19 Burst results for "Valerie Lee"

Jacksonville teacher tries to buy meth on school grounds

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Jacksonville teacher tries to buy meth on school grounds

"The the school school teacher teacher in in Jacksonville Jacksonville faces faces drug drug charges charges after after getting getting arrested arrested in in a a sting sting while while at at school school Valerie Valerie Lee Lee friends friends thought thought she she was was in in contact contact with with a a drug drug dealer dealer actually actually was an undercover officer when she called from school to set up a methamphetamine purchase the arrest happened while she was at Jacksonville heights elementary school where she teaches first grade for teaching credentials have been

Jacksonville Officer School Teacher Valerie Valerie Lee Lee Methamphetamine Jacksonville Heights Elementar
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

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04:00 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"The media side have. I mean, I'm sure it does. But does it strongly have those issues as well? As far as a lot of it being white, dude, focus because I see more from the artists side where I definitely noticed the issue. But I've never really thought about if it's the same thing on the media side. I would say I mean, probably as much as any other industry, there is a level of it. But I think that from what I've noticed at least there's less of it in in the sense that I think a good media outlet respects different perspectives and different ways that people tell stories and the number one way to do that is to find people who are different, you know, like, you you get a different story when you are, you know, younger than that writer or you grew up in a different place in that writer, or if you look different than that writer. I think you just naturally will get a different story because you're looking at things differently and people talk to you about different things. So I think less in that way. But I mean. As every industry there. Yeah. Of course. And I think that's that's a good note. Just for anyone who thinks about getting into this industry. Right. Is that your perspective? And what you bring to the table is more valuable than almost anything else and your specific experiences. No one has that. But you so. Yeah. How much of what you do for your work is something that's pitched to you versus something that you personally, just say, I wanna write a story about this. And what do you look for when it is pitched you like what catches your your is? Yeah. I mean, I think definitely at this point care. It's a lot less of like what's pitched me versus like. Okay. I found that really interesting, and we're gonna go for it. And that's not to say that PR is important because there's a lot of Allieu in having somebody on your on your side working really hard on the PR side. But yeah, I think I just realized a long time ago that people. Are looking for stuff like this. You know, like they wanna hear the kind of off guard perspective of like an artist or story, or whatever it is. They don't need the same click bait copy paste post that has been fed out to a lot of people already. And it takes a lot more work to do stuff. Like that as I'm sure, you know. But I think the value is always so much higher. You know, like, you always get along people like when somebody comes out of something that you created wrote recorded, whatever. And they're like, wow. I really like never thought about it that way or like that's new to me that that's like, oh, I've done it. That's it. I'm good. I don't need anything else. But that or if they're like angry about if they don't agree with it. But they're like thinking about it differently. You're like cool. I don't agree with you. But like at least you're thinking about it differently. That's awesome too. So it's a human connection again. Right. Yeah. I think that's so valuable I'll wrap this up the only other thing I wanted to ask is this whole time while you were talking I've been thinking about the questions I ask a lot of artists on this show. And one thing we end up covering lot is sort of musical influences, and that sort of thing, but I'm curious if on urine were there writers who influenced you along the way or other outlets. You know, any big ones that really affected the way you thought about what? You did or change the way you thought about what you did. Yeah. We're even your life. Yeah. Definitely. I mean, there's a lot of really impressive music writers. But I think as you finish that question is that other people in your life, and it kind of always comes down to I mentioned before that like, my mom traveled a lot when she was when I was young and she took me with her, and my mom, actually is a professor of criminal Justice just kind of wild and her research specialization is in human trafficking, which is kind of crazy when you start thinking about it. And I grew up with that like a early exposure..

writer Allieu professor
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03:49 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"I mean, so on your side of it from the journalistic side, how how do you thread that needle of shining the light on either the originators or the p the roots of it or the people who aren't getting the shine that maybe they should be versus the popular stuff versus you know, what people I just have this hunger to consume. Yeah. I mean, I think it just comes down to respect. I guess I mean, it's been kind of a theme of what we've been talking about this whole time of like if you like if I go to a kid who like thinks techno people are all snobs. And I'm like, hey, like, I appreciate like what you like. And like I'd love to learn about it. And learn about why you are such a fan of it. I hope that that person would feel the same way about the other end. You know, they'll go and be like all right like fine. Like, I've never really understood techno. But at least I'll like try it out. And like learn about who Jeff mills is. Learn about who liked the Belleville three are like really like figure out like is is important to me. And you know, if it's not like cool. Whatever. That's fine. Because there's also that element of like those like there are people who like it's always going to be a little underground fine. It's not for everyone, which is kind of the cool part about it. You feel like you're part of something really special. Yeah. And I think that's just kind of at least it's worked for me bus far just kind of approach things that way like even Besic that. I don't listen to in my personal spare time, I, you know, talked to a lot of artists that make that kind of music and respect where they come from. How far how far they've had to trudge along to get there. So when I I guess I I agree with that. And I think that's a healthy attitude. Yeah. I guess the the point I keep thinking about it bothers me even doing this podcast. Like, I've had trouble not making this the white dude's talking show. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And it's both in terms of race ended terms of gender. I feel like there are that's a strong issue in dance music, probably all of music, but I feel like specifically dance music has kind of bad. Yeah. Even before when you were talking about that you felt like you're the anomaly in the room, and it's like a young woman in this group of older dudes is that something you've experienced in your own career as far as has it been have something's been harder. If people not taking you seriously. Yeah. I think I've definitely experienced my fair share of it. I'm thankful that. It hasn't been obviously hasn't affected me in a terribly negative way. Because I feel like I've gotten to where I wanna be actually thanks to the support of a lot of older guys seen the value of being like, all right? Like, I would like to bring this person in because I value like I know that they're younger, but also are willing to learn and can bring a lot of things to the table. And I. Will never never not. Appreciate that. But yeah, I mean, there's happens to all women. It's like you'll be the only one in the room, and like a guy will come around and shake. Everybody's hand except for yours. And you're like, it's fine. I work here this conference that you are attending. But it's fine. And they find out later, and they're like, oh my God. I'm so sorry didn't say Hello. And I'm like, really? Yeah. But I think it just comes down to like this conversation that we've had over the past year about, you know, paying attention to women in music has been really important. I think it definitely got to the point where I think a lot of women were like, I'm tired of talking about this, which is also really important to acknowledge respect. And, you know, don't don't like single out be like cheese, my favorite female DJ on your like, why are they not just your favorite DJ? They can be just a regular j too..

