18 Burst results for "Vanessa Gregorio"

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

02:57 min | Last week

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Popcast

"Story big <Speech_Male> picture <Speech_Male> there may <Speech_Male> not have been the language <Speech_Male> in the mid to late <Speech_Male> two thousands <Speech_Male> to say this very <Speech_Male> famous person <Speech_Male> has a mental <Speech_Male> illness or as or as <Speech_Male> mentally unwell <Silence> whereas now <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> most famous <Speech_Male> popstars speak <Speech_Male> openly about <Speech_Male> bieber gonyea <Speech_Male> selena. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> it's just become <Speech_Male> part of the discourse <Speech_Male> now <Speech_Male> and people are very <Speech_Male> transparent <Speech_Male> and open about <Speech_Male> it. And <Speech_Male> i think having that conversation <Speech_Male> out in the open <Speech_Male> maybe <Speech_Male> will <Speech_Male> help <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> cut off <Speech_Male> the oxygen <Speech_Male> situations. Like the one <Speech_Male> that you wrote <SpeakerChange> about need <Speech_Male> in order <Speech_Female> to really <Speech_Female> doesn't say <Speech_Female> you know i <Speech_Female> have wondered like <Speech_Female> without really actually <Speech_Female> be helpful to her. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> she didn't feel like she <Speech_Female> had to put <Speech_Female> kind of this <Speech_Female> front on all <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the time and she could just <Speech_Female> relax. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I mean i do felix <Speech_Female> just <Speech_Female> this incredibly <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> tragic <SpeakerChange> figure <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> who made some <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> really good news <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Male> this idea <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> you know. She was just <Speech_Female> taken and put in this <Speech_Female> industry when she was <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> so young <Speech_Female> and she had to handle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> so much <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's not really <Speech_Female> the life that <Speech_Female> she chose for <Speech_Female> herself. I find <Speech_Male> really <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Very sad <Speech_Male> the particular <Speech_Male> era in which she <Speech_Male> became super <Speech_Male> famous the <Speech_Male> convergence of <Speech_Male> tabloids paparazzi. <Speech_Male> All that stuff that was <Speech_Male> like pressure <Speech_Male> cooker. Stuff that <Speech_Male> just even three <Speech_Male> years earlier <Speech_Male> wouldn't have been the case. <Speech_Male> So she's <Speech_Male> the guinea <SpeakerChange> pig for <Speech_Female> that entire generation <Speech_Female> and he was <Speech_Female> the guinea pig. You know <Speech_Female> back in the late. Ninety <Speech_Female> s ray like what <Speech_Female> will the. American <Speech_Female> public agrees. <Speech_Female> Okay <Speech_Female> for a sixteen year <Speech_Female> olds to do <Speech_Female> that sexy <Speech_Female> and can <Speech_Female> we talk about whether she <Speech_Female> had breast implants or <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> not. I don't think <Speech_Female> that there would have been <Speech_Female> as much pressure on her. <Speech_Female> And so many <Speech_Male> different <SpeakerChange> ways <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> vanessa. <Speech_Male> Thanks for going back <Speech_Male> in time machine <Speech_Male> with me to <Speech_Male> the wild days <Speech_Male> of your mid to late two thousand. <Speech_Female> I appreciate <Speech_Female> it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Thank you don. <Speech_Male> That is our show. <Silence> <Speech_Male> A minimum <Speech_Male> of toxicity. <Speech_Male> I hope <Speech_Male> thank you to joke <Speech_Male> garelli. Thank you to <Speech_Male> vanessa gregorio. Addis <Speech_Male> you can listen <Speech_Male> every podcast ever <Speech_Male> ny times dot com <Speech_Male> slash podcast. <Speech_Male> Email us <Speech_Male> podcasts. Ny times <Speech_Male> i com. Tell <Speech_Male> me your deep dark. <Speech_Male> Britney secret <Speech_Male> favorite songs <Speech_Male> or get on. The facebook <Speech_Male> group started thread. <Speech_Male> I'll jump in <Speech_Male> there with some sleepers <Speech_Male> subscribe <Speech_Male> pop gas anywhere. <Speech_Male> You get audio <Speech_Male> content. You <Speech_Male> know where that is apple. <Speech_Male> Google <Speech_Male> spotify <Speech_Male> yada yada yada <Speech_Male> our producer. <Speech_Male> Always pedroso <Speech_Male> from ed separate media. <Speech_Male> We will be back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> next week. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Let's listen to a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> little classic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> brittany <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> not a girl <Speech_Music_Male> not yet <Speech_Music_Male> a woman <SpeakerChange> who <Music> can

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"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Case. You are wondering i never partied did with vodka trump not even close okay. I want to ask the chief designer of the ivanka trump collection. Don't even ask how i met her. What ivanka was like sorta starry eyed and she said what do you think she's like. I actually got kind of scared. Fashion people do that to me. Okay also ivanka donka went into the bathroom at her all girls school in manhattan with a pack of her shark friends and hissed at a pal of mine who is installed mid everything and said get out also jacob weisberg who started trump cast who did have dinner with a vodka trump said she surreal but not stupid unlike kerr husband who he said was dumb. As a this is jacob talking box of rocks. I love that expression. I got to use it more. Yeah i mean picture like a shoebox sort of oversized gravel in it or maybe smooth stones but smooth stones seem kind of wise. This is the dumbest. I wonder see thinking about vodka takes you to lobotomy places or it does me anyway how in the world could could a person with a beating heart was once a baby become a stifled white supremacist icon an enabler native form fitting polyester rayon spandex spandex that somehow been so into her flesh like buildi- banks is vodka at all. My guest today knows she's. She's vanessa gregorios a longtime journalist reporting on the one percent. I'd say one percent and up. I mean down like the point five percent and she's got a deceptively deceptively entertaining podcast on luminary called tabloid about the woman vanessa calls her father's very favorite trophy ivanka trump. I essay deceptively entertaining because vanessa show tablets starts off gossipy as it should and then it gets very very dark. I'm not to the dark turn yet. I'm only through two episodes that are available now but vanessa. It's gonna give me a hint of the dark part today and she promises to come back. When vodka ivanka darkness truly falls also vanessa has some ideas of where ivana trump is going to end up vanessa welcome to trunk house. Thank you so much my favorite show it was just saying i now really truly think that i organized everything just to be on trump cast so it would finally he dove tail with something you're doing which is a podcast of very fun podcast about a vonk trump but also strangely terrifying headline. How do you like working in audio for one because audio for your show especially. There's some really interesting voices. I mean just actual dialects alex and accents and strange pronunciations in the form of ivanka trump at her mother donna and all the people around you so that's sort of interesting to work with. I think yeah i mean i think the concept for the show was like i grew up in manhattan. I went to the same prep schools as a vodka. I know these people who are friends with author. I know like a bunch of guys who dated her. Then when i went back to talk to them a couple of them were saying like. Will i just kind of you know. I met her a couple of times and i realize it's a real feather other in your cap to say that you dated vodka trump among party so they had said they dated her but really they had just met her. Yes i was is going around saying oh look at trump tweeted every guy in new york. She was up and downtown. If you had a rich dad who was going out with you and then i found out okay no actually she was more of a boyfriend in person will what's also interesting is there's so much in the show and in the article you just had an new york magazine about avangard <hes> that's almost topsy turvy from the way that this street crowd the squares talk about her where you say you know god. She's so awful. Now she so toxic she she used to be so much fun and sleep with everyone. The exact opposite of what a republican would say about her. She settled down exactly. I mean the thing is is that the whole idea i mean the only thing that was getting me to focus on a vonk trump for six months was that i had known her in this like ninety two thousand party scene when she was a model. You know she's a few years younger than me but she was around. I didn't die us at high to her. A couple of times is i mean i didn't know her but i knew all these people who knew her and she was traveling with this very fast after hours hang out at moomba kind of crowd and dancing dancing up a storm and like in the tabloids constantly for like going to like dennis basso furrier fashion show and sitting in the front row. I knew when you she said she hung out with dennis. Basso this offer listeners who blessedly don't knew who that is is a furrier who someone i was out with his publicist sometime sometime back in those days and she had this kind of awesome bag made of all different kinds of furling in a patchwork. Do you remember that but then he also is a curiosity regular color so let's not say that no one's hanging out with anyone to classy. He's like sewing fake furs on q._v._c. also which was basically where she seemed to be headed. Did you see as a teenager. She was kind of cheesy proto paris hilton. Everybody thought oh she's going to q._v._c. just like her mom who by the way trademarked her name for like bronze irs impressed powders and skorts when she was like thirteen and then it was like no i'm going to go to college. I'm going to go to george town because because i want to be independent. My dad didn't give any money there and he doesn't have any ties to it. No actually i'm just going to transfer to u. Penn where all trump's go you know. Go work for herat ner under to be independent going to santa my oh no. I'm just gonna work for my dad. You know the thing that i really found out that i didn't know although anybody looking looking her would say wow. This person has a really messed up relationship with her dad. He's like how much of a lie it is that they were always the closest she was the favorite a red and he was there every step of the way below blush but they had a relationship where he barely knew what she was like. He didn't look at her until i mean i hate to say this but until she hit puberty heating look you know what i mean like was totally absent as a father and proud of it. Yes i remember he had not some interview where he said he doesn't change diapers. Contemptuously about girlie men who used bjorn's and change diapers that wasn't him right exactly and then she goes mary security the really this weird team where they're two minds that together make one powerful mind gas or semi powerful mind but jared that basically is kind of in some ways to opposite right of donald somewhat you know quiet and he always has kind of polite polite everybody nobody even though he's a crazy behind the scenes of screaming at everybody but he also is like he's not gonna cheat on her right. Which is her dad. She's aware aware of what was going on but he's also going to not change diapers and she's gonna dress in. These weird gowns that she's wearing now. These kind of weird weird somehow relaxed. Eileen fisher princess gowns that go all the way down to her ankles that she's never showing her shoulders anymore you know and they're keeping kosher and friday night dinner and balu law so it's actually like a weirdly patriarchal family that she said. I don't know i'm fascinated. I mean their relationship is truly the stuff of a henry james novel god yes it is good and as you were describing her new style. I wanted to just push you you to use the right so deftly that you probably don't even want to repeat yourself but it's such a treat for people who haven't heard it before just use those awesome three words that yet at the front donatella versace cheese tell up for sachi. Both i mean all three of those magical words <hes> the yiddish for orthodox. What's the word from and then donatella for a figure who and i hope i can land this point. Bring it back around donatello for saatchi who darkly tanned a kind of clowney mushy face very thin. I assume bleach blonde straight hair and for some reason she was sort of like recuperated or or like re rehabilitated as very stylish and interesting and so instead of seeming like a hideous lion queen queen people looked at her as this wonderful camp icon and that really brings me back to certain era of new york magazine a little bit vanity fair that allowed us to like ivana trump also right exactly 'cause vaughan after the divorce had like a big star turn aren't right before she got totally q._v._c. it out. She was like having parties in her apartment for cuco having bob college. Hello follow her around in prague to write a vonnas second act like vanity fair and people felt like donald was so disgusting. Everybody knew the divorce was his false offs. Yes we knew he had been running around on her for ever. Actually the third episode of the podcast is truly fantastic because it's cindy adams burr says liz smith the battle of the tabloids over the divorce will say that donald kind of manipulated that whole situation against bench very sad in some ways for vonk and part of the project that i was engaged in was trying to really look at her three dimensional and being like okay this girl all at eight years old watched her parents go through like the most grotesque big new york divorce ever young now and she had people he photographers outside side of her girls school like trying to take photos of her before she knew that they were getting divorced now later in life she said no no no no i knew but on on born rich which is like really only legit interview she's ever given yes jimmy johnson guberman documentary from like the early two thousand. Yes you know and she was dating bingo so she was like being honest because here's your boyfriend like she's not going to lie..

