19 Burst results for "Varicella"

"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

The Health Quest Podcast

07:55 min | 9 hrs ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

"Is that important? I mentioned that we also have available our marine collagen sources. And so much like is the branded ingredient that we use for our total body collagen formulas as a bovine source in the marine collagen formulas that we have the branded ingredient is called collective. And so collective is a French company and again, very focused on R&D and making sure whatever ingredients they produce, that they're high quality and backed by clinical trials by clinical studies. And so collective has done a lot of similar clinical trials like, not the same extent, but they've done studies, which have shown at a very low dose, in fact, their dose is only 2.4 grams. So just a slight to lower amount than varicella, but in comparison to other generic marine collagen formulas out there that are not using branded collective. You do have to use a much higher amount. What I do notice is that there are a myriad of marine collagen formulas out there that have a fairly low dose. I've seen 2.5 grams. I've seen 5 grams, but it's just generic marine collagen and marine collagen for our listeners is essentially from the scales of the fish. That's the source of where we would get the marine collagen. But unfortunately, much like the bovine source collagen, the collagen is a large molecule. You need to do hydro vision to it to reduce the particle size. But much like what varicella did, where they have a special composition, meaning that they focused on those specific amino acids. That's also a collective is done. And so we feel that our total body collagen lineup, whether it's from bovine or from marine, is really the Pinnacle right of the top quality ingredients both from a quality, but also from an R&D side. And you mentioned earlier, Steve, that many companies borrow the science. And it's very frustrating, of course. It's imagine it's frustrating to the actual research organization that spent hundreds of thousands of dollars doing their own research only to have more competitors borrow their science, it's obviously a little bit unfair, but it happens, right? There's not much that we can do about it. But I just tell I would encourage people, I would tell the listeners to really pay attention to what the collagen product is, the serving size, how much collagen you're getting or how much you need. I was scrolling through Instagram, as we all do, I'm sure, and I can't believe how many collagen products I come across. And there was this one collagen product that really stuck in my mind. And the call out was, and I can totally see how consumers would want to buy this product. And it said, 9 years younger in three months and 90 days or your money back. And I'm thinking to myself, are you kidding me? There is no way that that's possible, right? And for myself, having worked in this industry for as long as I have, I would love to believe that. I would go ahead and take that product, but I know better. So I just tell consumers, you really have to be careful. If it sounds too good to be true, it likely is. Even though the studies that have been conducted using Versailles and using collective are incredibly impressive in returns of reducing deep wrinkles in as little as 28 days, but that's a big difference between saying, look, 9 years younger in 90 days, right? So don't fall for those types of marketing schemes. So just be very, very careful when you're reading labels. Well, that's part of the challenge because obviously nobody's going to be 9 years younger. So if we make it better as we age, but nobody's going to get younger. So it's a kind of puffery, I think, is a term that's used in advertising, a claim that's not really meant to be taken literally or as true. It's a euphemism, and yet it's so powerful because we think, well, they can't say it if it's not true, well, you and I know lots of things are said that aren't true in the marketing of nutritional supplements. And so the credibility of the company is everything. And so again, vet your company, companies like that, if you can't go to them and get the science, then what are they basing their claims on? When somebody says 9 years younger, well, how do you know that? And so if we just believe it because somebody said it, then we're going to be a victim of that kind of advertising. So word to the wise, look beyond the claims and look for why those claims are substantiated. So this is why one of the reasons anyway, why we do these podcasts. So we can explore those again scientifically clinically studied raw materials. Are there any contraindications for using collagen? If somebody, here's this interview, wants to use it. Is there anybody who should perhaps be cautious? The good news, Steve, is that there really are no contraindications with using collagen. So that is very beneficial because in our industry, of course we're touted as selling natural products. And unfortunately, people think that that's synonymous with oh, there are no contraindications with any of these natural products. Well, that's not true. We know that some of our natural products have a blood thinning effect and so you have to be careful with blood thinners, for example. But in the case of collagen, there really are no issues. And that's great because it just simply gives peace of mind and it does open up the collagen options in terms of making it available to a lot of people. So no issues that I'm aware of and I definitely have researched this extensively. Now, having said that, if you're taking a product like our total body college and that has all of those other ingredients, the one ingredient for example the tryptophan. Some people that are on depression medication. It's very specific depression medication and you'd have to be taking pretty high doses. There might be a contraindication because of the tryptophan, but in Canada, when you compare Canada, regulations to the U.S., Canada's far more stringent than the U.S.. And whenever we're having to get market authorization for a formula, there is a specific caution statement that the contraindications for the left don't very specific meds. They have to be careful of. In our formula, we didn't have that caution statement. So that just shows you that based on their review of all of the studies involving tryptophan and any potential contraindications with medications, they didn't see that as a concern because of the low amount. But I just wanted to mention that because some of the listeners might go, wait a second, it's got tryptophan and I've heard tryptophan might be contraindicated or good. I don't believe that there are any issues. Okay. And I think it's word to the why S that if you have a medical condition, if you're on a medication, discuss these with your medical professional. Do your homework. Make sure that you understand your supplements, your nutrients, your medications. This is your journey of discovery. The more you know about yourself and what you're putting into your body, the better you're going to be able to manage this journey. You had mentioned say using it for 28 days. You've mentioned using it for maybe three to 6 months. But would it be fair to say that if we are dealing with issues, say, observable? Our skin. This is something that we see. If we are dealing with aging and a loss of collagen production and we see it in our skin, can we assume this is going on throughout the body. And if we're taking a collagen product, like you're a total body collagen, is it likely that even though we're seeing benefits in the skin, we're going to actually find those benefits and exerting themselves throughout the body.

Steve 5 grams 2.5 grams three Canada 9 years three months 28 days 6 months 90 days one ingredient hundreds of thousands of dolla 2.4 grams U.S. both Versailles one Instagram collective U.S
"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