Jeff mills Belleville
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

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03:30 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"And thankfully, we were like we were in the backstage area. And we'd like just gotten there. Maybe like ten minutes later we heard like gunshots. I think you kind of really never know you don't can't prepare for them that like I think when we heard it. We were like wait does that really happening is that really what's going on fireworks? Like is it not? But I remember at the time when it happened. It must have been right ofter another mass shooting somewhere else. I think it was like very fresh in people's minds. So people started running right away. And we were like hiding in an area and just kind of like waiting to figure out like what was going on. It probably was only for a couple minutes. Yeah. Just yeah. You just can't really like prepare for a moment. Like that. Really? But we think got out. Okay. And like, I mean, if you don't know what happened. It was pretty terrible. Several people died security guards died. There was some terrorists that died as well. And I know friends who are also at the club who were in different parts of the club or had like really really really scary experiences. Where like they almost like got caught in a stampede. They saw things that were like pretty horrific. So yeah, I mean, I just feel really lucky that we were we got out. Okay. And it was fine. That's. I mean words kind of fail me in a way because it's so senseless, right? And it doesn't you know before. And after this thing is happened. And it's significant and it requires processing. But I don't know what you do with that. You know, the thing. Like, I remember after it happened. That was my first time in Mexico. And it was like you would think that I'd be like coming here. I never want to go there again like terrible place, which like I may never go to like Playa del Carmen again rush because it's like a little frightening to think about going back there. But I went back to Mexico like twice afterwards to like different cities. And I really had a lot of appreciation for people who had known about what happened, and they were like so eager to be like, it's not this way. You know, we have so much appreciation for this music. And we're like the people who put on these festivals have strong love for it. And yeah, I just think I mean, it's definitely something unfortunate. Ashby said like people should be aware that stuff like that happens. Certainly. I mean, it happens plenty in the states. Yeah. Exactly. So that's definitely one thing. Like, I you kinda take for granted. Like when you go to club or you go out. You're like I'm here. How fun like about anything? But like you kind of always have this moment of like, I'm gonna look around. And like do I feel safe here like my comfy here? Move. Yeah. I mean, it's it's one of those things where it's like that old name of lake you can't let the terrorists win. You know, if we start house, blah, blah, which is true. And I mean for me like I think about that kind of thing. And I mean, I'm lucky in that I have not been through that kind of experience. But I like to think that even if I did, you know, I would still be doing the same things. I'm doing right now. But you're right. That's smart. I mean, it's a weird time, and this I was just talking to together. And he was saying he literally I guess this like he has a thing about shooting like mass shootings, and it's like weighs on him. And he was saying he plays shows in kevlar vests now, and that's just like, wow..

Ashby Playa del Carmen Mexico ten minutes
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04:22 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"And why they reacted dance music in the ways that they do China's specifically as you mentioned I have been going to China since I was a kid like every single year to visit family and just re up on my Chinese language. And so it was a really interesting experience to go to China for the first time as a work trip, and then, you know, talk to people who've been working in the country trying to build up dance music culture there, and like, you know, creating these festivals. So that was really. Interesting thing because it all it comes down to just every single like every single part of culture affects the way that they receive this kind of music, for example, obviously, people know that China's quite restricted you can't go online freely in the same way that you can hear, you know, Facebook Instagram all blocked. And at the time, I didn't actually even know that soundcloud was also blocked YouTube all blocked China. So such a different experience base level. Yeah. So that was the craziest thing is realizing like that people weren't hearing from people in China simply because we were just living on different digital planets. You know, they're all these kids. Who were like, oh, yeah. I've been trying to learn how to produce. But like, I can't look up YouTube tutorials. I can't go on Facebook. And like message my favorite deejay, and I've also got my tracks uploaded. But no one hears them, except for people in China that like if you just think about it for a little bit is like so mind blowing that you're like, oh my God. Like, it's insane. How we got here insane. Yeah. Yeah. So to like be in the same room. And then also like realize the way that they appreciate like when an artist I come to their country. Like, I remember that year that I was there like scroll. Headlining festival and just like to see the way that those kids react to scroll IX because he's literally never there, and they have no access to him. Besides like, maybe at this point. He has like a we chat profile setup. But I doubt. It's like, I doubt. It's quite as updated as his regular Instagram him. I guess even the biggest artists probably still felt underground. Right. Yeah. Yeah. And just the way of like what's happening in China's underground like it's crazy to think about that. Like, what are we missing out on? No, that's such an interesting question to me because in the states there are plenty of of dance music stars from overseas, but not a ton from China that have broken over here. Yeah. Really, none at all. And I honestly don't feel qualified enough to talk about like what could be going on. But it's just I mean, even just thinking about the possibilities is really exciting. And then I remember another like important experience from that conference was I met a bunch of people who had come over from India to conference to just kind of meet people and be in the same room, and realizing that like India has apparently they've got like hundreds and hundreds of dialects, and you know, like to Indian people could be standing next to each other not be able to speak to each other. And the way that dance music, apparently like brings people together in that crazy way 'cause they they don't have to be disconnected because of language like just little things like. That like it sounds really cheesy. But it really makes you think and be like, okay. Like there is like a very important reason why we're all coming together. And having a music conference to talk about it. I think sometimes feels a little like, oh like is this just like a ego? Potty other on the back kind of thing. Massive, Tori, work. So if you really dig in and let those people come to you and tell you their stories like, that's really cool. It's so interesting to me the way other cultures perceive what's going on here? Yeah. Because you know, I think we all know at this point in the last ten years like dance music in the states, just gone crazy. There's this big explosion. I mean, that's the reason we're all here probably still here doing it. But you know, you go overseas. Like, I think for my perspective playing shows over there, and it's it's perceived so differently, right? And if you saw sort of if you saw it on film with the sound off it would kind of look the same..