ivanka trump vanessa gregorios donald kind new york magazine manhattan ivanka jacob dennis basso ivanka donka chief designer jacob weisberg Eileen fisher donatella paris donatello kerr herat ner bob college york prague
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:28 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thirty. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. Let's get back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio Addis, author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred and twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports Google is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award part of her book is about the culture of fraternities and the frat parties that often lead to binge drinking one of the fraternities you write about in your book is delta Kappa Epsilon known as Dc decay e which is at Yale, George W Bush was. Part of that fraternity. And so was Brad Kavanagh? Why did you decided to look at at Dc? And what did you learn about it in terms of the sexual environment? Well, I think the deed at the time that Cavanaugh was there. It was actually a pretty uncall- thing to be part of it was a repository of future power and people like once you've just described were in it. But nobody wasn't in cared about Dc. But over the years since the eighties frauds have become very popular on American campuses millennials. They like to join things on your social network is so important right now in terms of moving forward getting a job being decree meal that could maybe really help you. You know, we seeing students really join up with the Greek system. So the famous story with Dc is the story in the early two thousand tens where a group of pledges were marching across campus went to the women's center whereupon they chanted. No means. Yes. Yes. Means anal and. Some of the students who were yell at the time. Really thought that this was the straw that broke the camel's back for them. In terms of the way, girls were being treated on the campus. And they ended up filing title nine complaint with office for civil rights about Yale, and particularly Dc, and who was the first one that was filed during this kind of two thousand eleven Obama time when Obama said yes students, tell us what's happening. We want to hear from you. What's going on on your campuses? So it was a very important part of that history. What are some of the ways colleges? College administrators are trying to deal with fraternities and with the binge drinking at fraternity parties. There are some universities who have moved pledging either into January or they've moved it to sophomore year entirely because they realize that, you know, having kids start to pledge. In september. When the sexual assault risk is the highest is just madness right now, you have kids pledging a fraud, and who knows what kind of dares. They're going to be told to take and they're gonna be getting wasted every night as her hazed sisters hideous. So I think there are some fraught sitter are trying to bring in. Courses about sexual assault. Trying to be more enlightened about it. I- fraternity expensively. Sure, there are some fraternities are doing that. Yeah. Definitely. I wrote extensively about Wesleyan where I went to school which is not exactly known as a fraud haven, but there were a bunch of frauds there. And while I was reporting the book, the Wesleyan decided to shut the all of those products down. So, you know, I didn't know this 'til I read your book, but sororities are by the Greek code or whatever it is sororities aren't allowed to serve alcohol at their parties. Only fraternities can do that. And that's a kind of unequal status right there. Because it means that it's the men on campus who are going to control the party atmosphere since people expect alcohol at parties. Oh, absolutely. I mean, this is the key issue. That universities have boys still really dominate the social scene on college campuses. Not only are one in six American boys who go to four year colleges are in France now, which is a population that's up by. Half in the last decade guys. Get the kegs right guys by the drugs. You can't even have parties at sororities in America. That's the Panhellenic rule. So the guys get to have the parties at their houses may set the rules and they set the costume theme. And the theme is always something like little mermaid for the girls to come really scantily clothed. So I was just kind of shocked that the animal house ethos, which we used to think was just a small sliver of the American college experience. And almost a joke has really spread out across America where you can just do whatever you want to do. And then when it's over it's all scrubbed. And it's just that crazy. You did in college. Well, no, actually because there's a lot of girls coming out of here with a lot of traumatic experiences. You know, some women are saying now, I'm what really need to do in order to like stop, or at least diminish the amount of sexual assault on campus is to stop rape culture. What is meant by that? So reap culture is a term that really just tries to connect the dots between an American society that turns this blind eye to sexual assault and the true experience of girls, which is that they are experiencing a lot of sexual assault. So, you know, this rape culture is take culture where they're rape myths that a woman's outfit or her alcohol consumption has caused her rape. And nobody questions these attitudes that box in the victim. Like, nobody says it doesn't matter that you were dressed a certain way or doesn't matter. How much you drank? They say well victims are kind of weak, and they can lie, and maybe they're just crazy or maybe they're gold. Figgers all these reasons why a woman would make up the story, maybe she's just trying to lie. So she doesn't get in trouble with her boyfriend, etc. So what we really see about removing this young generation is this refusal to participate in that culture and also very differently than than the nineties when I was in college back, then of course, we talked about sexual assault a lot in the early nineties during that PC era, but what we were taught his carry me go to a self defense class, right? Protect yourself because boys will be boys and the best. You can do is make sure you're safe on your own. Now, these girls are saying, no, it's not our problem. It's your problem rain and their signs will say things like don't get raped, and then they'll cross out some of the word. So it's don't rape. No, it's boys who have to change. It's the into to Sion's there have to change. This is about institutional accountability. Let's talk about the message that young men and women are getting from pop feminism. And I'll use beyond say as an example here. I mean, she is a symbol of empowerment to so many women so many men and women just I mean, adore her understandably at the same time in so many of her concerts over the years. She's she's dressed in very sexualize clothing. And a lot of the clothing it's in this is true of a lot of women like Popstars and hip hop stars. It's it's very centralized in kind of designed to call attention to the most sexual areas of the body. So you know, you could see it one way. Like, it's a sign of my sexual empowerment, or you could see it another way I'm offering myself to you as an object as a sexual opt as somebody I want you to look at me sexually I want you to see my power as being sexual power. Or at least partly sexual power. And I am inviting you to really focus your gaze on the most sexual parts of my body. And again, you can see that as empower manner, you could see that as objectification. And I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts about that. Or that's an issue that came up a lot when talking to young women on campuses. Well, it's certainly not an issue that came up when I spoke with the young women 'cause they completely believe it's empowering, but it's an issue that came up a lot for me because I found myself really torn between those two ideas is empowering or is this denigrating, and, you know, being somebody who comes from second wave feminism, I am my knee jerk reaction is like you guys were climbing this south of gentrification, isn't that just a ruse isn't that a some way you're justifying this kind of way that your your present? Eating yourself. But after speaking to so many of these students, I truly changed my mind about that. Because I realized like this is how they grew up these kids that I interviewed in college just graduating. Now, you know Britney Spears was like they were they were just tiny when Britney Spears without the culture has been. So saturated with sacks the entire time that they've been growing up. They've been growing up around pornography around fashion that is much much scanty earlier than anything that I grew up with. So they don't have the same ideas about Ovalles dressed this way. It makes me look like a slut because this is the way people dress. Now, they're such a casual way, and you're right. And a lot of concerts of beyond say or Katy Perry Riyadh. I, you know, it's it's crossing the line way from scanty to something makes really sexual but. This is what they believe is empowering to them. Now, we have all sorts of data also seeing that they have huge amount of nervousness about it. And they feel anxious and depressed if guys like their social media posts cetera. So there's there's a flip side to that. But they were adamant with me that this was only to the good that they were presenting themselves. See right in your book. We're in the process of developing new power dynamics in the bedroom an area where feminism has previously not been able to reach. So I just explain what you mean by that. I think this raising of demons that has been going on three the metoo era is allowing women not only to say these are the things that happened to me in the past that I might call sexual assault or I might just call things. I was extremely uncomfortable with and now going into the future I want to be treated differently in the bedroom. I want to be us. Asked what I want? I want to be able to say no tonight and have that actually be heard. I think that behavior always kind of lies behind attitude shift were definitely in the attitude shift now, but I truly believe that that kind of most private act is beginning to shift Vanessa Gregorio Artis. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you so much Terry Vanessa Gregorio is the author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. After a break, Ken Tucker will review a new album by Hazel, dickens, and Alice Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass this is fresh air..

