39 Burst results for "Vanity Fair"

Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

KDKA Programming

00:41 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

"18 on Chris Moore. Termina is our guests that shipping and when you were with the White House, did you advise them on this policy at all? No, I actually already left. One epidemic started. But while I was at the White House, I worked on the paper related to pandemic influenza, the hypothetical scenario for pandemic influenza in the United States. And the takeaway from the paper was that we should modernize our vaccine production technology. So that we could have faster and more scalable technologies to be able to produce vaccines if a new influenza strain over suddenly comes to the U. S s R U for me you with this Vanity Fair article that has been critical of the president's son in law, Jared Kushner about his handling of Pee pee. Ah, and the vaccine, saying that they were going to blame it politically on democratic governors in those kinds of states and allowed people to die. Are you for me with that article? No. Sorry. I haven't read this article. OK, There's an article out there that says that Mr Kushner Bassem Test Vanity Fair, published in The New York Times has talked about it. The Washington monthly. I didn't see any of the morning get fish shows talking about it, and they essentially say that they allowed Some of this testing to go LAX because they thought they could blame it on Democratic governors on DH allow people to die that that's kind of thing is Just kind of scary to be on. Some people say that they should be charged with crimes against humanity. Do you have any opinion on that? Yeah, Actually, I should read this article. I don't want to comment before have read it. OK, but you know what? We worked on it. It was kind of a joint project between Council of Economic Advisers National Security Council. It was kind of more general saying that we should have we have this buckskin technology, which is very, very old. Let go of excuse in eggs in chicken eggs, and this is 50 years old. So over saying that we should switch to better, more modern technologies. There's no need to rely on those old technologies, even though we've perfected them and every cheap right now. And usually we get back in Australia who strains from a note from Australia from China and would have some lead time before the train comes to the U. S. What was said in the papers that we could have a pandemic flu strain arising really suddenly and being very different from what we expected, and we should just be able to produce a vaccine really, really fast. Wouldn't know if there's anything good that comes out from the current pandemic that we will take it very seriously. And we will think And now with Moderna and other companies, it seems like there's a lot of innovation in the technology. He's so hopefully that's something that's going to benefit us. And the influence of space is well, What do you think of the vaccines that they're developing that focus on genetic mutations, as opposed to The 1st 1 that you talked about. Yes. So I think that AG based technology is not very robust. It's not very scalable, and those new technologies understand them much more scalable, and they have a different way off. In them, creating antibodies, human antibodies to all those different viruses, something that they could be produced faster and they could be scaled faster. And as you can see, now, why we had to do for the lack of vaccine. We had to go into this economically costly suppression days if we could instead produce a vaccine really quickly. Then we could address all kinds of different pandemics, You know, Beats influence Corona virus pandemic that arise without going into this socially cost economically course, called the social distancing step of faith have any country's done better in handling the covert 19 crisis. Than others. Yes, I would say that. Germany, for example, has done extremely well. Because they kind of got on top of it. They are really good at conduct tracing their really good at enforcing socially social distancing rules. So they're really good at enforcing that people I saw themselves if some somebody in their family or colleague got sick, and that's something that they are really good at, and you could see their statistics there much better, for example, down statistics in other countries. Such as the U. S. All right, let's go The phones very quickly. We don't have much time. Ted Mount Washington You're on Katie Kay with Dr Ana. Brooklyn dock a couple courses number one when it comes to my African Americans have a higher and sexual rate and also dying that this important for the mouth. What's called that is the access to health care, affordability healthcare. The sudden question self career to me is amazing, because they're able to handle the power. We'll find the lock down. Is there a possibility that we could do the same thing in that state? Thank you. Okay, So the first part of the question is, if it is true that statistics show that African Americans have a higher infection rate, and also a higher probability of dying, and this is really unfortunate. I think part of the explanation is that a lot of African Americans work in service industries that were considered to be essential. Such a grocery stores and those industries have not really shut down. And initially that didn't really offer a lot of protection whom those people working there and also if you don't get sick leave, then you kind of forced to go to work even when you're feeling sick, So you are delaying seeking medical care, and that puts you at a higher risk. And those old brand fortunate, So this is something that we need to address. And yet the number of African Americans is disproportionately high among the essential workers and Korea. They handle it better. What did Korea hand the their covert 19 crisis better than we have in the United States? Yes, Korea also. I think they also did right they did You know anybody who did a lot of testing. Anybody who really enforce the social distancing rules they did better and then, all right, let's go back to the phones. Ross and Braddock go ahead, quickly released Doctor. If this language is used by our medical professionals here, just human human contact. Transmit ability was discovered recently that even body fluids or sweating or things of that nature can be transmitted..

Pandemic Influenza United States Korea White House Influenza Jared Kushner Pee Pee U. S S R U Mr Kushner Bassem Chris Moore Washington Epidemic Vanity Fair Council Of Economic Advisers N Australia President Trump Moderna Germany
Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:25 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on Le Show

"Great don't cover it. And most. Bizarre. Perhaps. Story in Vanity Fair of all places about a we're just now learning about A. Convening of billionaires and pals and some people with knowledge of public health probably. A secret grouping. Commandeered cobbled together by Jared Kushner, the president's. Senior. Adviser. They worked together in March to develop a national plan for testing. and. then. A few months a few weeks later. As it came to the president. The feeling. Grew. Then maybe they didn't want to do. A national plan for testing. Vanity Fair's article says Kushner was involved in that decision and there's reporting that indicates one of the reasons why they cooled on the idea was that at that point. The coronavirus hotspots, world democratic states. And that would be politically. Advantageous to. Walk away from big testing program and just blamed the democratic. Governors. That's Only, part of the story wonders how Vanity Fair got its hands on a copy. Of. That plan. More information maybe available now. This week for the first time, the real polls are looking like the fake polls and for the businessman turned chief executive getting the dead wood off his teams as never been more important or harder. Make, yes sir, we're entering Gorda legislative something that can lead to something that can end the day. Quite. Arguably. Amount to something. That's interesting. Like, a mosquito bite in the ASS is interesting her I've a legislative liaison. What's the deal with that? Right? But. Okay. We got much bigger problems right now than whether some hoodlum gets two, hundred, six, hundred dollars a week for his fix by we. I mean me Yes sir. I am getting a lot of pressure for my bone rable members on this unemployment extension. No. You WanNa see vulnerable member. Show. What's my brand for the reelection? Mitch McConnell million human history if I remember Brandon. Brad he's not running the campaign anymore I mean he's running the getting coffee for the campaign but. Yeah that's still a brand. and which the economy doing. Well served this week's figures for the. Second quarter indicating there's. Some softness. In the economy. And The freaking economy dropped off the face of the map and you know why Wilshire? To say the Covid nineteen affects seems to be A. Bit More pronounced I think either of as warranted or predicted or predicted that we want. But and you know why? Because my freaking show called senior adviser jared didn't have the guts to ignore my desire to ignore is planned for the corona. Gordon I don't I don't have visibility into internal White House. Except separately, people on my staff leaky by seven every morning, right Sir I think Washington whispers were invented long before either I got here jared at poor excuse for real estate family that my genius daughter decided the Mary some night when she was blitzed on rum. I. Call Him Jared the Dope. I don't know what you call him. To be owners with you sir, we don't have that much contact usually. Work Count. Your blessings believe May. He's the genius who bought the building on Fifth Avenue that would make more money as a hole in the ground. HOURS ARE COMING UP AND Don't hire family you can't fire them. Funny. In my own business, that's all you hired or at least that's all you paid. Anyway, this week's task for you is a solid. Yes or For solid work. It's like you're doing me a solid. You're offering jared job. He can't resist like kids chief-of-staff Azam Bomani money more real power without the wife's dad always on his case. Sounds like a good deal, right? Except for the Inconvenient fact that I already have a chief of staff and we do a job swap here I suppose I. Have to say now where she becomes my senior adviser. But like they get to just walk in jared does but as long as they have the balls to resist me when my gut says to junk big plan. That's all I need. But I needed like yesterday and a half. Last night. I see as that's something he or she would be interested in. Hey, Legend appeal is the last thing I. Need Chief from staffs or CO S. Absolutely. It's a tough team to be on but. Those moments I just keep saying into words to myself. Conservative judges. Shell Jared at LE- Quebec your biggest national plan. Dealing with the virus last spring Mr Dad somebody in my office, push the send button they they shouldn't have pushed. It may be in my gut look bad, right. And that just might get. Seen It. Sir. Poisoned campaign advertising that was one of us to write I agreed with your new campaign manager Sir. The ad with the three am rape call to the police just wasn't breaking through and the fact that cheese poll numbers like stratosphere plus and mine are like basement minus in all fairness serve that's not really anything that can be blamed on me. You haven't done anything to stop it. Right Right. I haven't stopped the rain either his thing. Maybe you need a change of scene, maybe need to change your whole movie. Maybe that she task for this week. Interesting I mean I've. got. Wrap. Up My Middle East peace plan before married Bibi. Netanyahu himself said to me he said that deal is colder than last passovers ham he said something like that. So. What do you think? Just. Might be a major league chief of Staff Positional beneath for you. Here in town. In all fairness, I really hate to leave my office just now. So many send buttons to make sure nobody's pushing. Okay. Vika your task. I gotTa go call Mitch. NEW TEAM NEW TASKS SAY MISSION WE'RE GONNA make working with family. Great again. Now, the world is his boardrooms. The president is this week can dove polls get many faker. Had A ground-breaking idea. Forgot to write it down. Now every thought starts to distort and they chase himself ceram. Every concept loses meaning when you look at.

Jared Kushner President Trump Vanity Fair Mitch Mcconnell Senior Adviser Chief Of Staff Chief Executive Gorda Middle East Azam Bomani Wilshire Mr Dad Brad Rape Gordon
Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

KDKA Programming

01:41 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

"Showers understood but a few spots early on partly cloudy for tonight below 64 Clowns and Samsung tomorrow shower thunderstorm to the area into the evening. High 81 Patchy clouds tomorrow night Low 66 of pop up showers Storm on Tuesday High 80 A nice low humidity Wednesday for accurate there. I'm meteorologist John Feerick on NewsRadio 10 20 K. T. K. Dedicated radio news time. 5 35 to 66391 10. 20 is remember. Um, I was Many of the morning gap fish shows from Fox News to CNN, CBS News and others. And I don't see much reporting on this Vanity Fair article. I did do some research online and found out that the forward the Jewish newspaper Has covered it. And they said the task force that Jared Kushner, the president's son in law, chaired it originally come up with a nationwide test distribution program. We're testing equipment could be searched the states that had the highest need. But in late April, President Trump announces states would bear the primary responsibility. Well acquiring in administering the test. At that time, the biggest outbreaks when New York and other blue states. Other reports have also raised questions about Kushner's handling of the crisis, The Financial Times reported in May that, Kushner told Trump Too much testing would rattle the stock market. Politico reported in Mars that Kushner also consulted his breath Brothers father in law, Kurt Kloss, who is an emergency room doctor Cross, then solicited advice on a Facebook page. The doctors today 22,000 members. Vantage affair reported in May that several volunteers from the financial sector had signed up to help him on Ly to be disillusioned by their Work environment and what they saw is Kushner's and experience and incompetence. With one going so far as the follow whistleblower or report with the House Oversight Committee. I also found something on the Washington Monthly's Web site about the Vanity Fair article, but so far mainstream media has not picked it up. 866391 10. 20 is the number It's open. Talk all the way to nine o'clock tonight. Let's go to the phones. Frank and him feel you're on Kenny K. Yeah, I was just getting ready to head out the door. Are you your guest Wass? Uh, By the way, the one question I wish you wouldn't ask this when she turned out report in that report gave the White House plenty of time to prepare for this. And, uh, you know, like I said, they dismissed it, you know, and the other person to contact at that is Helen. France. Well, BRN es w A. L. L. She spotted it coming back on New Year's Day. And, uh, she has a lot of epidemiologists appreciate her. In fact, they call or godlike some of car like a godlike figure. What's the last? What Pardon? What's her last name again? Grand's well, B R A and w E L L It's stat. Okay? Yeah, that she's written on it quite a bit. Uh, another thing. How rotten this administration wass. In this oven epidemic. Was really hitting New York, California and Washington state. States were trying to buy equipment and supplies. The federal government under Trump went in and outbid the state, so the state's didn't get this equipment they needed. This is criminal. They don't care. They were letting ago willing to let it die. And I think they're going toe, you know, blow it all over. And, uh, that's been on many news channels that they went ahead and they outbid the state and then they would give this stuff to the state. Well again. I'm doing my best as a one man band to try by. Listen, I know what you mean. I can't give us I got a life to lead. Like I said, I was trying to get out the door. But I mean, the stuff was there And And the thing is, they had plenty of time to get on top of this even business. Make magazine. I subscribe the business Week magazine and other things and I used to use the Squirrel Hill. Leiber. I don't even have a Computer all this stuff. I wouldn't go there three days a week, but that's hard to do now. And, uh, you know, you're one person digging this up, and I know you know, you've got a life to lead to And, uh, but this stuff is really important and it just shows how dirty they are. In this administration. What does it say to you? You said many others have picked it up, but I watched. I mean, I went across the spectrum this morning from Fox News to CNN, the CBS Try living with that stuff. I know. But what does it say that they don't pick it up? Because they don't want to talk about it What they did just like when this bad economic report come out, Trump goes out, says We're going to cancel the election. So that is a hogs up all the news space and they talk about that instead of the economy, and this is what they've been doing all along. They vomit all over the news. Well, I have done that. You write so We'll do the best that we can to keep you informed. Okay? Like, you know, a thought came to me A what? I said on your program. You're a few years ago. But I hear Anthony. I said to you 90% of the time when you hear Anthony, you're hearing me. Why? Because Anthony tries to get his facts. Remember? I said, 90% and opinions can only be bay based on what facts you can yet. You know, this is hard and I hear some other people and I repeated again and that was before I found out and that he worked the US deal before he works, Uh, this union work and that But I said this guy tried to get it right. You know, and what I thought we had all this time We should have started a Congo, a group calling court together. And dig up the facts. And publish our own newsletter. Stuff you can verify, Put it out there because it gets buried. It's just like this report on the coronavirus that got buried from all of their vomit all over the news. People don't pick it up. People don't read much anymore. And television for place to get new stuff, like 60 minutes front line or stop stuff like that. All right. Like I said, with these library shut down there really hurt me. All right. Thank you, Frank. I appreciate your help. Okay? My alright. 866391 10. 20 is the number to call. I like he would open talk until the top of the hour. We can talk about Anything that is of interest to you. And I wonder what you think. Is Frank, right? Ah, the and we hear from other people like John and Ohio that, say the TV news..

President Trump Jared Kushner Fox News Frank Vanity Fair John Feerick New York CNN Anthony Samsung Cbs News Wass Business Week Magazine Politico France House Oversight Committee Washington Monthly White House
Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

KDKA Programming

02:01 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "vanity fair" discussed on KDKA Programming

"Well, he might be an interest. I mean, there was on the political talk shows this morning they had. Ah, ah, ever tie some things about Republicans, the Lincoln Project or whatever That's advertising on Fox Network and Train campaign, saying some of the ads Yeah. Yeah. Um, It's pretty interesting How many people were turning against Trump? And I hope a lot more because the guy I talked about it. Ah, ah Frat Thursday or Friday this week on the head of the Federalist Society has turned against him. Also. Yeah, yeah, It's interesting to see And it's good to see that people are finally waking up. But I want more people to wake up and I want him to be put in jail, like lock him up. You know what I mean? Well, I heard up until long after his term is over. This latest article that we've been talking about there was in Vanity Fair. Might provide the evidence for that, but I think the first thing that's going to have to happen is they have him turned out of office. Once people are more familiar with some of the things he's done. Yeah. I thought the article would come up from Vanity Fair on the talk shows this morning too. But I watched Ah, number of them, and I didn't see it either. So you and I, and even when I found references to it in the Washington monthly on and Ah, couple of other Publications. I haven't seen any coverage of it. I thought the gap officials would would jump all over it, but they did not even see it well. The morning shows on Monday or the beginning of the week may bring it up, so there's still some chance it'll come up, But you know, it's hard to bring things up because he always does something startling. To steal the headlines in the news line, like elections should be delayed, right? Yeah, Yeah, exactly. Anyway, quick, you go good work. I enjoyed listening to you and I tune you in every time I got the chance, But sometimes you surprise me, I turn the radio on just to see if you're on is a replacement. So keep up the good work. Alright, Thank you Call Bye bye. All right. We have take this break. 866391 10. 20 is our number. This isn't a grilled cheese I'm making. It's a melty masterpiece that deserves a kitchen worthy of greatness. Looks like my part is full of packages again. It also looks like my compulsive buying needs to change to compulsive saving. Because I sit here on this couch, I decided to make some changes. Starting with this couch would love to be looking out my window at a beautiful backyard instead of a brick wall time for a new house, Whatever your passion U. S bank and helped turn it into your next pursuit. Equal housing under member f D i C Love is completely trusted. Captain speaking. The Flying locksmiths can't help. But before we take off, here's a little secret of flying locksmiths could do more than fix broken lungs. It was on a door. They've got it. They've.