China Facebook YouTube Instagram India Tori ten years
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04:20 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"I like there's no reason to not. Yeah. So I helped them launch Mary, Jane, which is a a website kind of like a lifestyle website. That's all about lead, which is kinda funny. Because like, I'm just not like a crazy. We'd person like I'm totally fine with it. But like, I just have never been the kind of person. Like, I know all the strains everything that happened. So that was a really interesting like I jump into real life. I was like in the daytime I'd be helping them just launched from like a very like technical aspect of like, here's how to build a back in. Let me find you writers. Let me get you off the ground. Okay. So you're kind of doing everything. Yeah. It was the website had was not existent before which was very exciting. Because I was like I've really helped them build it from top to bottom all that. Yeah. From from school. Yeah. From working with dancing like it was so full circle. It was a really strange strange way of how it worked out. Did you get to spend much time with? New came in for several like big meetings. And he's honestly of nothing bad say about him. He's a friendly super nice guy was smoking like crazy throughout the whole conference meeting. But he just like he had all these really insightful points to bring up because he really understands audiences and what people are looking for. And what people like so that was it was it was great. It was like being in the the genius. And it was was about to say, I actually think he is kind of a Jesus. Yeah. He's reinvented himself so many times. Yeah. Can appeal to kind of anyone at any age? He's like a mean. But like one that you take seriously right time, which is very hard. And he's managed to find this space where just sort of everyone loves him. Just this lovable presents no matter how you perceive. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. He's. Yeah. He's a very very interesting character. And obviously like amazing talent. Yeah. So, but I was like working with there. Team as my day job. And didn't really tell them that. I was also working functions at the same time, which hopefully they won't listen. But yeah. So I would be kind of like leaving for a week at a time being like, I've got a number gency. I really have to go like so many of -mergency. Yeah. Yeah. It was really I don't know how I got away with it. But I saw I'd be like in China like awake at like four AM like sending an Email out to them being like, I'm not in China. It was a very strange time in my life. But it was really exciting to be able to like figure out what I loved and what I didn't like because I think by the end of like a coup- couple months. I realize that I really loved working, and I just like couldn't let it go. But also, I was like burning myself out pretty quick. So it all was like a like somehow everything worked out kind of moment. Where Ben for my mess heard. My like cries for help essentially he was like, oh, I've actually heard that makes MAG is looking for somebody like an editorial person in LA like let's figure out a way to make that work. So that's how I actually got connected. So it was all oh just being in the right place with our at time now, which is I don't know. It's like that old saying like, I'm going to butcher this. But it's something about you know, you're the luckiest when you're working the hardest. Yeah. Yeah. Because it's a right time, right place. But also you're doing what you wanted to do. Yeah. I really hard burning the candle at both ends whatever you wanna call. Yeah. To me. That's when those moments always happen. It's not when you're sort of just sitting around and get lucky with it. Yeah. Why have to imagine to as somebody who said, you're very interested in culture. And dance music culture. Must have been fascinating working in other countries. Right. Yeah. And especially in Asia, which you know, China's still right now is crazy for dance music. How was that experience? You know, seeing it through different lands. What did you learn about sort of how they process dance music versus how we in the states do. Yeah. Yeah. That was one of my favorite things about learning it or working at S was how much I learned about the different cultures..

China Ben Asia Mary Jane
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04:22 min | 2 years ago

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"It was just more of like you realize that's what people wanna learn about like people don't want the like PR blurb from the artists that they're talking about like their new album, and they wanna talk about like that weird moment where they like met. Some person in the like, this is a real story also met like found a person in the middle of a jungle who is like playing on this like Japanese instrument, and they were like, oh my God. This sound is amazing. How can and they like had to go hunt and find that exact instrument. There's only like ten of them. Like what? I can't believe that happened to somebody like that happened to somebody. That's why they made their them that way that's cool is is part of the interest for you sharing those things too. Like for me. I was a DJ for long before I was a producer. And even as a kid before. I was a DJ. I was just always like trying to make other people. Listen to things I thought were cool. Yeah. And that's still kind of probably what drives a lot when I do. Basically like this really cool. And for some reason, you also think that. Yeah. I mean, I think it's just it's so cool to see how it connects people. I think I realized that a lot when I worked with I s 'cause I went to you know, I went to China and Singapore visa, and to me all these people who have that same excitement that people have when they first uncovered and seizing even though they've been in their respective industries for however long, let's talk a little bit more about that the IMS period. Was that your first, you know, out of college sort of I like major official gig working in media. Basically, you wanna contest versus right. Yeah. There was a contest. So a friend of mine had passed along this contest that I m s launched that year that I graduated is called the visionaries contest. And essentially it was pretty forward thinking of them in that they wanted to open up a door to young people in the industry 'cause they kind of looked around. And they recognize like, oh, a lot of our people that are involved are a little bit older. You know, they're. The guys that have been around for a long time. But we want to make it more accessible to people who are like, my who are graduating and really interested in getting into music, and the the premise of the contest was to find an idea to help either fix the problem or improve the music industry and present it, and it was really great because I had been doing that research about, you know, the drug laws in the US and how it relates to dance music. So I was like this is a great way to kind of just get into that. So I ended up entering into the competition and winning which is really great because the prize was to actually speak at one of the conferences, and they had one in LA that year. But then this is like a long story so have to bear with me a podcast. So I had this incredible billing I think I was supposed to speak like right after cascade or something like that. And right before Quincy Jones, which has I have no idea why decided like that was my spot. But I I've very much appreciate that. But anyways, all this stuff happened. Like, there was a technical difficulty. And then Quincy Jones arrived early. And they were like we really can't make Quincy Jones way. And I was like that's totally fair because it's Quincy Jones. So I was like, okay. Like all that. And I actually ended up not being able to speak about conference which at the time. I was like, no. Like a missed out on this amazing opportunity. But then Ben Turner, who is one of the co founders I m s was like really upset to hear that happen. And we ended up having a meeting 'cause he was like, oh, maybe we'll get you out to the next conference or something. And by the end of that, he was like, you know, what I think actually the conference could really use just like a younger perspective. Like I'd really like for you to start working on my team. So that was straight out of college. I was like all right. I'm gonna do this and help them launch. I m s in China really helpful Chinese and then did a couple rounds with them..