assault rape Dc fraud Vanessa Gregorio Addis Terry gross Brad Kavanagh Google Vanessa Gregorio Artis Cavanaugh Terry Vanessa Gregorio Britney Spears George W Bush America Wesleyan contributing editor New York Times magazine Obama Yale
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio Artis author of the new book blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. So let's talk about the definition of sexual assault. And how that is maybe changing what was the kind of common understanding of the definition of sexual assault. In the three years. You were talking to people on college campuses. There was a huge shift in the definition of sexual assault from like two thousand fourteen to seventeen while I was there. And I watched as it happened many students said to me that they weren't sure if groping counted as sexual assault. Maybe it had to be penetration by the end of those three years that idea was completely blown out of the water. And I even had students say to me. You know, sexual assault is maybe even the way you speak to people the way, you a grass on people in speech and make them feel like Justice like dirty like a sexual object. They were thinking through this idea. How far can we actually take this? So. Is there? No, commonly held understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is now. I don't think that there's a national understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is I think that people who are enlightened about this issue understand that it doesn't have to include penetration. But I think that part of why good part of the country is in line with Trump on this issue is that we don't have a national definition. So you also say that the definition of consent is being redefined and this Logan used to be no means, no. But now as yes means Yes, What's the difference between no means? No. And yes means yes. While there's a huge difference. Something like yes means. Yes is okay. Until you get some sort of. Yes. You don't really have permission to touch somebody now. Yes. In the college definition could be verbal or it could be they like to call it acts unmistakable, and their meaning, which is suppose means a Mon are grown are pulling off clothes etcetera. And from looking at this and researching it I didn't agree with this at least set, but I came convinced that this is a really good standard for young people, and perhaps for older people as well. Certainly anybody who's in a workplace who might have a crush on somebody else. You gotta ask a question because you could be misinterpreting signals people do that all the time. So why were you resistant to this? Yes means yes, dander, and why did you change your mind? Well, I'm an adult. You know, I'm in my forties. And I know that that's not the way sex usually happens means sexes. Something as unspoken. That's kind of energy between people and more exciting in some ways when it's like that. You know, we see a lot of young people who are having sex with people that they met on dating apps. Barely know. These people that's part of the titillation part of the charge. But I'm not so doctrinaire that I think that you should have to say yes to each escalating base or sexual act, which is the way a lot of people. Think of. Yes, mitya's. But I do think that a question is not that big a deal in genetics. We had the question, you know, should I get a condom which was always kind of a question about protection? But it was really a permission question. The really hostile be an extra question. You read that the strongest argument for affirmative consent for. Yes means yes is that it frees girls from the cage of socialized politeness. What do you mean? Well, one of the complexities of sexual assault. Is that girls? Don't always say. No, they certainly don't say it that way. No get away from me. I'm pushing you away. Right. They say, well, maybe another time. I don't think I want to do this tonight until band up giving up some of the most interesting work that's being done now in terms of trying to fix this problem is about girls understanding the signals from people who might in Trenton them harm and removing themselves from the room before anything actually happens because people understand once you're in the room. It's really hard to get out. Well, you know, the thing about yes means yes, there's a lot of people say, oh, that's so awkward to kind of have these like rules like almost like a questionnaire. Like, I authorize you to like take off my shirt, or whatever. But it's equally awkward, I think for the woman to be in the place where the man is making all these advances, and you have to say, no, no, no stop. No. I really mean stop. No, okay. I'll leave it just puts the responsibility on her. And it makes you like, really? Awkward, and it's not a shared awkwardness. It's like one person having the full burden of the awkwardness. Exactly. So this is a little dorky. Okay. But it definitely changes things. I mean, I went to a dance party. I'd like to go out and dance. It may recently guys try to come up and dance with you. And you try to get away and this guy came up, and he was about to put his arm around me. And then he said is it? Okay. If I put my arm around here, and I said, no because I didn't want his arm around me. And he said, oh, yeah. I get it consent. I'm I totally get it. I understand. I'm glad I asked was the first time that happened here. That was definitely the first happened today. I mean, I e yeah, I didn't think that that man intended me harm. But I didn't want his arm around me. I had no interest in him. I married. I was just there with my girlfriend having a good night and dancing. So I think that's the. Great thing to have that happen to have young girls who truly. You know are in nightclubs or at dance parties a lot understand like this is my body I own at people have to ask permission to touch it. My guest is Vanessa Gregorio Artis author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. We'll talk more after a break, Ken Tucker will review an early recording by Hazel dickens analysis Arar who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass and just in China will review I man starring Ryan Gosling as astronaut Neil Armstrong the first human to walk on the moon. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. Neubauer family foundation supports WHYY's, fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation support for NPR comes from this station,.

assault Vanessa Gregorio Artis Terry gross Trump Ken Tucker Logan Trenton mitya NPR Neubauer Hazel dickens Ryan Gosling China Neil Armstrong WHYY Arar three years
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross, the cavenaugh hearings and confirmation raised the question, again, how do we decide who to believe when a woman says she was sexually assaulted by someone she knows behind a closed door. And the man denies it. That's an issue. Universities have been grappling. With my guest. Vanessa Gregorios is the author of blurred lines, sex power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports, she says that while writing the book, she witnessed a historic moment when survivors move from the shadows to the spotlight I on campus, and then nationwide with the metoo movement Gregori odyssey contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award Vanessa Gregorio, welcome to fresh air. No. You're writing your. A book that there's a new understanding of what rape and sexual assault means that started on college campuses. But with me too movement, it's spread beyond campuses. What do the cavenaugh hearings and confirmation tell you about how far that new understanding has spread? I guess what I'm asking you is this if if the Republican senators in the judiciary committee had gone to college campuses. What do you think some of the things are of they would have been told about what to take into consideration before voting things that they might not have thought of and part brass the Republicans and judiciary were men. A lot of them were older men if their college days, we're very different in terms of thinking about sexual assault. Yeah. If those senators had been on college campuses as president Sor administrators or title nine officers. They would have had a completely different set of questions. Right because they would have already known what college campuses know about sexual assault, which is very few women make it up. Very few women are excited to get there. And report and feel like this is their moment in the limelight. Something like not having reported for many years is not a big deal, most sexual assault survivors, don't actually report for a while. And they would know that they might not actually get a lot of evidence because there's very rarely good evidence. In many of these cases, particularly those that happened thirty six years ago. So they have to look at the credibility of each percent. Last tuesday. While the FBI investigation was still going on into Brett cavenaugh. President Trump spoke to reporters on the south lawn of the White House before boarding a flight this was October second. And so this was before the Senate voted on the cabinet nomination for the supreme court before they confirmed him. So this is President Trump say that it's a very scary.

assault Vanessa Gregorio Vanessa Gregorios President Trump president Terry gross judiciary committee Brett cavenaugh FBI New York Times magazine White House contributing editor Senate Gregori rape Vanity Fair thirty six years three years
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Air. I'm Terry gross. Let's get back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio Artis author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred and twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports Gregorios is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award part of her book is about the culture of fraternities and the frat parties that often lead to binge drinking. One of the fraternities you write about in your book is delta Kappa Epsilon known as Dc decay e which is at Yale George W Bush was a part of that fraternity. And so was Brad Kavanagh? What did you decided to look at at Dc? And what did you learn about it in terms of the sexual environment? Well, I think the deed at the time that Cavanaugh is. There was actually a pretty uncool thing to be part of it was a repository of future power and people like once you just described were in it. But nobody who wasn't in Dc cared about Dc. But over the years since the eighties frauds have become very popular on American campuses millennials. They like to join things on your social network is so important right now in terms of moving forward getting a job being dick from Yale that. Maybe really help you. You know, we seeing students really join up with the Greek system. So the famous story with Dc is the story in the early two thousand tens where it group of pledges were marching across campus went to the women's center whereupon they chanted. No means. Yes. Yes. Means anal and some of the students who were yell at the time. Really thought that this was the straw that broke the camel's back for them. In terms of the way, girls were being treated on the campus. And they ended up filing title nine complaint with office for civil rights about Yale. And particularly in who was the first one that was filed during this kind of two thousand eleven Obama time when Obama said yes students, tell us what's happening. We wanna hear from you. What's going on on your canvases? So it was a very important part of that history. What are some of the ways colleges? College administrators are trying to deal with fraternities and with the binge drinking at fraternity parties. There are some universities who have moved pledging either into January or they've moved it to sophomore year entirely because they realized that, you know, having kids start to pledge. In september. When the sexual assault risk is the highest is just madness right now, you have kids pledging a fraud, and who knows what kind of dares. They're going to be told to take and they're gonna be getting wasted every night as her hazed sisters hideous. So I think there are some products that are are trying to bring in courses about sexual assault. Trying to be more enlightened about it. I- fraternity expensively sure are some fraternities are doing that. Yeah. Definitely. I wrote extensively about Wesleyan where I went to school which is not exactly known as a fraud haven, but there were a bunch of frauds there. And while I was reporting the book, they Wesleyan decided to shut the all of those products down. So, you know, I didn't know this 'til I read your book, but sororities are by the Greek code, or whatever it is sororities aren't allowed to serve alcohol at parties only fraternities can do that. And that's a kind of unequal status right there. Because it means that it's the men on campus who are going to control the party atmosphere since people expect alcoholic parties. Oh, absolutely. I mean, this is the key issue. That universities have boys still really dominate the social scene on college campuses. Not only are one in six American voice who go to four year colleges are in France now, which is a population that's up by. Half in the last decade guys. Get the kegs right guys by drugs. You can't even have parties sororities in America. That's the Panhellenic rule. So the guys get to have the parties at their houses. And they set the rules and they set the costume theme. And the female is always something like little mermaid for the girls to come really scantily clothed. So I was just kind of shocked that the animal house ethos, which we used to think was just a small sliver of the American college experience. And almost a joke has really spread out across America where you can just do whatever you want to do. And then when it's over it's all scrubbed. And it's just that crazy thing you did in college. Well, no, actually because there's a lot of girls coming out of here with a lot of traumatic experiences. You know, some women are saying now, I really need to do in order to like stop, or at least diminish the amount of sexual assault on campus is to stop rape culture. What is meant by that? So rape culture is a term that really just tries to connect the dots between an American society that turns this blind eye to sexual assault and the true experience of girls, which is that they are experiencing a lot of sexual assault. So, you know, this rape culture is a culture where they're rape myths that a woman's outfit or her alcohol consumption has caused her rape. And nobody questions these attitudes. Fox in the victim. Like, nobody says it doesn't matter. The you were dressed a certain way or doesn't matter. How much you drank? They say well victims are kind of weak, and they can lie, and maybe they're just crazy or maybe they're golden. Figgers all these reasons why a woman would make up this story. Maybe she's just trying to lie. So she doesn't get in trouble with her boyfriend, etc. So what we really see about rung? This young generation is his refusal to participate in that culture and also very differently than than the nineties when I was in college back, then of course, we talked about sexual assault a lot in the early nineties during that PC era, but what we were taught his carry me go to a self defense class, right? Protect yourself because boys will be boys and the best. You can do is make sure you're safe on your own. Now, these girls are saying, no, it's not our problem. It's your problem rain and their signs will say things like don't get raped, and then they'll cross out some of the word. So it's don't rape. No, it's boys who have to change. It's the into tuitions that have to change this is about institutional accountability. Let's talk about the message that young men and women are getting from pop feminism. And I'll use beyond say as an example here. I mean, she is a symbol of empowerment to so many women so many men and women just I mean, adore her understandably at the same time in so many of her concerts over the years. She's she's dressed in very sexualize clothing. And a lot of the clothing it's in this is true of a lot of women like Popstars and hip hop stars. It's it's very sexualize in kind of designed to call attention to the most sexual areas of the body. So you know, you could see it one way like to sign of my sexual empowerment, or you could see it another way I'm offering myself to you as an object as a sexual opt as somebody I want you to look at me sexually I want you to see my power as being sexual power. Or at least partly sexual power. And I am inviting you to really focus your gaze on the most sexual parts of my body. And again, you're can see that as empower manner. You could see that as objectification. And I'm Jay wondering if you have any thoughts about that. Or that's initially Cam up a lot when talking to young women on campuses. Well, it's certainly not an issue that came up when I spoke with the young women because they completely believe it's empowering, but it's an issue that came up a lot for me because I found myself really torn between those two ideas is this empowering or is this denigrating and being somebody who comes from second wave feminism. I am my knee jerk reaction is like you guys were calling the self of Jack to vacation, isn't that just a ruse? Isn't that a some way you're justifying this kind of way that your your present? Eating yourself. But after speaking to so many of these students, I truly changed my mind about that. Because I realized like this is how they grew up these kids that I interviewed in college just graduating. Now, you know Britney Spears was like they were they were just tiny when Britney Spears without the culture has been. So saturated with sacks the entire time that they've been growing up even growing up around pornography around fashion that is much much scanty or than anything that I grew up with. So they don't have the same ideas about Ovalles dressed this way. It makes me look like a slut because this is the way people dress. Now, there's such a casual way, and you're right in a lot of concerts of beyond say or Katy Perry Riyadh. I, you know, it's it's crossing the line way from scanty to something makes really sexual but. This is what they believe is empowering to them. Now, we have all sorts of data also seeing that they have huge amount of nervousness about it. And they feel anxious and depressed, if diced like their social media, posts, etc. So there's there's a flip side to that. But they were adamant with me that this was only to the good way that they were presenting themselves. See right in your book. We're in the process of developing new power dynamics in the bedroom an area where feminism has previously not been able to reach. So I just explain what you mean by that. I think this raising of demons that has been going on three metoo era is allowing women not only to say these are the things that happened to me in the past that I might call sexual assault or I might just call things. I was extremely uncomfortable with and now going into the future I want to be treated differently in the bedroom. I want to be. Asked what I want? I want to be able to say no tonight and have that actually be heard. I think that behavior always kind of lives behind attitude shift were definitely in the attitudes shift now, but I truly believe that that kind of most private act is beginning to shift Vanessa Gregorio. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you so much Terry Vanessa Gregorio is the author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. After a break, Ken Tucker will review a new album by Hazel, dickens, and Alice Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass this is fresh air..