The Health Quest Podcast

07:45 min | 9 hrs ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

"To health increase your collagen production. Hyaluronic acid, on the other hand, a little bit different, but collagen topically isn't going to do much. So really, it's important to make sure that your supplementing with collagen or getting it through your diet or a combination of both. So that's the one study cellulite. I know a lot of women in particular, although definitely men also get cellulite. But unfortunately, because of how society they put this very negative shadow, they cast this negative shadow on cellulite. That's a topic for a different podcast perhaps, but there was a study that was done using and showing basically how it helped to improve the overall skin texture, making it smoother. And then basically decreasing cellulite. So it was a double blind, randomized placebo controlled study, and it showed again with the 2.5 gram dose of varicose that it essentially reduced in a pretty significant way. There's a cellulite score survey that patients use. And the first results were visible after three months and were definitely more pronounced after 6 months. So although we don't talk a lot about cellulite in the context of collagen, it absolutely makes sense, right? Because you think about what causes cellulite. So a lot of that will essentially benefit from taking oral collagen. So there are definitely been a lot more study Steve, but those are probably the two more notable ones that varicella conducted. Are there other ingredients then in your particular collagen product? And what's the name of that product again? And what are some of these other ingredients that you've used in there? Yeah, so in Canada, we launched total we call our line total body collagen. And we introduced total by collagen into the Canadian market several years ago. And we're now recently launching it in the U.S. market. So we're really excited about that. So total body collagen in the U.S. will launch with three SKUs, three formulas, and there's different flavors. There's an unflavored. There's an orange and there's a pomegranate. And when we were formulating these products, we wanted it to be obviously on collagen forward formula. But we also wanted to add some synergistic ingredients that would be what we would consider cofactors, right? That will help the collagen production in addition to strengthening hair, skin and nails. So we added ingredients like biotin, biotin is definitely a well-known B vitamin that is synonymous with strengthening hair skin and nails. It's also a very important vitamin in the production of keratin and elastin. We added vitamin C because remember I mentioned earlier that vitamin C is important in helping to produce helping ourselves to produce collagen internally. We also added glutamine to our formula because when you think about your digestive system, when you think about your intestines, that's essentially where the majority of our absorption of our nutrients for our food occurs. And so glutamine is one of those very important amino acids that essentially helps to improve the health or the integrity of our small intestine, the lining of the small intestine. So it's essentially there to help improve the uptake or the absorption of the overall collagen formula. We also added tryptophan because remember I mentioned earlier that collagen is not a complete protein. Now, there are some missing amino acids, but the most notable one is tryptophan. And so we've added a little bit of tryptophan to make it a complete protein. And that's again not because we're trying to have people take our total body collagen as a protein source, but just simply because we wanted to have it more balanced. And then lastly, we've added some hyaluronic acid because hyaluronic acid like elastin is very, very important for improving skin density, smoother skin. So those are essentially our formulas. In Canada, we do have some newer formulas that we're going to be launching and we'll also be rolling those out in the U.S.. And there are multi collagen formulas, essentially we decided to introduce those two formulas and unflavored and I can't reveal the flavor yet because they kind of want to keep it a secret when we finally do launch it, but I know that people will love it. But we just wanted to give people the option so that if they didn't really want to have something so targeted for skin, we thought, let's just produce these multi collagen formulas as an option without all of the additional biotin hyaluronic acid, et cetera. Now, for the U.S., we're also launching or have launched our marine collagen. So we have marine collagen available in a powdered version. We also have it in the capsule version, but really for the most part I find that powders are so much easier to use, especially when you're talking about collagen, it's just so much easier to throw into if you're making smoothies or smoothie bowls or you can use it for baking. You can use it in so many different types of recipes. So it's very versatile that way. So in our marine collagen, we have two versions we have the powdered version, which is just straight marine collagen. That's it. And then we also have a product that is similar to the total body collagen that I mentioned, the only difference is the source of the collagen instead of being from bovine is from marine. And the difference with the marine source really is mainly lifestyle, right? There are people out there that have like a pescatarian lifestyle, right? That they're not necessarily strict vegetarians, but they do eat fish or perhaps they just have some sort of a sensitivity to a bovine source or maybe it's for religious reasons that they can't have a bovine source, but one distinction with marine source collagen, even though it is a type one collagen, it has a little bit more of type three collagen. But for the most part, both bovine collagen and marine collagen are very similar in terms of their benefits for skin health. So just some options for people to choose whichever collagen they prefer. Well, just as an aside here since you mentioned vegetarians and so on. Our vegans able to find collagen products if they consume no animal product. Is this a challenge for them? Or is there an alternative even? Definitely, that's a great question because we do get asked that a lot and there are definitely options. So as long as you're able to provide something to your body, whether you're getting it through your diet or through a supplement, that has those amino acids that I've mentioned, the glycine, hydro glycine, arginine, you can actually find those amino acids in tropical fruits, like very specialized type of plant extracts, goji berries, pomegranate, there are other fruit sources primarily that do contain naturally occurring levels of these amino acids. The challenge is that you're not going to find the levels of these amino acids to be as high as what you would find them from animal sources. So you have that as an option, but you're going to have to work a little bit hard right to just make sure that you're getting the necessary amount in order for these ingredients. These plant ingredients to be able to produce health your body to produce collagen. Well, vegans have that challenge and I've been a vegan and that's all I understand. Some of those challenges and you really have to pay attention as in every diet to get good quality foods into your diet. And so vegans now have that particular challenge if they want to get in on this conversation. Well, one of the things that was mentioned to me that I don't think we've talked about today was the benefits of co active. And I don't know what that is. So in your notes, why

U.S. Canada Steve
"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

The Health Quest Podcast

08:17 min | 9 hrs ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Health Quest Podcast

"Of raw materials through manufacturing through testing. Let's just explore your collagen product. Tell us about it and what collagen is it used. Just give us this introductory overview. And then we'll look deeper into some of those components. Yeah, so most of the products that are out there that are collagen supplements are just using what we call generic hydrolyzed collagen. And while I said that it's important that you buy hydrolyzed collagen, we feel that there is an even better source of collagen. And we use a branded ingredient called varicella. So there's sol is from an Italian company. They've been in the business in the nutraceutical industry for well over 60, 65 years. And they're specialty is all things gelatin from bovine sources primarily. And they are in the business of gelatin. So they really are considered the experts. And they've been in the collagen ingredient business for a very, very long time. And so they've made considerable investments in R&D to not only showcase, hey, we can manufacture hydrolyzed collagen, but we can also improve further for helping to improve bioavailability, helping to improve the way that the body uses it. So in addition to hydrolyzed collagen, aerosol goes one step further to ensure optimal absorption. So remember I mentioned the specific amino acids earlier that I said are essentially part of what helps our bodies to produce collagen. So I mentioned the glycine the proline to arginine. Their salt contains a very special composition of just these amino acids. And that's important because you're essentially giving your specialized cells in your body. They're called fibroblasts. And these targeted cells are essentially responsible for manufacturing collagen. And so if you're feeding the right ingredients, the right nutrients to these targeted cells, they're going to be able to produce collagen a lot more efficiently than just giving it a generic collagen that will contain these amino acids, but they also contain other amino acids. And so the body has to figure out how to break it down into the right sequence. So this is a really important differentiation. So with that, improved absorption Steve, the dosing of varicella is so much lower in terms of efficacy than non varicella or non branded or generic collagen that we refer to. And so typically when you see collagen supplements, you typically see doses of a serving size rather of ten grams or 20 grams. And people think, well, this is great. I'm getting a lot of collagen. Well, according to the clinical studies that varicella has done and they've done a lot, you only need 2.5 grams of their collagen and the results of improving skin hydration, skin texture, de wrinkle reduction, improvement of joint pain in terms of reduction rather a joint pain. That's at a 2.5 gram dose in comparison to what you would need with the generic collagens. I mean, there haven't even been studies, so no one really knows what kind of results you would get if you were taking like a ten gram or a 20 gram. So that's a really important differentiator. Now, in our products and we'll talk a little bit about those products and we'll explain our dosing. But I just wanted to point out that that is really one of the few branded collagen ingredients in the market that have done specific clinical studies, placebo controlled double blind, have been accepted by Health Canada because we are a Canadian company. We have manufacturing in the U.S., but so much of our R&D is focused around proving the efficacy and Health Canada does have amongst the highest standards in the world in terms of not only quality, but in terms of getting market authorization, like in order to sell that product, you have to prove efficacy, usually you have to submit at least two human studies in the preferably are the well designed, a larger participant size. And being double blind placebo controlled. And so the fact that we were able to get health claims like deep critical reduction in 28 days, improving skin hydration in as little as 15 days. I mean, these are very, very impressive. And you simply don't get those type of planes that type of efficacy with a generic collagen. So I think that varicella is hands down one of the best collagen ingredients in the market. That's so important what you just described there. And I've touched upon this many times with our audience. And that is that as a manufacturer, natural factors has a choice of many different sources of raw materials. Many different sources of collagen and certainly I'm sure there are cheaper sources of collagen than. And so when you have a marketplace like we have in the U.S. where anybody can put a product on the shelf and call it collagen and the consumer is not going to know the difference, especially those companies who use inferior raw materials are not going to have the science to articulate their product. And so oftentimes what they will do is borrow the science. Collagen did these results. So they might actually borrow those claims when they're not even true for their particular collagen. And so it's important for consumers to understand that there are these distinctions in the marketplace. And as a company, you can make it cheaper or you can make it better. And or you can make it the best by going out into the marketplace and seeking out these trademark branded clinically studied raw materials and usually they're going to have a name like varicose and when a company uses that product, they're going to let their consumers know that they use. So it's really important to understand that not all collagens are the same and therefore not all in products are going to be the same. And the unfortunate part of it is nobody's actually watching the industry close enough to give us that information. We have to learn this and rely on good companies who do what natural factors does. So it's one of the reasons I so want the listeners to understand that point so that they will look for better products because there's nothing worse than spending your money on something that is inferior and you don't know it. You think it's as good you hope it's as good but in reality it's not. So bet your companies learn about companies and when you find one like natural factors who does it right, then you start to have confidence throughout the product line that they're going to pay attention in every one of the products that they make. So I'm really happy to hear about that. So this is this raw material that you source from this Italian company and it has these clinical studies and you alluded to those. Is there any more about those particular studies that you would like to mention in terms of what some of those benefits are relative to the dosing that you described? Yeah, definitely, I think one of the more well considered the flagship study. So there was a study where they used at the 2.5 gram dose. And it significantly reduced wrinkles. And so got a specific duration of use claim, meaning that significantly reduced wrinkles after four weeks. I mean, that's significant. And it led to significantly higher skin pro collagen concentration. So it actually showed a statistically significant reduction in wrinkles of about 60%. I mean, that is unheard of. It's interesting to me when we see in the beauty industry that cosmetics industry where whatever new functional ingredient is trending or obviously collagen is one of those ingredients. Topically to apply collagen to your skin, Steve is really not going to do very much