Vanity Fair Fox Network Federalist Society Donald Trump Washington U. S
Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

Mac Minutes

07:33 min | Last week

Episode 85, Apple updates to macOS Catalina 10.15.6 and launches new audio and news features - burst 1

"In this episode, we will discuss the recently released Mac Os. Catalina ten point fifteen point six update which introduces local news audio features in the Apple News along with improving the security and reliability of your Mac. This update, which is now available for downloading introduces several new features for Apple News and Apple News plus including audio stories of some of the most read feature stories from Apple News plus a daily audio news briefing hosted by Apple News Editors and curated local news collections, beginning in five cities and regions and expanding to more areas in the future. Apple News is also adding more top local and regional news outlets for readers and subscribers including the Charlotte Observer, the Miami Herald and the news in observer, which is located in Raleigh. North Carolina. Lauren Kern editor in chief of Apple News said the following about the new features. Apple News showcases so much great journalism and we're excited to help bring it to life in new ways with Apple News. Plus audio stories and a new Daily News Show Apple News today. We also greatly value are many local news. Partners are new local news feature highlights work for readers who live and are interested in those communities finished Kern. Let's delve deeper into some of the new features. Apple announced including Apple News plus audio stories. Beginning with the update Apple News will produce about twenty audio stories a week across a wide range of interests. Narrated by professional voice actors these are audio versions of some of the best feature reporting and long form pieces published by esquire essence. Fast Company G Q New York magazine sports illustrated. Time Vanity Fair Vo wired and more and newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times and the Wall Street Journal audio stories are now available to Apple News plus subscribers in the US. Apple News plus is available in the US for nine dollars ninety nine cents. And for International Listeners Canada for twelve, ninety nine a month, the UK for nine, ninety, nine, a month and Australia for fourteen, ninety nine a month. Customers can sign up for a free one-month trial in the plan automatically renews after the trial and. Through family. Sharing up to six family members can share one apple, news plus subscription. I use family sharing, and for some. It's a great bargain. Next features are to apple news today with Apple. News today, a daily audio news briefing Apple News Editors and Co host guide listeners to some of the most fascinating stories in the news, and how the world's best journalists are covering them. Apple News today is free to all listeners available mornings Monday through Friday directly in the news APP in the US and apple podcasts. Productivity is a huge interest to me, and this is another way to learn the topics of the day. I am preparing for work or listening throughout the day. Audience Stories and Apple News. Today can both be found in a newly added audio tab located at the bottom of the news app where listeners can manage their Q. and get personalized recommendations both new audio features are available I. Phone, Ipod, touch and carplay. Apple Awful introduced support for the news APP in Carplay, so users can listen to audio stories and Apple News today while driving. Users will be able to sink listening progress across devices start listening to an audio story with carplay from your iphone and pick up listening to a reading it later at home. Also new is curated local news apple news introduced a new curated local news experience, currently available in the San Francisco Bay Area Houston Los Angeles New York and San Francisco featuring a variety of content from a diverse collection of local publishers, including a major newspaper in each city and region. Local news collections and Apple News include coverage of topics most important to local communities, such a sports dining and restaurants whether news and politics and more with curation by local apple news editors as well as personalization for each user. There is now even more local news apple news recently added even more top, local and regional newspapers. Do the Apple News plus catalog! A subscription to Apple News, plus in the US now includes access to the Charlotte Observer, the Idaho Statesman, the Kansas City Star the Miami, herald the news and observer and the state from Columbia South Carolina in Canada. Leading french-language newspaper lay divorce is now available to Apple News plus subscribers and the Globe and Mail. One of the country's most prestigious national newspapers will be available to subscribers later this summer. Apple News draws over one hundred and twenty, five million monthly active users in the US the UK, Australia and Canada and has revolutionized people excess news from all their favorite sources. Apple News is available for free in the US the UK Australia and Canada an IPHONE IPAD and MAC devices. Apple News plus is a single subscription with the prices previously mentioned earlier, which additionally provides access to written an audio content from hundreds of the world's top magazines and major newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times the wall. Street Journal as well as many local and regional newspapers, including the Houston. Chronicle and the San Francisco Chronicle. There were also several bug fixes in this update. So I would encourage you to update as soon as possible. If MAC minutes can help you with your tech. Please get a hold of me and I can answer them in a future episode. The maquis minutes web page is located online and MAC minutes dot be. L. U. B. R. Y. Dot net. Other places are twitter minutes underscore MAC and facebook at MAC minutes. So that's all we have for Mac men's for this week. I urge you to join the MAC minutes podcast group on facebook where I post articles from the top tech journalist people could discuss topics post articles joint special events in great tech happenings. All the MAC minutes listeners out there out all of you and your loved winter wealth and I look forward to seeing you next week. Thank you again for listening and Mac minutes is available on apple podcasts. spotify I heart, radio, cast box, Caesar and many other of your favorite podcasts yours take care of yourself during the upcoming week and we'll see you soon and the MAC minutes podcast.

Apple News Apple United States MAC Charlotte Observer Los Angeles Times UK Lauren Kern Carplay North Carolina New York Magazine Australia International Listeners Canada Facebook Canada Raleigh Miami Herald Editor In Chief
Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

This Week in Photo

06:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Assisting the Professional Photo Assistant

"Jesse welcome to the show man. How's it going? Unanimous really excited. Excited to you're looking at your website is we were talking before I started recording. We're talking a little bit about some. Stuff and I brought your website up on the screen. Your work is fantastic man I've I've got lots of questions I? Know we're going to target this. We're GONNA. Talk a little bit about the social distance to photography all that, but I want to go off the rails and talk about your work as well because it's. Cool. All saw the man I'm here. I'm here to answer questions. I love it I love it, so give it give us the Jesse. ditmars sort of the origin story. You know what brought you into this crazy world of photography? And what what? What's the gravity that keeps you in orbit around it? Loaded question right. That's a long. We have. To keep us sure. Yeah exactly. I. Mean I've. I don't remember going. I've always. I've always been into arden and music and we're going to barnes and noble. Go to the book section of Shark from section, dislike pulling open some of these books by. Any LIEBOWITZ avenue iron earning Penn. Nigel Perry in the beginning was a huge. He has some great photo books and just being enamored with all the faces in. Just. The idea that I had a book in front of me that I knew was of people who are famous, and I had no idea how it was compiled by one person or purpose I just thought the images were selling interesting and I had to spend gravitating towards photography at that time of my life, my early teens and I. Just was the moment where. The rest of my life figuring that out How how do I do this thing? and that was that was really the springboard in. It's all been one kind of pretty much straight path since then to here I ended up. Working for a lot of those people for for any Liebowitz soon, the best photographers in the world is there assistance and that's how I learned to. How and Every step along the way man from college into interning into assisting into shooting and a struggle between us ASEAN shooting, and in the beginning of my career. It's all has been A. Reinforcement of kiss is something that I love to do so. That's the origin story, and now I'm here. It's been about about five years six years since I started being a fulltime freelance, photographer and I'm still still loving it. You know I get to meet the coolest people and I get to photograph people that are really accomplished end really are changing world in. Highly influential ways in the ability to stand in front of then, and and have a couple of minutes of their time, and really kind of be able to put that experience and transforming into art is deputy I do it. I love that man. What a great answer and you! You hit it right on the head. A lot of people say that the the. One of the the benefits of being a photographer is the camera and a lot of ways access your passport into situations that ordinarily wouldn't have any access to or access to people you know at the same time, which is which is really cool. I'm one of the. There's a million things to talk to you about so I'm going to try to I'm GONNA try to keep it focused. But you mentioned any Liebowitz we here. We are name all the time you know mostly in the contract fully. Yeah mostly in the context of accomplished photographer kind of the gold standard for you know if you get up to the Anti Lebron Woods level. Now you're real photography. Well, pass your science your Rockstar at that point. So how is it? How is it working for somebody with that much talent? That you know what? What does the day in the life? Look like for an assistant. That's assisting for someone like Ami. Well there's different levels right of. Sutri, for someone like anti. She has her full-time people who are on salary or their day in and day out, and then she has any number level of prevents assistance that are coming in on a needed basis in all the way down through interns who are also there for a short period of time, but day in and day out, and so it depends on where you are in. That tree is a freelance assistant I got to Canada's coming in come out of a couple of shoots and. You know for me. It was A. It was a fantastic experience. I think that. I was the best photo system I was going to be by the time I got to work with Anne which was very good for me, because I was one of six assistance on on set, and I was the. Fourth or third on the hierarchy, so I was getting asked do stuff that was not super complicated like setting up stands like setting up lights. Things that were very easy to me because I had done them thousands of times before so I was able to do that job very well without putting a ton of my brain power into a per. Se So I was able to at the time. Really kind of visualize taken everything that was happening on set. An. That was a that was awesome for me. I really enjoyed my experience You know I think it's different. It's different. Bene- first assistant as well as not to any and I. Set of experience because experiences because there's so much more. Weight on your shoulders and so much more responsibility on your shoulders to your part of the team on a day to day. Basis on, and you learn a ton doing matt to. I mean if I ever was the for going to become the first assistant Liebowitz. I probably would still be there now. I would be here so I would have a different path. so I'm really happy with what I ended up doing. There I ended up learning so much. I learned what it takes to. Have the quality that she has and the quantity of output that she has which is unrivalled in industry. I mean people. People have their qualms about her work on some people love it. Some people dislike it. I, consistently say no one else in the world is putting out the cover of vogue. The cut the cover of Vanity Fair and a Nike campaign all in a three week period it just she's the only person that can do it on because of the because of the infrastructure that she's built, and that was the biggest thing. I walked away with I I when I stopped to six Randy I said to myself right then and there. I'm not any LIEBOWITZ right now, but I'm GONNA I'M GONNA make my operation. Move as if I were and it might it might be only a tenth of the size, but I'm going to operate using the same structures and the same kind of

Liebowitz Randy I Jesse Asean Jesse. Ditmars Nike Nigel Perry Vanity Fair Lebron Woods Canada Barnes Sutri Bene Anne Matt
Sarah Paulson doubles down on saying Lisa Vanderpump wasn't nice when they met

Colleen and Bradley

00:23 sec | 3 weeks ago

Sarah Paulson doubles down on saying Lisa Vanderpump wasn't nice when they met

"So nice behavior months ago. The actress came under fire on Vander Pump's fan base when she admitted in a Vanity Fair interview that the former Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star wasn't very pleasant tour when they met. I didn't say she was a terrible person. I simply said she wasn't that nice to me. She wasn't and that's okay. Paulson said It wasn't a character assassination. Oh, well, that's fine. I mean, Lisa Vanderpump wasn't

Vander Pump Vanity Fair Beverly Hills Lisa Vanderpump Paulson
"vanity fair" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

05:25 min | 2 months ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"It's hard to. It's hard to know like what happened behind the scenes, and does he does he have power control of everybody blackmail on everybody, and that was like another thing that came out of this. The level that he would go to for blackmail that they would show like the place in Florida had like this kind of cement stucco. Finishing in the walls. So, you have like all these tiny little holes everywhere. and. There are just cameras in in every single room, so you come over and he's got the girls here and you do something. He's Gotcha. Because every single room is on camera and he was in like this vault, he kept all that stuff in a vault where he would be able to sit there and watch who was doing what and then he then he had you, so he said they said. said the same setup into Mexico, same set up in the Virgin Islands same setup in. New York City and that's where the people who install the shit because the workers were you know? They knew something was going down, had because they interviewed. You know the landscapers interview Dino people who just did maintenance on the house, the telecommunications guy in the virgin islands gas, and everybody was timid and the police recordings. Timid like. I like they knew. I don't want to be part. I don't really wanted to do this I. Don't want him to come after me. And and don't blame him because he has a long history of coming after people threatening people they, it said the one pharmacist serve the older one. She moved all over the country and then choose get settled. She'd be there for three weeks. She phoned it was maxwell like I. Know where you are. So so the level that the they would go to threaten these women after they had already abused, them was absolutely sickening, and it should be noted as well like that's. How maybe okay the Vanity Fair? Maybe that is true about the whole libel suit, but they were also failed by people who said they knew this guy. Yeah, because that's when it very very started the whole doc, Maria farmers I don't know if it was a school or if it was just an art company, she worked for me, but she had three paintings, and they had sellers for twelve grand twelve grand. Grand, fourteen, grand or something like that and they're like. Hey, you gotta take those the market. This is my friend Jeff..

Virgin Islands New York City Florida Dino Mexico Jeff
How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

06:59 min | 2 months ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Fast Fashion Forever

"We've all heard how fast fashion is damaging to the people and the planet. What you probably haven't heard is that the covid nineteen pandemic has created a crisis for garment factory employees around the world amid this unprecedented event workers factories and brands are losing wages and are being forced to make difficult decisions to keep their businesses running while protecting health and safety orders are being produced postponed or canceled. Lockdowns are preventing work in some countries and viral exposure on the job a threat to workers and their families in this episode of Good Together. Liza and I discussed with Jessica Andrews Deputy Fashion Editor Bustle. How Fair Trade? Usa is mobilizing to protect garment workers. Jessica's years of experience in the Fashion Journalism Space and her passion for fighting back against the negative impact of industry make for a fascinating and timely conversation at the intersection of Human Rights Fashion. An advocacy. Hey Jessica welcome to good together. Were so excited to have you so for listeners. Who aren't familiar with Jessica. She is the deputy fashion editor at bustle overseeing all things fashion from red carpet roundups to trend reports Before she went she was at bustle. She did stints at refinery. Twenty nine teen vogue an has also contributed to places like L. Vanity Fair New York Times essence. Just like all of the wonderful news sources. I could say so. We are thrilled to have her on a speaking about all things fair trade USA. An ethical. Fashion so Jessica. I wondered if you could give us an intro As to your background I know I just covered a little bit of it there. But you know why you got into The the ethical fashion space specifically. And we'll just kind of take it from there. Good why I love The you because it really sums up my career. I've done a little bit of everything I've worked in housing brands and as a freelance writer and I found that I was really passionate about not just about fashion though. I love beautiful clothes. But like the ethical aspect of it on whether that's diversity on the runway or treating garment workers fairly and being conscious about the environment and I think for me. My passionate about environmental issues really developed from my sister. She's a climate analyst. She works out of DC. And she's always been really passionate about how we can make the world a better place four to leave behind our kids and that really starts with us being more responsible about our carbon footprint and I always loved hearing her talk about it because she's so passionate but I didn't realize how much it crossed over with the fashion industry until I started my career and I saw just how wasteful the industry can be An also I learned about Rana Plaza and I was devastated to know all the garment workers who lives were lost that day And I really felt like I could make a difference through my platform and my jobs by speaking out about this because I thought if I wasn't aware of you know how the fashion industry was contributing to climate change and just that like lack of environmental responsibility that they had I bought. There must be other people that feel this way to you know so. I I realized could really use my platform to spread awareness. And you know working with my sister. Her name named Sabrina and other advocates in this in this space like Rachel weighing who was established for the fair trade. Look book who such an inspiration to me. I was able to learn more about these issues and then find a way that I could cover them at all the different places I've worked so that's been something that really rewarding for me to do to feel like I'm helping make a difference in somewhere. So yeah it's good to hear how you of got into ethical fashion and you absolutely kind of Nailed it in terms of like when you feel like even you don't know about it and I think at despite the fact that we are in the fair trade ethical fashioning still we all know about the staff we are super passionate about you know spreading awareness about what happened. Rana Plaza by the way for our listeners gives you know Rana Plaza was a factory collapsed in Dhaka. Bangladesh holding tire factory collapsed on Apple. Two fourth two thousand thirteen killing over eleven hundred people garment workers and it kind of gave Was fuel behind the ethical fashion fashion pollution moods which is With we we've been through so much over the years of the seven years now It's you absolutely right. Not everyone knows about it and spreading awareness solely incredibly Just so everyone knows what was happening the because again. We are so so disconnected this days. from the people who are making basically every product. Not just the that. We're wearing but products that we eat with for the run our with in the house Absolutely right with that So you also mentioned that we wear fair trade campaign ride UA one of the Bruins women spokesperson for the we wear trade campaign that was launched last month right and time of professional dilution week buy fair trade. Usa. Can you tell us more about it? Yeah of course so. It's interesting that you brought up Rana Plaza again because that really inspired it And Fair trade originally launched the where fair trade campaign last year on during fashion revolution. Week to honor the Rana Plaza Garment Factory Collapse And I think doing it. This year felt really urgent as well. I'm just to raise awareness around how garment workers are still being impacted today on and then also especially considering the effects of cove in nineteen And how you know. Fashions most vulnerable people are impacted during a crisis even more so this campaign we wanted to really highlight that Rachel Wang again She was the stylist and the creative director. She collaborated with B. Y. T. NYC too short film And that would really moves me so much just to hear about how these different advocates started getting active in the space and why fair trade is so significant to all of

Jessica Andrews Rana Plaza Rana Plaza Garment Factory Fair New York Times Editor Rachel Wang USA Liza Dhaka Analyst Writer Usa. B. Y. T. Nyc Sabrina Bangladesh Apple Bruins
Benjamin Moser: Sontag: Her Life and Work

Bookworm

07:10 min | 3 months ago

Benjamin Moser: Sontag: Her Life and Work

"A biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been A controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems. Now do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book? Well I think a book about Susan Sontag. That wasn't controversial. Would NOT BE A book about Susan? Contact? I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see controversial this book. I see it more as just I hope something. Starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever man. Santiago was always associated with fashion. She was associated with With photography she was associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who have been on the cover of Vanity Fair. I think the real writers we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths. And who have these chances to be reevaluated? I can remember the first time I read. Susan Sonntags First Book. Which was against interpretation? Can you remember the first time you read against interpretation? Yes yeah I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really. I know I had read the photography stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation. I think I hadn't read the whole book. I'd read notes on camp. I'd read the title essay. Read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read. It now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again. It feels contemporary. But it's almost sixty years old against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and of ideas. That feels very exciting to me. I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read. I was astonished by it because of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh i. you'd already read that in the early sixties. She was only in her early thirties to show thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to event. Artaud Susan cared about our Dole. And in fact you know. She seems to know that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when people new things. I- slivered out some quotes from Susan. Let's hear Susan people want to be moved? Is a writer. Want to move people. I was very moved cried. Even a couple of passages that that I was riding this one line that made me laugh. Grimly where I WANNA say I say but I don't feel it's me I feel. It's the book says It it was a time when knowledge was fashionable. Philistinism was unfashionable. And I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness because the time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable and Philistine as it was very fashionable. I'm talking to Benjamin Moser. Sonntags biographer. That what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face was. Susan was from our first conversation and you consider deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines. Can you talk to me though? I think it's really funny. I think it's one of the great American questions. I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant We don't have to name names. But I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and that all the things that in her lifetime worse symbolic of middle-brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music. All these kind of things. Santi always stood for the opposite of all that crap. Now you you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her. Tell me what you mean. Tell me what that use a lot of. It might have had to do with the fact that she was physically. Ill a lot of her life when she was forty two. She got stage four breast cancer and almost killed her and she was subjected to this. Very gruesome and horrifying treatment did end up saving her life. And that's in nineteen seventy five to seventy eight. So she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient. She got more Intolerant of certain people. But I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then not dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas. I think that what we're talking about is the person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a Herman Excite Lard and she writes about her fondness for the supremes. Which at that time you take someone go take number of someone's whether it's Irving Howe or saul bellow listening to the supremes. They find it to be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life. She's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic sue criticism. No well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is. This is again. It's almost. It's more than fifty years ago in that time in that me. That was really shocking. And it's absolutely hilarious to see the reactions that she got 'cause the thing about the supreme. It's not like she wrote about this frame. She says something about how she likes. The supreme one line nobody. It followed her her whole life. You Point Down Very well and intelligently and correctly in this book that cultural conservatism is has very little to do with political conservatism.