Quincy Jones Ben Turner China LA US producer official
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

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04:03 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"Was it enjoyable to kind of or how did you change your approach when you know, you just have like a couple of minutes to talk to somebody versus an hour long podcast, or you know, yet, I page article definitely it's very high pressure. Also that because we're kind of like, the kind of tell you exactly how much time you have right before you have it. And you're like, okay, three minutes. Okay. What can I talk about in three minutes? But I was also really lucky in that the artists that I talked to you this time around because of the work that I've been doing for the past five six years a lot of them. I have met before and have interviewed them at different points in their careers. So to kind of have that chance to talk to them at Coachella, which I think a lot of people take like this huge like big important moment in their career, and they're just like happy and thankful to be there that helped a lot like, for example, Troy, I remember I had interviewed him. Maybe like when he was had just moved to the US and was like just people were starting to be like, oh, this guy's really cool. He's making like a really interesting sound, and then just like a year or two later to be talking to him at Coachella or he's like bringing out all these live dancers. And like has this whole show was like this is cool to be able to like you trust me. And that like, you know, I know your story. So I know what highlights like pull out right now that was like a really really cool way that it worked out. I think that what you just described that relationship is one of the things that those the more established media outlets can provide. Is there's that trust. Ideally, there's that trust between a journalist and an artist that can evolve over years of over coal careers. Sometimes that you don't always see with the more, and I just keep shitting on blogs. But like the more click Beatty just kind of like of the moment gossip stuff. Yeah. The sort of here in God. And you look at it. And then you never think about it again. Yeah. It's I don't know. I love those kind of relationships. I love thinking about how you can marry sort of the old way of doing things with the culture just always comes down to the fact that Eno a lot of people are like really jaded about music and music industry. But the two rules of like, you're an artist, and you write about music or visit culture, those are the two rules like you really in it just because you love it. If you're not in it because you're going to get a guarantee of Ilic, you're paid out like a ton of money or. Like, you're going to get all this fame or anything. But it's really the same shit. Right. Like it's like for what you do. I mean in the same way. I'm just making this up as I'm talking. But I for what you do. I have to imagine, you know, you had to find your own voice. Yeah. You have to you know, in the same way an artist does like it's all the same thing in a way. Right. Yeah. Like, you're known for a certain perspective, you're known for a certain style. And in the exact same way an artist would be. Yeah, there's a lot of and, you know, there's that's what I think my favorite parts of my job are to find the stories that are worth telling. Whether it's you know, you just find artists. No one's ever heard about or you have known artist for a long time. And you remember like there's this one story that really like shape them to be who they are. And I can like help them tell that story and show people like, whoa. There's this whole other side to that person. So how do you find those stories? I don't know. I think it's just, you know, just being true to just wanting to be a positive part of the culture, and like that person's story like, honestly. So just your natural. Love of what you're doing kind of a tracks. Yeah. I think that's what it comes on. Because again, it's kind of that thing where I never got official traditional like training. Like this story. This is how you know. Like what sticks?.

US Beatty Eno Troy official three minutes five six years
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03:48 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"Talking about earlier about all the little like things that you do when you're interviewing artists like you're worried about checking looking at your phone notes thinking like they might think that you're checking grammars and things, but like that's all stuff that we learned just by doing it. You know? So it was the same thing. So that was yeah. That was definitely a highlight. And coach. Show within come about. So there's this wonderful guy named Raymond Raymond Roker who works at Coachella with the team. And he actually started his own magazine called herb, you are b. Yeah, that's crazy because I was thinking about urban driving over here. Yeah. Because I was thinking about how mixed maggots still going strong. And how a lot of other aren't yes. And when I was coming up. Herb was like the like, I, you know, I got like an article in herb about some of my early stuff. And it was like I've made it good literally like ten Kavi thing. And now doesn't exist and no one even a new kid doesn't know what it is. Exactly. Yeah. So yeah. So those who know so he started herb many years ago and has worked his way up and is working with the Coachella AG team. And so he actually reached out to me on Twitter. And I was like who is this random person? And I did some like Lincoln searching, and it was like, oh, he's like a real person. He's not like some random creep like a real like I was I was like. Yeah. Yeah. No. So and talking to Raymond it's really great to see how something is monstrous Coachella can value something like that. Because you know, he came from DIY grassroots like I'm just going to make this magazine because I love house music, and I love the scene, and he still has that knowledge even though Coachella lineups or like so current and like everything they're doing is. So different than like what that was. So he reached out to me on Twitter. We had a great meeting, and he was like, you know, I just found you based on my knowledge of what makes Maga's, and it seems like you could be a really good fit for what we're trying to do. They essentially built out a new team along with mentally. He's done it for several years. Now, a new team of people who kind of knew their stuff about every genre. So like we had dusk who works at complex. She was all hip hop and a girl named Brittany who was just like this wealth of knowledge about. Live and rock music. So that was it was it was so fun to be a part of that team to kind of also like learn from people about other John rose because sometimes I get so like, oh like, I do know a lot about dancing Zik. But I don't know anything about other honors and to have those conversations with like young women who also new new their shit about. It was really really cool to realize that it's all kind of happening in parallel to what you're doing. And you're a part of a bigger thing. Those are and to hear other perspectives like Brittany. And I who she was like the live rock music girl. We had a really funny and lively and pleasant debate about the, you know, where rock music has gone in Coachella and now taken over by electron music. So that was a really fun conversation. I like really really enjoyed that chat with her. I was like, okay good. Like, this is this is the person I need to talk to about this. Let's get into. Yeah. And I saw a few of those clips of the interviews and the hosting redoing act Coachella. How is it different for you? Because you know, a lot of those were sort of these shorter like five minute chunks. You know, talking to an artist then throwing his, you know, some performance that kind of thing how did that feel was it different?.