Health Canada 2.5 grams 2.5 gram 20 grams 20 gram ten grams 28 days ten gram Steve U.S. 15 days about 60% four weeks one over 60, 65 years at least two human studies one of those ingredients one step double varicella
"varicella" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Doctor gorka, great to be with you. Thanks for having me. So did I miss something that is flu unique or are you allowed to say that about flu but nothing else? So I have science as they say evolved since 2004. Well, Doctor Fauci is like a broken clock. He is right twice a day or so. He is absolutely correct that the best vaccination is getting the infection itself. It's right with flu. It's right with COVID-19. And other illnesses as well. For example, Seb, when I was a kid, I got chickenpox. The actual disease chickenpox. And I got that because my mom dragged my brother and I down the street to a kid's house who had chickenpox. Of course, was before the vaccination. And we were home from school for a week or so with typical chickenpox lesions and calamine lotion and oatmeal bass and so forth and we recovered. Recently for a variety of reasons I checked some titers and I still have very powerful chickenpox or varicella titers because I got the disease itself that's better than a vaccine. I have lifelong immunity. And we think the same is true with COVID-19. We know that there are studies out of Israel and elsewhere that clearly show natural immunity that is from getting the disease itself is much more powerful than the very limited or fleeted immunity that comes from the vaccine. We're calling it a vaccine. It's not really a vaccine. It's more, I think, accurately to describe as a therapeutic biologic. But Fauci was right as it related to the flu. He's absolutely wrong on most things related to COVID. Good riddance to him that he's retiring. Yes. He can run, but he can't hide. I expect we'll see hearings in the Senate or House come January and I'm hoping Doctor Fauci is brought back to testify so we can learn more about the malfeasance of doctor Anthony Fauci. Yesterday, baron Donaldson, the black conservative Republican representative from Florida, tweeted out. Just a reminder, Doctor Fauci, you may be out of government service, but that doesn't mean we can't subpoena you to testify before Congress. I read three of the good congressman saying it doesn't mean we can't charge you and prosecute you either. This is the state of affairs with regards to this topic. It is very, very depressing for me as an immigrant to this country to see what has happened to those who are prepared to speak out against, well, politically driven lies and propagandists like Doctor Fauci. I realize something was amiss, doctor baki, when I saw the definitions, I'm not a doctor of medicine. I'm a PhD, but I decided to look through the professional literature. And I saw key organs redefined the definition of vaccine, which previously had been a process, a product that provides permanent or semi permanent immunity to a given virus. That was changed about a year and a half ago. Why would the definition of vaccine change given that vaccines in the past have given us permanent or semi permanent immunity? It was there a political requirement to change that definition. It's like the definition of case. Case, as far as I know, used to mean in most statistical analyses, when somebody has a serious infection, a serious incident of a viral infection, meaning they have to be hospitalized or receive treatment. It doesn't mean I stick a test up my nose and it comes out positive and therefore I'm a COVID case..

Doctor Fauci chickenpox flu Doctor gorka chickenpox lesions Seb baron Donaldson Fauci Anthony Fauci baki Israel Senate Florida Congress House
"varicella" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"He is the author of the book COVID-19 doctor Jeff baki. Welcome back to America first. Doctor gorka, great to be with you. Thanks for having me. So did I miss something that is flu unique or are you allowed to say that about flu but nothing else? So I have science as they say evolved since 2004. Well, Doctor Fauci is like a broken clock. He is right twice a day or so. He is absolutely correct that the best vaccination is getting the infection itself. It's right with flu. It's right with COVID-19. And other illnesses as well. For example, Seb, when I was a kid, I got chickenpox. The actual disease chickenpox. And I got that because my mom dragged my brother and I down the street to a kid's house who had chickenpox. Of course, was before the vaccination. And we were home from school for a week or so with typical chickenpox lesions and calamine lotion and oatmeal bass and so forth and we recovered. Recently for a variety of reasons I checked some titers and I still have very powerful chickenpox or varicella titers because I got the disease itself that's better than a vaccine. I have lifelong immunity. And we think the same is true with COVID-19. We know that there are studies out of Israel and elsewhere that clearly show natural immunity that is from getting the disease itself is much more powerful than the very limited or fleeted immunity that comes from the vaccine. We're calling it a vaccine. It's not really a vaccine. It's more, I think, accurately to describe as a therapeutic biologic.

Doctor Fauci chickenpox flu Doctor gorka chickenpox lesions Seb baron Donaldson Fauci Anthony Fauci baki Israel Senate Florida Congress House
Sebastian and Dr. Jeff Barke Discuss the Power of Natural Immunity

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 3 months ago

Sebastian and Dr. Jeff Barke Discuss the Power of Natural Immunity

"He is the author of the book COVID-19 doctor Jeff baki. Welcome back to America first. Doctor gorka, great to be with you. Thanks for having me. So did I miss something that is flu unique or are you allowed to say that about flu but nothing else? So I have science as they say evolved since 2004. Well, Doctor Fauci is like a broken clock. He is right twice a day or so. He is absolutely correct that the best vaccination is getting the infection itself. It's right with flu. It's right with COVID-19. And other illnesses as well. For example, Seb, when I was a kid, I got chickenpox. The actual disease chickenpox. And I got that because my mom dragged my brother and I down the street to a kid's house who had chickenpox. Of course, was before the vaccination. And we were home from school for a week or so with typical chickenpox lesions and calamine lotion and oatmeal bass and so forth and we recovered. Recently for a variety of reasons I checked some titers and I still have very powerful chickenpox or varicella titers because I got the disease itself that's better than a vaccine. I have lifelong immunity. And we think the same is true with COVID-19. We know that there are studies out of Israel and elsewhere that clearly show natural immunity that is from getting the disease itself is much more powerful than the very limited or fleeted immunity that comes from the vaccine. We're calling it a vaccine. It's not really a vaccine. It's more, I think, accurately to describe as a therapeutic biologic.