assault rape Dc fraud America Vanessa Gregorio Artis Terry gross Brad Kavanagh George W Bush Terry Vanessa Gregorio Cavanaugh Obama Britney Spears Vanessa Gregorio Yale Wesleyan contributing editor
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

13:57 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Come out the meaning. Are you. Are you. And your stories of coming out, you like other men. Why on the latest episode of it's been a minute from NPR. That's got back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio Addis, author of blurred lines sex power and consent on campus over the course of three years. She interviewed one hundred twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators in experts and read dozens of case reports. Google Oreos is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award. Part of her book is about the culture of fraternities and the frat parties that often lead to binge drinking. One of the fraternities you write about in your book is delta, Kappa Epsilon known his D.C decay e which is at Yale. George W Bush was part of that fraternity and so Brad Kavanagh, what did you decided to look at at D.C and what did you learn about it in terms of the sexual environment? Well, I think that de at the time that Cavanaugh was there, it was actually a pretty uncool thing to be part of it was a repository, a future power and people like the ones you've just described, we're in it, but nobody who wasn't in deep cared about D.C. But over the years, since eighties frauds have become very popular on American campuses. You know millennials, they like to join things on your social network. Is so important right now in terms of moving forward, getting a job being D.C from Yale that could. Maybe really help you. You know, we seeing students really join up with the Greek system. So the famous story with D.C is the story in the early two thousand tens where it group of pledges were marching across campus, went to the women's center where pond they chanted no means yes. Yes means anal and some of the students who were yell at the time really thought that this was the straw that broke the camel's back for them in terms of the way girls were being treated on the campus, and they ended up filing title nine complaint with office of for civil rights about Yale and particularly D.C. And it was the first one that was filed during this kind of two thousand eleven Obama time. When Obama said, yes, Dudin tell us what's happening. We wanna hear from you. What's. Going on your campuses. So it was a very important part of that history. What are some of the ways colleges college administrators are trying to deal with fraternities and with the binge drinking at fraternity parties. There are some universities who have moved pledging either into January or they've moved it to sophomore year entirely because they realized that you know having kids start to pledge in September when the sexual assault risk is the highest is just madness. Right now, you have kids pledging a fraud and who knows what kind of dares they're going to be told to take, and they're going to be getting wasted every night as our hazed. This is just hideous. So I think there are some frauds that are are trying to bring in courses about sexual assault, trying to be more enlightened about it. I return it extensively short. There are some fraternities or doing that. Yeah, definitely. I wrote extensively about Wesleyan where I went to school, which is not exactly known as a fraud haven, but there were a bunch of frauds there. And while I was reporting the book, they Wesleyan decided to shut the all of those products down. So you know, I didn't know this 'til I read your book, but sororities are by the Greek code or whatever it is. Sorority is aren't allowed to serve alcohol at their parties only for turn. Ities can do that. And that's kind of unequal status right there because it means that it's the men on campus who are going to control the party atmosphere since people expect alcohol at parties. Oh, absolutely. I mean, this is the key issue that universities have boys still really dominate the social scene on college campuses not only are one in six American boys who go to four year colleges are in France now which is. The population that's up by half in the lost decade guys get the kegs right guys by the drugs, you can't even have parties at sororities in America. That's the Panhellenic rule. So the guys get to have the parties at their houses, and they set the rules and they set the costume theme and the female is always something like little mermaid for the girls to come really scantily clothed. So I was just kind of shocked that the animal house ethos which we used to think was just a small sliver of the American college experience. And almost a joke has really spread out across America where you can just do whatever you want to do. And then when it's over, it's all scrubbed. And it's just that crazy thing you did in college will? No, actually, because there's a lot of girls coming out of here with a lot of traumatic experiences. You know, some women are saying now what we really need to do in order to like stop or at least diminish the amount of sexual assault on campus is to stop rape culture. What is meant by that? So rape culture is a term that really just tries to connect the dots between American society that turns this blind eye to sexual assault and the true experience of girls which is that they are experiencing a lot of sexual assault. So you know this rape culture is a culture where the rape myths that a woman's outfit or alcohol consumption has caused her rape and nobody questions these attitudes that box in the victim like nobody says, it doesn't matter the, you were dressed a certain way, or doesn't matter how much you drank. They say, well, victims are kind of weak and they can lie and maybe they're just crazy or maybe they're gold. Here's all these reasons why a woman would make up this story. Maybe she's just trying to lie so she didn't get in trouble with her boyfriend, etc. So what we really see about rung, this young generation is this refusal to participate in that culture and also very differently than than the nineties. When I was in college back then of course, we talked about sexual assault a lot in the early nineties during, you know that PC era. But what we were taught, his carry me go to a self defense class, right? Protect yourself because boys will be boys and the best you can do is make sure that your safe on your own. Now these girls are saying, no, it's not our problem. It's your problem, right? And their signs will say things like, don't get raped. And then though cross out some of the words, so it's don't rape. No, it's boys who have to change. It's the into tuitions that have to change. This is about institutional accountability. Let's talk about the message that young men and women are getting from pop feminism. And I'll use beyond say as an example here. I mean, she is a symbol of empowerment to so many women. So many men and women just I mean, adore her understandably at the same time in so many of her concerts over the years. She's she's dressed in very sexualize clothing, and a lot of the clothing it's in. This is true of a lot of women like Popstars and hip hop stars. It's it's very sexualize in kind of designed to call attention to the most sexual areas of the body. So you know, you could see it one way like to sign of my sexual empowerment, or you could see it another way. I'm offering myself to you as an. Object as a sexual opt as somebody I want you to look at me sexually. I want you to see my power as being sexual power or at least partly sexual power. And I am inviting you to really focus your gaze on the most sexual parts of my body. And again, you can see that as empowerment or you could see that as objectification and I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts about that or if that's an issue that Cam up a lot when talking to young women on campuses. Well, it certainly not an issue that came up when I spoke with the young women because they completely believe it's empowering, but it's an issue that came up a lot for me because I found myself really torn between those two ideas is empowering or is this denigrating and being somebody who comes from second wave feminism, I am. My knee jerk reaction is like you guys were calling this self objectification. Isn't that just. A ruse, isn't that a some way you're justifying this kind of way that you're, you're presenting yourself, but after speaking to so many of these students, I truly changed my mind about that because I realized like this is how they grew up. You know, these kids that I interviewed in college just graduating now, you know Britney Spears was like it. They were. They were just tiny. When Britney Spears without the culture has been so saturated with sacks the entire time that they've been growing up. They've been growing up around pornography around fashion that is much much scant ear than anything that I grew up with. So they don't have the same ideas about Ovalles dressed this way. It makes me look like a slut because this is the way people dress now they're such a casual way, and you're right. And a lot of concerts of beyond say or. Katy Perry riana, you know, it's it's crossing a line way from scanty to something makes really sexual, but this is what they believe is empowering to them. Now we have all sorts of data also saying that they have huge amount of nervousness about it, and they feel anxious and depressed if guys don't like their social media posts, etc. So there's there's a flip side to that, but they were adamant with me that this was only to the good way that they were presenting themselves. You right in your book, we're in the process of developing new power dynamics in the bedroom, an area where feminism has previously not been able to reach. So just explain what you mean by that. I think this raising of demons that has been going on through the metoo era is allowing women not only to say these are the things that happened to me in the past that I might call sexual assault, or I might just call things I was in. Extremely uncomfortable with and now going into the future, I want to be treated differently in the bedroom. I want to be asked what I want. I want to be able to say no tonight and have that actually be heard. I think that behavior always kind of lives behind attitude shift were definitely in the attitude shift now, but I truly believe that that kind of most private act is beginning to shift Vanessa Gregorio. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you so much Terry. Vanessa Gregorio is the author of blurred lines sex power and consent on campus. After a break, Ken Tucker will review a new album by Hazel dickens and Alice Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from each raid. Are you ready to make moves with your money, invest with each raid and you'll see how simple investing can be? No. You're your level of experience each raids, easy to use platform keeps you in the know about your money every step of the way, but it's not just their platform that sets them apart. Each rate has the people to offer guidance and support to make your money work hard for you for more information, visit each raid dot com. Slash NPR each rate, securities, LLC member. FINRA as IPC Hazel dickens and Alistair ARD. Each had a successful folk music career before they started recording together, the country and bluegrass music. They loved Emmylou Harris Rosanne cash and AO me Judd have all cited dickens and Gerard as inspirational performers. And now we can hear the birth of their musical partnership on sing me back home, the DC tapes, nineteen sixty five to nineteen sixty nine rock critic, Ken Tucker. Has this review. Told