Artaud Susan Susan Sonntags Susan Sontag Philistinism Supremes Vanity Fair Life Magazine Benjamin Moser Santiago Herman Excite Lard Writer Santi Irving Howe Saul Bellow
Carlson says he felt obligation to meet with Trump on virus

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Carlson says he felt obligation to meet with Trump on virus

"Tucker Carlson says he went to the president's Mar a Lago resort earlier this month to issue a blunt warning about the pandemic which wasn't getting the attention and urgency he felt it deserved Carlson tells Vanity Fair he started sounding the alarm on his show in late January and by March said people you know will get sick some may die it was his wife who convinced him to speak directly to president trump who has changed his tone in recent days and stop downplaying the spreading virus Carlson is blasted lawmakers on both sides for minimizing what is clearly a very serious problem and not helping Americans take it seriously hi Jackie Quinn

Tucker Carlson President Trump Vanity Fair Jackie Quinn Lago
It's Sharapover: A Complicated Affair

The Body Serve

10:09 min | 5 months ago

It's Sharapover: A Complicated Affair

"Thought we had the weekend off. I thought we had bought ourselves a little bit of time doing that. Mailbox episode but Maria Sharapova decided to upend our brief break and announced her retirement from tennis. Let's not do a whole lung. Preamble about this. We're here because Maria Sharapova has retired and we're here to talk about that to situate her career talk about the the ups and downs of her career and put her career and her into some context. She announced this week via an essay that she wrote for Vanity Fair and Vogue which were released at the same time both conde nast publications. It's the sort of flex that only a player of her magnitude can do. It's been interesting to me to watch her over. I would say probably the past year or a little more and an observed how little attention and how little fanfare has followed her around considering that she was once the highest paid female athlete in the world. She was tennis's biggest superstar for for many years and this latter stage of her career has been quiet. When you say only a player like her obviously Serena can do that too. I Know Naomi can do that too. I think those are the three players in women's tennis who have that kind of stature status to be able to call up an A. Winter. And be like. Hey can I can let y'all know in your publication regardless of who can do it. The point is that Maria is bigger than tennis. In the same way that Serena or Roger or Rafa are Novak are bigger than tennis. They don't have to go through the traditional tennis media to do these things they can call on their sponsors their friends mainstream press. They have that freedom does afford them because they are successful and they make a lot of money. Of course I knew what you meant but I think dealing with a complicated figure like Maria Sharapova comment on us to be as precise as we can with our words so as to not open up ourselves controlled. But we're not doing this. The whole episode. Every every statement about Maria is not an equal statement about serene. We're just not. I agree I'm just saying we can easily cost nothing to be more precise okay. You see what you did there. You put me in a position to be the bad person. Well maybe you shouldn't shouldn't do it anyway. Maria wrote this essay. I think there were probably a few journalists and people within the sport who was coming and we can't release it as a massive surprise considering that her body has been betraying her over the past few years. It's been extremely difficult for her. To stay healthy at this point for even a match or two in a row. Her events have been sparse. It seemed that the writing had been on the wall for a little while. What's interesting to me is that there is no retirement tour. There's no final triumphant moment at a Grand Slam. That meant a lot to her. There's no on-court Farewell. It almost seems I know. Use The word quiet before but it. It just seems a little anti-climactic for somebody who has meant so much to the game for the past fifteen years. Sure but to me. It makes sense because to embark on some kind of farewell tour. You'd have to be able to count on your body to a low to show up for right and I think that's what the bottom line is here for Maria. She told this story in her Vanity Fair Vogue Essay. That just getting on court for her match at the. Us Open last year. Felt like a victory getting the shot in her shoulder Infos cortisone or whatever but just being able to play to numb the shoulder and play in the first round was a big achievement and so she was past the point of being able to plan anything tennis related because their body just wouldn't let her right and I don't think she's the type to be like well. Let me just show up for this first. Rhone have a cute little moment and lose six two six two like. That's not the kind of scripting that she would one. No and she's had an interesting career injury wise because after that big shoulder surgery that she went through with that had really compromised her play. She had to rewrite the way that she served. Her game. Looked quite a bit different than when she was seventeen. Eighteen nineteen years old but she learns how to move on Clay. She wins two French Open. She becomes a dominant player. Again will maybe not a dominant player. But she reaches number one again. She's part of this triumvirate for a little while with Serena and as Aranka all the while dealing with this shoulder issue. That is still very much a problem. It's not just that she won the French Open. She was winning tournaments on clay. Yeah her up until two thousand ten. I believe she had one or made. Just one final unclean. It was green clad. Amelia Island But from two thousand ten words you see Maria making a ton of clay finals in fact the majority of her finals that she makes I believe in the second half of her career come on clay winnings took three times and winning Rome three times. So that's like you said a complete change of course from what we conceive of her to start her. So where do you WANNA start here? Do you WanNa talk about her career on the court and just kind of give a little background where she started where we are now and then I mean the extracurricular things are huge story with Maria as always I wanNA talk about first about her influence one of the things that I've seen since the the announcement that she's retired is some folks. Scoffing at just how much her actual influence was and how much she inspired people and I don't think you can underestimate. Just how much influence Maria Sharapova had in bringing people into tenants. They might not be the reasons that you would want people to come to tennis. But Maria Sharapova is Bar. None globally the most well-known women's tennis player. And we know this. Because Jamaicans don't know what Serena Williams looks like. We know this from schools John's quits. I can't tell you how many times I've interacted with people and they're like what would you like? Well I have a tennis podcast and like Oh Maria sharp over. I'm like do you follow tennis. No but they know who? Marie sharp over yes. Her Persona has cut through so many different facets of life to the point where random people know who she is on top of that. There are a lot of people who the very first match they saw was Maria Sharapova match. And that's the kind of thing that can't control. I was a Cheetah van because the very first match I watched was a continue to match the very first men's match. I watch was an Agassi match. Those are the things that that people hang onto. Because it's their first introduction right so there is that there is the fact that she occupied this place of prominence being the top paid female athletes in the world. For so long we can have a totally different discussion about whether that was warranted or deserved that separate and apart. If you're able to separate those two things then I think you can see clearly that Sharipova mental out to a lot of people and had great influence within the tennis world the sporting world and in society at large globally as well within tennis. She is a polarizing figure. We are not going to pretend like we have always been kind to her on the show. We've had our fun roasting Maria over the years. You've had your fun today with the title for this episode and You know. I'm going to be totally straightforward. Maria is not not a player that I loved to watch play tennis. I can appreciate her place. I respect a lot of things about her. She's not somebody who's matches I- flocked to watch and we've been critical about the way that she wrote about Serena and her bulk about how she handled the IT F. and then water ban and there's a lot going on but she is not an a boring character by any stretch. If you were to look back now and Marie his career what is the one word or the one thing that comes to mind what well? Unfortunately right now. It's Mel Donen. That's the first thing that comes to my e. Yeah like if we're doing plane Word Association. I'm not saying that's fair. Okay but I think when we have some distance when I've been thinking about her career. I'm thinking about winning Wimbledon at seventeen thinking about having a career slam on Sugar Povoa. Her tennis achievements are huge. Because very few women have won a career. Grand Slam. Her off-court achievements are also big and they're also painted by the fact that her blindness and her whiteness made her the perfect foil and the perfect heroin. As opposed to this dominant black champion Serena Williams you know she was the great white hope right again. Another consideration of the great white hope for me. The word is complicated when we covered the muldoon thing. We came down right in the middle of the fence. We come down on either side of the. I think I'm still there actually. It was kind of interesting to go back and look through some of the research done for that episode. What like what three years ago? At this point I'm early. Two Thousand Sixteen when it when it came out so almost four years ago we would have covered this on the show and to now be going through it again are thinking about it again and and feeling the same way like not much has changed for

Maria Sharapova Maria Tennis Serena Williams Maria Sharp Grand Slam Clay Marie Sharp Vanity Fair Conde Nast Publications Vanity Fair Vogue Essay Naomi Amelia Island Heroin Rhone Muldoon Word Association Mel Donen Agassi John
Not Everyone Gets To Use iPhones In The Movies

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

00:59 min | 5 months ago

Not Everyone Gets To Use iPhones In The Movies

"They let us iphones in movies. But and this is very pivotal. If you're ever watching a mystery movie bad guys cannot have iphones on camera. Who said that. I don't even get it if the if you're watching a mystery movie bad guys can't have iphones on camera. This famous director who directed one of the biggest mystery films of last year. Said Apple will never let you put an iphone in the hands of a villain. Oh it's bad. Pr For them. Was the biggest mystery film of last year knives out. Yes okay so this is the point. Yes so Ryan Johnson Director of the film knives out which I saw twice in love. It's great talking Vanity Fair this week and he said yet. This is a dirty little secret of Hollywood Apple Iphone to look a certain way and movies and they don't want to be tied to the villains

Vanity Fair Apple Ryan Johnson Director
5-time major champ Maria Sharapova retires from tennis at 32

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

5-time major champ Maria Sharapova retires from tennis at 32

"Maria Sharapova burst onto the scene at seventeen when she won Wimbledon in two thousand and four and gathered five grand slam titles with her blonde hair and trademark grunt Sharapova was as big a star is tennis had making millions of dollars and sponsorship deals surepos rivalry with Serena Williams was supposed to be one for the ages but it became so one sided it can hardly be called a rivalry with Sharapova winning just two for twenty two battles with Williams Sharapova suffered a serious shoulder injury in two thousand and eight and was dogged by injuries to her five wrist and shoulder she ended up leaving at the Australian Open in twenty nineteen you realize that you're not a moral you're never gonna play this for forever in an essay written for Vanity Fair and vogue about her decision to retire she asked how do you leave behind the only life you've ever known I'm Jennifer king

Serena Williams Williams Sharapova Vanity Fair Jennifer King Maria Sharapova
Five-time Grand Slam champion Sharapova announces retirement

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

Five-time Grand Slam champion Sharapova announces retirement

"And one of the great names in sports she's only thirty two here so how is this possible no nineteen year career can you believe this she turned pro at age fourteen five time grand slam champion and Maria Sharapova announced her retirement this morning at the age of thirty two she announced it in an essay that appeared dead today in vogue and also in Vanity Fair she won Wimbledon in two thousand for the U. S. open NO six the Australian Open a no wait and the French Open in twenty twelve and twenty fourteen she was number one in the WTA rankings on all five oh seven oh eight and Dan done in twelve lost in the first round of this year's Australian Open in straight sets played only two matches this season lost both was battling injuries but Maria Sharapova calling it quits at age thirty

Maria Sharapova Vanity Fair DAN
Tennis superstar Maria Sharapova retires from sport

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

Tennis superstar Maria Sharapova retires from sport

"We have breaking tennis news is forty years Redeker doing yes we do no news conference today for tennis star Maria Sharapova nope she announced she's retiring from tennis via vogue and Vanity Fair magazine's the thirty two year olds at injury issues after a fifteen month doping ban and dead and again has struggled so Maria Sharapova calling it quits hang up the tennis

Redeker Tennis Vanity Fair Magazine Maria Sharapova
"vanity fair" Discussed on We Hear

We Hear

10:02 min | 6 months ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on We Hear

"E. A. R. to sixty four thousand. It was a terrible week for the faces isn't good looking people all say okay let me break it down for you. Amber rose and Presley Gerber both have face Tattoos Yass. Ask Okay so amber rose. The former girlfriend of Kanye west and former fiance former fiance on say is Khalifa and current activist behind something called slut. Walk yes no that yes Owner of gorgeous face throughout I've correze view of a woman rose and the rest of her whole package so there was a video posted over the weekend of amber and her current current largest Alexander Edwards Alexander Alexander e Alexander Alexander Edwards Edwards Alexander a the Edwards. Okay Maggie M. C.. Cognition exactly exactly my friends. Call me Mac. EMC enough time to say the whole. Think okay so they go shopping in La for some sneakers as you do. And she's in this video and we noticed that she's got tattoos right at her hairline. Her forehead meets her hairline. That is nice to slash and bash right there in sort of like cursive. Yeah classic kind of Tattoo script and she always has like a shaved tune head shaved hair like very short kind of gold. Old Hair So they're like right at the top there right so they say slash and bash so says slash bash. Yeah what is slash bash slash. is her her seven month. Old Son With A. E. His name is slash electric Alexander Edwards seemed after slad And basch is her nickname for Sebastian. Taylor who is for Sun with Wiz Khalifa. So what do you think about this Maggie like being it looks good. What's the reaction? been or people that if I was that beautiful I wouldn't be doing it. I mean it's her choice her face but I just feel like you can love your children and place your tattoos somewhere else besides your forehead right. Yeah it's a little bit. I don't know I kind of agree with you on this one. But she's not the only only person who's gotten so everyone is getting face tattoos now every single person Presley girl people's MOMS amber roses people's MOMS exactly clearly. She's yeah she's people's mom's getting face tattoos mom. If you're listening Kenny rash decisions okay. So Presley Gerber son of Cindy Crawford and Ranbir Right Model Model Ashen model has gotten a tattooed boy now new Maurienne. He's got got attached to you under one of his is that says misunderstood. Why how? What's the misunderstanding about? And I quote it says Misunderstood Ed because that's how I felt my entire life. Yes I don't know that's how everybody feels that's called being a human. Yeah so you know. He's got tattoos on his neck on his hands. I don't know why we had to take the leap under the eye. But does he have tattoos on the rest of his body. Because there is a thing Maggie in the Tattoo community where people who get some people now will just. They're not heavily tattooed on the rest of their body but they they just are getting tattoos on the neck and the hands. It's called the warped tour bodysuit. They call that. Yeah that's amazing so I he might. They'd have a warped tour bodysuit of that term. So he's only as you just get the knack in the hands and you're all like like but then the rest of the anyway. So He's He's twenty years old twenty so but like everyone feels misunderstood within twenty years old. I'm much older than that. And I feel misunderstand totally I understand all too well which is my the problem understanding my crushing rushing awareness but the other thing about his tattoos see the the thing is that it is a weird thing and I don't know how to explain the science of it but I think we should consult some sort of a panel of experts because because there are some people on whom face tattoos actually look really cool like when I was in Miami for the Super Bowl and I saw post malone. I hate to disable like his face. Tattoos look awesome. He looks really good and they make sense. I think part of it is that you're like casual air about him and they're done in such a casual way and then also there's sort of. They are kind of practical like his always always tired concrete statement whereas misunderstood. It's like I don't but also asked me about my post Malone. I feel like I'm looking at kind of. It's an entire project. His face the Tattoo. Hugh seem to play off each other. And it's very cohesive whereas this misunderstood feels like someone took a stamp that's at misunderstood it. Just hit him underneath. Thi- also the Tattoo trend like like the the mainstreaming of it sort of happened in that. Like soundcloud rapper. Role of like the Takashi six nine and the bills fan and the Lil peep and the Lil Maggie and the The Face Tattoo now only looks good. If you're you gotTA start putting on some more stuff there like what I would have started with. is you go rand. I on awesome random iconography like a little cross Sar- with the Cross under the I like the aft up Little Cross that your buddy did you know what I mean. 'cause he got his by like John Boy. Who is this celebrity tattoo artist? Who does all of the kind of the Kendall Jenner's and all the kind of Hollywood Reality Reality Stars Right? So it's like he started with that. You have to do it in like yeah you were like in your friends. Living Room goofing around you know. And you have the little jacked up kind of trash tattoos on your face and then you get misunderstood so he needs to just get some more crazy jacked up stuff on his face and then Back Tamboura Tamboura back to amber rose. I don't know I mean is this the influence of a e because he has a lot of facial that's true her her partner hurting her the father of slash He has a bunch of tattoos on his face in his neck and then he also has green green hair Green hair now. It's not permanent. I mean a lot better about like I'll tell you one thing though about this. Like so when Takashi six nine came out and like that whole world of all these people with face tattoos I have to like initially I was an. I'm as you know. Oh Pro Tattoo maximums exactly and I actually recently got two more tattoos. I'm GONNA show you after I. Maybe I'll even post them on social media which which I've never done just for our listeners of we hear the page podcast and exclusive social media drop you have the exclusive on herself. Amazing gun clearance from myself to release this to myself and my contact declined. So but the thing is like the Kashi nine had all the crazy six nine tattoos in the face and I was like watching his videos and going down this crazy k hole of this whole world because the one guy who really got me was the Robert named Zan Frank who has the giant an Dan Frank portrait tattooed on his face and the weirdest so I was totally shocked by the whole thing and I was like this I. I was horrified. Fight because you see it and you're like Oh my God. Something's wrong with the world. Everything's up. People are running amok. The youth is going wild like we got highs like I don't clutching my pearls and whatever but then I was just like this is ingenious and I'm like the reason this is amazing is I'm now like you know a parent and like you know I like youth culture. Its job is to shock parents and make parents like think. Oh my God like in the fifties like there at the sock hop going nuts there at the drive in or whatever I'm like. This is brilliant. Dan I should be afraid of this and like it should make people like scared so I'm not against like the whole trend in a way but I just think it's now trickling it. This is what we're seeing is it's like trickled down to like the male models and the sort of like peripheral I mean why would you ever get face to. Yes no I well. I don't no no like I was thinking about it on the subway the other day. This is what I think about on the subway like a small but I. I don't think I could pull it off. That's the thing is like I notice. Stay in my lane. You know what I mean like. I see stuff and I'm like I know that I can't do it and that's where Presley Gerber I think has gone wrong but I have an idea Maggie you know unlike shows like twenty twenty or whatever and with like John Keno Nassar ever lead right. They go in they do these like sort of hidden camera. Kinda man on the street thinks about whatever we need to do a we hear segment we get you a face tattoo non-permanent and get you out on the streets and you're going to report back to us on how you are treated with the face Tattoo. I have freckles. which are face tattoos from God?.