Raymond Raymond Roker Brittany Herb Twitter Lincoln Maga Zik John rose five minute
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01:52 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"And we know that. But other people don't I guess, I mean, how do you change that conversation? How do you change that perception I think it's about doing stuff like this, actually, which is why I was really excited till find out that you're doing this like telling stories, you know, it's so simple. But once you start talking to people, the people who make the music people go to the shows, and you talk to them, and you realize that like, oh, the people that go to these festivals. And dress all crazy are actually like doctors and lawyers like need that kind of release and want to do something really fun on the weekend. And they're all people. I think that's a great point just talking to someone in that way. Yeah. I mean, I think that's that's a good point for kind of everything. Yeah. The US is going through right? I mean, it's the same thing for artists like you never talked to an artist. And they're like, oh, I just wanted to like fuck kids up make them like take drugs music like that's never anybody's. Like, I've talked to a lot of his you've talked to a lot of artists like that's nobody's story. And then you look at places like Europe where they do have like that history to hold onto understand that like that's why people really like this stuff. Not because of the drugs that like happens on the side. But also happens everywhere else, and that's another interesting point too. So I mean, if we all make an intro and all of this will have been set already. But I do want to say your position now is the digital editor for mix. Meg am. I read about that. Yeah. I'm actually it's actually changing my new position, which will be announced very soon. Probably by the time because it's the exclusive I'm the global culture editor MAGS. Oh, that's really cool. And so actually that's even better for the question..

editor US Europe Meg
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"Not so good, basically like unlocking, the key to like the city of like you had to go to all of these shows now, and you meet all these people, and it was great because blogging is really great to do while you're in college you can like manage dislike here in that. Like go to class, and then write about your things that you really like lifestyle. Yeah. Yeah. So that was what I did all throughout college, and I loved it. Yeah. It was great. And so was there any kind of theme you're known for anything specifically they hired you to do. Or was it kind of like a mix of different pieces. Yeah. It definitely I I just got brought on to be like a basically writing the news and just getting it out there. But I think pretty quickly I kind of fell back into the same trend that I was doing before of culture, observing, you know, doing more of like opinions of like, why is this happening? Like what what is instigating this? Where's this going? I remember. Over one of my favorite pieces that I did with DA was talking about the laws in the US that are related to drugs, and how that relates to dance music culture specifically, and I think a lot of people know about it at this time like the rave act, literally it was called the rave act point, which is kind of wild and just unpacking that history, and that was like the very first taste. I think that I got a realizing that it it goes a lot deeper than what you think it is. You know, it goes all the way back to what is like the nineties or even before that when they were like trying to crack down definitely. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Like, literally then and like that law got so just folded into what's happening now. And that's a big reason why we went through that phase of all these kids were dying. And it seemed as though no one could do anything about it. Even though the media was talking about it nonstop. And there's like all these laws that prevent people who want to do something to prevent it from actually taking those actions will sure, and that's always the stereotype, right is dance music is drugs music. And you know, everyone there is on drugs. And that's what you do. If you go there, and for me, it's always been bizarre. Just because like I've never been a drug person. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Like I was just like a lame nerd kid. And I like this weird music, and like me, that's all it was. And in some ways still is. But yeah, it was always interesting to me because it's such a strong stigma. But I don't know maybe, you know, because I'm sure you've looked into this way more than I have. I mean, statistically, like numbers wise is it that much worse than any other music subculture. Well, that's the thing is when I started doing this research and getting really interested in this subject is you realize that it's just everywhere. It's not just physically just think about this seventies. When people were listening to rock and roll. Like there was there were a lot of drugs involved with all that. I'm sure people were dying. Unfortunately, it just wasn't talked about in the same way. It's the same thing with hip hop. There's a lot of drugs and a lot of drug references in hop. But it doesn't get spoken about in that way either. So yeah, I think it's just one of those things where yes, there are sure there are big majority of people who feel like they can't enjoy the music. Without drugs, and that's too bad. But there's a lot to dance music that is not just circled around that..