assault rape Yale NPR Vanessa Gregorio Addis fraud D.C George W Bush Ken Tucker Obama Brad Kavanagh Britney Spears Google Hazel dickens Cavanaugh Vanessa Gregorio America Wesleyan contributing editor New York Times magazine
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio, author of the new book blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. So let's talk about the definition of sexual assault. And how that is maybe changing what was the kind of common understanding of the definition of sexual assault in the three years. You were talking to people on college campuses. There was a huge shift in the definition of sexual assault from like two thousand fourteen to seventeen while I was there. And I watched as it happened many students said to me that they weren't sure if groping counted as sexual assault. Maybe it had to be penetration by the end of those three years that idea was completely blown out of the water. And I even had students say to me. You know, sexual assault is maybe even the way you speak to people the way, you a grass on people in speech and make them feel like Justice like dirty like a sexual object. They were thinking through this idea. How far can we actually take this? So. Is there? No, commonly held understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is now. I don't think that there's a national understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is I think that people who are enlightened about this issue understand that it doesn't have to include penetration. But I think that part of why good part of the country is in line with Trump on this issue is that we don't have a national definition. So you also say that the definition of consent is being redefined and this Logan used to be no means, no. But now as yes means Yes, What's the difference between no means? No. And yes means yes. While there's a huge difference something like s means. Yes is okay. Until you get some sort of. Yes. You don't really have permission to touch somebody. Now. A yes. In the college definition could be verbal or it could be they like to call it acts unmistakable and their meaning, which is suppose means a Mon are grown or pulling off clothes etcetera. And from looking at this and researching it I didn't agree with this at the outset. But I came convinced that this is a really good standard for young people, and perhaps for older people as well. Certainly anybody who's in a workplace who might have a crush on somebody else. You know, you gotta ask a question because you could be misinterpreting signals people do that all the time. So why were you resistant to this? Yes means. Yes. Standard. And why did you change your mind? Well, I'm an adult. You know, I'm in my forties. And I know that that's not the way sex usually happens between sexes something. As unspoken. That's kind of energy between people and more exciting in some ways when it's like that. You know, we see a lot of young people who are having sex with people that they met on dating apps. They barely know. These people that's part of the titillation part of the charge. But I'm not so doctrinaire that I think you should have to say yes to each escalating base or sexual act, which is the way a lot of people. Think of. Yes means yes. But I do think that a question is not that big a deal in China. We had the question, you know. Should I get a condom which was always kind of a question about protection? But it was really oppression question. The really hostile be an extra question. You read that the strongest argument for affirmative consent for. Yes means yes is that it frees girls from the cage of socialized politeness. What do you mean? Well, one of the complexities of sexual assault. Is that girls? Don't always say. No, they certainly don't say it that way. No get away from me. I'm pushing you away. Right. They say, well, maybe another time. I don't think I wanna do this tonight until band up giving up some of the most interesting work that's being done now in terms of trying to fix this problem is about girls understanding the signals from people who might in Trenton them harm and removing themselves from the room before anything actually happens because people understand once they're in the room. It's really hard to get out. Well, you know, the thing about yes means yes, there's a lot of people say, oh, that's so awkward to kind of have these like rules like almost like a questionnaire. Like, I authorize you to like, you know, take off my shirt or whatever. But it's equally awkward, I think for the woman to be in the place where the man is making all these advances, and you have to say, no, no, no stop. No. I really mean stop. No, carry all leave. It just puts the responsibility on her. And it makes it like, really. Awkward, and it's not a shared awkwardness. It's like one person having the full burden of the awkwardness. Exactly. So this is a little dorky. Okay. But it definitely changes things. I mean, I went to a dance party like to go out and danton may recently guys try to come up and dance with you. And you try to get away and this guy came up, and he was about to put his arm around me. And then he said is it? Okay. If I put my arm around here, and I said, no, no because I didn't want his arm around me. And he said, oh, yeah. I get it consent. I'm I totally get it. I understand. I'm glad I asked was that the first time that happened here. That was definitely the first time happen today. I mean, I. Yeah. I didn't think that that man intended me harm. But I didn't want his arm around me. I had no interest in him. I married. I was just there with my girlfriends having a good night and dancing. So I think that's a. Great thing to how that happen to have young girls who truly. You know are in nightclubs or at dance parties a law understand like this is my body. I own people have to ask permission to touch it. My guest is Vanessa Gregorio, author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. We'll talk more after a break, Ken Tucker will review an early recording by Hazel dickens analysis. Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass and Justin Chang will review. I man starring Ryan Gosling as astronaut Neil Armstrong the first human to walk on the moon. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air..

assault Vanessa Gregorio Terry gross Ken Tucker Hazel dickens Ryan Gosling Trump Logan China Trenton Gerard danton Justin Chang Neil Armstrong three years
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

"It wasn't a law, but it was a letter of guidance about how colleges should go about trying to handle accusations of sexual assault. And this was built on title nine. And so explain what title nine is which was passed as a small part of a larger piece of legislation signed by president, Nixon in nineteen seventy two. So title nine is just short law that nobody in university should be discriminated against on the basis of gender, and I knew it in the nineties as a law that would protect women's sports, which of course it doesn't. And this argument about whether title nine should cover, sexual assault has been going on for many years, President Trump secretary of education. Betsy DeVos is changing the guidelines for sexual assault on campus and tell us about the changes that she's making or is on the verge of making. That's DeVos has been very concerned about the due process in a campus courts. She has also made it fairly clear that she is aligned with Trump in believing that this is a scarier time for boys. So she is quite concerned about the accused students and thinks that. You know, I mean, you just had to her deputy set it to the New York Times. You know, ninety percent of the cases that they're seeing involve just regret. It sucks. So DeVos is concerned about due process rights. She's concerned about false accusations. She's also concerned that Obama imposed these mandates by Fiat, even though they were guidance, he really did have the office for civil rights. Try to go to universities and say, open up your books. I wanna see how you've been deciding these sexual assault cases, and I'm here now and this is serious. So she's really backed off of sending the OCR out. But for the students, really the most important thing is that she may change this definition of sexual assault, which had previously been something kind of vague about unwelcome contact. And you know, various colleges had interpreted what sexual assault was on their own. Now she's interested. In saying, okay, what would count it needs to be something that is severe improvise of enough to deprive us student of education. So what would happen if it was a one-off sexual assault like Blasi fort described upon over close a hand on the mouth, quote, unquote in nothing happened, even though she or she is thinking about it years later, she was afraid should be smother to death. She was afraid that she was going to be killed unintentionally mother today. Yeah. And she was prevented from leaving. So is Betsy DeVos trying to say title nine, which mandates against gender discrimination on campus needs to be applied to discrimination against men because so many men are being wrongfully accused as that her case that is exactly what you're saying. Yeah, she's interested in this idea of gender discrimination coming both ways. So have her guidelines, they're gonna affect yet? No, they haven't. They were leaked to the New York Times on. There will be notice and comment period. You know, we have to see also if she's going to put these out. These were draft that the times got their hands on. So let's talk about the definition of sexual assault and how that is maybe changing. What was the kind of common understanding of the definition of sexual assault in the three years you were talking to people on college campuses. There was a huge shift in the definition of sexual assault from like two thousand fourteen to seventeen while I was there, and I watched as it happened. Many students said to me that they weren't sure if groping counted as sexual assault. Maybe it had to be penetration by the end of those three years. That idea was completely blown out of the water. And I even had students say to me, you know, sexual assault is maybe even the way you speak to people the way you aggress on people in speech and make them feel like just us like dirty like a sexual object. I mean, they were thinking through this idea, how far can we actually take this. So is there no commonly held understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is? No. I don't think that there's a national understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is. I think that people who are enlightened about this issue understand that it doesn't have to include penetration, but I think that part of why good part of the country is in line with Trump on this issue is that we don't have a national definition. So you also say that the definition of consent is being redefined, and this Logan used to be no means no, but no, as yes means. Yes. What's the difference between no means? No. And yes means yes. While there's a huge difference. Something like yes means yes is okay until you get some sort of. Yes. You don't really have permission to touch somebody now a, yes, you know, in the college definition could be verbal or it could be they like to call it acts unmistakable in their meaning, which I suppose means a Mon or a grown or pulling off clothes, etcetera. And from looking at this in researching it, I didn't agree with this at the outset, but I came convinced that this is a really good standard for young people and perhaps for older people as well. Certainly anybody who's in a workplace who might have a crush on somebody else. You know, you got to ask a question because you could be misinterpreting signals. People do that all the time. So. Why were you resistant to this? Yes means yes. Standard. And why did you change your mind. Well, I'm an adult. You know, I'm in my forties and I know that that's not the way sex usually happens. Mean sexes, something as unspoken, that's kind of energy between people and more exciting in some ways when it's like that, you know, we see a lot of young people who are having sex with people that they met on dating apps. They barely know these people home. That's part of the titillation part of the charge, but an I'm not so doctrinaire that I think that you should have to say yes to each escalating base or sexual act, which is the way a lot of people think of, yes, means yes. But I do think that a question is not that big a deal in genetics. We had the question, you know, should I get a condom? Which was always kind of a question about production, but it was really a permission question, the really hot. Custody an extra question. You read that the strongest argument for affirmative consent for yes, means yes. Is that it frees girls from the cage of socialized politeness. What do you mean. Well, one of the complexities of sexual assaults is that girls don't always say, no, they certainly don't say it that way. No. Get away from me. I'm pushing you away, right? They say, well, maybe another time I don't think I want to do this tonight until band up. Giving up, you know, some of the most interesting work that's being done now in terms of trying to fix this problem is about girls understanding the signals from people who might in Trenton them harm and removing themselves from the room before anything actually happens because people understand once they're in the room, it's really hard to get out. We, you know, the thing about, yes means, yes, there's a lot of people say, oh, that's so awkward to kind of have these like rules, like almost like a questionnaire like I authorize you to like, you know, take off my shirt or whatever, but it's equally awkward. I think, for the woman to be in the place where the man is making all these advances and you have to say, no, no, no, stop. No, I really mean stop. No. Okay. I'll leave. It just puts the responsibility on her and it makes it like really awkward, and it's not a shared awkwardness. It's like one person having the full. Burden of the awkwardness. Exactly. So this is a little dorky. Okay. But it definitely changes things. I mean, I went to a dance party like to go out and dance at night recently. You know, guys try to come up and dance with you and you try to get away. And this guy came up and he was about to put his arm around me. And then he said, is it okay if I put my arm around you? And I said, no. No, because I didn't want his arm around me and he said, oh, yeah, I get it consent. I totally get it. I understand. I'm glad I asked was the first time that happened here. That was definitely the first time that it happened to me. I mean, I e, yeah, I didn't think that that man intended me harm, but I didn't want his arm around me. I no interest in him. I married. I was just there with my girlfriends having a good night and dancing. So I think that's a. Great thing to how that happen to have young girls who truly, you know, are in night clubs or at dance parties, allot understand, like this is my body I own it. People have to ask permission to touch it. My guest is Vanessa Gregorio Addis, author of blurred lines sex, power and consent on campus. We'll talk more after a break. Ken Tucker will review an early recording by Hazel dickens analysis, Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass and Justin Changle review. I man starring Ryan Gosling as astronaut, Neil Armstrong, the first human to walk on the moon. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air support for this podcast. And the following message come from TIAA TIAA supports people who are driven by purpose. Those who build others, instead of just wealth who give back and never give up whatever your purpose may be. TIAA will help you live your definition of success. Yes, whether you have five hundred dollars or five million TIAA will get you where you want to be with investing advice, banking and retirement planning. Start today at TIAA dot org. This week, the history gay person come