Presley Gerber Lil Maggie Alexander Edwards Alexander Al Alexander Edwards Amber rose Alexander Alexander Edwards Ed Maggie M. C Dan Frank Kanye west Wiz Khalifa EMC E. A. R. Little Cross Kendall Jenner Miami La Kenny Malone Taylor
"vanity fair" Discussed on We Hear

We Hear

04:52 min | 6 months ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on We Hear

"Shirt on we hear DOT ORG Yeah Angelina. Jolie has not had as much luck Maggie On the big screen. Some of her recent movies like Melissa. Sint sequel Have not performed so well. The box office one thing to keep in mind as well as well her Melissa. Since sequel did not perform as well as people were perhaps expecting acting domestically it made like one hundred fourteen million dollars. It was huge internationally so Worldwide the movie made four hundred ninety one million in dollars so think Angelina. Jolie's currency is much more as an international star than as a Hollywood star in America America sort of going a bit of a different direction than Brad Pitt and our own. EMILY'S SMITH OUT IN LA for the Oscars reported that behind behind the scenes Angelina Jolie has just switched agencies to try and revamp her career. Oh yes she reported that Joe Lee has signed with w view Emmy Yup after she had been with their rival ca and UTA right. She spent time she had been at. UTA for many years. And I think for the bulk of her career earlier she'd always been at. Uta then she jumped ca. The kind of you know death star of Hollywood agencies I mean not a complimentary wag because you want your agent agent beyond the death star. You don't want your agent to be like the like you know cuddly fluffy place and then Now she's gone with Wm. which is headed by you? You know our Emmanuel and Patrick White Soul Lauren. Sanchez's ex but sources have told us that it is not to necessarily boost her her movie movie career she has some other projects in mind that she wants. WMU To land for her. What kind of projects like more you meant humanitarian work? Exactly she's looking these are going to be more Things along the lines you say of her humanitarian work so more you know. She has been directing and producing documentaries. She wants to do more documentaries. More books and other initiatives around the project she cares about you know including protecting refugees and stuff about education So a source told emily. That Angelina has been looking for a global noble company to support her global ambitions. She wants to diversify and to grow. Who doesn't what is Lindsay Lohan? Doing she had correct. The source. Said this is all about helping Angelina. Create a platform right to use her knowledge of international humanitarian causes MHM. The discussions have been about documentaries events speeches books caused your caused driven motives. Seems like that idea. Seems like a very smart smart move for her it does I mean the thing. Is that even wall. She is focusing on this stuff. Humanitarian stuff stop is I call it in my sort of sophisticated parlance. She hasn't given up entirely on her movie career because she does have attorneys right. which is like she's out to star Dr in this whole marvel franchise she already has that going? So if that succeeds she'll have the marvel franchise you know to fall back on while she's doing these these other documentaries. I feel like so much of her. Identity is unitarian aid focused that to think about her as an actress. Something that's kind of Harkening back to an earlier time when I think of her. I know that she's an actress. I know that he's directed but I mainly thinking about her work with with refugees and other marginalized groups. Yeah I think she's sort of moving into that Amal Clooney's zone where you know you sort of think of her more charity. The work than her acting. But it'll be interesting to see if this attorneys franchise works. You Know Selma Hayek is also in it. She's kind of resurrecting acting her acting career. Richard Madden from actually Kit Harrington an Richard Madden from game of thrones are both in it and then this is the movie that Kumail who male Nanjiani got super jacked. Forgot Super Jack Warren. That's why he's in shape so he's getting in shape for like you know the past year Angelina. Julia was already in shape. Let's see what shape her career takes on the quest for an excellent night of sleep and it sounds easy. I'm tired I work out. I go to work. I talk to you all on this podcast. I should be tired. I got into bed. I stare at the ceiling and toss and turn now. I'm going to try attitude sheets. I have ordered attitudes featherweight sheets for my queen size bed. I'm really excited..

Angelina Jolie Angelina Uta Lindsay Lohan Selma Hayek Melissa Hollywood EMILY MHM Oscars UTA Jack Warren Brad Pitt WMU Richard Madden Sanchez Amal Clooney LA Emmy Yup America
"vanity fair" Discussed on Curiosity Wins

Curiosity Wins

09:59 min | 6 months ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Curiosity Wins

"Payne DOT TUMBLER DOT COM. And it has pictures of Taylor pictures of herself. Pictures of cats And it's interesting in her instagram. By which is private and it specifically says like she really only lets people she actually knows in real life follow her. She has a link to the song with Those on the fifty shades darker soundtrack contract. I don't WanNa live forever. which is a great song? It's Zane featuring Taylor swift but I thought those interesting that that's the one she links. Since it's just one that Taylor swift's featured on on an order song so fascinating she liked. Taylor also loves cats with squished faces. Oh and this is a fact I like. She has a connection to the property. Brothers so her husband is lance pain. Who was formerly the President of a massive candy brand as well as Scott brothers global the company behind? HDTV's property brothers. And then lastly this article talks about how her effectiveness as with spear is a subject of debate because of all leashes. That's gone down with Taylor with You know the Taylor Swift is over party when cam released the Connie tapes. Her public break up with Tom. Hilson her continuing feuds with Conde Nikki Manashe and again as I mentioned being painted as an outright combi various neo Nazi groups online. But I think people probably don't realize what a good job she is is doing and how much other shit probably could be out there if she wasn't doing her job. So I think when you how someone like Taylor it's just impossible to keep track. Keep Dibs on everything you know. So I I. I don't think I could better job. Let's put it that way and since I didn't have a ton of updates this week and I've been kind of blowing through all these articles. I thought it'd be fun to do one more so this one is called the night I crashed column. Births Oskar moment by Nell scoble in all. This might be one of my favorite articles. Ever Robert short-form Otter hole that they've done because it speaks to that elusive feeling of being around celebrities but not being one of them and wanting an access to what they have. It's sort of the strange conundrum that feeling. Because when you're in a situation like that you you totally get that they are normal people. They go to the bathroom like you. They get hung over like you. Yeah they might have more money okay. But they're human but the glitz the Glam the freebies that access. I feel like even though. I'm not a super superficial person. You want to be close that it's infectious you. You WanNa get up in the grill. So this articles written by fanfare contributor and she talks about attending the Vanity Fair Oscar party which is very timely with the Oscars. Coming up tomorrow so now Lieutenant I v F Oscars Party in the early nineties. And as you can imagine things have definitely changed since then so. She writes that her first. The party was an intimate gathering of about two hundred people. Can you believe that only two hundred people and it was held at a now defunct restaurant in Beverly Hills. It was odd to roam around a room where where I recognized everyone in new. No one starstruck. I made a loop around the main room and passed in the center to Gawk Diane Key and looked happy and comfortable. Playing herself. Steve Martin Linden elicited visited a laugh. old-timer Kirk Douglas. Didn't he just die. RIP looked elegant. As did new timer Julia Roberts in a room of statuesque women no one looked more regal. Then indelicate Houston until Sheldon. I wanted to take it all. I wanted to remember the moment forever. I wanted to move. I need you to move a man holding a camera bark. You're ruining my picture. I turn to see what he meant. In realized Mohammed Ali Madonna were conversing behind me. Any shot would have captured to icons of the twentieth century and in a short nerdy. Commodore who hadn't even taken the time to put on lipstick. I ducked out of the shot. scooting off like Groucho Marx. So I like that little story about her very first. Pf Party and then she tells a delightful story about years later. The cookies at the party had famous people's Pictures Inc jetted on them and I swear I remember. I think this was like when I was in in high school and still watching E.. which I miss like I was such an e junkie? I think I probably talked about this before. Like I teed on E. TO GET my pop culture goodies lease and I swear I remember them talking about these cookies because it was like new tech back then so she talks about how she finds when Goldie Hawn's face on it and she wraps it up in a Napkin and she she puts in her purse and guys maybe just related to this article so much because that is one hundred percent my move. When I'm at a party I wake up with a mutilated? napkin wrapped wrapped chocolate chip cookie. Every Damn Party I go to. I swear that's my move. So back to Nell an hour later. She was standing at the Valet. She heard a familiar. Laugh Goldie Hawn was behind hind her waiting for her car. Had she seen her cookie I had to ask no. She said with haunting in enthusiasm. I missed it. That didn't seem fair so now pulled the Napkin out of her clutch. Such an unwrapped the treasure. You should have this. She said Goldie lit up and clearly accepted the cookie. The cookie exchanged encouraged now when presented with the right opportunities. She we do more than just observe the stars. She also related this part or. I'm sorry I related to this part. About how one good celebrity interaction she can really give you some bravely bravery but usually minor bad so I don't really have this but we're fast fast forwarding Brunell story to two thousand eleven and by this point that the party had grown a shit ton and Colin. Firth was the man of the hour for the king's speech which I honestly was directed by the director as cats who we all know how that went so now explains the whole night. She couldn't get close to Earth because people circled him late. Vultures and I can vouch. This is another thing that happens at events where celebrities are. It's scary sorry the volt truism like you don't really WanNa be that close to it because it's it's it's a lot so I feel bad for them just like have to deal with that. Because every at these parties there are people who are not celebrities and even the people who were celebrities like lower down on the totem pole. They want to be close to them too. So it really creates a fortex of celebrity. Hell anyways I'm going to read you now. Widnall says at one am. I called it a night. I walked out of the hotel. Handed my tickets to the ballet and weeded under a heat lamp near the in and out truck while pondering whether at time to grab some fries stretch Shlomo pulled up in a valet waved to a group that emerged from the hotel behind me. Colin Firth and his party were on the move. I figured Oscar winner would screw into the parked vehicle I but instead instead he remained on the sidewalk and held the door open for his entourage with their high heels and long gowns. It took some time for the women to maneuver into the Limo. Ever the gentleman. I waited patiently early at the curb as he stood facing the sidewalk. His gaze fell on the person standing directly across from him. That would be me. Perhaps six feet separated us and I could see the dice. Triumph still still still twinkling in his eyes. He flashed me a roguish little smile. I smile back convert and I were having a moment I felt a rush of warp which could have been the heat lamps and realized realized I wanted more than a moment. This was my chance to connect with Colin Firth. Tom How happy I was that he won. And I knew just what to say in my serious voice. I called out. Well done Mr Mr Darcy instantly. The actor's face fell he lord. His liver's shook his head with annoyance. He spun around and hurried along. The last person loading into the Limo were were sports sliding and quickly closing closing the door. The Limo pulled onto sunset boulevard and sped off. I thought offered this was a high point of his career and somehow my forwards seem to darken his perfect night. I slunk into my car and cringely entire drive. Home wracked with guilt. Now I knew how Elizabeth Bennet felt so as not telling the story to her sister. Her sister acknowledges judges that obviously this was a faux pas but she made her feel better inside. You did nothing wrong. If convert doesn't want to be associated with Mr Darcy than maybe he should stop playing him and now writes after years of attending the Vanity Fair Party. I've come to understand that while actors loom large on the big screen they can be all too human at the valley stand. So maybe you guys is won't find any pleasure in this article at all but I really think it nailed kind of the celebrity interaction thing and how it can go on the head and I don't know if I told this story before but one of my favorite slept interactions was so stupid. I was obviously with Aleida. Whenever something crazy happens we were in the East village? We're right by Frankie's I think which really cool store there and we're just standing outside. We're trying to figure out their next move. I think really waiting on her uber. And I see Robert Schwartzman Smith who is the front man of Rooney and he also plays Michael Moskovitz and Princess Diaries shout out miracles and so I literally just raise as my head up. And I'm like Hey rob he turns and you could tell it for far away. He's trying to figure out if he knows who I am. But he's kind of like um no I don't so as a worried he's going to walk over. I literally just say just a fan and he does like head. Does like a little wave and walks off. Now is the last time I saw him but it was a pretty satisfying interaction for me. I have to say so even try that method. I think it goes pretty well. It it's it's kind of a fun story and now on for today's Legit Shit. I thought I would share my favorite drink to get at a bar and maybe this isn't nude nude any line. Maybe you don't give a shit but my favorite drink order. If you wanna be feeling good you wanna be feeling a little for ski. Get get a Tequila. Soda Splash Grapefruit. Lots of lives. And then you'LL WANNA get a real fancy Asan to add a little special contro so basically you have like a not sweet great Margarita and it is heaven and you can bring them all night dullish. That's May legit Shit Shit. This week is nothing you even have to buy. Just a little tip when you're out there this week and having fun hope you guys have an amazing weekend and I will see you next week bye..

Taylor swift Colin Firth Goldie Hawn Nell scoble Mr Mr Darcy Tom Pf Party DOT Brothers President Groucho Marx Scott brothers Beverly Hills Julia Roberts Conde Nikki Manashe Zane Vanity Fair Party lance cam
Trump rule could lead to big Medicaid cuts, governors warn

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

10:40 min | 6 months ago

Trump rule could lead to big Medicaid cuts, governors warn

"Tell folks what has happened in terms of Medicaid in particular. I guess let's start way the way you did. What are the proposed cuts to Medicare that the trump administration the station has been talking about the proposed cuts to Medicare You know I think it started with their rollout of increased privatization of Medicare with increasing Medicare advantage. uh-huh Plans Kober last year in the lakes and Florida Trump you know reported in Vanity Fair that he said it would be fun. Second Term Project to cut Medicare and then in a couple of weeks ago now in Davos Switzerland he was talking. NCNB CNBC and he said Yesterday the fact that would be on the table cutting cutting Medicare in those social security and he said that would be the easiest thing to do very strange choice of words. So that's kind of the Medicare and that's what I started with. That's why I was in Des Moines that day with the committee to protect Medicare talking about these possible Medicare cuts with you know doctors from Iowa that join me for a press conference One Press When one member of the press showed up at that press conference now you know a little bit more of the presses is listening to the line that we're calling out at my committee about these proposed cuts it's And then you know because of the news of the day. Last Thursday was Davis encounter occurred in that was the day that Seema Verma the cms administrator for trump mm rolled out these Block grant Waiver proposal. That you know everyone I can see. That is talking about this. In an honest this way tells us this will cut folks from Medicaid. Okay and so tell us. CMS The centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services when they roll out this proposal are they actually just basically introducing. They're they're basically announcing that you can you as a state Can apply for a waiver. Is that right right. Apply for a waiver. Currently Medicaid is funded by the federal government on a kind of a per person per need basis. So you know. For instance when there's a recession and more people lose jobs and more people qualify for Medicaid. The federal share of spending on healthcare for those folks will go up because of course they need that you know people with diabetes if they have a job or they lose their jobs to no fault of their own still. Have they still need three hundred dollars a month insulin slim so with block grant States could say listen Why don't you just give us a lump sum of money? And then let us in the where he used was innovate let us innovate. Ah figure out how to cover anyone cover everyone but you know if the needs go up in our state. We still get that that pot of money that you're giving us it doesn't change and yet our needs go up so more people lose out the other thing they can do is choose to cut certain services they can you know cut certain drugs that are that are. Currently they covered up a prescription drug benefit under Medicaid. So I mean I mean it is just cut. There's no way around it. And there's no way that pence didn't understand that Seema. Burma used to be his Medicaid Administrator in the state of Indiana when he was governor there so this has been a conservative dream for for ages decades thirty years. They've been trying Graham. They've been trying to block grant and and so. There's there's like you say there's multiple problems that come with the block. Granting one is that it does not act as that economic stabiliser in other words doesn't doesn't Basically expand as the the need gets greater in crises. It also does not a increase along with the cost of medicine and And like you say the states can get sort of clever because the federal government has basically said I mean this is the difference between just sort of you know me me giving ten bucks to my kid and saying you know do whatever you want with it as opposed to making sure that she spends it on you know not on on junk food or whatever it is and and she can then go out and basically spend five bucks on the. I want to keep this metaphor too much but the idea is that they can use this money in other ways that I really don't have anything to do with providing health insurance for people right and my governor is Governor Gretchen. Whitmer who gave you know. I thought an amazing response to the state of the Union last night and I was there and we talked beforehand. And she's she helped. Uh sure in expanded Medicaid under the affordable care act when she was the minority leader of the State Senate here in Michigan and got a Republican governor to expand Medicaid. And we've had you know. Nearly three three quarters of million folks in Michigan Benefit from that Their study I think Carter. Kaiser family reported recently specifically Michigan showing the economic economic benefits of expanded Medicaid. The fear was that the federal government was going to give them a hundred percent in the first year and then scaled back to I think ninety percent of eventually by next year and the reality is even though the federal share has scaled back because people are healthier because they can afford treating their chronic illnesses. They can work more they. The actual tax base has increased. I think thirty thousand jobs in Michigan created directly resulted expanded Medicaid. So I you know this is. It just doesn't make sense to me that they try and and I think that's why he dodged the question and tried to revert back to things he did. And and then eventually just said agree to disagree because He knows what it is they. They held him what it is and they know if they say what it is. People won't like it you know. It's an election year. They're trying to get reelected so they just say whatever they want they lie will and state of the Union almost solely healthcare allies again about every other aspect of healthcare. And you know I think they just say what they want they get away with it. He just wasn't expecting to meet up with a guy in tyner who you know. I mean again. I don't know this issue like a policy. Wonk I mean I just I have a biology degree in a medical degree and I work clinically as a doc but I read you know and I and I try to learn as much as I can and so you know with my limited understanding of these policies he just. He wasn't ready for that one briefed them known gave them talking points. And I think that's. That's that's what we saw unfold. Yeah he did look like a deer in the headlights and we did try to dance around it quite a bit. You were pretty easy. Road brought in on them pretty quickly I think as he tried to sort of pretend like he didn't understand what you said the first thing. It just didn't that first exchange where you said. You're going to get cuts and Medicaid. 'cause I don't think we're GONNA do cuts in Medicare and so we'll give us. I mean So you know firsthand. The implications of this expanded Medicaid and and and I WANNA get into that as just your experiences as as an emergency doctor but I also get the sense. You're on this You're you're you're you're executive director of this committee you're in Iowa so you're aware at at least some of the you know the broader politics involved in this. Where would you anticipate what states or at least you know if not specific ones than the profile of the states eight? That are going to be applying for this waiver. I mean presumably the thirteen states. Now that did not expand Medicaid under the affordable. Care Act. I would imagine would be a prime targets or prime applicants to get this waiver. Because they're going to continue you. Say we're going to expand medicaid. They certainly are interested in dismantling it as much as they can right. I think that and I think you know anywhere that there is a Republican And I guess I have to. I don't know the nuances of the directive if it's if it's an executive decision at the state level or if it requires you know something passing through their houses so we have enough house majority Republican state legislatures plus governorships. In this country that I I mean I think that would be the profile. You know certainly because those will be the places where you know folks are more likely to be in charge that share vice president pence views on you know on Medicaid in general in a and and whether or not we should be helping out poor people when it comes to healthcare That that is that's the fear now. And why should we in Michigan you you know. Why should we in Michigan? Have a different set of. I mean the whole healthcare system. So Patchwork in Hodgepodge if you WANNA call it a system a series of systems. But it's so patrick work anyways I mean I guess why should this be any different. Let's let certain states do one thing and others do the other. And if you just happen to be born in Michigan versus Alabama. Well you know good on you right Well there's so much in our society today that's determined that way it's all just a coin toss and met. I guess maybe a bunch of coins get tossed in the air. What now? There's a vote tomorrow in the house. I Don I imagine you're familiar with it. And what the what the vote is is it's under the The CRA which has been used in the past to see the Congressional Review Act. It's been used in the past undo executive the actions that have been done within a certain timeframe and the Republicans did this with a bunch of executive actions by Obama and then once they do that once they pass that to reinstitute any type of rule like that Congress has to has to authorize it with a two thirds vote right so this is like this is a this is a real this is a sledgehammer as it were and they're going to. They're going to vote on this in the house and they will probably pass yes it which would not allow the president to block grant but then it goes to the Senate and the Republicans are sure to shoot it down. How do you think this plays as has a An issue in the fall when you have a half dozen or so Republican senators running in sort of purple states on their refuse their essential like voting to allow for cuts and Medicaid right. Yeah and I and I kind of anxious to see what folks looks like Like Collins I mean she seems the only one in the purple state that I think might make along with this I think you know tell us and and MC sally the and who is a gardener I think is already toast You know maybe Joni Ernst I don't know Yeah I mean I think at least I mean the thing is having having gone record. I mean that's That's I think that's all that's what we're trying to do as a committee. I mean what we're what we're rolling out over. The next. Several months is is an accountability campaign.

