a full scholarship to vassar college and kind of made herself and raise four of us by herself that that kind of stock and once we opened the restaurant finally opened the restaurant in nineteen eighty eight and it was an old warehouse in one of the worst parts of them lower downtown lower downtown the rent was one dollar per square foot per year so essentially almost free and it reflects that the community didn't value that part of town the town at all but there were four five other entrepreneurs and people and i didn't know i was not preneurs if i if the if the price of oil hadn't collapsed i'd still be geologist and yet once we finally opened the restaurant the first day we walked in and the and the place was a hit right off the bat and big crowds and i knew i was going to be better at running that restaurant than i ever was geologist and it's funny i mean so many people have law.

geologist vassar college one dollar five foot
"vassar college" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Warms my heart of what they had to say and i completely agree with them that uh the total eclipse is so brief people will ask me why would you travel to the other side of the world for something that last two or three minutes but the fact is it's not the two or three minutes it's how those two or three minutes reverberate for the rest of my life i can't tell you how often i think about that eclipse i saw particularly in a rubel but all of the ones i've seen stand out as sort of these milestones in my life these moments i remember the people i was with the places i went the feelings i had it's not just about that momentary experience at how that experience changes the rest of my life and you know you are you are all about travel i tell you it's going to see a total eclipse is the closest you will ever get to space travel it really is like standing on some he alien world and then be in thrust back to earth at the end of the total eclipse and so if you wanna go visit another planet and you probably embarked going to have time to go to mars make sure you go so turn look you are so convincing david i really enjoyed that that whole idea of the government eclipse campaign they could just imagine these people in eighteen 78 building these wooden structures and setting up there newfangled telescopes were some of the personalities that came out in your research about chasing that eclipse of eighteen seventy aden what sort of insight did that give you but what was going on in america during the generation i think that the eclipse of 1870s is in some ways a window into what was going on in american society at that time uh how society was changing and and one of my favorite characters in the book and of course these are all real people was an astronomer from vassar college which who had just recently been found in as an allwomen's college and the astronomer there was mariah mitchell she was by far the most famous.

aden vassar college mariah mitchell david america three minutes
"vassar college" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The things that we've seen as investors take a little bit of a more confident stance towards the path for fed policy over the coming quarters particularly after the announcement of governor powell as the next fed chair we saw investors really grow in their confidence towards the path for fed policy so we've got the december rate hike fully priced into the marketplace people are now pretty pretty sure that we're going to get another rate hike in march beyond that so people are expressing those views by selling bonds in the front end of the old curve if i thought this was going to be sustained if i thought the fed could carry on hiking at the economy would continue to improve i wouldn't expect to see to fives down at thirty basis points that doesn't make sense because if you think this can lost and the fed won't be cutting rights aggressively and a couple of years time you're not going to see to fis at thirty basis points you're going to see two five steeper i don't see that i see thirty i see a market essentially in a couple of years time the feds gonna have to cop well well that that's the magic of of how markets work you know when we're sitting here going through our two thousand an eighteen year ahead outlooks typically by the time you come to the end of the process a consensus has developed amongst wall street economists and strategist like myself and typically by the time that consensus develops its in the price and so what that means is that the outlook for two thousand eighteen stronger growth higher inflation that's already in the price today we're ultimately ends up moving markets in 2018 itself is any surprises to those to those consensus views and then how the outlook for 2019 develops in on that front our economists are are not as optimistic on 2019 as they are on 2018 you came out of that acclaimed quantitative house vasser indeed i did it on the give our how did you get from fixed income vassar college that's like almost original to american education so.

governor powell fed the outlook vassar college eighteen year
"vassar college" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on WDRC