US
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"It wasn't like I had my own blog platform is definitely like I was on tumbler writing like almost diary style entries which quickly started leaning towards like I was writing about music stuff that was experiencing was this in the the blog explosion of the late two thousands. Yeah. It must've been I graduated high school in two thousand ten okay. So it was around that era. I obviously didn't know that that was happening at the time. But I was writing my own blog and did that for two years while I was in Santa Cruz, and I actually ended up transferring down to USC here in LA, which I think it was the whole thing where I went to school being like, I just wanna go to school, and then realized pretty quickly that I was like, okay, I like school. And now, I know what I want to study and USC has a really great communications and media department and degree. Yeah. Communication. So I somehow managed to get into USC. Which was a total. I did it. So you could do to. And you must have been decent school. If you're writing, you know, stories at whatever I was I was I was I was good. I think for me it was kinda one of those things where like college is definitely better than high school. And that I realized like, oh, I like learning about things that I care about. Sure. But I definitely was never like the typical Asian Syria type of always getting as and like just always doing the best. Which thankfully, my parents were like not crazy in that way. As long as you're doing. Well, I realized that I really wanted to get a degree in something around communications, our media and it worked out and definitely coming to LA was a blessing in disguise that I didn't realize part of the package and getting into US was really excited about. But being in LA really helped me like take the next leap into being like, okay? I'm really interested in this writing about music thing. What can I do with that? So that's interesting. So when you're in college and kind of in that transition point it was the second year that you move to LA thirty. Yeah. And at that point, did you have any kind of a vision for where you wanted it to go definitely because I remember I was I was I got to USC, and I really wanted to dive straight into kind of like the internships like figuring out what was going on. And I guess I might have had some sort of inkling that I was interested in music because I did end up a music marketing company and. He would. And it was doing really basic stuff like learning what a press release was and like learning how to make a Mailer campaign and realized that wasn't for me. I didn't like that part of it. But I did really like being involved in the music side. So that quickly turned into me looking for a place like like, I was still blogging throughout this whole time and blogging to no one I think is really important because I still did it even though it was like my five friends who didn't care about music. We're reading..

USC LA Santa Cruz US Mailer Syria two years
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"I think it comes from just like her loving like traditional Chinese music, which is a lot of like opera style singing because she loves like the selene Dion. And they douse of the world. Like emotion on them. Like, I'm here. She's not alone in that. And then my dad was kind of into some more like traditional like American or western music, but it really liked that was kind of like the limit. Okay. So you were kind of just left to your own influences. I learned how to play instruments, and it was always like a lot of class like piano and flute and stuff like that stereotypical Asian instruments. But yeah, I just didn't really like music wasn't really even a big thing that I was like I'm passionate about like a big fan. Yeah. Yeah. Until I think maybe when I got to college. I think that's like really when it started happening for me. 'cause I I went to UC Santa Cruz. I and anybody who knows anything about the bay area knows that the berries music scene is just one of kind. Definite key where? Yeah. And it's just unlike anything even like having traveled all around the world at this point. Nothing is like the Bayer is music scene. There's like Barry a hip hop, which like I didn't grow up there. I was born in Vallejo. Put that out there. I do have like fair. Yeah. Me and. But yeah. So like, there's berry hip hop, which is like just so unique and like so much history to learn from that, and then moving to Santa Cruz, I became familiar with this really crazy fascination with electronic music, but not only electric it was like a very specific stroke like basic. Which is just really exciting. When like you're in college. And someone's like, hey like someone's having this rave in the middle of the forest like you wanna go find it. It was like, I guess. When you say like a specific strain of bass music. What what are we talking about in? What era is this? I mean, I think it's called like west coast base. The base nectar is probably like, yeah. Base. Probably like the number one kind of example of what it was like, I know what you're talking about guys like Minnesota. Yeah. Like all those guys. So that was just really it was so different than anything. I was listening to because I remember I would go to the catalyst which is a really famous venues. Yeah. And I'd be going for like hip. Hop shows coming from like, oh, I like like bay area, like the pack and stuff. So I'd go see hip hop shows. And then they also have like dance music people saw base nectar. And I was like I have no idea what's going on. This is really interesting. This is crazy. So that's kind of where I started an interest in like what was going on? When what about interest in journalism and in writing where you writing as a kid reading? Kid like where does that side? Come. Yes. I think that's definitely like I was saying as a kid. I wasn't like the music it. I was definitely like the writer kid. I was writing like fiction like chapter books and stuff when I was a little bit. Yeah. Like, just I I can remember one was about like a dragon a Princess it was very silly. But it was really fun and then not translated into like I got into poetry for a little bit. And I think there was even a portion of my life where I was like writing songs, and I've never revisited them. Really funny to see what I wrote. Yeah. And then that definitely came to life a little bit more. Once I got to college because I was one of those kids who went to college knowing that I should go to college. But not really knowing what I wanted to do. Yeah. And thankfully, I had parents who were like, you know. That's okay. But like, we really just want you to be there, and like figure it out, which is really supportive, and helpful way to look at it. So once I got there. I started blogging. Like for fun. And it wasn't..