Medicaid Medicare Michigan Federal Government Medicaid Administrator Iowa Executive Des Moines Davos Cnbc Diabetes Switzerland Seema Verma Cms Administrator Florida Vanity Fair Joni Ernst CRA Davis
Shady Deals at Trump Properties

All In with Chris Hayes

07:40 min | 7 months ago

Shady Deals at Trump Properties

"President surrounds himself with criminals? His campaign chair. His deputy campaign chair is former national. Security Adviser you. You get the picture and as a rule if you're a politician that kind of thing isn't generally a great move but it does offer one surprising benefit when one of those folks turns turns on you you can point to their own shading dealings and say what anyone trust this person and as the president has defenders go after Parnasse repeating the same. You can't trust him line or I don't even know him remember. We have seen this all before with the last bag. Man Who talked about President Michel Com for about a decade Cohn was the Executive Vice President Trump Organization and Donald Trump's special counsel in September of two thousand seventeen profile of him appeared in Vanity Fair entitled. Michael Cohen would take a bullet for Donald Trump. The piece points out cones extreme loyalty to the president quote cone has been described as the sixth trump child. Or as Tom Hagen in this twisted version of the Godfather and sometimes as both Michael Cohen was the president's fixer but that relationship started to fall apart in early early twenty eighteen as news leaked out of illegal hush money payments made to women ahead of presidential election by April the FBI had redid. Cohen's office and hotel room in Hatton seizing recordings electronic devices. Initially the president was supportive of his longtime attorney. Michael lawyer who. I've always liked him respected. Most most people will flip if the government lets out of trouble sorry. I don't see Michael doing that. Despite the horrible which hunt and the dishonest media but on the day after Cohen pleaded guilty to do eight federal crimes including campaign finance violations. Implicating the president directly as an unindicted co-conspirator individual one the president trashed him quote. If anyone is looking for a good lawyer I would strongly suggest that you don't retain the services of Michael Cohen burn months later. Cohen found himself before Congress delivering a warning. I did the same thing that you're doing now. For Ten years I protected Mr Trump on for ten years and I can only warn people the more people that follow. Mr Trump as I did blindly are going to suffer the same consequences suances that I'm suffering. Michael Cohen pulled back. The curtain. On trump world in two thousand eighteen and live parnasse did that last night telling us what an absolute cesspool of conflicts flicks of interest corruption and shady characters around the President United States. We'll talk about that next today. The the FBI showed up at the home of Robert F. Hide just days after the house. Intelligence Committee released text messages. Provided by indicted Giuliani associate partners in which hide appears to be representing sending himself as actively surveilling then. US Ambassador Ukraine revanche high was told NBC News. He was drunk and unserious when he sent those tax. The question you have to ask ask yourself is how did someone like Robert. Hi gain access to the United States and the answer to that was laid out by himself told Rachel maddow how easy it is to get. Close the presents inner circle just show up at the trump international hotel in Washington DC. That's how Parnasse himself met Robert. Hi You met him where I met him at the I think the trump hotel yes trump hotel. He was a regular at the bar because it was like a breeding ground that trump hotel so it every event would be there so everybody would hang out there afterwards. Everybody all the meetings would be there. So it's basically you would see the same people every day or the same congressman that supported the president would be there and nobody else so he was a fixture on site he was always there and but he was always drunk. What you got in the stands where the trump hotel it's like one a big Cesspool and there's really hard to keep any secrets for more on that Cesspool joined by independent journalists sack efforts in the last two years staking out the trump hotel and writing up what he saw in the eleven hundred Pennsylvania newsletter and an article for Vanity Fair titled Power Tripping the swamp how trump's DC hotel swallowed Washington Zach. This is your beep deep probably more than it is anyone's beaten. I'm curious how is description. Squared with what you've been reporting over the last two years it's spot on. I mean Robert Hyde was on my radar Ariza early as April e. You look at his instagram. And they were pictures of him with the president pictures of him with the vice president all sorts of important people and for him it actually transcended ended the trump hotel. I think he was at six different trump properties. But if you want to project important you can just go hang out at the hotel and take some pictures one of the things that has struck me about about this where we are right now. The impeachment is usually it is very hard to get to the present United States and and and that's for that can be really maddening for people when you're trying to if you're working in the in the staff of the White House and you want to get the president something on his agenda. It's hard to get to him This president seems remarkably easy to get to buy all kinds of people with all kinds of agendas and it seems like his properties are the nexus of this this kind of soft corruption absolutely. I spoke to the president at the trump trump hotel. I was staying there researching one of my articles in for the cost of a nice steak dinner I was able to chat with the president which mix for really good social media posts there so if you you just you know hanging out there take your pictures with your Kevin McCarthy user Mike Pence's as they go back and forth now they're usually not upfront in the bar they're usually going back and forth from the entrance way way to private rooms but see them coming and going you can collect enough pictures and you look like you're really important and then what do you do with that really important the look like you're really important. Well well I think with Robert Heidi. He's using it to run for Congress and there are certainly some other people who are running for Congress typically Republican challengers who seem to be collecting pictures of themselves to the trump hotel. But I've seen some people move from the lobby where the lesser swamp. Thing's hang out to the back rooms and I. I don't know exactly what they're doing to get back there. But looking on social media it almost looks like that they are puffing up their importance with a lot of pictures and then all of a sudden they kind of get to be important That's interesting what. What do you mean by backrooms described it because at one point apartments talking about a private dinner with the president which I think happens there in the hotel room? What is what's the sort of distinction between the the the lobby bar in the backrooms actual important power players are so there's really two tiers if you go out in the lobby? That's where you're gonNA find you not even Fox News host but like Fox News guests are going to be hanging out there. People who really wanted to be seen in need to be seen to kind of project some sort of importance but they may not actually be that important example. Corey Lewandowski is somebody. You'll see it there rudy. Giuliani was the exception to that. But it's the back rooms. It's the trump townhouse which is where if died with dined with the president. And it's the Franklin study in the Lincoln Library where they had those private events. And that's where you'll see the mingling with special interest groups that have flown in lobbyists. Anybody can see them coming back and forth though to the main entrance which is where some of these other interactions come from and is that final question here like do like my understanding from the reporting we haven't from the disclosures that special interest groups if you're trying to get a rag changed if you're trying to get a piece of legislation like they we know that's the place to go and that's where those back room meetings happen. It can't hurt. There's absolutely no downside to booking the trump hotel now. I spoke to lobbyist obvious really early on when it was clear that hotel was going to stick around. said they're going to go there to try to influence them in response was of course they are. Why wouldn't they yeah? Search efforts in who's been covering this beaten his newsletter. Thanks a

President Trump Trump Hotel Donald Trump Executive Vice President Trump Michael Cohen President Michel Com United States Vice President Vanity Fair FBI Parnasse Giuliani Congress Robert Washington Dc Robert Hyde Rachel Maddow Special Counsel Cohn
Journalists apologize for mocking appearance of Blue Ivy, Beyoncé's 7-year-old daughter

Colleen and Bradley

05:20 min | 7 months ago

Journalists apologize for mocking appearance of Blue Ivy, Beyoncé's 7-year-old daughter

"Leave the children alone which children blue ivy Carter hall if the children along yes so here is why this journalist violet Luka and chaos in Collins the two okay already bags are both on the list yeah they're both on the list because Sir dragon blue ivy Carter she seven years old leave her alone leave her alone if the children alone there is a great photograph of beyond say her child blue ivy and making the stallion she's a pop artist dnia making the stallion sure to photograph of the three of them that they took a photo booth on new year's eve it's like they're they are enjoying their new year's eve fiance as Q. will top out on because it's new year's eve and that's what you wear so making sure this on her Instagram account well then Vanity Fair critic chaos in Collins wrote in a tweet that is now since been deleted quote quote I have a feeling the JZ face jeans are about to really hit blue ivy and I feel so sorry for her yeah route it then violet Lugo who is a editor for Harper's magazine replied quote or should just get plastic surgery at sixteen Allah Kylie Jenner and we'll all have to pretend that she always look that way I can't allow myself to feel too sorry for the incredibly rich of that tweet has holes with yeah I don't I can anything that starts with it reminds me of honestly and this is not a political thing this is just the thing yeah the way that people drag to Chelsea Clinton aha and that was before social media people were not kind yeah when she was a young lady and her father was in the office of the president and people talked about her appearance in such is sick and sad way and and there's a tendency in a you know I'm trying to blink with other celebrity children who have been you know talked about poorly for their appearance it is that is morally reprehensible yeah road that's rude to say the least to say the least yeah it's like look blue ivy is a seven year old girl role and the be mindful of what you say just in general but specifically about children now both of these journalists eventually apologized you know they wrote out on Twitter chaos in Collins wrote the first tweet tweet that we read a quote I'm sorry about the blue I between bad joke and black girls in particular deserve better now and then he responded later to somebody calling about saying no you're right poor form on my end thanks all for calling it out so at least they're all the crap to to that tweet being like yeah I know what that was dumb I said something dumb I need to do better so they apologize for that and violet Lucas at or tweet was cool petty but seem to feel the responses she receiver dramatic call so kinda shaming people for have an opinion about her opinions so she said quote sorry I was cleaning my apartment while this blew up children of famous ought to be off limits but time and again that they haven't been so I said something petty and have been called ugly old and races yes I will say this is one there will say yeah about the way that social media self correct yep often times when somebody is said something that that is ill advised and cruel it is okay to call them out without committing the exact same misstep yeah you could just call won't be like Hey guys I was room that was really ready to yeah okay but you don't have to then take the other person's character or their appearance or their age or their social status or whatever you don't have to make that the that part of your response yeah that doesn't that doesn't that's not going to get you the results you're looking for right and then that person violet followed up with the tweet I'm not playing the victim sorry that I insulted Beyonce's daughter by suggesting that she might get plastic surgery someday like many children of famous people do so isn't it just kind of been like you know what those tacky yeah hi shouldn't said that I'm sorry but kind of almost doubling down on the fact like well basically I'm pointing out the obvious in that last phrase was like well I'm just pointing it out we we do have a tendency to not be able to just say I said something dumb yeah that was a really dumb I don't know what came over me but now I know better yeah and I will do better yeah that that is enough of an apology you do not have to double down on your D. Bagheri and also if you are a person who is a debate fighter you do not need to fight fire with fire exactly you can just say I don't think I maybe maybe maybe bring the kids into it yeah yeah but you are just like yeah you know give them the benefit of the doubt like you probably don't realize how awful that was for these reasons yeah for move on twenty twenty what's always be nicer put your phone down and

Ivy Carter Hall Violet Luka Collins
Nell Scovell: 'Ten Years Ago, I Called Out David Letterman. This Month, We Sat Down to Talk'

The Frame

06:37 min | 7 months ago

Nell Scovell: 'Ten Years Ago, I Called Out David Letterman. This Month, We Sat Down to Talk'

"Welcome to the frame John Horn ten years ago. TV writer Nelson Avella took a pretty big risk. She published an article calling out her former boss. Late night King David Letterman for running writer's room and a show that favored men scovill has since co authored. Sheryl Sandberg's two thousand thirteen book. Lean in and last year she published a memoir. You're just the funny parts and a few hard truths about sneaking into Hollywood boys club for her latest piece. In Vanity Fair Scoville met with Letterman to finally talk about gender discrimination at late night. Scoville join me in studio and described what it was like to write for Letterman in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Yeah so this was a dream. I'm job for me I had already worked in Los Angeles. I actually worked on the last season of newhart. And I'd written a Simpson's episode road and I finally. After years of sending material to the Letterman people got a call asking me to come in and meet with Dave and like a lot of late night shows not a lot of women in the writer's room. Now there's only been one before I got hired it was Merrill Marco who was a genius and the first head writer on that show and also Dave's girlfriend at the time so I guess I was the first female hired who was in a relationship with Dave so many years after you leave the show in two thousand and nine something compels you to write about your experiences sir. Right Dave was the victim of a blackmail attempt. He was having an affair with one of his assistants Whose boyfriend found her diary and the scheme was that he threatened to write a screenplay about the affair? If Dave didn't give him two million dollars at the same time Nancy Franklin writes a piece in the New Yorker that points out that there were zero female writers on Letterman Leno and Conan. And I have to say Dave's announcement was not surprise. Is anyone who worked on the show knew about his extracurricular activities. But the fact that I'd been gone for twenty years and they'd move backwards awkward as far as gender in the writer's room that was stunning to me and I literally lost sleep so on a fast forward word to a decision you make and certainly there's another party to this conversation which is going back today. Insane I want to have a conversation about about the fact that you didn't respond to what I wrote. And how did that come about because there seems to be an important condition and that is that it's on the record as we approached October twenty nineteen. I knew it was the ten year anniversary of this article I had written for Vanity Fair and then I just got this crazy idea which is With Dave sit down and talk to me and I knew he hadn't read the article because in this weird coincidence he and I ended up working together in twenty fourteen on the Kennedy Center Honors and I actually had a chance to ask him. Did you ever read that article. And he said to my face no. I don't worry about that stuff. Don't worry about that stuff it meaning inning. He didn't wear. He doesn't worry about what people write about him. Is that what it means. Already doesn't worry about how he behaved and how he treats women he claims it is the former when you sat down with David. I'm curious what was the most striking thing that he had to say. Well first of all it was pretty extraordinary that he agreed to sit down with me. If you do any reading about apologies and someone wronged you find out that as the person who has been wronged you lose status status and so the second Dave agreed will sit at a table and talk. He really did offer me the status right. We were equals at that table and I would love to see more powerful white men doing that sort of thing which is being open to that discussion so the point was not just for me to get what turned out to be an apology from Dave but also to you try to model behavior that I would like to see more. We're talking with TV writer and author Nelson cavill you mentioned in your Vanity Fair Peas. How male all writers rooms have been for people like Jay Leno and he has no regret and no apology? No it's all about the material. Just if you give me material than I will hire you. Just come up to me in a comedy club. He says you know Jay Leno went off. The air was zero female writers and that's he should be ashamed that for the rest of his life. What would you say are the things that make you optimistic about how conversations are changing not just in and around this issue but in the workplace about a show runners interest in hiring a room that looks like the country not like the country club? I do think we've made some improvement and I think it certainly helps to have people like Kenya barriers and Shonda rhimes who have been so successful and even giverny They're all doing amazing work. And I think it's Shonda who made an amazing observation. which is if you walk outside? You see people of all colors. There's US see people from all walks of life that's normalcy so we actually shouldn't call it. Diversity what we want is normalcy. You know in Nineteen nineteen ninety. I went to the EMMYS for the first time Letterman had been nominated and I was in the audience when they announced the nominees for the five best comedies comedies and it was Murphy Brown Golden Girls Designing women wonder years and cheers three and a half of those shows were created by women. Diane English one for Murphy Brown and I sat there in nineteen ninety and thought we we solve this. We proved it. You're if such a dreamer now I just want to get back to where we were in. Nineteen Ninety nells. cavill is a TV writer. She's the author of the memoir. Just the funny parts in a few hard truths about sneaking into the Hollywood boys club. Now thanks much for coming in. Thank