"To have you on the program i wanted to talk to you about how you were smeared for giving a lecture on of all things hate speech had vassar college what happened in high lars thanks for having me on it we crazy situation was like walking walking an alternative hit alternate reality i plan to give it speaker we invited by the vasser conservative libertarian union to give you speak on heat speak and free speech on college campuses and hate speech in quotation marched acquitted not really a legal term and how we can it got i had the tension between free beach where we want everybody to be able to say what they want and they'd college campuses like back there in the key in new york where they want to have an inclusive environment and hep everybody feel welcome how wicket kinchen it till i plan to give to speak at saint to give it in light of charlotte hill where you had the people marching with the torch it and it really he was going to be a speech devoted to the constitution to the concept of free speech white important and how you try to balance hidden how other universities have tried to bounded we'll be completely lost their mind as kitouni they heard it i was in a speak about heat the eight each at pocket leaping protected eight which legally it is that they literally went nuts they organized against me coming they falsely accused me of wanting to bring nieto not he's in white supremacist campaign to target minority student they accused me of posting the event done white nationalist website all of which was completely false they had a meeting with three almost three hundred people on the small college campus devoted to how we are they gonna protect duty from me and my supporters and uh eight really get sweet they neared me you can imagine what they said about me and any really jet the moment where a significant portion of the campaign khieu law it and they even tried to get my speech cancelled them back your student association wicked student government we to protect depend in whipping the camp it into a frenzy and they sent a letter to the president of you'd demanding that ib gop from coming to campus secret my ideas whatever those happened to be are not just words they were actually if political danger to.

vassar college new york charlotte hill president gop nieto
"vassar college" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"V i n honestly check it out right now it's just an incredible service and really is all right let's see what's cooking let us see what's cooking we have a great guest right now who's a friend of mine who runs a wonderful website called legal insurrection and that he contacted me about something that took place at one of these so wonderful universities this smear effort smear effort before he he spoke at vassar college and he has talked spoken at vassar college before he say right of centre individual he he's a very thoughtful temperate individually runs a wonderful website legal insurrection and there was an organized effort absolutely destroy his reputation built jacobsen how are you my friend good thanks for having me on television body what took place bill and you know i could quite cornell lord go and a variety of being in that field but i also have recently been gutting the issue beach on campus been dumping at been covering for years at my website anti we've invited bukit factor in new york i woke in the before bad academic freedom i was invited by the factor conservative libertarian union would you can imagine it all at twenty people at factor college out of twenty four hundred very great and they invited me to speak on topic out quote unquote happy greek beat and it thankfully gripe for.

vassar college bukit factor new york
"vassar college" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KOIL

"V i n honestly check it out right now it's just an incredible service it really is all right let's see what's cooking let us see what's cooking we have a great guest right now who's a friend of mine who runs a wonderful website called legal insurrection and he contacted me about something that took place at one of these so wonderful universities this smear effort smear effort before he he spoke at vassar college and he has talked spoken at vassar college before he say right of centre individual he's a very thoughtful temperate individually runs a wonderful website legal insurrection and there was an organized effort absolutely destroy his reputation bill jacobsen how are you my friend good thanks for having me on tell everybody what took place bill sure and you know i could lloyd core now law school and a variety of investment feel but i also have recently been studying the issue free speech on campus been jumping up and covering her ears at my website and so i was invited to speak it back for college in new york i spoke in there before about academic freedom i was invited fight of actor conservative libertarian union which you can imagine is all of twenty people at vassar college out of twenty four hundred very great students and they invited me to speak on topic beach quote unquote beach and free speech and essentially describe for the student body what that means how the constitution protects beet even each we don't like even disgusting it's still protected by the her amendment so we get your day and the camp equipped out the door date.

vassar college law school new york
"vassar college" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Loan they put down six hundred seventy thousand dollars earns money which i tell you it's a large amount in a high percentage to be involved you like this of a surprise was that much but they did anyway the bank appraisal came back at four point three five million so the newest unable to get the three 35milliondollar mortgage open for the property located near vassar college in the city of pope paul keep she i was like set word is back on the mark right now for seven point seven five million what happened was the miller's ask for the mercenary back as they could get the full because they could not get the finish and they wanted what is sues next is very interesting the islanders offered a loan to the motors for the difference interesting ill twister a seems ernest way agreement both parties signed states that the either party can counts the contractor the buyers can opt in a mortgage commitment kate and they couldn't but they could and there's also clout a clause in the conduct states that the sales not contingent upon a satisfactory appraisal so there's another gray area blurs love greer's guy the ictr's think the millers are trying to use appraisals a tool to gouge him on the agreed upon price the ship it interesting case should ever go to trial make sure when you enter contract you know and understand all potential issues like this one that may be affected as far as other tissues not been resolved yet once again this is your chauffeur answers about your property taxes locally 503 nine seven two or eight four three or.