UC Santa Cruz selene Dion Barry Vallejo Minnesota writer
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"Even the Dutch house stuff that gave to the big room how stuff which is one of the most mocked John reside feel like now a hundred percent. So if we say like, okay lowbrow, why do people look down on it? Why do like techno snobs or how snobs look down upon all that stuff? My thing was always like, okay. For each person. There's a different purpose or something that you're taking from the music, and I think that's just kind of the general divide. What always comes down to his like when you go to a dub step show? I think ninety percent maybe even higher you're going because you are trying to release an emotion and just like have a really great time. And have this experience that comes with dub step, and I don't think that's the case for a lot of people who go to for example, quote, unquote, highbrow show, if you're going to see someone who has like this really intricate live setup, or if you're gonna go experience a techno show in this venue that has like all this crazy history. I think there's a little bit of. The difference of. Why are we attending these shows? What are we hoping to get out of it? So I think that's where the divide is. Right. Because it's it boils down to the very simple. Like, oh, you just don't understand what I want from this. Which is why people get so angry about it being like, no, I'm like, my John RAs the best like, yeah. If you're trying to just like head bang and just like feel like you're getting like release of like, physical and emotion and all this stuff than. Yeah. Probably you should go to show. I don't think you'll get that from like this like beautiful like Niko jar show. Like, you're not going to get that kind of release think. But you're if you're trying to dislike appreciate like history and like go on the six hour journey with an artist like that's completely different. So and I mean, I guess that's sort of the beauty of the scene. We're in right. Is that you can have both of those experiences to you. And maybe at a certain point you want the one thing, and then a couple years later, you might want the other thing. Yeah. And that's also the other side of it. Least for me because I went through that of Lucien. I'm like I came into the scene because it was popular. You know, I didn't grow up in a household dot even really had a strong like music identity like my parents, loved music and in their own way. But I had the freedom to kind of uncover what my own musical taste was and grew up at a time when people were going to raves and EDM was cool. So I got in that way. And then did my research because I really loved what I was finding and then ended up being like, okay? Like now, I listen to all this kind of music that definitely wasn't the stuff that was at the top. When I first got into it. So where's your grew up? I grew up in a place called Davis up in northern California like UC Davis Davis that way, but it's a pretty small time. Besides being a university town. It's quite a small cute safe town. Yeah. And what did you folks do? Why were they in Davis? So my mom is professor she teaches it sucks. Stay up there. Which is why were there and my parents, divorced? So my dad lives in China. So he's off elsewhere. But that's why we were in Davis. And yeah, I think that's just I think what I was saying earlier about my parents, not really haven't, you know, like you hear about people who their parents grew up listening to Tom petty and the Beatles. And that's what they love like, I didn't really have that experience. And I think a lot of kids of immigrant families probably have a very similar experience because you're just coming from families that have different cultures and things that they grow up with. So I definitely wasn't like a musical kin with music in the house at all. Or there was I mean, I'll put it this. I like, my mom was definitely like she loves a good like soulful singer, which I think actually I thought about this the other day,.

Davis Davis John RAs professor Tom petty Lucien California China hundred percent ninety percent six hour
"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

Back To Back

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Back To Back

"There's plenty value in both an I well, this is something I talk about a lot and think about a lot idea of lowbrow versus highbrow culture. And what we do. And I think, you know, say techno voice is dubbed step is maybe a greater. Yeah. That because you know, techno has this stereotype, sometimes deservedly, you know, that's where the pretentious snobs are. And you know, that's like the the most evolved. If you had that brain me m- where it's like regular brand shiny brand exploding. Quoting Bryn, Pokemon. Right. After did you? But you know, and so it has that reputation. Whereas dub step is dirty, grimy, whatever, you know, Neanderthal music. Again, these are just the stereotypes I love both. But it's interesting to me because I the way I got into dance music and kind of my mentality. Still is the lowbrow stuff. Like, I was I was a metal head as a kid, which is another scene where you take a lot of pride in like, this is my thing. Fuck everything else. And and then I started with hardcore and happy hardcore and Kabir and that kind of stuff and there's a long time ago. But that's still like it's still in me. It's still in my heart. And I still love stupid simple Bangor music. Like, I love it. And but I also love the the more, you know, cerebral, whatever you wanna call it. And it's interesting to me. Here's the whole point. I was trying to make ten minutes ago. Tell me about the history of your job. I'll stop now. The whole point is that I think there's this weird thing where the highbrow culture looks down on the lowbrow culture. Right. But the low brow culture to me is oftentimes more accepting like, I know a lot of people who like the sort of quote, unquote, uncultured this the simple music, the bangers who love deep techno and weird ambient music and all that. But I don't see the reverse so much, and I want to bring it back to to what you do in journalism in general too. Because I I've always felt like for certain journalistic outlets, if you don't have that kind of cultural perception behind you, it can be easy to feel like you're just counted out. Yeah. And. And I think probably that's a hard line to walk. Right. As far as what do you said light on? What do you wanna talk about? Where is there? Actual culture worth reporting on. Yeah. Yeah. And is that something you've in counter journalistically? Yeah. That culture war. I mean, there's there's a lot to impact there. I think in general the whole genre war. Here's the thing. So for me for my experience, again, kind of going back to what I was saying about how I was given the opportunity to kind of be like the outlier in a lot of rooms really early on in my career, which I think helped me realize that there's value on both ends, right? Because like I started loving like Africa, and I was like front row EC like really partying it out. And then and there's something to be said about artists like that. Or, you know for saying low row like the dub step, which isn't always low. Rob, you know, let's just say that..

Kabir Africa Bryn Rob ten minutes
"valerie lee" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