Dave Writer David Letterman Letterman Leno Vanity Fair Scoville Ninety Nells. Cavill Sheryl Sandberg Nelson Avella Shonda Rhimes Vanity Fair John Horn Scoville Los Angeles Hollywood Boys Club Hollywood Newhart Nelson Cavill Simpson Merrill Marco Kenya
Britt McHenry sues Fox News, alleging sexual harassment

Todd Schnitt

03:25 min | 8 months ago

Britt McHenry sues Fox News, alleging sexual harassment

"I suspect a TV I mention fox and break make Henry a fox host it's fox nation which I think that's their online service but I'm sure she's been on other shows as well so is Britt McHenry still with fox we know good can you check real quick and see if Britt McHenry is still with fox and fox nation she is sued fox news for she's sold fox news and the hi Chris this contributor Tyrese whose real name is George Murdoch for sexual harassment so it says it's a former co host I guess they did a show together and it's been reported as of yesterday according to Vanity Fair and exclusive trick that the Tyrus is getting sued and sells fox by McEnery a lawsuit was filed yesterday in New York state Supreme Court also alleges gender discrimination and retaliation names Murdoch not the murdocks as in the murdocks and the owners of fox or the she says she's still there so she still employed issue suing fox and Lisa bloom asserts tourney that's Gloria Allred's daughters are returning yeah so this guy Murdoch George Murdoch is Tyrus that's his real name at a sewing fox nation fox news channel fox entertainment and some other names as well as well as this Tyrus guy and you know some of the details I've got the the one of the texts among other comments that McEnery ledges Murdoch center beginning October twenty eighteen just two months after meeting her and one month before the to launch their show includes the following text message just pull your boobs out and now why don't you just grin and bear it keeping negative and I'll send you another deep pack that would be a a **** pic but the the D. word I love ponytails and braids you look amazing and it's a real turn on not that you care but I love it I'll show you what it means to be bad breath make Henry another **** pick at you know but Richard Peck or a the Dick Nixon pick up coming in five seconds he tweeted well if not the next part I love your legs is a creepy how I look at you FIR FYI you'll need those legs to escape from me in Montana I please especially on your knees hotness and I love the fact that you're always working if we ever had sex I feel like an orgasm you say speaking of feeling good did not did not or did see the story on puppy rescue we should do a segment on it hand me my phone so just a these are some of the text messages that he center so Murdoch's attorneys are denying the claim they're saying that these are improper that he might actually file a defamation lawsuit so this Britney cannery Stiller fox Tyrus is still in fox and got a big old lawsuit going

Lisa Bloom Britney Murdoch Center New York Tyrus Montana Dick Nixon Richard Peck Murdoch George Murdoch Gloria Allred FOX Supreme Court Mcenery Vanity Fair Harassment Tyrese Chris Fox News Britt Mchenry
The Life of Mike Nichols

The Book Review

13:58 min | 8 months ago

The Life of Mike Nichols

"Ask Carter and Sam Kashmir join us now they wrote together an oral history of Mike Nichols it's called life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred and fifty of his closest friends Sam Ash. Thanks for being here. Just thanks for having US thank you. What was was the genesis of this project? Well after Mike's Death I was at Vanity Fair and wanted to do an oral history as much as we can get away with the magazine and ask had worked as a PA.. With Mike. And I knew him mm somewhat and so I thought it best to join forces and so we did this for the magazine originally and it was so interesting and there was so much material that it just kind of presented itself as a book kind of instantly. As soon as we saw together in the magazine they must have been painful to have to cut. Had it down to magazine size well. The piece was originally assigned at six thousand. Words ran at eleven thousand and still not a word practically about his theater career hear about his time at the compass. Players is a founding member of Improv. I mean there's so much still on the table Ash you're very lucky person having worked as the PA.. What did you work on? I worked on Charlie Wilson's war. That was my first job out of college. I was so upset on hangs Julia Roberts. What was that often? Yes Oh right. Of course. It was a big movie so very often. You felt very distant from where the the real real action was taking place but still. I really feel blessed who've been able to be as close as I was. So you mentioned Charlie. Wilson's war my immediate reaction. Shen is Oh my God. That's Mike Nichols. Also the thing that I think people don't even fully appreciate now is just how incredibly accomplished. He was and for so long so if we could just kind of begin with his I think I real fame fame was with Nichols and may but before we go into each of those stop. Just take us through because I think people may be associated him with the graduate and a couple of other major projects. But let's just list some some of them so people have a sense. Well there was the great success of the Nichols. and May Elaine. May and Mike Nichols as a comedy team. which kind of transformed formed Comedy really and Mike as Director. He and Neil Simon joined forces and he really kind of in a way. Reinvented invented Simon. For Neil Simon. You know with barefoot in the park and the odd couple and as of film director his first film was the Richard Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf which frank rich other people believed to be the maybe the best reputation of a of a stage play for film ever the graduate which was second film his second film shocking. JFK transformative you know and Oscar worthy. And then there's all all the stage work Tom Stoppard's the real thing David Raves hurly-burly streamers. Yeah camelot and S- Pamela camelot idle. I mean it's kind of prodian extraordinary range of of gifts that that he I mean. He Directs Spam Lot. I I think two years after doing angels in America for HBO. I mean that's range. I don't WanNa go too much into his early life by. I think it's important to point out that this was a person who arrived here. Didn't speak English. Not as first language goes to the University of Chicago right he meets Elaine. May let's start there. What was it that made that pairing so extraordinary? What did they do? You said that they revolutionized comedy Elaine may was the dangerous genius that entered Mike Nichols life and and changed him she was kind of a combustion engine and he was the steering wheel a little bit. Steve Martin told us the first time. When you listen to those records those bits or you know the sketches? which is he said that the that I heard irony brock kind of modernity to comics situations and things that comedians did not go? Nya such as the cost of funerals was is the time of Jessica Mitford the the American way of death. And you know I mean these are weighty subjects adultery a- adultery right the previous generation of comics from the fifties where people who came from Vaudeville and the Borscht Belt Nichols and may had a theater background around. And you know both the classical repertory but also as Improv actors and by the way they're also both at analysis and brought a level of psychological acuity to comedy that really hasn't been seen before let's just a clip of them from that period some day Arthur. You'll get married and you'll have suit of your own and honey when you do. I only pray that they make us suffer the way you. That's all I pray to mothers. Okay mom thanks for calling you very sarcastic. I'm doing my best now. You call me on on the telephone I me. I'm sorry I'm sorry that bothered you and look I didn't make you feel bad. Are you kidding I feel awful. Oh honey if I could believe that I'd be the happiest mother it's true. What do you think I feel crummy Arthur honey? Why don't you call me sweetheart? That's the one bit. That's kind of in a way close to auto biography at least for Mike that was sort of his mother in a way and and he had a difficult very difficult relationship with her. Are you know after the death of his physician. Father they were really plunged into poverty into serious poverty in in New York. He I used to have to go in the olden days to the Museum of TV and radio to watch these old clips. But now I I'm imagining that. You can see all of this on Youtube. Yeah there's a lot of great stuff and Youtube I encourage people to also look up there The award for total mediocrity that they did at the Emmys when you're in the nineteen fifties so that's just breathtaking. I just actually making fun of their own mirror. You know I mean they're making fun of show business with a successful right away. They were both part of this. Very heavy kind of avant-garde guard group called the compensator in Chicago and the two of them just clicked as their manager. Jack rollins later said there. They were like ham and eggs. They were a local will hit first then they came to New York. He signed them up his clients started booking them at local nightclubs and they were hit right away and then they started going non Jackpot and omnibus and they were hit nationally. So yeah it was. It was really just like that. It was that quick. How does it get from that to? Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf well well they had a great success Nichols and may on Broadway at the Golden Theatre was an evening with Nichols in May ostensibly directed by Arthur Penn.. You know but not really and Elaine was just sort of tired of doing it and in a way was the comedic version of of the Beatles. Breaking up people were just. I just chop fall in. You know it's tragic. Yes yes yeah. It was kind of a loss in a way They would wind up working together. Other eventually you know as a screenwriter and director but but Mike it kind of put him in in the wilderness for a while He was really at see if we rely on a little bit. When he's got that evening on Broadway with a lame the theater? They were in shared an alley with a theater where her camelot was on stage with Richard Burton and they would kind of hang out after after the show and that's how he kind of got to know him and it was. It's essentially through that meeting Richard in that alley and threw him Liz. They were the ones who hired for Virginia Woolf. When you think about the collaborators he had the people he got to work with you mentioned Arthur panel the you know lately Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor Dustin in Hoffman Jewels pfeiffer on carnal knowledge? It's just you know on and on Meryl Streep the biggest names and your subtitle is is Mike Nichols as remembered by hundred and fifty of his closest friends. Did He. Frequently form friendships during these professional collaborations was. He's one of those the people that everybody felt like they knew. And we're close to make exactly this actors and and many was writers really kind of fell in love with him. I mean we could have called the book seduced by Mike Nichols you know Natalie. Portman really wept recalling. Her work with Mike Sue now. Yeah and that was much later and the closer yes. Yes but also they did stage work together so they were totally devoted to him. I I mean Tom Stoppard. For example said I think his advice memorial you know he thought to himself who is there to to write for he so he was kind of an Avatar to all of these. She's tremendously gifted complicated. People and the friendships were very deep. And Very Real Maureen Dowd. Your colleagues said that he was a null coward figure with the Jersey Kaczynski past and unlike a lot of other people who had a really horrible childhoods he did not kind of wear it on his sleeve and he we've talked about it and didn't particularly want to spend a lot of time thinking about it and I I mean I think this is kind of the key to his career. Longevity Eddie is that he was. Somebody really always wanted to be living in the moment. And kind of looking forward to the next project even up until the end of his life when he had several things that were in progress including masterclass terrence. McNally's play that he was gonNA adapt for. HBO With Meryl Streep. Yeah I mean in a way. Our title is taken from a a model of Mike's life isn't everything but it's kind of a misnomer because it was everything to him. You know in a way I mean he could be difficult to and and some of the people in the booker occur quite open about yes. That Emma Thompson is one right exactly Thompson who who adored him. You know said we're not talking about some saint here so you know and in fact Mike toward the end of his life felt that he had been cruel to people and had betrayed others. You know but he did develop a music also about someone who sort of as much of a genius as he was you know he was also complicated difficult cat and felt like there were people to apologize to. Some people presumably wouldn't talk to you Elaine. May of course wouldn't what about Diane Sawyer and were there other people who you pursued and just said you know what no now. We did approach. Diane we wouldn't have done this actually without her been addiction you know and she gave us the same response that initially initially Sam Beckett gave to digital bear you know which is. I'm not going to stop you but I'm also not going to help you all that much. But when push came to shove and we needed the people such as Meryl Streep she was helpful behind the scenes and Elaine. She did. Give us a blurb. Although we didn't use it and the blurb facetiously officiously said well I I would tell you all I know. But they're going to pay me millions of dollars to write my memoirs something. You'll never do you know. She meant it as kind of a joke before before we go one final question what do you each of you. Thank was Nicholas's greatest work and then also so perhaps a personal favourite may be less known or just something new especially leaden. And why. Let's start with you ash. I would say probably the graduate. It's not the most original choice but I just have seen the movie so many times and I think that it it just has held up so much better than a lot of other youth movies of the time that it was sort of lumped in with that plus the the comedy albums is sort of where my original enthusiasm for him started. But you know I I think catch twenty. Two for example is a movie that has not really gotten. It's do. I think it's actually kind of a brilliant movie that was overshadowed by Mash at the time though it is I see no reason why the existence of Mash prevent people from enjoying it today not an easy novel to adapt to know and but I think him and Buck Henry and we did a credible job adapting it. Sam will I mean. It's so hard to choose. My mother would choose working girl in or Silkwood you know an but are you. Seeing your mother would be wrong. My mother never wrong But for me it's you know the stage work is kind and of extraordinary. I mean the Philip Seymour. Hoffman death of a salesman at the end of life using that was really just is an extraordinary unearth accomplishment. Really it brought him Full Circle Because that streetcar with the two original productions that changed his life really all right. I'm hoping that this interview. If nothing else forces everyone to go to youtube everyone to go and stream every single thing that Mike Nichols did that was available. He was such an incredible credible talent ash. Carter Sam cash. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much thank your new book is called. Life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred

Mike Nichols Mike Elaine Meryl Streep Virginia Woolf Charlie Wilson Carter Sam Richard Richard Burton Elizabe Tom Stoppard Youtube Virginia Neil Simon New York HBO Arthur Director Sam Ash Mike Sue Julia Roberts University Of Chicago
Natasha Romanoff gets the origin story she deserves in Black Widow trailer

GSMC SciFi Podcast

03:37 min | 8 months ago

Natasha Romanoff gets the origin story she deserves in Black Widow trailer

"This time will move who move back to the Marvel Marvel universe because so many things happened in the marvel universe. You know it's just constant news coming out of there and this is that there is a first trailer for black widow. The Solo Film. I saw on facebook today. One of my friends posted a reference to this and I think his comment was about damn time so at least one person who is excited for this. Let's see so Natasha. Romanoff off black widow is getting her own. Solo movie. Black widow is set after the events of captain. America's civil war just to put it in the timeline for for marvel movies stories etc.. It's a time when all where all the vendors had to do some self reflection on what being a superhero really meant meant and one that put a Natasha Romanoff into a crisis of self reflection as Scarlett Johansson explained in an interview with Vanity Fair. Are we just wrapped black widow like two weeks ago or something like that. So it's very fresh in my mind and I don't have the total perspective on it yet. It's a film film about self forgiveness and it's a film about family. I think in life we sort of come of age many times. And you have these kind of moments where you're in a transitional phase and then you move sort of beyond it and I think in the black widow standalone film. I think the character is at when we find her a moment of real crisis and throughout the film by facing herself a lot of ways and a lot of things that make her her she actually kind of comes through that crisis on the other side and we start to be able to reset set where she's a more grounded self possessed person so that's her journey. Well I hope anyway again. That was a quote from a Scarlett Johansson in an interview with Vanity Fair hints of that journey are seen in the trailer on Natasha Tells Yelena below who is played by Flori- pugh. We have unfinished business. We have to go back to where it all started and for black widow part of going back to back as putting together a team that not only consists of Yelena but Melina Astakhov played by Rachel Vice and Alexei Shostakovich Known as the Red Guardian David played by David Harbored Harbor. Excuse me and the trailer also gives us our first look at the film's Big Bad than Torius taskmaster and So there is that first glimpse an black widow will be opening. May I twenty twenty so you do have a few more months to wait although twenty twenty is right around the corner. It's crazy. How fast this year went by just moosh? I'm pretty sure that New Year's was like a week ago. Last New Year's it just feels like it was crazy fast. Are you excited for the new. Black widow. STANDALONE on film. Are you intrigued to find out. What Natasha's journey is going to look like and how this team is going to interact And where this is going to take black widow in her character arc. Although you're kind of backtracking in time which can be a you know you gotta got to keep it all straight in your head. So hopefully you're you're better at that at that than I am. I said before I definitely need a marvel universe for dummies thing. We need a very detailed synopsis of everything to Keep It all straight

Natasha Romanoff Scarlett Johansson Marvel David Facebook Vanity Fair Yelena America Flori- Pugh Harbor Twenty Twenty Alexei Shostakovich Melina Astakhov Rachel Vice Two Weeks
"vanity fair" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Buzzed visitor joins us on sports byline. You certainly know him is the best selling author of three nights in August. And of course, the classic Friday night lights. And I'm we're talking about his latest article for Vanity Fair on tiger. Woods buzz. I alluded before the break the fact that his dad passing away, I wonder and some people have speculated this as well. If he had been around, whether this would have happened, you have any gut feeling thoughts about that. Well, I have a gut feeling that his father of anyone in the world. Tiger down. Tiger look you know I'm a man your man, I understand the impulse to have sex. There's nothing wrong with it. It's a natural impulse but the way you're going about it is it's going to be disaster. It's clear that he had doored and loved and respected, his father, and I think is father, as I say, you know, could have said he would have listened because, you know what a certain point is, you know, tiger became larger than life. And I'm not sure if he would've. Listened to anybody whether it was fiber, or anyone else, the one person, I think he would have listened to was that because that was a real relationship, and they were, you know, very, very close. And I think with the death of his father, obviously, was a blow to tiger, and I think, more and more, he said, you know what I'm gonna call the shots. I know what I'm doing and I don't need to listen to anyone 'cause you run. I don't know how many athletes you've interviewed probably a hundred million at this point. I don't think I know anyone who's interviewed more interview them better. You know what they're like they all and, and I understand this. The great ones think. They're invincible, right? And the great ones think nothing can ever happen to me. And I understand that because that's what you need. And tiger you know felt I'm invincible on the golf course there's no one like me. He does have a big ego. You know, underneath the F ability, he must take felt I'm invincible off the Gulf course, whatever happens if there's a problem, I'll take care of it. And it's really proven by how he reacted after. The accident, which was one of the worst handlings of situation that I've ever seen. I think the other thing too, is when he got the itch the one ahead and did it a couple of times when he found out he could get away with it. He came away saying, hey, I can do anything. I want. And that's why continue. And you pointed out something that I think is very strong, and that is the fact he got sloppy. And when people get sloppy it's because they become era that about what they're doing. I think there's no question about that. I think what's, what's interesting, you know, about the Vanity Fair piece or the pictures, which are, which are wonderful taking by any leibel. We've, it's who's really a great artists in Greek photographer, and they do they were taking two thousand six and they show, you know, tiger in light that we had never seen them, you know, not just that he's shirtless, but he's muscled the obviously loves himself very, very narcissistic portrait. And I think as you said, he did a few times at worked, and then he said, hey, you know. I'm going to be okay, I can get out of any situation, nothing's going to happen. But, you know, he's paying women at one point, and, you know, we get in deeper and deeper. And what it's wanna one that, if you're having sex with fourteen or fifteen women, while married, one of them is going to at a certain point. They do you love me. Do you not love me? And he says, well, you know, I can't really do this anymore, and then she's going to say, hey, I got nothing out of this. I want some money and it was just inevitable that this was going to go up. And, you know, I'm not a prude, but there is a morality, to, you know, doing this while you're married, and while you have children and what I think makes it even worse is he started. He didn't folk his family. You know, he would do interviews and say, you know, the most important things in life are being a good father and being a good husband..