Chickenpox Jeff Baki FLU Doctor Gorka Doctor Fauci Chickenpox Lesions SEB America Israel
"varicella" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:55 min | 7 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Get vaccinated against flu? And then tens of thousands of people die every year of flu. And we just let it go. And I've been baffled by that for decades. Like I just don't understand. So, but I do think also I've been struck we focus so heavily on the individual argument for vaccination this time around as well. Like every article in the newspaper that tries to convince people to get vaccinated is that same chart like here's the rate of people who die who don't get vaccinated. Here's the rate of people who die, do you get vaccinated? Therefore, you should get vaccinated. And that will work on an elderly person. But it doesn't work on a kid. And it doesn't work on a young parent because they're not, they don't have that chance to do. So the argument for them needs to be like, no, no, no, this is a societal good, as you said. Look, this is to protect those who can't protect themselves. Who's making that argument though? This is where I'm just sort of baffled because I just don't see that being pushed at all. It just seems to be this individual protect yourself. How do we do better about that? Yeah, I honestly wish I knew. I just wrote an article with Sally perm. I was a department chair at Cornell and Mark slices infectious diseases professor at University of Minnesota about the importance of vaccination for the kids who have been available, so kids 5 years and up. And in that article, we stressed both individual protection and societal protection. I think a lot of us feel like, I mean, there is an argument made for individual protection, but it's a. Relative risk for a child is small, and I think it's disingenuous to not acknowledge that. And so we push this societal argument for it. But I have heard, including from many vaccine experts that you can't ask people to do stuff for other people, they're only going to do it. If it's for their kid, and I find that, frankly, amazing. And so every communication that I put out about this, I try to emphasize, this is for everyone and you should care for all kids, 'cause there's a lot of statements about oh fear mongering the pediatric population and stuff. And I always say it's not fear mongering. The statistics, the numbers are the numbers. This is a thousand children that have died. This is 550,000 hospitalization days for children. These are facts. And so kids do get sick with this, but also the goal of one shouldn't vaccinate out of fear. One should vaccinate out of love for all children. And I honestly and probably naively sort of assumed that that was a very powerful argument, but it's not that powerful an argument, apparently. I would love to see evidence on that, 'cause I'm just baffled by that sentiment. I mean, you probably know one of my all time favorite papers. Was that and I've talked about it so many times. Was this study of the varicella vaccine chickenpox for those of us listening who don't know varicella? But before the varicella vaccine was widely used, some number of babies died every year of varicella. And then, of course, we instituted widespread vaccination at one and up and a couple of years later, zero babies died of vaccination. We don't vaccinate babies. We don't do it. They start at one. But by vaccinating their siblings, we prevented all the baby deaths. And we ask now, you know, grandparents to get reupped for pertussis or other things before they see baby. This is to protect babies. And everybody does it because, well, of course you protect baby. So I don't understand that argument to say that we don't we are unwilling to vaccinate. When my kids, I'm John, I want you to get vaccinated. And they're like, why? I don't want another shot. And I'm like, 'cause your grandparents could die. And then they're like, oh, okay, I get that. I get that totally. Like, you know, I gotta do that to protect cramp. We have loved ones who are elderly. The babies or who have cancer or, you know, why? Why does that not work? Or are we sure that doesn't work? Or is this just people being cynical? Yeah, I think it should be studied. I get feedback on, I get feedback when I put out an announcement of like, well, you know, most kids just do fine, so we're not going to do it, which seems like they're not directly saying we don't care about all kids, but they sort of are. But I think so the varicella vaccine is a very interesting example because even among physicians, there was some question about it because, you know, varicella sort of like it was more visible than COVID-19, but sort of like COVID-19. It was pretty benign disease in most children. And the deaths were largely from necrotizing fasciitis from group a strap. So like that was the deadly thing was a super infection with group based strap. And like you said it was, I think a couple hundred kids maybe 200 to 300 children that died every year. So not a small number, but a terrible thing. And I would have to look up the actual data, but I believe the story with the varicella vaccine was that uptake initially was not that great. And then people sort of started to accept it and then uptake went up and then so it wasn't like the first year that vaccine uptake was so great that it took a little bit longer. But it held because as you said, that's went from a couple hundred to zero. And so even if the couple hundred didn't totally register with people, the zero did, and they took it. And so that gives me a little bit of hope maybe for the COVID vaccine that part of this is about people having hesitancy because of mRNA is new vaccine and what does it do in kids and stuff and you can tell people it's safe but they have to internalize that. And so maybe either seeing that kids do fine with it and or getting new vaccines that aren't mRNA vaccines will mean that more people get back..

Sally perm Mark slices flu varicella University of Minnesota Cornell John cancer
"varicella" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:06 min | 7 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"That's exactly what concerns experts like doctor Gerald Harmon, president of the American medical association. We've had three different pandemics, he says. The COVID-19 pandemic, the disinformation pandemic, and now the pandemic of distrust, so there is a substantial risk of giving more oxygen to the anti vaxxer population. The recent CDC study looked at the change in vaccination rates from 2019 and 2020 to 2020 through 2021 for three routine childhood shots, measles, mumps, and rubella, or MMR, for which vaccination rates fell from 95.2% to 93.9%. Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis, which fell from 94.9% to 93.6%, and varicella, or chickenpox, which fell from 94.8% to 93.6%. Those seemingly small drops below the 95% threshold are troubling, especially when it comes to measles, which is so transmissible that even a point below the 95% herd immunity rate is enough to get the disease spreading widely among the unvaccinated. Measles is an incredibly contagious childhood disease, which carries a serious risk of lifetime injury, says Harmon, in some cases, kids who get measles can develop damage to the central nervous system as late as ten years after the initial infection. Troubling as the national vaccine numbers are, they are far worse in some states. Maryland saw its vaccination rate plummet from an average of 95% for all three vaccines in the 2019 2020 school year to 87.6%, 89.7% and 87.3% respectively for the MMR DTaP and varicella vaccines the following year. Wisconsin saw a 5% drop to about 87.2% for all three shots. The least vaccinated state in the nation for this age group is Idaho at just over 86% for all three jabs. That represents a 3% drop from 2019 through 2020. Since the CDC last tallied childhood vaccination rates in 2021. Schools have reopened with mandates for vaccinations in place and visits to pediatricians have increased after a sharp decline. In theory, those two factors mean that the vaccination numbers could recover, but Harmon and kirkus are not alone in worrying that the damage done by mistrust and misinformation regarding COVID-19 vaccines could have a lasting impact on the uptake of other vaccines. Indeed, routine immunization rates have been slow to rebound, said the American academy of pediatrics in January 2022. Francisco Pierre, a post doctoral student at the polytechnic university of Milan, and lead author of an April study published in nature scientific reports that correlated COVID-19 vaccine misinformation posted on Twitter and negative attitudes and surveys about the shots, but leaves that the low childhood vaccination rates may well be tied to unfounded COVID-19 vaccine rumors. You can assume some spillover effect, he says, the activity around this kind of malicious content has increased, leading to an increase in the prevalence of misinformation of vaccines in general. Says Harmon, the AMA president and a former major general in the air force reserve and the Air National Guard..

Gerald Harmon acellular pertussis CDC Harmon American medical association rubella mumps Diphtheria
"varicella" Discussed on Inside Supercars

Inside Supercars

06:44 min | 8 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on Inside Supercars