MMA Junkie Radio

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on MMA Junkie Radio

"The only show that matters host gorgeous, George, he's always devious industrially goes are he's co host to my left. It's the fight analyst, Dan, Tom becky's producing Danny auto sought fellas. Hulo Georgia frightening kinda sort of. Yeah. Having to bring our rear ends in in this spot. Yeah. It'll it'll feel like that. No, are we conditioned to feel like that from school? We're all misery. Last weekend. There is no such thing as the whole day off planking out unless you leave the laptop and phone at home, and that just doesn't happen. I know a lot of people that they check out on Thursday. Friday is actually Friday, but I'm checked out by Thursday just coast through Friday. Maybe maybe. So to reiterate, we won't be here. Tomorrow nor Friday. And we won't be here all of next week, except there will be a show on Monday and Tuesday and goes, our do our best provide a video feed that you guys can check out while we do our show at the Sirius XM studios in New York. Junkies. Got your back all week. The news will continue to pour in the guys will be out in Hawaii. Dan, Tom's actually gonna be on Hawaii, Jon Morgan, Kenny. Hathaway pathway is going to be out there. I almost said Bigalow. Kenny bigalow? I wanna call him that now. We call them. Bam. Bam for sure. Well, is it? What kenny? Okay. I've never heard of that name. Right. So. Morgan I think salsa in Toronto. So like, I say, the whole teams hustle and everywhere. We got you UC to thirty-one coverage. We got bell tour to twelve and two three to thirteen coverage. We got Mr. Matt arsenal pie be Milwaukee. That makes sense, right? Yeah. I mean, it's no joke to close at the a lot of cards. So at throwing a lot out you lot of. Daily debates a lot of well those are daily but main event breakdowns coming breakdowns featured match breakdowns just a lot lot happening as we wind down the year. But tomorrow there will be no show. Those breakdowns. I'll be I'll be gone as well from the same times as these guys except working from the other end, whether it's on the ground doing my analysis all those like normal breakdowns are usually get from us. You guys will still get next week. So yeah, George said cool. All right. So there you have it, folks. We have a busy schedule today. We're going to catch up with a guest Luiz rescheduled from yesterday show Lewis Taylor. Josh copeland. Also, join us Nate land where and one champion. Valerie, Lee turno. Alejandro Lara two ladies vital rebel tour. The turnover trying to get her hands on a strap. Copland and Taylor trying to get their hands on a million dollars. So lots going on may still add one more guest. I don't know. But this I thirty forty minutes a pretty wide open eight six six five two two two four six. That's the number to call in. If you wanna chat some mixed martial arts. Imagine they're going to want to. Yeah. And I guess what I want to start off with guys have you seen embedded haven't wanted to start off. Well, there is some news with UFC booking. Greg hardy on the same card as Rachel Oeste vich and that blue Twitter up what happened there did the UFC just not thinking through that was on embedded. No oh. Got you. Dude. I really, okay, man. Neither booked it. And didn't realize it or they booked at someone said, you know, and they said, well, we this is the way we do business. That's got to be impossible. Right. The second one because I was about to say that I've made mistakes like this. Where like we've had a guest on the show. And maybe I've asked a question. And then I thought oh my God. I can't believe I asked the I shouldn't have asked that. Because this and it's just something I had forgotten. So I could see something like that happening. But there's so many people there that somebody could have caught this right and said, wait a minute. This does we maybe we shouldn't do that. And then somebody would have said, you're right. Let's take that apart. Who would have caught it anybody? Right. Like PR department. Somebody like just can't do that man that that just doesn't make much sense. I think maybe it went through three people think so I don't think hardy or Austin pitcher at the level that Dana has to see this through..

Kenny bigalow George Greg hardy Jon Morgan Dan Tom becky UFC Lewis Taylor analyst planking Hawaii Georgia Sirius Hathaway Alejandro Lara New York Josh copeland Milwaukee Toronto Danny auto
Landlords accused of renting out illegal Airbnbs to pay SF $2.25M to settle lawsuit

Marketplace

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Landlords accused of renting out illegal Airbnbs to pay SF $2.25M to settle lawsuit

"Rental loss. According to city attorney Dennis Herrera landlords Darren and Valerie Lee kept more than forty five apartments off the long-term market and created several several fake Airbnb profiles in an attempt to make it appear that individual tenants were listing their apartments, whether you're a cannon or a landlord who's been following the law. This is a victory. I it the outcome. Frees up more homes for long term tenants and stops unfair. Competition in the marketplace the lease and their attorney were not immediately available for comment on the settlement. One of the bay area's leading Latino. Art galleries is ramping up pressure on its landlord as their lease negotiations. Have

Attorney Dennis Herrera Valerie Lee Airbnb Darren
"valerie lee" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Scorecard that's about eight hundred i don't like those fis on their yeah well you don't get many now we we see your point hey it is 102 year literally on the teeth thank you for doing this all pleasure it's great to see yang's lacroix we root and forty this week are you guys keep talking on them on the radio you guys do great job literary ice by green of course that they're going back shen o'clock this year i now so hopefully shower valerie lee out there all right and by the way the poll to tell you understand the pull you over to update us on the poll resort powers of the poll it's now up to seven hundred and sixty three votes in you still have seventy two percent of the people with telling you the tightest turned on these laker fans they've starting under stewart in mind michael thompson is in studio michael blend some sanity to these proceedings if if lebron james and paul george want to come to your team is there any way you say no ireland you have a responsibility as a responsible citizens sitting next the ben lions you make sure you call them an eager to get him on home because he should not drive 'cause he is on something the army is this land really make is he'd say in all this with a straight face are you telling me in okay for one thing these are too crazy things the lakers won't get the second row with lebrun a paul george are you crazy and liberals got four prime years have you seen his body is body of work this man doesn't get heard he is different from everybody else he's a tank what does wall with you been lions if you sign up lebron james that means no to klay thompson all we all know klay as interesting.

yang valerie lee stewart michael thompson lebron james paul george army lakers lebrun klay thompson seventy two percent 102 year
"valerie lee" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"valerie lee" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"If you were to extrapolate the afc east enters focus in on like the real football teams have to play whether or not the number spikes up there it's my ansari you you they six wales automatically ordinary every year to schedule come out of this this i mean us why there's there's five wins automatically syncs automatically there right and then you go yeah they're really enjoying good no saying that's what i'm saying they going to steal another so you give him six vehicles still another three outside the jail nine the neglect a fight friday right they're gonna fight a couple of teams get you know a couple more take always b twelve and four i just zone where i tend to lose one in the one of the division two each team almost every year feels like no not to each team not not to instock no almost every year no they may lay may drop one game to a team in the division is that what you meant no no no no no he's not catch no morons and buffalo what i did this year are not going to be able to agree ray has a losingrecord at miami no brady loses to miami a renowned in but they're not going to lose three games in the division there's no way to every year necessary that's what i said every every year they might lose to one team right they may lose to a miami this year next jiji of jet or the gentle had them a couple of years when rex was there you have a groin into it you don't even look at you got when you look at the schedule ugo they'll win all these they may drop it in miami because they're tired at the end of the year they may lose they lose lo lose a game in buffalo occasionally or whatever or a jail last ronnie lost the buffalo uh i wanna say last year this your name of the before lahser on a valerie lee held us as a mike moore original point when you have those kind of opponents who don't have potent offense is to.

wales ray miami brady rex ronnie valerie lee mike moore afc football