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"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross, the cavenaugh hearings and confirmation raise the question. Again. How do we decide who to believe when a woman says she was sexually assaulted by someone she knows behind a closed door. And the man denies it doesn't issue universities have been grappling. With my guest. Vanessa Gregorio is the author of blurred lines, sex power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports, she says that while writing the book, she witnessed a historic moment when survivors move from the shadows to the spotlight I on campus, and then nationwide with the metoo movement Gregorio is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award Vanessa Gregorio, welcome to fresh air. No. You're right. Reading your book that there's a new understanding of what rape and sexual assault means that started on college campuses. But with the metoo movement, it's spread beyond campuses. What do the cavenaugh hearings and confirmation tell you about how far that new understanding has spread? I guess what I'm asking you is this if if the Republican senators in the judiciary committee had gone to college campuses. What do you think some of the things are of they would have been told about what what did take into consideration before voting? Things that they might not have thought of and Barbara's. The Republicans judiciary were men. A lot of them were older men if their college days, we're very different in terms of thinking about sexual assault. Yeah. If those senators had Ben on college campuses as president Sor administrators or title nine officers. They would have had a completely different set of questions. Right because they would have already known what college campuses know about sexual assault, which is very few women make it up. Very few women are excited to get there. And report and feel like this is their moment in the limelight. Something like not having reported for many years is not a big deal, most sexual assault survivors, don't actually report for awhile. And they would know that they might not actually get a lot of evidence because there's very rarely good evidence. In many of these cases, particularly those that happened thirty six years ago. So they have to look at the credibility of each person last Tuesday. While the FBI investigation was still going on into Brett Cavanaugh. President Trump spoke to reporters on the south one of the White House before boarding a flight. This was active over second. And so this this was before the Senate voted on the cabinet nomination for the supreme court before they confirmed him. So this is President Trump while I say that.

assault Vanessa Gregorio President Trump Terry gross judiciary committee FBI New York Times magazine Brett Cavanaugh president contributing editor Senate White House Barbara rape Ben Vanity Fair thirty six years three years
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from internet essentials from Comcast, connecting more than six million low income people to low cost, high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more now they're ready for anything from WHYY in Philadelphia. I'm Terry gross with fresh air. Brett Kavanagh is now Justice Cavanaugh, but Americans are still divided over who to believe. How do we proceed when a woman's accusation of sexual assault is countered by a man's denial? This is an issue. Universities have been grappling with today with talk with Vanessa, Gregorios author of blurred lines, rethinking sex power and consent on campus. When she was in college in the ninety, s women were told to protect themselves by carrying Mace and learning self defense today. Many women on campus are saying, no, it's not our problem. It's your problem. No, it's boys who have. A change. It's the institutions that have to change. Also, Kentucky reviews an early recording by Hazel dickens. Alice, Gerard who brought a feminist perspective to bluegrass and Justin Chang reviews. I man. Support for this podcast comes from the Neubauer family foundation supporting WHYY's fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation. The cavenaugh hearings and confirmation raise the question again, how do we decide who to believe when a woman says she was sexually assaulted by someone she knows behind a closed door and the men denies it. That's an issue. Universities have been grappling with my guest. Vanessa Gregorios is the author of blurred lines sex power and consent on campus over the course of three years. She interviewed one hundred twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports. She says that while writing the book she witnessed a historic moment when survivors moved from the shadows to the spotlight, I on campus and then nationwide with the metoo movement. Google Riyadh is a contributing editor at the near term. Magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award, Vanessa, Grigory, oddest, welcome to fresh air. You write in your book that there's a new understanding of what rape and sexual assault means that started on college campuses, but with the metoo movement, it's spread beyond campuses. What do the Cavanaugh hearings and confirmation tell you about how far that new understanding has spread? I guess what I'm asking you is this if if the Republican senators in the judiciary committee had gone to college campuses, what do you think some of the things are they would have been told about what to take into consideration before voting. Things that they might not have thought of in part pass. The Republicans on judicial were men. A lot of them were older men. If you know their college days, we're very different in terms of thinking about sexual assault? Yeah. If those senators had been on college campuses as presidents or administrators or title nine officers, they would have had a completely different set of questions, right? Because they would have already known what college campuses know about sexual assault, which is very few women make it up. Very few women are excited to get there and report and feel like this is their moment in the limelight, something like not having reported for many years is not a big deal. Most sexual assault survivors don't actually report for awhile and they would know that they might not actually get. A lot of evidence because there's very rarely good evidence in many of these cases, particularly those that happened thirty six years ago. So they have to look at the credibility of each person. Last Tuesday while the FBI investigation was still going on into Brett Cavanaugh President Trump spoke to reporters on the south lawn of the White House before boarding a flight. This was lactobacillus second. And so this this was before the Senate voted on the Cavanaugh nomination for the supreme court before they confirmed him. So this is President Trump. Very scary time for young men in America. When you can be guilty of something that you may not be guilty of, which is a very, very, is a very difficult time. What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a supreme court Justice. It really does. You could be somebody that was perfect, your tire life, and somebody could accused you of something doesn't necessarily have to be a woman as everybody's, but somebody could accuse you of something and your auto Mattingly guilty. But in this realm, you are truly guilty until proven innocent. That's one of the very, very bad things as thick in place right now. President Trump has, you know, kind of made fun of Bozzi Ford, and he said that her accusations were a hoax, a democratic hoax. So this is interpretation here. But what message do you think that ascending women who've been harassed, assaulted or raped? And I wonder if you've been talking to students if you've gone back to any of the students you interviewed for your book and ask them about the impact of the Cavanaugh hearings. Yeah. I have spoken to students that were in my book and the survivors are absolutely devastated. Horrified. By what Trump said. I think that they found a lot of the Trump presidency to be in their word triggering. And this is certainly part of it to watch a woman be just cast to the side just waved away when she went to the Senate. I think that that is your personal worst nightmares that I would sit there and be publicly humiliated. Remember there's so much shame that a lot of survivors carry about what happened to them. And this historic moment that we're in is about raising the team ends casting off the shame. You know, it's a really extra schism for them. So to have it be so publicly, the clock turned back has been extremely upsetting. So