Vanity Fair
"vanity fair" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"To listen to this. It's just I dunno. It's too especially because Alex Jones been attacking Rogan's surprise on at it. Sort of finish up. The why I'm so angry was that of I didn't wanna talk about any chance enters kind of transgender. The military in China. We did. Up here. Anyway, I just I don't think the you understand about women and about the stereotype of fetish, and you know, being an object and doing all that she goes on the cover Vanity Fair in our unaware. You know what I mean? I just think it's all she did was just varying all the stereotypes right into the forefront that we are like a sexual object. And it's about faddish knits about the clothing about that. The family that Kate one is a part of it's pretty reasonable picture because it's all about the car dashing. It's all it's all money and a tall glam and doing that. And then they're doing silly fashioned stuff. So again. I have not even on ICU. Maybe I'm just a moron. But it's I just don't I wanna stereotypes we broken in a good way. Not by promoting the stereotypes of that. And I really makes me kind of sound. And so I had Vanity Fair asking me to do a photo shoot. And I did a photo shoot advantage fair. But I told him I said right up, and I said, I'm not gonna wear anything. That's I'm gonna wear jeans t shirt. And you're like, wow. That's what you wanna do. Okay. And so I had jeans a t shirt and a cowboy hat on because I have a ranch with cattle and everything else. I really do have cowboy hats. I feel like that's trying to make it opposite. I was just want this to be totally respectful. On some level. That's you. And that might be Kate. What is you know? I I don't think Kaitlyn is someone who's in a cowboy jeans t-shirt, maybe a little harsh. I don't know. I I really don't. I I don't want kids out thanking that faddish, and I don't want, you know, dudes. They're young thinking that it's a sexual object. You know, that this person is this or that it's like there has to be more of a of respect. You know, I wouldn't want to promote the fact that this is about, you know, sex object, Tiffany or or anything else like that. Because that's totally opposite. What it really is about? I just wish she wouldn't have promoted the fact that that's what that's the stereotype. That's what gets me most upset. Well, wrapping pisses me off. They kept saying kept saying he really that that did vis you off. Okay. And it shouldn't be reserved because he can't you can't say that heroes is just a military corker just a military because it's not it's not at all. But they kept saying about hero and LGBT here on all this other stuff. And it was like right when she first came out, and it was like she hadn't done anything at all. She did was just walk out the door. How about we just give her some time before you start using that word science? She's a hero of this community. You know, let's give it a year or so until she doesn't stop for the community promotes a fact that hey, you can't just have so many walkout at door and say, hey, you're a hero because he walked out of door. Well, I'll I'll I'll send you the picture of Andrew with Kayla. Funny picture, but wrapping stuff up here, be sure to check out creek club. Of course, we've different tiers of membership depending on how prepared you want to be gift options are.

Vanity Fair Tiffany Kate China Alex Jones Rogan Kaitlyn Andrew Kayla
"vanity fair" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Is in Laguna Beach, California. Hey, what's happening? Hey, I want to thank you for all the education, you give all of us every morning. It's very appreciated. Thank you, sir. I am concerned with what the terms of the compromise on the wall might be I'm Cheryl on DACA. And if it is a pathway for citizenship, it should be coupled with changing asylum law. What what do you think on that? Well, I don't know. I mean, I don't I don't I don't yet know that there are the basic ingredients of a compromise. Look, I've heard this DACA business being thrown around. But I have not heard Trump throw it around. I've heard all kinds of other people throw it around to saying, this might be what was that via the Democrats will be starting point arrogant, DACA. Give them a. That that is the equivalent of. Oh, man, taking an element of the Obama agenda, which by the way, speaking of that there is a fascinating piece if it's possible. In Vanity Fair magazine today on their website. About the Democrats. Abandoning the Obama agenda and why they are. And much of it centers on the fact that the reason it's happening is that Obama was too much of a establishment guy here. It is. I just happened to turn to it. I highlighted two paragraphs. So where does this leave us in? What does it portend for Democrats in trinity trinity on the one hand, it's unfair to call Obama and establishment, president all the status quo overtones of the term. Obama gave us the Affordable Care Act. He gave us the stimulus. He gave us the Dodd Frank Wall Street before he gave us an executive action for dreamers. Are you have your DACA? He gave us the repeal of don't ask don't tell. He gave us a nuclear deal with Iran. He gave us diplomatic relations with Kuba. He gave us a climate deal in Paris. He gave us a new start tree read. This Trump has gotten rid of every damn one of them. This is great. Affordable Care Act, CEO ater stimulus bid, what dodd-frank well that's still around. But they're trying to weaken it. Executive action for the dreamers. Not yet the repeal of don't ask don't tell that's kind of hanging around nuclear deal with Iran were out of it. Diplomatic relations with Cuba. Climate deal in Paris. We walked out of it. A new start treaty strategic arms reduction treaty are reform of the student loan program in to liberal supreme court appointments on the other hand, many other countries most obvious trans proceeded with Obama the financialisation of the economy kept increasing. I'm going to get to the area this paragraph for the Vanity Fair writer starts criticizing Obama. And why it's understandable that many Democrats are running away from the Obama legacy is somebody tell me what this is the financialisation of the economy. May isn't the economy financial anyway. When we're talking about the economy. Are we not talking about money? We're talking about commerce. We're talking about the movement of goods and services. So what the hell is the financialisation? Of the economy. The financialisation of the economy kept increasing. What does this mean that was this clown? I'm sure there's an answer. Anyway. Financialisation economy kept increasing student debt kept exploding trade policy. Kept it same priorities opioid addiction kept. Spreading suicide numbers. Kept rising disparities in life expectancy between the rich and poor kept widening union membership kept declining illegal border crossers kept coming. Our defense commitments kept growing in towns like Jasper, Indiana and North Carolina factory workers a hundred here. Couple hundred their capital losing their jobs out competed by giant CHAI com mills with appalling condition, so that's an indictment. That's what was wrong with Obama after the list of things that they loved. The concise and indispensable new book the way, I'm fascinated by intellectuals right about each other the inestimable such and such. Indispensable such and such. Replaceable. We're talking to people nobody ever heard of. The concise and indispensable new book the nationalist revival. I'm sure you've all read it because it's indispensable. By the left leaning author. John be Judas contains one especially haunting statistic of this is what I was referring to earlier this is this listen to this three point four million jobs lost. This is an indictment of Obama, by the way, Vanity Fair three point four million jobs lost to the growth of trade with the tchaykovsky since two thousand one when they joined the World Trade Organization. For many of these forgotten Americans Obama's final state of the union resolution leading a manufacturing surge rang hollow and his vision of making change work for us, always extending America's promise outwardly, the next frontier. They don't really heard many times that they may have to retool may have to retrain renew era of decline. Obama said. It was Bill Clinton who said. At times had to observe that millions of people look pretty picture of America he painted, and they cannot find themselves at a talking about Obama. And it pretty picture though, about the pay that was BS because America was in decline. It was a new way of measuring economic success America's salad days were behind us. All that stuff. But this statistic it totally escapes this writer three point four million jobs lost to the growth of trade with China since two thousand one guess there's one person that is trying to change this one person trying to get those three point four million jobs back. His name happens to be Donald Trump. One person totally escapes this writer. But the people who lost their jobs to the Chaika know full. Well, what Trump is doing? And there by the way, there is more support. In that region over there among the Japanese the Malaysians in all of. Western asia. There is so much support for what Trump is doing vis-a-vis the CHAI calms. So here is a piece in diving Obama explaining why it makes perfect sense that this new crop a democrat presidential nominee is what abandoned the Obama legacy? Folks there in turmoil on the side, I'm telling you that they are in a big mess on the democrat side. They're going to have all these people seeking a democrat nomination. Some of them are going to be running away from the Obama legacy is going to be advocating it. In its own. Little contained element is going to be entertaining. If they win it's going to be challenging threatening. But I just thought this one little step three point four million jobs to China law since two thousand one. Yeah, it's a shame one guy is trying to fix that along with all the other jobs lost because of similar. Lackadaisical lazy American foreign policy when it comes to.

Obama Donald Trump Vanity Fair magazine Vanity Fair DACA Iran executive Paris Laguna Beach writer Trump California America China Bill Clinton CHAI com World Trade Organization CEO
"vanity fair" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"I like bumped into them at some sort of party, and like was like so attracted to them. And then like TM one of them when I was really stoned on corn. So great chatting last night. Like, we've really got to get together. I, you know, we want to have kids one day. So I'd love to like talk to you about your fam-. We did not talk about any of this all I was trying to respond. No, I think he saw here. Just he saw ended sought through it. You guys do a lot of stone diem to be honest with you. I probably do it more than I should is unaltered. Oh, oh, it's not good. I'm trying to get better about a. I myself when I have a crush on a guy I'm talking to them in the here's the thing. It's like it's like the opposite dead Deums are the way the Deums our the way we all know it through. So it's transparent and I follow so many like in mostly they're people I've never met and probably will never might because they're like models who live in other countries. But like, but it's fun to be like, hi, I'll tell you I met when we did we covered vulture festival for vulture. I'll be weird if you're coming in from Vanity Fair. But we we met my crush who is your crush Jonathan Groff. Don't think Roth. Okay, walk me through. I've actually never met Jonathan Groff, actually. What happens? So were there and I'm nervous because this Jonathan Graefin. I've talked about my crush on Jonathan DM him because he's not on social even on social. So he's coming in. And he's like talking to his co stars because we're interviewing him for mind hunter, which had it couldn't give buck about off. So I go to him. I'm like, hey. So pretend you're me and say, hey, I'm Matt. Okay. Hey, I'm Matt Jonathan. Ooh. That's a firm handshake. We're still holding hands by the way. And then my hand melted in his. Yeah. And I was like and I had to like pull it away. Like come came out of your fingers. It was it was very overwhelming. And then I think we did like a d plus interview with them. Yeah. It was not because they didn't say goodbye to us. It was it was very it wasn't like a winning interview of was his vibe sexy, though, he has a confident vibe he knows how these us. Okay confidence. Yeah. He's a competent. Viper. Also like this. And this is also equal it just adds to the charm in a way. But also to me I was like, oh, you're just like a dorky, dude. He was talking about musical theater with one of his co stars. And it feels like someone like would write that in a scripted Jonathan. He's normal too. It kind of got the vibe from him or it's like, okay, he's he's seems far away because he's Jonathan Groff. And I do think there probably is like not not an ego there because he knows how charismatic and Hoti is. But there there doesn't exist a world where we could not be friends. You know what I mean? Yep. It was like that. Yeah. Yeah. That's your number is here number one cry on. He's he is up there. But I don't know always top of mind free. You holiday love him. I have never ever once seen him in anything because I'm so frustrated by how hot is and his success. I'm jealous to watch his work. Yeah. He's so talented. Yeah. I've never seen him. Do anything. Never watched episode of looking mind, whatever that is. I could not care less about mind hunter. But I did watch slogged through looking. It had its high points and low points. Sure, largely wasn't great. But he I think I'm sure a great show. I literally cannot watch things with him in it. Because Rosen I get you. No, they're gonna really have avoided him. I mean, I've seen like the clips of seeded. Let it go. Let it go. Sure. I'm not a fucking monster. I have a question. I'd like to pose are we as a gay culture? Getting better about gay jealousy. I'm not really don't think. So I try I am I'm trying. I'm I I'm doing I'm doing great..

Jonathan Groff Matt Jonathan Jonathan Graefin buck Hoti Vanity Fair Roth Viper Rosen one day
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And I think we've kind of seen compelling arguments on both sides and so that sort of how I think about it story by story and I and I think you know when when we're all talking about stories in sort of what to pursue, it's kind of, you know, sometimes the thing to do is to sit down with the person and talk to them and hear all about it. And sometimes that's not the story that you need or want. And so I think for me, it's very much about figuring out like, how are we going to serve our readers, where do we need to put our investigative energy and access isn't the Bill and Endel of. Journalism about Hollywood anymore. Of course, celebrities are rioting against it. They, I don't know if you saw the New York Times magazine had a profile of Bradley Cooper where he the, the writer want to great profile writers working right now taffy Eichner. He basically said refuse to Cooper writing of the profile so that that creates its own its own issues. So I wanna talk a little bit about the new establishment lists, which just came out top of the list was a surprise. How did you put this list together and how is this year given everything that's going on? You know, obviously me to the craziness of the Trump administration, you know a world on fire. How did you put this list together sets amazing. When I got to Vanity Fair, they showed me this machine that they have where you put all the data in and then you crank it and it comes out with this rank and it's total science. Amazing. I, I knew it existed. Well, it should be said you do have some experience making worked on the time. One hundred which is I think of fascinating exercise in enlist making. So you come by this honestly? Yes. I'm have made many lists in my day. I, I'm a big believer in list. Actually. I feel like lists are useful. They're useful for me in my life. I love to see, you know, it's just a spectator sport, but all the year endless, what books and everything. So I think lists are a great way to take a snapshot of a moment in time and the newest published -ment has these two conflicting words in the name new and establishment. And I feel like that's exactly what we saw on display over this past year. And it was in Hollywood when as you had people sort of literally being toppled from their pedestals, but also in Silicon Valley and certainly in Washington and Wall Street to. And so it was it was a great year to be. Involved in this particular list making because it felt like there was a lot of newness to go along with the establishment and even the establishment people are kind of doing new things that are being forced to. So someone like Bob Eiger is certainly been on this list before his news cycle. This year's were different from what it has been in the fast with in the past with the acquisition of FOX. So we felt like there was a particularly for some fresh faces, fresh voices. I think a with a list like this. You wanted to have momentum. You wanna be able to capture some momentum and point readers toward you know where the energy is. And so we have the new CEO of brand new CEO of times up and the core time's up group on this list. And we have the kind of rule breakers in politics on the left to rewriting that playbook, whether they win or lose in the midterms. I think you know the, they've changed the conversation about what progressivism is and what the Democratic Party might represent in the coming presidential election and and yes, at the top of the list, we have a taciturn. Talk about an uncooperative profile, subject profile, subject, the man, everyone wants to profile Robert Muller exactly. Who is, I think probably the hardest working man in Washington right now. And whose findings might change the course of history or not. We'll have to see. Yeah. And you'll be holding an event around this this? Yes. So we have a summit in Los Angeles next week, and it's a couple of days of programming on all sorts of topics. We are talking to..

writer taffy Eichner Hollywood Bradley Cooper the New York Times magazine Robert Muller Bob Eiger Vanity Fair CEO Los Angeles Democratic Party Silicon Valley FOX Washington
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"So the great news has been that it is a combination, and I think that's a real. That's a strength for us. And it's something that again is very encouraging because the mix really matters to our readers like they, they want to because there are a lot of places where you can go for the one thing and where you can do a really deep dive, or you know, in politics or in celebrity news or what have you. But I think it seems from the data that we have that would people appreciate about Vanity Fair is that they can be an environment where they're being served. Multiple different kinds of dishes. But all with the sort of same level of quality, and I connect to the word entertainment, like the in the writing of it in the tone in the voice. So that's been great to see because we do care a lot about covering all of our different worlds and also finding the intersections between them. Your editorship has coincided with the metoo era in Hollywood. Vanity Fair, obviously, huge impact in in Hollywood. It's one of the main subjects that you're known foreign cover aggressively both the business of Hollywood and the celebrities themselves in the culture around them. How have you approached Hollywood in this in this time? It was truly fascinating. Again, I go back to a year ago just to think about what Vanity Fair could mean or could do in this era. That was that was just changing rapidly under our feet. You could argue that this magazine played a major role in the creation of the celebrity industrial complex, and and it's it's very much part of that world. But also, you know, it's it's our job and it's appropriate for us to hold that world to account. So for me, what felt like an opportunity to me with that. It meant that all of that that establishment the the kind of codes of the way things were done in Hollywood. The certain aspects of the clubbiness of it, certain impressions about what would fly in what wouldn't or what, what kinds of movies would succeed in what wouldn't all those things have been being picked apart? It's me too, but it's also this is the year of Black Panther. You know, this is the year of crazy, rich Asians, like there are just all of these truisms about Hollywood that I don't think are actually true anymore, or at the very least they bear interrogation and it's it's fun and exciting and intellectually exciting for me to think about how Vanity Fair can pursue some of those storylines because I think that audiences perceive the change. Certainly we read all about it in the news, but I think that that we're in the middle of a very dynamic kinetic cultural moment, and that's sort of the perfect place for us. I think that some folks would ask Vang. Fair has has. Really sort of conflicted relationship here. Right? It's it is one of the practitioners, the the prime practitioners of the celebrity profile, which requires access, which requires negotiation, which you know in in some ways can make you a less aggressive scrutinize her of of the networks of power in Hollywood. You know, Vanity Fair didn't break the Harvey Weinstein story. The New York Times and the New Yorker did despite Vanity Fair having a really aggressive passed in investigative journalism. Do you think that's shifting now? Is that something that you'd you'd you'd like to see greater scrutiny of these power networks enough investigative reporting kind of way? I think it shifting and I think that all journalists or at least a lot of us now it's funny. It's almost like the the analogy in politics makes it interesting to me at a certain point when certain kinds of stories in our current moment, one has to ask oneself whether. The access is helpful to the story. Her sister worry, you know, just having access to Donald Trump gets you closer to the truth about Donald Trump or is the right around really the way to, you know, to get at the truth about him..