vassar college miller islanders greer ictr millers property taxes six hundred seventy thousand d three 35milliondollar
"vassar college" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The that strange aura that was seen around the sun during utoe look cliffs which today we know is the sun's out atmosphere of the solar corona but back then was a great mystery and edison who was being called the wizard of menlo park he had is he's laboratory in menlo park new jersey was believed that edison if he was going to be out of the eclipse he was going to do something marvellous oh well when i think of edison today i think of the light bulb is there any chance the third a light bulb was sort of inspired by his seeing an eclipse well funny you should say that because in fact the very day after he returned from his eclipse expedition to wyoming he started work on the light bulb i mean so the eclipse expedition came right between his two most important inventions the photograph and a life well then there is a story told in wyoming that edison was inspired to invent the light bulb when he was in the west for the eclipse it was when he went fishing after the eclipse and had a bamboo fishing pole that he broke in through in the campfire and when he saw the fibres of bamboo glowing in the campfire that gave him the idea to use bamboo fiber in his incandescent lamp which in fact he did use bambu but that story is not true uh darn sorry so besides edison who else was there one that i focus on when west for very different reasons and and and that was more i am mitchell she was professor of astronomy at vassar college which of course was a new all women's college in the.

menlo park edison professor vassar college menlo park wyoming mitchell
"vassar college" Discussed on What's the Point

What's the Point

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on What's the Point

"Well so uh through mariah mitchell was the most wellknown female scientists in america and the 19th century although of course she is not by fears far from a household name today i have to say before i started work on the book i had heard her name but i couldn't told you anything about her so she she rose to prominence in eighteen forty seven when she was actually professionally she was a librarian on the island of nantucket but she studied the stars at night her father had been amateur astronomer and she became an avid amateur astronomer and she discovered a comet in eighteen forty seven and four that she was the first person to see it anywhere and she received a gold medal from the king of denmark and that became known as a miss mitchell's comet and she became quite prominent itchy actually ended up getting a a paying job as an astronomer she was in a computer her job was to to compute the orbit of venus for the navy's nautical almanac which was used by navigators and then when vassar college was founded in the 1860s she was hired as a professor of astronomy and she was understandably not just a scientist she was a staunch advocate for women in science and women's higher education at a time when obviously it was exceedingly hard for women to get anywhere in the sciences and and women's higher education itself was uh was actually something that was just barely getting off the ground so so but when i learned what she did in 1872 eight i just immediately knew she would have to be another main character in my book because here it is eighteen 78 at a time when travel to the american west was not easy when the west was still wild.

mariah mitchell gold medal denmark navy vassar college professor scientist america
"vassar college" Discussed on What's The Point

What's The Point

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on What's The Point

"In our own backyard and then congress promptly declined to fund it after the newspapers stepped in and started chiding congress for being so shortsighted did did congress come up with the eight thousand dollars yeah and kind of at the last minute right yep solutely they didn't have much time to put the expedition's together they had sort of decided to kind of press ahead with you know with the idea that they weren't going to get the money and then it came through but but i want to note here that not everyone was able to get some of this funding and here i wanna talk about mariah mitchell she's someone who just seemed like such a great mentor to people here maybe maybe we'll take a step back here tell me a little bit about mariah and how did you find out about her will so so mariah mitchell was the most wellknown female scientists in america in the nineteenth century although of course she is not by far from a household name today i have to say before i started work on the book i heard her name but i couldn't told you anything about her so she she she rose to prominence in eighteen forty seven when she was actually professionally she was a librarian on the island of nantucket but she studied the stars at night her father had been amateur astronomer and she became an avid amateur astronomer and she discovered a comet in eighteen forty seven and for that she was the first person to see it anywhere and she received a gold medal from the king of denmark and that became known as miss mitchell's comet and she became quite prominent and she actually ended up getting a paying job as an astronomer she was a computer her job was to to compute the orbit of venus for the navy's nautical almanac which was used by navigators and then when vassar college was founded in the eighteen sixties she was hired as a professor of astronomy and she was understandably not just a scientist she was a staunch.