President Trump assault Vanessa Gregorios Cavanaugh WHYY Justice Cavanaugh Senate Comcast Terry gross Brett Kavanagh Philadelphia Brett Cavanaugh Kentucky Hazel dickens Mace Neubauer family foundation Google Vanity Fair Riyadh judiciary committee
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:16 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. Let's get back to my interview with Vanessa Gregorio, author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred and twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports, Google Oreos is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award part of her book is about the culture of fraternities and the frat parties that often lead to binge drinking one other fraternities you write about in your book is delta Kappa Epsilon known as Dc decay e which is at Yale George W Bush was a part of that fraternity. And so was Brad Kavanagh? Why did you decided to look at at Dc? And what did you learn about it in terms of the sexual environment? Well, I think the at the time that Cavanaugh is there. It was actually a pretty uncool thing to be part of it was a repository of future power and people like once you've just described were in it. But nobody who wasn't an deep cared about deep. But over the years since the eighties frauds have become very popular on American campuses millennials. They like to join things on your social network is so important right now in terms of moving forward getting a job being Dc from yell that could maybe really help you. You know, we seeing students really join up with the Greek system. So the famous story with Dc is the story in the early two thousand tens where a group of pledges were marching across campus went to the women's center. Whereupon the chanted. No means yes. Yes. Means anal and. Some of the students who were yell at the time. Really thought that this was the straw. That broke the camel's back for them. In terms of the way, girls were being treated on the campus. And they ended up filing title nine complaint with office for civil rights about yell, and particularly Dc and was the first one that was filed during this kind of two thousand eleven Obama time when Obama said yes students, tell us what's happening. We want to hear from you. What's going on on your campuses? So it was a very important part of that history. What are some of the ways colleges? College administrators are trying to deal with fraternities and with the binge drinking at fraternity parties. There are some universities who have moved pledging either into January or they've moved it to sophomore year entirely because they realize that, you know, having kids start to pledge. In september. When the sexual assault risk is the highest is just madness right now, you have kids pledging a fraud, and who knows what kind of dares. They're to be told to take and they're gonna be getting wasted every night as our hazed. I mean, this is just hideous. So I think there are some fraud are are trying to bring in courses about sexual assault. Trying to be more enlightened about it. I- fraternity expensively sure there are some fraternities or doing that. Yeah. Definitely. I wrote excessively about Wesleyan where I went to school which is not exactly known as a fraud haven, but there were a bunch of frauds there. And while I was reporting the book. They Wesleyan decided to shut the all of those products down. So I didn't know this 'til I read your book, but sororities are by the Greek code, or whatever it is sorority is aren't allowed to serve alcohol at their parties. Only fraternities can do that. And that's kind of unequal status right there. Because it means that it's the men on campus who are going to control the party atmosphere since people expect alcohol at parties. Oh, absolutely. I mean, this is the key issue that universities hub, boys. Still really dominate the social scene on college campuses. Not only are one in six American boys. Go to four year colleges are in France. Now, which is a population that's up by half in the last decade, guys. Get the kegs right guys by the drugs. You can't even have parties sororities in. America. That's the Panhellenic rule. So the guys get to have the parties at their houses. They set the rules and they set the costume theme. And the theme is always something like little mermaid for the girls to come really scantily clothed. So I was just kind of shocked that the animal house ethos, which we used to think was just a small sliver of the American college experience. And almost a joke has really spread out across America where you can just do whatever you want to do. And then when it's over it's all scrubbed. And it's just that crazy thing you did in college. Well, no, actually because there was a lot of girls coming out of here with a lot of traumatic experiences. You know, some women are saying now, I what we really need to do in order to like stop, or at least diminish the amount of sexual assault on campus is to stop rape culture. What is meant by that? So rape culture is a term that really just tries to connect the dots between an American society that turns this blind eye to sexual assault and the true experience of girls, which is that they are experiencing a lot of sexual assault. So, you know, this rape culture is culture where rape myths that a woman's outfit or her alcohol consumption has caused her rape. And nobody questions these attitudes that box and the victim. Like, nobody says it doesn't matter. The you were dressed a certain way or doesn't matter. How much you drank? They say well victims are kind of weak, and they can lie, and maybe they're just crazy or maybe they're gold diggers, all these reasons why a woman would make up the story, maybe she's just trying to lie. So she doesn't get in trouble with her boyfriend, etc. So what we really see about rung? This young generation is this refusal. All to participate in that culture and also very differently than than the nineties when I was in college back, then of course, we talked about sexual assault a lot in the early nineties during that PC era. But what we were taught is carry me go to a self defense class, right? Protect yourself because boys will be boys and the best. You can do is make sure your safe on your own. Now, these girls are saying, no, it's not our problem. It's your problem rain and their signs will say things like don't get raped. And then though cross out some of the words. So it's don't rape. No. It's boys who have to change. It's the into tuitions that have to change this is about institutional accountability. Let's talk about the message that young men and women are getting from pop feminism. And I'll use beyond say as an example here. I mean, she is a symbol of empowerment to so many women so many men and women just adore her understandably at the same time in so many of her concerts over the years. She's she's dressed in very sexualize clothing. And a lot of the clothing it's in this is true of a lot of women like Popstars and hip hop stars. It's it's very sexualize in kind of designed to call attention to the most sexual areas of the body. So you know, you could see it one way like to sign of my sexual empowerment, or you could see it another way I'm offering myself to you as an object as a sexual opt as somebody I want you to look at me sexually I want you to see my power as being sexual power. Or at least partly sexual power. And I am inviting you to really focus your gaze on the most sexual parts of my body. And again, you can see that as in power man, or you could see that as objectification. And I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts about that. Or if that's an issue that Cam up a lot when talking to young women on campuses. Well, it's certainly not an issue that came up when I spoke with the young women because they completely believe it's empowering, but it's an issue that came up a lot for me because I found myself really torn between those two ideas is this empowering or is this denigrating and being somebody who comes from second wave feminism. I am my knee jerk reaction is like you guys were calling the self objectification. Isn't that? Just a ruse isn't that just some way or justifying this kind of way that your your present? Yourself. But after speaking to so many of these students truly changed my mind about that. Because I realized like this is how they grew up these kids that I interviewed in college just graduating. Now, you know Britney Spears was like they were they were just tiny when Britney Spears without the culture has been. So saturated with sacks the entire time that they've been growing up. They've been growing up around pornography around fashion that is much much scanty or than anything that I grew up with. So they don't have the same ideas about Ovalles dressed this way. It makes me look like a slut because this is the way people dress. Now, there's such a casual way, and you're right in a lot of concerts of beyond say or Katy Perry Riyadh. I, you know, it's it's crossing a line way from scanty to something makes really sexual but. This is what they believe is empowering to them. Now, we have all sorts of data also seeing that they have huge amount of nervousness about it. And they feel anxious and depressed, if guys don't like their social media, posts, etc. So there's there's a flip side to that. But they were adamant with me that this was only to the good that they were presenting themselves. So you're writing your book, we're in the process of developing new power dynamics in the bedroom an area where feminism has previously not been able to reach. So I just explain what you mean by that. I think this raising of demons that has been going on three the metoo era is allowing women not only to say these are the things that happened to me in the past that I might call sexual assault or I might just call things. I was extremely uncomfortable with and now going into the future I want to be treated differently in the bedroom. I want to be. Asked what I want? I want to be able to say no tonight and have that actually be heard I think behavior always kind of lives behind attitude shift definitely in the other to shift now, but I truly believe that that kind of most private act is beginning to shift Vanessa Gloria Artis. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you so much Terry Vanessa Gregorio is the author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. After a break, Ken Tucker will review a new album by Hazel, dickens,.

assault rape fraud Dc Terry gross Brad Kavanagh Vanessa Gregorio Google Cavanaugh Britney Spears George W Bush America Terry Vanessa Gregorio contributing editor New York Times magazine Obama Vanessa Gloria Artis Ken Tucker
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:42 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Michael continues to wreak havoc through the Gulf Coast region. The wind was so strong trees you can hear this about every tree cracking in breaking in the Wayne just hitting up against the house. Is you could tell it was something major. I melt the Chang the latest on the historic deadly hurricane this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news, weekdays starting at four on WNYC. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with the nessa Gregorio Artis author of the new book blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. So let's talk about the definition of sexual assault. And how that is maybe changing what was the kind of common understanding of the definition of sexual assault. In the three years. You were talking to people on college campuses. There was a huge shift in the definition of sexual assault from like two thousand fourteen to seventeen while I was there. And I watched as it happened many students said to me that they weren't sure if groping counted as sexual assault. Maybe it had to be penetration by the end of those three years that idea was completely blown out of the water. And I even had students say to me. You know, sexual assault is maybe even the way you speak to people the way, you a grass on people in speech and make them feel like Justice like dirty like a sexual object. I mean, they were thinking through this idea. How far can we actually take this? So. Is there? No, commonly held understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is now. I don't think that there's a national understanding of what the definition of sexual assault is I think that people who are enlightened about this issue understand that it doesn't have to include penetration. But I think that part of why good part of the country is in line with Trump on this issue is that we don't have a national definition. So you also say that the definition of consent is being redefined and this Logan used to be no means, no. But now as yes means Yes, What's the difference between no means? No. And yes means yes. While there's a huge difference. Something like yes means. Yes is okay. Until you get some sort of. Yes. You don't really have permission to touch somebody. Now. A yes. In the college definition could be verbal or it could be they like to call it acts unmistakable and their meaning which is supposed means a Mon are grown pulling off clothes etcetera. And from looking at this in researching it, I didn't agree with this at the outset. But I came convinced that this is a really good standard for young people, and perhaps for older people as well. Certainly anybody who's in a workplace who might have a crush on somebody else. You gotta ask a question because you could be misinterpreting signals people do that all the time. So why were you resistant to this? Yes means. Yes. Standard. And why did you change your mind? Well, I'm an adult. You know, I'm in my forties. And I know that that's not the way sex usually happens means taxes, something as unspoken that's kind of energy between people and more exciting in some ways when it's like that. You know, we see a lot of young people who are having sex with people that they met on dating apps. They barely know these people that's part of the titillation part of the charge. But I'm not so doctrinaire that I think the you should have to say yes to each escalating base or sexual act, which is the way a lot of people. Think of. Yes means yes. But I do think that a question is not that big a deal. In china? We had the question, you know. Should I get a condom which was always kind of a question about production? But it was really a permission question. The really hostile be an extra question. You read that the strongest argument for affirmative consent for. Yes means yes is that it frees girls from the cage of socialized politeness. What do you mean? Well, one of the complexities of sexual assault. Is that girls? Don't always say. No, they certainly don't say it that way. No get away from me. I'm pushing you away. Right. They say, well, maybe another time. I don't think I want to do this tonight until the end up giving up some of the most interesting work that's being done now in terms of trying to fix this problem is about girls understanding the signals from people who might in Trenton them harm and removing themselves from the room before anything actually happens because people understand once they're in the room. It's really hard to get out. Well, you know, the thing about yes means yes, there's a lot of people say, oh, that's so awkward to kind of have these like rules like almost like a questionnaire. Like, I authorize you to like, you know, take off my shirt or whatever. But it's equally awkward, I think for the woman to be in the place where the man is making all these advances, and you have to say, no, no, no stop. No. I really mean stop. No, okay. I'll leave it just puts the responsibility on her. And it makes it like, really. Awkward, and it's not a shared awkwardness. It's like one person having the full burden of the awkwardness. Exactly. So this is a little dorky. Okay. But it definitely changes things. I mean, I went to a dance party. I like to go out and dance may recently guys try to come up and dance with you. And you try to get away and this guy came up, and he was about to put his arm around me. And then he said is it? Okay. If I put my arm around here, and I said, no because I didn't want his arm around me. And he'd say, oh, yeah. I get it consent. I totally get it. I understand. I'm glad I asked was that the first time that happened here. That was definitely I happened to me. I mean, I yeah. I didn't think that that man intended me harm. But I didn't want his arm around me. I had no interest in him. I married. I was just there with my girlfriends having a good night and dancing. So I think that's the. Great thing to have that happen to have young girls who truly. You know are in nightclubs or app dance parties a lot understand like this is my body. I own at people have to ask permission to touch it. My guest is Vanessa Gregorio Addis, author of blurred lines, sex, power and consent on campus. We'll talk more after a break, Ken Tucker will review an early recording by Hazel dickens analysis. Gerard who wrote a feminist perspective to bluegrass and Justin Chang will review? I man starring Ryan Gosling as astronaut Neil Armstrong the first human to walk on the moon. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air. Targeted for who. They are. He was murdered in new home. She should have been safe. She should have been protected murders of transgender women and men of color are on the rise. We've floor why they're being targeted and what's being done to protect them that conversation next time on the takeaway, weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM. WNYC supporters include Amazon prime video presenting a screening of the first two episodes of the Romanovs tonight at the landmark theatre at fifty. Seventh information and tickets at G O F O B, O dot com slash WNYC. If.