"Welcome to our super cast, Tony we're talking Sunday at Grand Prix, Thomas Randy. He's had both good and bad in qualifying. But you've at least raced our back now. Yeah, exactly. Thanks, Tony. Yeah, being up and down in qualifying with this format we have four qualifying sessions in four races over four days. So a lot of racing and yeah, I really have to get on my game in qualifying so the fourth qualifying was Thursday afternoon after two practice sessions. One of those practice sessions was heavily cut short due to some tech pro barrier issues, but yeah, qualifying one was really good qualified 9th. And then in the second qualifying yeah, I got to track limits on my first lap, so that was that time deleted and then just overdrive and actually spun 5 on my second run. So that put us back in 23rd. And then qualifying three Friday morning was on the hard tyres. So probably on a drive in the first one, qualified 16th, and then now we got it all together and qualified force for the last one, which is yeah, as you say, is today so pretty excited about that. That's my best qualifying by far in the main series, and yeah, can't wait to get that race underway because we've had three races already, so we've sort of learned which way we should go with the strategy and so I had a race guys around here so now put all that knowledge into the final race. Now you practice here in the 5000 back in 1928 20 rather but of course I never got to race on that Friday morning and 13th at lunch. It was all kind of ironic that Friday 13th. Absolutely. But there's a new track here now. I've been told by black back Mike senior very well experienced driver. He said to me, well, you've got it not to race on the old track because this one's so different. Yeah. And look, he's not wrong. I mean, the service is so smooth and the back section of the track that a lot of the corner profiles have changed. So we're actually missing that turn 7 and 8 or 8 and 9 chicane. That's gone. So it's full throttle from the exit of turn 6 all the way to turn the new ten 9, which used to be turn 11 and 12 chicane, and the turn 6 corner radius or profile has changed significantly. It's a lot more open, a lot more camber so you can carry a lot more mid corner speed. So what we've found so far this weekend on the soft tyres. So we're doing mixed tyre racing. So hard, tyre. If you stand on the stock, you've got to finish on the hard. Or you just have to run both. So you could then finish back on the soft or start hard go soft, go hard, but in a 20 lap race, you really only want to pit once, but what we've found is that the soft tyre can not really last any longer than 7 laps and it actually delaminate from the heavy loading around the back section of the track through sector two. But what we have also found is that there's really not much tire degradation. So yeah, the strategy that we did in the first race was start on the hard pit early, try and make the soft last and unfortunately we had to beat again to go back on the hards because the soft delaminated. So yeah, giving your history an open wheelers, which is pretty extensive and obviously that you like when you've got maximum loads on. So that suits you, this is the way the track is now. To be honest, these sorts of circuits suit me. I like these longer tracks. Tasmania. Yeah, I like the longer tracks. You've got to be on your game for longer. So 52nd lap versa, one minute, 45. It's a lot longer that you need to focus and get every corner right because it's so easy to lose time and we found in the last qualifying. I mean, I was fourth, a tenth and a half off, and I think the top ten was separated by three and a half tenths. So even though I'm such a long track, the times have been so close, so that's where yeah. This is kind of the first race for me that I'll discover what it's like to start in the top 5. And if the first lap goes to plan, I think I'll find that it's going to be a lot easier race to manage because when you're mid pack or down the back, everyone's sort of racing for shape stations and now they're at the front. I think the strategies easier, but yeah, I think everyone now after learning a lot from the first three races, have all got the same sort of thought process going into the final one today. Well, you can't wait. We're looking forward. Congratulations on a great start to your year. If you've had the ups and downs that always happen to a rookie, plenty of those, yeah. At least you're not working behind the years in this category. I mean, you've done enough wildcards and Devon a couple of methods that they must be things that you are actually will looking forward to. For sure. I mean, the wild card certainly helped prepare me for this and now I mean I've got no issue racing guys and leaning on other cars. I mean, yeah, it's one of those things, isn't it? You know what I mean? I'm happy that we're showing really good car speed and to qualify for for the last one. I think it shows that we deserve to be here and that we've got the pace and to be up. Well, to be qualifying up there at this point of the year is really good. But now it's about trying to maintain that and yeah, this was the first time for me here in the supercar. My first race here was on Friday afternoon. But yeah, we go to Perth next round and then winton. So two tracks I have driven super cars or Super Tuesday. So hopefully we can sort of maintain or stay in that top ten bracket and yeah it'd be great for us to go for the team all the partners and all the Ford fans. And one last thing and obviously because you had a rare opportunity for any driver in this category when in beside jump your one of your motor racing heroes. One Alonso. Yeah. He was a childhood here at mine and it's someone had told me, you know, 5 years ago or a year ago that, hey, on your birthday, Fernando Alonso is going to take you around in your car at the Grand Prix. I'd be like, now you having a laugh. He respected you didn't put chewing gum under the seat or anything like that, did he? I hope not. I think he might have made it a bit quicker. As neocortex was saying the Alonzo effects, but it was a lot of fun and he loved it. I think he did about four or 5 laps. Then took his engineer for a lap or two and it was just great for the category. You know, they respect us so much and butter, but really cool. You can add his signature extra room as varicella on your elbow, couldn't you? Yeah, so. Yeah. All right, well thank you very much,.

Thomas Randy Tony Mike Tasmania winton Perth Alonso Fernando Alonso Ford
"varicella" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:19 min | 9 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on WTOP

"Thompson creek designs built and installs replacement windows without supply chain delays that other window dealers are seen You get high quality windows at an affordable price installed faster than other window companies Plus it's their biggest sale of the year With 25% off all windows endorsed plus no interest until October 2023 C Thompson creek dot com for details Oh 8 5 5 57 creek today Four 38 Traffic and weather on the 8s and when it breaks with Dave dildine in the WTO traffic system This is a bad traffic day There's a good chance you're probably not going to hear about your backup right now There's just too much to go over in Virginia 95 southbound very slow into woodbridge northbound very slow out of Quantico at dumfries Remains of a car fire just pushed to the right shoulder but damage done even though the lanes are open Rollover crash police investigation closing the outbound spout run Parkway North George Washington Parkway backed up under many of the Potomac river bridges You got to go north on the GW Parkway You can't bear left onto spout run 66 eastbound you're fair lakes fairfax county Parkway crash clear Varicella traffic all around the beltway given the wet weather slowest perhaps for now heading into Silver Spring Near Connecticut got a crash in the second lane from the left There is a crash on Connecticut avenue Near Chevy Chase Lake drive there was a crash in Wheaton on Georgia avenue near Henderson avenue Two 70 northbound very slow traffic leaving Montgomery county into Frederick county Caller found one facing The wrong way near the monoclonal scenic view mostly on the right shoulder Back in Virginia old town the crash involving one that was stuck underneath the king street station Metro bridge king street is still blocked both ways outside of the metro station between Commonwealth avenue and sunset drive back In Maryland on branch avenue southbound before surratt's road had a crash on the left and one in Waldorf northbound on three O one near billingsley That was reported on the left side as well ID and a saving taxpayers over $210 billion securing identities providing equitable access and preserving control of personal data more at ID dot ME slash hour promise Dave dildine WTO traffic Let's talk about this changing forecast here's Brianna Whether alert day as we're tracking the potential for thunderstorms the cloudy very warm and muggy weather will change to very cold.

Dave dildine Thompson creek Parkway North George Washingto Near Chevy Chase Lake Quantico WTO dumfries Virginia Potomac river fairfax county Frederick county Wheaton Montgomery county Connecticut metro station billingsley Waldorf Maryland
"varicella" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Is where I'm having a hard time reconciling this is again a non medical professional like yourself If the research turns out to be accurate in vivo when we start getting say liver samples from people and starts to show the yes spike proteins are being pumped out for a longer term than anticipated Then how is it that the vaccines effectiveness is waning so poorly In other words if it's pumping out the spike proteins that are supposed to be recognized by our bodies as foreign invaders then we're producing antibodies and why is the vaccine You get what I'm saying like it's producing the spike proteins but it's not doing what it's supposed to do It doesn't seem to make sense It would seem to be zero sum here One would take away from the other That's a brilliant observation So your question is if we're being presented with this antigen all the time why don't we have these rock and rolling in them antibodies right Why do they trail off in a paper by Israel Israel is the first author They showed a 40% drop off per month of these antibodies after the vaccine It must be and I think Bruce Patterson is right on this It must be that the body is concealing the spike protein as an antigen because your white blood cells your monocytes and macrophages are trying to gobble up the spike protein So in a sense your sequestering away from antigenic presentation but yet you're stuck with this over time So let's hope that it's not a chronic stimulus for blood clots It's not a chronic stimulus for myocarditis or a heart inflammation that evolves over time or bleeding disorders like vaccine induced thrombocytopenic and let's hope that it's not a stimulus for cancer in the first cancer data was presented out of the Department of Defense epidemiological database demet And that was at the January 24th Senate hearings where it's just epidemiological but there has been a market increase in cancer among our service

Peter McCullough Peter McCulloch Epstein Barr Pfizer cancers blood cancers Sweden Bruce Patterson lymphoma lupus cancers Lyme disease Lyme disease Stanford Intel SARS
"varicella" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:31 min | 9 months ago