congress mariah mitchell mariah america gold medal denmark navy vassar college professor scientist eight thousand dollars
"vassar college" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Science Talk

"And and after identified edison the second person identified was mariah mitchell and mariah mitchell back in the 19th century was by far the most famous female scientists in america she had discovered a comet back in the eighteen 40s and for that she received a gold medal from the king of denmark and by the 1870s she was teaching astronomy at vassar college which was a relatively newly founded university of course for women and in eighteen 78 at a time when there were all of these men who were assembling eclipse expeditions out to the west and receiving government support government subsidies and she was excluded mariah mitchell decided to take it upon herself to put together an allfemale expedition to denver both as a scientific endeavour but also was kind of a bit bit of political theatre to prove to an american public a sceptical public that women could be scientists the two biggest things that may become out of the clips are mariah mitchell's exhibition really to the public about what women can do in science and the overall boosting is almost like a sputnik affect you ride abound of the how books americans science really started to rise up match european science the era is just so interesting because i mean this is it the gilded age in america a time when america with getting rich and in fact america's reputation was that all we cared about was getting rich uh we were industrializing uh we were challenging europe in terms of r e m economic might.

edison gold medal denmark vassar college mariah mitchell america europe university of course denver
"vassar college" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on Here & Now

"Well i think some people might describe it of being terribly serious and on the truth is i do take dragged really seriously and i think that there's a place for that to see it as this on political and historical art form and to wanna continue pushing in new directions and also um honor the all directions as well some sort of like a drag intellectual slash dragqueen it will you were you say you're drag intellectual you a fulbright scholar a you have a master's degree a tell us a little bit about your educational background yes i went to vassar college for undergraduate and studied literature unclear if theory and all be all the above and then i kind of i took a fulbright scholarship in russia and that's really where my direction shifted a little bit because i became really interested in what kind of work actually helps to change things for where people and i became really fascinated in drag with drag because it's it's such an accessible and joyful art form and i wanted to create dutiful images in drag that would not just inspire cui people who need to see some beauty and need to experience some joy but also would on engage people politically i get political discussions started in gay bars in the community and really inspire people to action as well as on to to wearing a few more sequins and a little bit more glitter political discussions is like what.

russia vassar college
"vassar college" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"vassar college" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"That was this astronomer mariah mitchell who fought against tremendous odds brought about by well her fellow americans to be able to get out and enjoy in and do science at this eclipse talk a little bit about her because she's just to an amazing character in american history yeah i just love mariah mitchell to summarize mitchell was an astronomer at she was by far the best known female scientists in america in the nineteenth century she first came to prominence in 1840 seven when she was working professionally as a librarian by day but was studying the heavens at night while living on the island of nantucket massachusetts so she discovered up a comet in 1840 seven and for that she received a gold medal from the king of denmark and that kind of lawn the church to fame by eighteen seventy eight she was teaching astronomy at vassar college the at that point new all women's college in pixie new york and as you can imagine this was a time i mean as hard as it is to be a female scientists today multiply that by a thousand um there were so few opportune kennedy for women to actually work in science and in fact you know there was a real societal obvious societal biased against women going into science and mariah mitchell would have none of it and she not only did our own scientific studies but she saw it as her personal responsibility to pave the way for the neck next generation of women to come along and she was out there publicly advocating for women to go into science and it eighteen seventy eight.

mariah mitchell america massachusetts gold medal denmark vassar college pixie new york kennedy