assault Gregorio Artis NPR WNYC Gulf Coast Wayne Michael Terry gross Ken Tucker Hazel dickens Ryan Gosling Trump Vanessa Gregorio Addis Logan china Justin Chang Amazon Gerard Trenton
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Know that New York opinionated in your face? I know what's best New York has nearly the lowest voter turnout in the entire country. Let's change that this election season together. Give us your questions voice. Your concerns we promised to get you the answers you need to choose to act to float stay with WNYC this election season. And let us know what's on your mind at WNYC dot org slash election. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross, the cavern hearings and confirmation raise the question. Again. How do we decide who to believe when a woman says she was sexually assaulted by someone she knows behind a closed door. And the man denies it. That's an issue. Universities have been grappling. With my guest. Vanessa Gregorio odyssey is the author of blurred lines, sex power and consent on campus over the course of three years, she interviewed one hundred twenty students from twenty universities spoke with nearly eighty administrators and experts and read dozens of case reports, she says that while writing the book, she witnessed a historic moment when survivors move from the shadows to the spotlight I on campus, and then nationwide with the metoo movement Gregorio is a contributing editor at the New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair and has won a national magazine award Vanessa Grigory oddest, welcome. To fresh air. No. You're writing your book that there's a new understanding of what rape and sexual assault means that started on college campuses. But with the metoo movement, it's spread beyond campuses. What do the cavenaugh hearings and confirmation tell you about how far that new understanding has spread? I guess what I'm asking you is this if if the Republican senators in the judiciary committee had gone to college campuses. What do you think some of the things are they would have been told about what what to take into consideration before voting? Things that they might not have thought of and the Republicans on judiciary were men. A lot of them were older men if their college days, we're very different in terms of thinking about sexual assault. Yeah. If those senators had been on college campuses as presidents or administrators or title nine officers. They would have had a completely different set of questions. Right because they would have already known what college campuses know about sexual assault, which is very few women make it up. Very few women are excited to get there. And report and feel like this is their moment in the limelight. Something like not having reported for many years is not a big deal, most sexual assault survivors, don't actually report for awhile. And they would know that they might not actually get a lot of evidence because there's very rarely good evidence. In many of these cases, particularly those that happened thirty six years ago. So they have to look at the credibility of each percent. Last tuesday. While the FBI investigation with still going on into Brett calving on President Trump spoke to reporters on the south lawn of the White House before boarding a flight. This was active over second. And so this this was before the Senate voted on the cabinet nomination for the supreme court before they confirmed him. So this is President Trump say that it's.

assault New York Vanessa Gregorio Trump Terry gross New York Times magazine judiciary committee President Vanessa Grigory FBI White House Senate contributing editor rape Brett Vanity Fair thirty six years three years
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Now that yoyo Ma is in his early sixties. He has recorded Bach's cello suites again and promises that this will be the last time. The new album is called six Volusia. Nhs. Like the solo violin partied is the cello suites. Each consist of six dance movements, alternating joy and solemnity six weeks, six movements. Each numerology can have a field day. Bach indicated no temple markings. So the speed of each movement is left completely up to the performer. My has always conveyed the music's lilting song fullness more than Casale ferocity. But in this latest evolution, MAs cello has a more speaking quality than his previous versions. He presents Bach as a wise and quietly spellbinding storyteller. Yoyo Ma gives each sweet a tidal nature at play journey to light celebration building struggle for hope, and finally, a Pippin. These titles underlying the way each sweet tells its own story, how each one finds its own way to balance dancing and lamentation. But then each one becomes a chapter in a bigger story, how all the Swedes taken together in larger and larger patterns of light and darkness gather all of us up the composer, the performer, and even the listener into a vast process of soul searching and discovery Lord Schwartz is the Frederick s Troy professor of English at the university of Massachusetts. Boston is most recent book of poems is called little kisses. He reviewed, yo, yo, MAs new recording of Bach's six cello suites called six Aleutians. Tomorrow on fresh air. My guest will be Vanessa. Gregorio Addis, author of blurred lines, rethinking sex power and consent on campus. We'll talk about how colleges are dealing with the issue of sexual assault, had a define it and how to decide who to believe when acusations are made, I hope will join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineers Audrey Bentham. Our associate producer for digital media is Molly seavy, nesper Roberta. Shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry gross.

Bach Yoyo Ma Fresh Air Volusia Lord Schwartz Terry gross Gregorio Addis Nhs Audrey Bentham Boston Frederick s Troy professor of Molly seavy producer Danny Miller Shorrock assault technical director executive producer university of Massachusetts
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

Weekend Edition Saturday

07:33 min | 2 years ago

Pot Breathalyzer: California Company Creates THC-Detecting Breathalyzer For Safer Roads

"Is weekend addition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The group Nexium says its mission is to quote raise human awareness and. Celebrate what it means to be human based in Albany it's attracted wealthy. Clients over the, years and promised personal and professional development. But federal prosecutors say the group is a criminal enterprise several members, have been charged with sex trafficking, racketeering and other crimes and, this includes the group's, leader Keith Rene and Allison Mack the actress last week four more women were charged and fluting an. Heiress to the Seagram's liquor fortune for. More about Nexium we're going to turn to Vanessa Gregorio she's been. Reporting on. The group for the New York Times. Magazine this Gregorios thanks. So much for being with us thanks for having? Me, so what are what are they promise which alluring well Nexium on the face of it is one of these intensive therapy outfits. That offers courses maybe. Last a. Weekend or several days twelve hours. A day very wealthy. People were involved in this rate you. Could spend too Eight hundred three hundred thousand. Dollars on. Their classes no problem they claimed that. They could help people. Overcome childhood trauma, a divorce by integrating? Is what? They, called it those experiences into their lives and they were using a form of hypnosis to help people see their way through these, terrible events in their. Lives and. It worked for a lot of. People by many accounts Yeah and, I mean? It's it's tempting to see if there any illusions? I, guess both, with s and let's say even Scientology do you see any I think this is squarely, in the tradition of on, self help, and certainly there's, a secret side to, it much like. Scientology where we are, now learning that there were some things going on in. This group that were. Extremely unsavory like what according to, the federal, prosecutors in your, own reporting. Well you know it's clear that the, group was demanding fealty not only to the ideas that they had but also to the leader, Keith Ranieri middle aged guy lived in. New York. All his life they called him vanguard and they believed. He was some sort of all being so behind. The scenes there was also, a lot of you know he had many many girlfriends and in the last couple of years he was using some. Of the women in the group to bring other women too His bed with what we think are pretty coercive tactics which, of course of tactic the women claimed to, other women that they could kind of move more quickly down their personal growth path if they joined this women's only international, self help? Group there was a man who is involved in. This, group and, it was the leader heath who knew much of what was going on he was in, at least one case if, not more, those women were, coming to his bed, and he was. Then seducing them additionally, of course the New York Times Brooklyn us that they. Were branded with a. Symbol that looks kind of like, a hieroglyph, indeed they actually, were his. Initials k. and r. and women were, not told that how how does this boorish in reprehensible behavior become sex trafficking sexual The argument that the prosecutors are making is that there, was coercive sacks here that. Some of the women were actually acting or specifically Alison math this actress she was coercing women into having. Sex with him and that she was indeed kind of, a Madam where she was bringing in these women and she was also getting some sort of financial benefit within the group from Keith. Himself to financial reward for sexual favors, financial reward for sexual favors exactly even after these charges, the group still operating well they've. Closed, down all, of their classes you cannot go to them anymore and try to work out your problems but even after the. News, came out of the New York Times about women being branded at least one hundred members stayed with the group they think that they have not Done anything wrong, and they believe that they'll be vindicated. Vanessa Grigory Addis contributing writer for the New York Times Sunday magazine thanks. So much for being with us thank you Scott police across the country are growing concerned, about stoned drivers behind the wheel thirty states and. Washington DC of legalized medical marijuana Nine of those plus the district have legalized recreational pot one California company now says it's made a major breakthrough in creating. What some thought of as a kind, of unicorn a marijuana Breathalyzer NPR's Eric westervelt has our story in, his downtown Oakland office Mike Lynn hold his creation in the palm of his hand device about the size of a large. Mobile phone with a small plastic tube and a slot for. A cartridge this is this, is a disposable cartridge. And there's a whole bunch of science in this in this Partridge but Lynn is not some, pipe-dream Stoner inventor the entrepreneurs also a. Practicing, ER, trauma, doctor in an active swat team medic he's seen. Firsthand sometimes devastating impact of drunk and. Drugged drivers. The CEO of hound labs the scientific device company he founded slips a new, cartridge into the pot Breathalyzer since starts to blow Indicator Barr show whether the machine detects any THC the psychoactive, component in pond tools now, on the market to German marijuana use tests blood saliva or urine. Those devices can take days for. Result and they can't tell whether a person has smoked a half. Hour ago or eight days ago THC dissolves in fat so it can stay in your body up to a month, after us but Dr Lynn says his company's device detects whether someone has smoked, pot in, the last two hours what's considered the peak impairment window it accurately does that he says by measuring the mere presence of THC molecules in parts per trillion in. Your breath and that's in contrast to, alcohol which is parts per thousand THC is something like a billion, times less concentrated than alcohol that's why it hasn't been done before because it really is hard the company hopes to have. The Breathalyzer ready for sale by early next year a handful. Of police departments including Boston, plan to work with. Hound labs to test the device starting this fall for law enforcement there issue Is trying to figure out who's potentially impaired versus hey. Who somebody who smoked maybe yesterday, is not impaired they're interested in it providing objective data for them at the roadside just. Like they have for alcohol but a big problem there's still no. Scientific or legal consensus on what amount of THC equals functional impairment that matters, to the courts only seven, states have set basic legal guidelines as to how much THC in. The system makes you dangerous behind. The wheel Harvest a stylish dispensary in San Francisco's, mission district David downs. Does some market research Roma which is really scrumptious the California bureau chief for the cannabis news site lethally has. His nose in a jar of Indika dominant hybrid buds.

New York Times Marijuana Mike Lynn Scott Simon California NPR Seagram Vanessa Gregorio New York Albany Racketeering Keith Ranieri Keith Rene Allison Mack Boston Vanessa Grigory Addis San Francisco
"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"vanessa gregorio" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"Vanessa gregorio addis the author of the article was kind enough to join me on the podcast a knowing i would say my issues with the article i soon do his best to be honest and see if she had regrets or feelings on how the coverage may be different today when i read it i treated twice in the last couple of weeks god gang now i mean it for firm me if it fell lake it lacked any sense of empathy towards her i agree i agree on people really were angry about oh interesting yeah i hear from on offer it head on young carry out i would not email apathetic tori tear bayden young sorry to at her to find what you mean low youngsters while i'm talking about people who are hunting up in turn on him while right now like makoni are all um uh i think you know look at me mad not my poor attache on a b i talking at her as you know up cultural break down and not necessary at mandativu all their him interview with britain will story at right around i tried to stick to my basic question by way of context you'll hear vanessa mentioned one line in which she describes brittany as a quote inbred swamp thing is there anything that you feel like you do differently now ten years later why do we abandon more on open to talking about her on at income tori mental disorder pain right head he is an allegorical figure in a follow accu paul terror on and you know practicing online kind of things that i hang about her being like an end brad swamp pain not or who i want everybody to now wake he made a ban of virgin get flowered for our immediate manpower right now is the time that he's going to like take control of the we all vanessa would go on to say that these days brittany would have more control of our own narrative celebrity her able to put their own story out there we whatever it is that they want people to see uh what has changed most recently is that public figures have a chance at creating their own narrative lady gaga demi lovato and other female stars are well respected for their willingness to share their own hardships with mental health on social media.

makoni britain demi lovato social media Vanessa gregorio addis brittany brad ten years