"varicella" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"And get right to them This is doctor Peter McCulloch doctor Thanks for spending some time with us Thanks for having me So doctor I read this study I saw it on your social media feed about the intracellular reverse transcription of the Pfizer COVID-19 mRNA vaccine Can you explain to us in layman's terms what this means it sounds to me like our bodies could be incentivized to produce this spike protein a lot longer than anticipated and if true that could cause a lot of complications And am I wrong That's true I mean the concerning new news on this is that lab in Sweden now has found the cell line that indeed a lot of this has to do with laboratory technique The cell line that has demonstrated the fact that the vaccines now in the cytoplasm in basically in the area where the messenger RNA should be transcribed in order to produce the spike protein that in fact it's there long enough for DNA to be laid down against the RNA and that DNA moves into the nucleus of the cell And with that it's found in the nucleus and it's coding for the spike protein Now we don't know if it's actually physically changing the chromosomes permanently but many believe that that is circumstantial evidence that that's happening Now there's going to be a really hot and heavy investigation to see whether or not these vaccines in fact permanently change chromosomes And if this is the case is spike protein going to be produced long-term Does any other vaccine we're talking to doctor Peter McCullough Is any other vaccine do that lead to long-term chromosomal changes that you're aware of Or is this new technology the first one to your knowledge It's new technology and that's the consequences of using new technology in a widespread vaccine program is these things are not can not be assessed ahead of time in enough preclinical studies Now the respiratory illness itself has been shown and particularly in severe cases where there's prolonged exposure to have some reverse transcription We don't know what the implications are When you get a natural viral infection some of it can incorporate it in your own DNA It's called the Herve region And you may know this because if you get chickenpox the virus doesn't install and later on in life you can get shingles which is the varicella zoster virus coming back out the same thing is true with Epstein Barr virus You get a permanent install But with a vaccine there's just under no circumstances what we want to see evidence of a permanent install particularly on production of a protein which is pathogenic Doctor we're talking to doctor Peter McCullough about a troubling new study Once we hang up I'll show you folks where you can read it for yourself For a guy like me who's recently hopefully recovered from lymphoma I'm in remission now And my wife was an autoimmune disorder herself and lupus If that turns out to be the case and I understand some preliminary study you know you were very cautious in your approach to it as well But if it turns out that we are producing spike proteins long term What could that mean for people with autoimmune difficulties and people with various types of cancers blood cancers and immune system cancers I think it's going to be a matter of degree If it's one or two shots and it's echo cells and there isn't much passage to daughter cells this thing can in a sense burn itself out or be cleared out over time Bruce Patterson who leaves a company called Intel DX doing terrific work is formally professor at northwestern and Stanford He's actually shown in the respiratory illness that the spike protein is in the body a long time to end but up to 15 months in CD 16 positive monocytes And I did have him on my show and I asked him about what has he seen in vaccinated people And in fact he does have samples He's seen both the S one and the S two segment of the spike protein in humans after vaccination as long as he's observed them So for a month I asked him I said can you predict how long it's in the body He said probably over a year SARS CoV-2 the virus And then the spike protein installed in the body with vaccination It has a persistence in the body That's the reason why people feel bad There's a long COVID syndrome And I estimate is there any other infection that's similar to this He said yeah there is I said what is it He said Lyme disease Lyme disease does an install of the organism called borrelia bardia It takes forever to clear out lime That's the reason why people get this post lime syndrome So I think people who are immune deficient people with lymphoma they've had chemotherapy or radiation or they have other autoimmune illnesses This could be a problem And I think doctors will have to keep a careful watch on organ systems that could be involved including the bone marrow measures of the immune system brain and heart And let's hope for the best But none of this is adding up to having people get enrolled in a periodic booster program I think that could be trouble Doctor you have time for one more question I know you're crunched for time you're seeing patients One more and we'll let you go This is where I'm having a hard time reconciling this is again a non medical professional like yourself If.

Peter McCullough Peter McCulloch Epstein Barr Pfizer cancers blood cancers Sweden Bruce Patterson lymphoma lupus cancers Lyme disease Lyme disease Stanford Intel SARS
Dr. Peter McCullough: The Consequences of New Technology, Pfizer Shot

The Dan Bongino Show

01:11 min | 9 months ago

Dr. Peter McCullough: The Consequences of New Technology, Pfizer Shot

"Does any other vaccine we're talking to doctor Peter McCullough Is any other vaccine do that lead to long-term chromosomal changes that you're aware of Or is this new technology the first one to your knowledge It's new technology and that's the consequences of using new technology in a widespread vaccine program is these things are not can not be assessed ahead of time in enough preclinical studies Now the respiratory illness itself has been shown and particularly in severe cases where there's prolonged exposure to have some reverse transcription We don't know what the implications are When you get a natural viral infection some of it can incorporate it in your own DNA It's called the Herve region And you may know this because if you get chickenpox the virus doesn't install and later on in life you can get shingles which is the varicella zoster virus coming back out the same thing is true with Epstein Barr virus You get a permanent install But with a vaccine there's just under no circumstances what we want to see evidence of a permanent install particularly on production of a protein which is

Peter Mccullough Epstein Barr
"varicella" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"I'm very much the same thing I'm saying to you. I would talk about risks and benefits. In fact, this is part of what we do with everything. And what parents like I want an antibiotic for my kids ear infection. I talk about well, these are the benefits of it. And these are the risks, and often it's saying, you know, your child is two to three times more likely to actually have a side effect than to get any benefit from this. I'd rather just watch it. And when you say it that way, many parents will get it. Even if parents are like, I want antibiotics. You can sometimes say, well, why don't we? Why don't I give you a prescription? But you go home and you watch and if he's not better in two days, you'll fill the prescription. But if he's get better today, then you don't have to. You know, it's negotiation. It's making sure people feel heard, making sure that you understand what they're going through, that it's not unreasonable and trying to find a solution that works soft. Well, in your writing about varicella, I noticed that you said, in 2008, only about 34% of eligible adolescence were fully immunized. And by 2018, about 90% of kids have been vaccinated. And that seems both great and made me think like, oh my gosh, are we talking about immunizing kids against COVID on a decade long time frame? Is it going to take us ten years? Unless we have mandates, yeah, I think it is. Because and to be honest with you, we won't get all the way there without mandates. Let's be clear too. I can't win 90% as a pediatrician. I just own that. It's not going to happen. So you need a school system or something like that. You need these to become so expected that the school systems requiring it the default has to be.

"varicella" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"I'm very much the same thing I'm saying to you. I would talk about risks and benefits. In fact, this is part of what we do with everything. And what parents like I want an antibiotic for my kids ear infection. I talk about well, these are the benefits of it. And these are the risks, and often it's saying, you know, your child is two to three times more likely to actually have a side effect than to get any benefit from this. I'd rather just watch it. And when you say it that way, many parents will get it. Even if parents are like, I want antibiotics. You can sometimes say, well, why don't we? Why don't I give you a prescription? But you go home and you watch and if he's not better in two days, you'll fill the prescription. But if he's get better today, then you don't have to. You know, it's negotiation. It's making sure people feel heard, making sure that you understand what they're going through, that it's not unreasonable and trying to find a solution that works soft. Well, in your writing about varicella, I noticed that you said, in 2008, only about 34% of eligible adolescence were fully immunized. And by 2018, about 90% of kids have been vaccinated. And that seems both great and made me think like, oh my gosh, are we talking about immunizing kids against COVID on a decade long time frame? Is it going to take us ten years? Unless we have mandates, yeah, I think it is. Because and to be honest with you, we won't get all the way there without mandates. Let's be clear too. I can't win 90% as a pediatrician. I just own that. It's not going to happen. So you need a school system or something like that. You need these to become so expected that the school systems requiring it the default has to be.