Vanity Fair Hollywood Vang Donald Trump this magazine Harvey Weinstein The New York Times
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Class, travel for everyone been correct me if I'm wrong. But my sense is that there is a desire to to bring that into more into line with the realities of publishing as as it exists today. And more generally, I think Conde nast is been on a on a trajectory of what seems from the outside, like decline, your closing titles, consolidation, things like that. How's the business going? Well, I will say reading tina's diaries. Was very entertaining on that score just as someone who's worked. I mean, let alone Vanity Fair, but he's worked in the business over the last twenty years, I guess. Well, and I've been all over it. I've been in at newspapers been at a weekly magazine at time. I think what I take away from the arc of that experience is that there are ways to innovate. I mean, they're definitely they're are titles that are that are lost to us. Now they are gone and their titles. I still miss, I miss gourmet, and so not everyone makes it. But I do think that in terms of brand like Vanity Fair, the legacy is something that works in our favor. There are assets. I mean, I thought about this. You know, I thought about this one. I was. Thinking about the job because you know it's something I think back in the day, if you were the editor, you just didn't worry about the business side of it and, and that's just not true anymore. What percentage of your time do you spend thinking about the economic sort of challenges or opportunities of Vanity Fair? I probably spend one hundred percent of my time thinking about aditorial and a hundred percent thinking about the business. And so that's two hundred percent. That sounds really familiar completely your it right experience. Like it's almost, you know, it's I, I just think for people of our generation, it's almost harder to split them apart because you're thinking about the vitality of the product, and those two things are related in my mind. But there are values to legacy publication that I hold very dear. For example, the opportunity to work with an archive vanity. Fair's amazing, and that is just a huge asset to us. And so. And so when when we think. About the challenges of the business. You know, one of the challenges of the businesses just that there was a very clear model that used to be the case, and it was very straightforward advertising model, and that's what powered tina's Vanity, Fair subscriptions to. But really it was an advertising model, and the truth is now we just have to diversify and that's already happening. I mean, we put up a paywall this spring which has been very encouraging successful and that's about, you know, we have. We still do have a robust advertising business, but we also want to think very seriously about what our consumer revenue picture could be because there are a lot of people out there. Harari touched to what we do. And I remember from my days as a freelance her, the philosophy that if you set a value to your work, people will believe that you are worth it. And I think you know, personally, I was very struck by that advice. You know when I was young, scrappy editor. Roaming all around town looking for work, but I think it's true of of content to, and so I think really for me and maybe this is true for Conde nast large, but I can speak mostly for myself. It's really about just trying to creatively about where how can we, we know that we will not be able to ride on a solely advertising business for the rest of our days, or rather if we do the rest of our days will not be terribly long. And I care about this content and I and I care about the opportunities that it presents not just for me and my stuff, but for the people we cover and the stories we can tell. So it's, you know it. So it's part of the job to think about how we can change that model. Have you gleaned any insights from your experience with the pay wall about what motivates people to to sign up? I mean, is it got annot the latest inside dope from the White House from Gabe Sherman is at the big profile is or is it some combination?.

Vanity Fair Conde nast tina editor Conde nast large Gabe Sherman White House Harari one hundred percent two hundred percent hundred percent twenty years
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"And so when it came to thinking about that cover, which was the April cover? I just. I don't know what seemed to it. I wouldn't say it was obvious necessarily, but it just seemed to me like she her work aligned with the kind of thing that I wanted to be thinking about. And so we we did that shoot any liebowitz to shoot, which was great. And we went to Jackie Woodson to do the profile, literary writer, a writer of young adult fiction among other things and memoir and memoir, and someone who I felt would I'm I've always been interested as an editor in cross casting. So someone who's written a lot about politics, have that person right about someone in music or or have a fashion writer right about celebrity or something because I do feel like that in the intersection of those worlds. That's that's where my Vanity Fair loops and something that we can offer, but also just brings things out differently and different conversations emerge and, and you never know. I mean, you never know if that person's going to be interested in the subject or. Or what, but Jackie was interested and it, it just worked out. It is just felt like a interesting match and something that I hadn't seen before, and I come back to that idea that if to be in an editorial role, the way that we are the thing that makes it worthwhile as to think, oh, am I, you know, I'm using this opportunity to put something in the world that maybe hasn't been there before in the same way. And I mean, I think if I look back at the covers since you took over as editor in chief, Meghan Markle may perhaps an obvious one, Meghan, Harry, but you know, Kendrick, Lamar, and then this this months cover Michael Jordan. That's a pretty high proportion of people of color. They're, they're younger people. There voices that wouldn't necessarily have been seen with such frequency on the cover of of Vanity Fair. So I think that's, that's been really remarkable ask you about sort of the case for magazines in general, and there's a really interesting jokes too. Position to my mind. I feel like the internet is the perfect medium and particularly social media's the perfect medium to transmit the kind of me like quality that a magazine cover has. Right. And yet the disaggregation that the internet has brought to media really kind of pulls at the seams of idea of the magazine. So this is true of tabloid newspapers as well. So it's like the best of times because the your, your billboard travels in a way that it really couldn't before even when it was on newsstands, you know, in in the palm of everyone's hand. But the thing -ness of the magazine has has been in many ways kind of fragmented and pulled apart. And then he wrestled with that. It's funny because as a consumer, I, I feel all of that. I feel it viscerally. I mean, I do see the place I see magazine covers his on my phone. I see my own magazine hours on my phone. I see other people's I react to them, and and that really, I think a lot about that. You know, I think anyone in my role either. In five years ago was thinking about new stand and I just feel like there aren't a lot of newsstands now. I mean it's great if you're if you have a great news tense Heller. That's awesome. That's wonderful. And everyone should go to the newsstand and buy Vanity Fair. And I'll say that again before our time is up, but, but I also just I do think that there is that that you know the amplifying power of technology in terms of getting those images out and getting that identity out is really powerful. So I guess my answer to your question is these days if you have a brand like Mandy figure that is a legacy print publication, but also a player in the digital space and and the event space and all that, you know, you do have to do all things that is the job. And so the, you know, the challenge for us is to do the best work that we can do Taylor to the pace and momentum of each place. And I in a way I feel like the print magazine like the the, the opportunity for print magazine now is to raise the bar even higher..

writer Jackie Woodson print magazine Meghan Markle editor in chief Mandy editor Taylor Heller Michael Jordan Kendrick Lamar Harry five years
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"It's like, yes, I am terribly literary. I worked so hard to be high. Zero? No, I, it's, I am absolutely literary person, but I also will sit on my phone and look at slide shows of prince, George, which I feel is you know, it's like it makes me human left to do it. I think that honestly, most people have that range of interest, but I certainly to and and I think that the common denominator again for Vanity Fair is, you know, there are a lot of news outlets that do serious investigative journalism which the magazine is always been known for their fewer places that publish really high impact photography. And I think that's a core area of strength and one that we want to build on. But I think that as long as if we're telling a story, well, then the story can be about the high or the low, but the thing that makes it equality story that makes it a Vanity, Fair stories in the telling of it. So it feels to me, I don't have a problem reconciling that at all it, it feels. I mean, the other thing is that. I, I think I've always had a quick taste in music and books and all of those things. And I think that that's kind of that's really at the heart of it for me in that high low. What's your biggest? Low brow. Guilty pleasure. Oh my, that's a very loaded question. I mean, we're talking about egg mcmuffins before. Well, my mind is mine is real housewives, Beverly Hills. Okay. That's a good one. Well, we gotta have yours. I have to think about it a little bit. This doesn't really count, but I will say one of my go-to shows is the great British baking show. I think of that as therapy in the credit in the current environment, it's uplift, it's it's uplift it like how they're so nice to each other. Super nice to other everything looks tasty. Even the things that don't work look, tasty, we'll we'll stay with the baking show. But if something else comes to mind, I'm gonna let you interject let me know. We're gonna take a quick.

Vanity Fair Low brow George Beverly Hills
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"But it was an incredibly volatile time in Moscow, and there were wars going on with Chechnya and there was a there were a lot of sort of juggling alliances, and there was sort of the rise of the oligarchs and an all of these. It was like the table was being set for a lot of what we see going on in the world today in terms of certain power alliances and struggles. So it was just a really exciting time to be there and be kind of in this world of the news. And I sort of worked all around the paper. You know, it was people came in and out because it was this very small but dynamic English language paper in Moscow at a certain point. I was the restaurant critic which may still be my best ever job I was. I will say a terrible restaurant critic in I had no palate, but in a way it was more like a sociological survey because there was really no restaurant culture in Moscow at the time. So it was just every week was sort of an adventure with my dining companion. So I, I learned a lot of just almost about just like being curious and being open to experiences and. That was my first experience with journalism was like, like world events are happening. But in this very volatile away and my center of gravity had shifted from the US. So that was very informative for me. But I did realize that I wasn't going to stay there for the rest of my life. So I came back to the states and I started a graduate degree at Columbia, PHD track in English, which I did end up finishing, but it but I ended up working in magazines throughout. And as you said, I worked at literary magazines, visual arts, kind of all over the place. I just kind of became a magazine junkie. I like project based work. I like deadlines. I like the adrenalin of news and I basically just tried to take upper -tunities and jobs where I felt I was gonna learn something from the people around me. And as you know, there are a lot of incredibly intelligent, but also curious and innovative people in our field. So I was lucky to be able to move from place to place and just keep learning. I mean, there were things I went on press when I was working at the Paris review. Which is a literary journal. Philip, which was the editor at the time, and he felt it was very important for one of us to be on press because we were publishing photography, and we were doing it on Matt paper, not glossy paper, which which means that it's harder to reproduce the colors in the way that the photographer might have intended. So I went on pressed to Winnipeg seven times for the Paris review. And I think I saw all the possible sites to see in Winnipeg. I was there every season, but just to be in a printing press and watch something come off. The press is very romantic, but also it's, it's just, I feel like I, I got to touch through all of these various jobs. I touched not only a lot of subject matter, but a lot of parts of the of the work like the actual making of a magazine or journal in that case. Or you know the creation of a micro site for digital project or something like that. I've always been an omnivore in terms of how things get done. So in a way the dotted line from job to job is a little bit. Of his exact, and I can't say that I ever had a master plan, but when I started having conversations about Vanity Fair, it did feel that there was something about the eclectic nature of my experience that actually worked for this role because it's sort of an eclectic and just intellectually curious magazine in it's interesting because I mean, you obviously, I think you're the first doctor person with a PHD to edit Vanity Fair. I suspect maybe I don't know. Actually we should. We'll find out. I think the, you know, when when the initial sort of shock of your name emerged and people are like, wait who? Oh yeah, have very glamorous woman who runs the time. One hundred isn't she terribly literary? Isn't she incredibly high brow? How is she going to manage the high low mix that so important to Vanity Fair. It's so funny because the things you work for in your life, you know they change on time..

Vanity Fair Moscow Paris Winnipeg Chechnya Philip US Matt paper Columbia editor
"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"What would the boss do? Either way boss would choose Hilton hotels and resorts to get down to business and the little pleasure checkout Hilton hotels and resorts and travel like the boss. This is Recode media from the vox media podcast network. I'm Lydia poll green in for Peter Kafka. I'm the editor in chief of huffpost, but I'm here at the vox media studios today in New York City because this is Peter show. I will tell you what he always says. Tell someone else about this show tweet about it or post about it on Facebook or just tell someone in person today. I'm really excited to be in the studio with Redick Jones. The editor in chief of Vanity. Fair for Deka. Welcome to Recode media. Thank you. Lydia. It's great to be here. So you have been the editor of Vanity Fair for how long now? It's been about nine months, nine months, long enough to make a baby. Does it feel like a baby has been born? I almost wish you could go into hiding for nine months and then come out with the baby. That thing about the thing about Vanity Fair is we're, you know, we're publishing hourly and republishing monthly, and you know how it is. So all of. The baby making is done, kind of, you know, every moment, but it has been great to start to cycle through this first year and kind of get an understanding. We cover so many with these core areas of coverage, Washington, Silicon Valley, Hollywood and Wall Street and celebrity culture also in general. And so I feel like over the course of the year just because of certain events like the Oscars, and also just because of the natural ebbs and flows of the news cycle, not that the f. so much anymore. You know you, you start to get a feel for the rhythms of the job. And so nine months in is a lot better than six months in which is love better than three months. So you took over this job from a one of the best known magazine editors out there? Graydon Carter a celebrity in his own, right? What's it like stepping into a role as yourself following someone who's a larger than life personality? Not that I personally have any experience with this having followed Arianna huffing. Even at at a huffpost. I think the thing that I try to be very clear about in my own mind from the beginning was that there was no way that I could replace Graydon Carter. He is still walking among us for one for one thing, and he's an incredibly iconic and creative and innovative editor. And I think that with these jobs, you have to just have confidence that you make the job your own. The brand has existed for a long time. Tina Brown was the editor before grading, and she too was icon. And so I thought a lot about tina's vanity Farren and I spent time looking at the archives and thinking about wh- what is the vendor Graham between the editor sensibility and the identity of the brand? And I think that's really the challenge for me is not, you know, do I imitate, Tina? Do I imitate Graydon? I could try to do those things for very long time and I would fail utterly because because imitating is not how you succeed in these roles. So for me, it was more about trying to figure out. What I could add to this brand to make it special in my own way. You mentioned Tina Brown. And I think I read that that you read her diaries, which I think was one of the most delicious reads, I devoured it basically in one sitting on a flight to India and one of the things that struck me in reading that book was just how different the media world is. Now, are you going to those kinds of parties that she goes to? Are you running the business in this kind of big ticket way that she was running in sort of women in the arena. I loved reading that book and I had an early copy because I was the New York Times..

Tina Brown Graydon Carter huffpost Vanity Fair editor in chief vox media Peter Kafka Lydia vox media studios Hilton Facebook New York City Redick Jones New York Times Deka editor Washington Arianna India Farren
"vanity fair" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on WEEI

"Great piece from vanity fair um that disgusts exactly what happened and how it's how it affected our counterintelligence when donald trump decided to show what a what many is how much show he is an leaked information that was obtained by the israelis to russia yes so that famous oval office meeting where they have the picture of him with a sergei sergei lavrov surya ira so the true like basically russian spots in most of it was about solve this call me problem because he was being too much repair about about russia but he also just blithely tossed out oh we i get the best intelligence in fact we got some intelligence from a little town in syria that the nato isis is planning to put the bombs in laptops and blow up planes and we figured it out and issuing so gave away that the intelligence came from israel which is not hard to figure out get bogged name the town probably outed the deeply place source if they hats that guys dead like no question that guys dead and now israel doesn't trust us and doesn't want to share anything and even crazier the story is a detail that before trump was inaugurated the cia was meeting with their you know cope they're the guys from them assad and they told them aside agents we have reason to believe that putin has over trump so be careful what you share with us really literally being told be careful you share because it's probably going to end up with russia and if russia has it than iran your mortal enemy is going to have it so good luck its terrifying because if in i don't believe any more that it's just from what i understand from his vanity fair article eight it goes deeper than just the massad and the counterintelligence in israel that there are other countries in europe now who are hesitant to share intelligence with us because they don't know if it will end up in the hands like germany doesn't have the greatest relationship angela ongo uh not have a great relationship with vladimir putin sir russia in germany in turn don't have necessarily the most cordial relationship so germany might be now hesitant to share something with the united states because they may feel that they share it with russia vivian it is it is a it is.

donald trump sergei sergei lavrov surya ira russia syria israel cia united states assad iran vanity fair europe germany angela ongo vladimir putin
"vanity fair" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"vanity fair" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Aw driven barton were to be interesting to look at the emergence of criminal also an olive leases they're on more profile for this really subversive streams raft especially ensued allies like from one world trade center in manhattan this is the new yorker radio hour this looks like the lex you a nightclub in the 80s action suicides studio fifty four how are we going welcome to the new yorker radio hour i'm david ramnik tina brown by friend and predecessor at the new yorker is a legend in magazine publishing and a force of nature in the very best way i'm just saying this looks like a schrager hotel was my lunch reservation helo brown brown came to the united states in 1983 to takeover vanity fair magazine she'd been running the small but influential british magazine gossipy thing called tatler and very quickly add vanity fair she somehow caught the american zeitgeist of the 80s she mixed glamour and celebrities in glossy photography with serious reporting and intellectual heft in a winning formula that made vanity fair must read later brown went on to edit the new yorker and talk and she founded the daily beast tina brown has just published a chronicle of her first years in the united states and it's called the vanity fair diaries she was not even thirty years old when the adventure starts you weren't happy immediately you arrive in new york on april ten 1983 and you say that you're london bravado almost immediately began to evaporate what was your sense of the city and why did you bravado which i've never known to event i was absolutely mowed down by the velocity of new york i mean i realized the sudden ladies reagan 80s reagan new york uh you know i arrived for my job interview just before christmas when the stores are just sort of a light with a materialistic thumbing commerce you know and and christmas lights sudden holiday blablabla coming up me in a then i take over an unjust the velocity of at the sort of american media machines to seemed to me so big uh i mean county nice felt like.

barton manhattan tina brown new yorker united states vanity fair magazine new york christmas david ramnik force of nature schrager british magazine london reagan thirty years