"varicella" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"The COVID vaccine? I think people have this view of people who are hesitant about vaccination that they're all woefully misguided or just adamant about it. This is never going to happen. I hate vaccination. Now, when you deal with though the reasons, they're reasonable. And people are often vaccine hesitant for the kids because they just are worried. People are much more risk averse for their children than they often are for themselves. And the risks that people are willing to take in their daily lives even and what they're willing to do are not the same as what they're willing tolerate for their children. What kind of questions do you see? Yeah, I mean, it's amazing because most of the questions I see from where people who are otherwise totally pro vaccine. I get a lot of people who absolutely got vaccinated, but now it's their children and their well, my child is prepubescent. I'm worried about their fertility. Or we just don't know how many kids are going to get myocarditis. And I heard that it's more common amongst adolescents and I'm really worried about my small child, or a bunch of people have had COVID. It's very possible. My kids even already had COVID and didn't know why should I then vaccinate them? Isn't that dangerous? Would it be worse if they've already had COVID? What do you say? Well, to each of those, you have different answers for people that are worried about fertility. That's just unfortunately a myth. Or people worried when they hear mRNA that somehow mRNA gets into the DNA and it's going to change a genes. In which case you have to go through the explanation of how there is no mechanism in the body to turn mRNA into DNA. It's just DNA and mRNA. So the mRNA we give you can't be turned back into DNA. There's no mechanism to do so. If it's people worried about myocarditis, then I have to talk about how relatively rare that is and how the risk of myocarditis from COVID is so much greater than the risk of myocarditis from a vaccine and given how infectious delta is another variant that everyone's eventually going to get vaccinated or COVID and that you're much, much, much, much better off getting the vaccine. I'm listening to you talk through these and I've also watched some of these webinars you do ask Aaron for the university community. And it feels a little bit like you're kind of on variations on a theme autopilot. Like you get this question, you say this answer, you get this question, you say this one. Does it feel that way? Does it feel like you're just a vending machine with I hear you? And here's the answer. It eventually gets there? Because there are only so many questions. The questions eventually become repetitive to me and to people who watch every single webinar, but they're new to the person asking it. And really, people's individual concerns are very individual and until they are specifically answered in person, many people will not be converted. And if they hear a message which doesn't resonate with them, that, you know, feels like you're trying to skirt the issue. They assume you're trying to hide something. And so I think that this unfortunately is just very retail work. It has to be done individually. It's actually one of the things that makes me happy about the way that we're actually distributing the vaccines to children is that we're now finally making use of the healthcare system. We have not been giving out vaccines in the traditional method with respect to COVID. It's at pharmacies, it's at big centers, not. You go to your doctor's office whenever you go to my doctor's office and they tell me what vaccines I need and I get them. When we go to the pediatrician's office, they tell you what vaccines you need, and you get them. That's what we're doing with COVID finally is that, you know, we're distributing these to actual pediatricians offices. That's a way to get to people who are vaccine hesitant. Why do you think there's this disconnect that might exist between what a parent is willing to do for themselves? A vaccinated parent. And what they might be willing to do for their kid. Well, I think one is that you feel a sense of responsibility to your children that sometimes feels harder than to yourself because you've been taking risks with yourself your whole life. You choose to drive. You choose to ski. You choose what you eat and drink. You've probably made some reasonably risky decisions in your 20s. Both with respect to sexual activity and perhaps with substances. Like you're just, you're just used to understanding tradeoffs. With kids, however, were much more restrictive. We try to keep them in the boundaries more because we're worried that they don't have the same kind of experience and guardrails. That adults sometimes still lack, but we know that kids don't have them. And we feel that we could be blamed. The dangers seem much more big and the benefits sometimes pale in comparison. Of course, weighing benefits and risks of vaccines is nothing new. That's why family has turned to their pediatricians for advice. For years, doctors have tried to increase vaccination rates and fight hesitancy. Aaron says that can be tough when a new vaccine comes out. He saw it happen with a vaccine for varicella. Otherwise known as chickenpox. When the varicella vaccine got approved in the 90s, lots of parents were and this is when I was just starting to be a pediatrician where why should I why should I vaccinate my kid against chickenpox? It's a nothing burger minor illness. Everybody gets it. Everybody does fine. Why would I subject myself to this? And I'd have to explain that for a lot of people that's true. But when adults get chickenpox, it's massively bad. My dad got chickenpox when all three of us me and my brother and my sister got it. And he was sick. Plus, some number of babies died every year of varicella infection. It wasn't huge numbers, but they were real numbers, and they were babies and other people got hospitalized. And just a couple of years after we really started vaccinating kids in the early 2000s, zero babies died of chickenpox. That's a huge win, given that zero babies are immunized against chickenpox. You can't get it till your one year of age. But by vaccinating children, we protected everyone. Now today, we have like 86% of eligible children vaccinated and chickenpox is largely gone away. You wrote about your experience as a young pediatrician vaccinating kids with the varicella vaccine against chickenpox. How did you break through to skeptical parents? I think it's time and effort and one it's building up trust. I mean, one of the what did you say to them?.

myocarditis chickenpox Aaron varicella infection
"varicella" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

07:02 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"The COVID vaccine? I think people have this view of people who are hesitant about vaccination that they're all woefully misguided or just adamant about it. This is never going to happen. I hate vaccination. Now, when you deal with though the reasons, they're reasonable. And people are often vaccine hesitant for the kids because they just are worried. People are much more risk averse for their children than they often are for themselves. And the risks that people are willing to take in their daily lives even and what they're willing to do are not the same as what they're willing tolerate for their children. What kind of questions do you see? Yeah, I mean, it's amazing because most of the questions I see from where people who are otherwise totally pro vaccine. I get a lot of people who absolutely got vaccinated, but now it's their children and their well, my child is prepubescent. I'm worried about their fertility. Or we just don't know how many kids are going to get myocarditis. And I heard that it's more common amongst adolescents and I'm really worried about my small child, or a bunch of people have had COVID. It's very possible. My kids even already had COVID and didn't know why should I then vaccinate them? Isn't that dangerous? Would it be worse if they've already had COVID? What do you say? Well, to each of those, you have different answers for people that are worried about fertility. That's just unfortunately a myth. Or people worried when they hear mRNA that somehow mRNA gets into the DNA and it's going to change a genes. In which case you have to go through the explanation of how there is no mechanism in the body to turn mRNA into DNA. It's just DNA and mRNA. So the mRNA we give you can't be turned back into DNA. There's no mechanism to do so. If it's people worried about myocarditis, then I have to talk about how relatively rare that is and how the risk of myocarditis from COVID is so much greater than the risk of myocarditis from a vaccine and given how infectious delta is another variant that everyone's eventually going to get vaccinated or COVID and that you're much, much, much, much better off getting the vaccine. I'm listening to you talk through these and I've also watched some of these webinars you do ask Aaron for the university community. And it feels a little bit like you're kind of on variations on a theme autopilot. Like you get this question, you say this answer, you get this question, you say this one. Does it feel that way? Does it feel like you're just a vending machine with I hear you? And here's the answer. It eventually gets there? Because there are only so many questions. The questions eventually become repetitive to me and to people who watch every single webinar, but they're new to the person asking it. And really, people's individual concerns are very individual and until they are specifically answered in person, many people will not be converted. And if they hear a message which doesn't resonate with them, that, you know, feels like you're trying to skirt the issue. They assume you're trying to hide something. And so I think that this unfortunately is just very retail work. It has to be done individually. It's actually one of the things that makes me happy about the way that we're actually distributing the vaccines to children is that we're now finally making use of the healthcare system. We have not been giving out vaccines in the traditional method with respect to COVID. It's at pharmacies, it's at big centers, not. You go to your doctor's office whenever you go to my doctor's office and they tell me what vaccines I need and I get them. When we go to the pediatrician's office, they tell you what vaccines you need, and you get them. That's what we're doing with COVID finally is that, you know, we're distributing these to actual pediatricians offices. That's a way to get to people who are vaccine hesitant. Why do you think there's this disconnect that might exist between what a parent is willing to do for themselves? A vaccinated parent. And what they might be willing to do for their kid. Well, I think one is that you feel a sense of responsibility to your children that sometimes feels harder than to yourself because you've been taking risks with yourself your whole life. You choose to drive. You choose to ski. You choose what you eat and drink. You've probably made some reasonably risky decisions in your 20s. Both with respect to sexual activity and perhaps with substances. Like you're just, you're just used to understanding tradeoffs. With kids, however, were much more restrictive. We try to keep them in the boundaries more because we're worried that they don't have the same kind of experience and guardrails. That adults sometimes still lack, but we know that kids don't have them. And we feel that we could be blamed. The dangers seem much more big and the benefits sometimes pale in comparison. Of course, weighing benefits and risks of vaccines is nothing new. That's why family has turned to their pediatricians for advice. For years, doctors have tried to increase vaccination rates and fight hesitancy. Aaron says that can be tough when a new vaccine comes out. He saw it happen with a vaccine for varicella. Otherwise known as chickenpox. When the varicella vaccine got approved in the 90s, lots of parents were and this is when I was just starting to be a pediatrician where why should I why should I vaccinate my kid against chickenpox? It's a nothing burger minor illness. Everybody gets it. Everybody does fine. Why would I subject myself to this? And I'd have to explain that for a lot of people that's true. But when adults get chickenpox, it's massively bad. My dad got chickenpox when all three of us me and my brother and my sister got it. And he was sick. Plus, some number of babies died every year of varicella infection. It wasn't huge numbers, but they were real numbers, and they were babies and other people got hospitalized. And just a couple of years after we really started vaccinating kids in the early 2000s, zero babies died of chickenpox. That's a huge win, given that zero babies are immunized against chickenpox. You can't get it till your one year of age. But by vaccinating children, we protected everyone. Now today, we have like 86% of eligible children vaccinated and chickenpox is largely gone away. You wrote about your experience as a young pediatrician vaccinating kids with the varicella vaccine against chickenpox. How did you break through to skeptical parents? I think it's time and effort and one it's building up trust. I mean, one of the what did you say to them?.

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"varicella" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Absolutely not. I'm creating little freethinkers and future politicians and lawyers and teachers and changemakers. Our kids are smart. They know what's happening, and I think we do them A disservice by continuing super send like critical race theory is the issue when it's really You just don't want kids to learn the truth. Because now Not only do they become critical thinkers, they also become voters. And that is what's scaring a lot of these people because they know that as this generation gets older, a lot of these people that are making these laws will be voted out of office. All these opponents of critical race theory told us that sure Racism was a problem in the past, but it's not now and so we got into these long conversations about when exactly they thought. Racism had ended in America, and they didn't have a good answer. What did they tell you? What were their answers for that? Did they point to any specific data points? Well, one person offered the nineties. Another person said. Well, the fifties and sixties were really bad, but that ended sometime in the eighties and nineties. Other people pointed to Barack Obama. It is a fascinating report and such an important in depth. Look that you took their Ellie. Thank you. Thanks. No, No, it wasn't. It was terrible now. I don't know. Ellie read. I'd welcome around the program. She wasn't there. When I was at CNN. I believe she joined in 2017. I never worked for him. That was an exhibit that would get an F. If I was teaching the class in journalism, she graduated the University of Missouri journalism School, She worked for HBO and bys in the New Republic. Hard left unfair and biased. I'll come back to the first thing. I take my relief factor calm at that time in the morning before I hit the sponsor. Uh, Moment I will tell you I will come back. But I got to take my relief factory. Give them going out in the hot D C weather right After this I carry in curcumin is varicella mega every morning, I think Done. The hatchet goes. Why? Because I like to walk. I like to keep moving. I like to be out there every day in every way. And you should be to get your introductory through starter pack.

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"varicella" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

The Relaxed Dog

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"varicella" Discussed on The Relaxed Dog

"They. They technically going to the rules early. Songs were funds a bag of dog Obviously she wasn't frightened or anything like that on the when you're on the on the block and stuff like that. She was very Just just curious and sometimes she even just talk through in Initiation of Defaults lewis recycling the Bills for did amazing legacy lucky. I wasn't sure how it will among ratio Any other though. I have not but with popularity shabina pulse and lock me cillian. Jumble something like that so I think you can do to install. Allow you to do really even for example. He just saved the suitcase. I i suspect may all those would be combined. Those has been seen walking around with a suitcase. The some of the just what would not wear anything like that. Exactly exactly yeah. I'm tiffany a pox or outdoor areas that you took them to a solid fun begun as usual police and the beaches very little beach. So the usual Early but you know what what i remember was the Walsum the beach Nice especially monroe's Is the long conversations ahead with a is damage. The knife in general show many built on us go solve relate to that is been said l. of all human basic needs is need for a living connection mosul. Superbowl connection nichols is tricky. You from the whole five minutes added combat. He or she you as though he wasn't until six months ago so he's a law. I'm just talking. They will amazing listeners. Have a choice. harassing studies. Difficulties have implied love relationships. Assess vela's kim listening listening mutual overtime. You just this automatic conversation with adult. Which i'm sure many. I'm sure you related in many many gardens related you just chat to adult Even feel that they have responded in a way whereby the buck you look at you. Almost hang -sition little cocker the head off. And you think about it. Exactly exactly a major a physician's ought to be made. You still have a check them out. Get dealt kenyan which vascular adjusted accept the medal in australia or roy collision. Thanks for helping us employment million chosen so yes austrailia very at lost the. Uk's guide in guests off muddle a model. I think it's just started difference. Yeah so yes. I certainly do cello. Those manuals like i've been any Garden associate relate to the verb on walls bishop making tax. That's nice. I'm do you think that has any sort of like a peculiar habits or individual habits apart from listening to your conversations though see she will cook it like i said no. Bring a little initial thing. She was very good at hitchcock. Location issue of balk almost in agreement or disagreement. So so okay well. It was actually a question if she did bob at well okay in have strong response. Few stone Just acknowledged a new. Believe you you believe it's things but actually butler this. That's interesting Bills Sometimes phar-. She did it twice. Why should come to you and put the poll on your lap. Okay that was interesting denies failures on your so. So you mentioned making a decision about Vet school the family. Have an influence in your life in that way. It was always difficult because in singapore all-singaporean events always qualified usually australia or uk. But some from china. Taiwan an obvious degrees. America's will so what it meant. Was that full of reasons. I believe the country. With one of the biggest decision that i had was to a rehome madala which extremists from utah and varicella detroit. Hold by as low as possible. But i knew that it was unfair for my family. Who like i said. I was the only president Animals of while stopping studying time in london so that was very challenging Certainly she affected my choice. Like in way. Wales asking Uk as you give me a zone. Hannah's go you give your approval. Thank you very much but it was. It wasn't so much of the choice it was more of which go small saying that the country end the rehome them so that was challenging. The is also why. I promise myself. itself on number the again unless i am committed a node can kill his entire natural existence which also limits limited to me to went to get adult. But can you give those still student full time student foreign as well and even looking you kill was hall over here and things like that so that really helped me back in getting a bill goes for show the naturally because reloading van was a on the hottest thing. I would do absolutely and i applaud. You'll your ethics and you'll it's an having dogs were having had dogs. Mike's sign much hotter to say no. I will live my life at at this stage without one because not being on be fair on that dog but know that lighter on able to divide myself and and that will have a much alive. I consider myself lucky really. I get mine though. he's adult is my i. Top issue built an be dog my life at all because like is it again olympics. I all of those begin to help them. So is the volumes amoeba saying back to when you just had the three and ram at. What stage did the alida coming. Sola was only a little after that typical like you said the best almost logical though parallel though doug of this couldn't choose foods give to sell it. Was it off.

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