16 Burst results for "Valerie Hopkins"

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:41 min | 3 months ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Non-negotiable what does it mean. Then for the future of europe if you can be a member but not stick to what is it the very heart of what the eu means indeed. I think that we're opening up a big question. Now i should point out that hungary and poland maintain that this is a political process. Hungary's justice minister in repeated jewish with me and others maintains that there is no single definition of rule of law. She says rule of law is whatever they don't like about hungary you know and it's true that all of the member states have different Legal setups different Constitutional courts of ministry of justice's ministries of justice have different power in in all these different countries but but the fact remains that that both of these countries and also others. I should point out the czech republic. Bulgaria have well documented issues with with using european union funds. That wind up being used in a in a corrupt manner. But but i think the question that you raised is more interesting. Some of the analysts that i talked to say that you know. We're at the us definitely in crisis. But it has a potential for a deeper crisis than brexit. Because for instance the uk is leaving whereas this is fundamentally challenging the way that the eu is functioning. Institutionally from the inside and some member states are already talking about okay. Hungary doesn't like this recovery fund and we will then the twenty five of us without hungary and poland will create our own recovery mechanism and they can be excluded from that if they don't want to adhere to these basic rule of law restrictions. But you know again. What does it say them when you have a twenty-seven member block but but not everyone can agree on how to get out of the very deep economic crisis since the second world war. I mean of course. A massive own-goal hungary and poland. They desperately need those funds Valerie just quickly before we go what happens next the ease instituting legal action. I understand well. I think that the eu are still looking out for what to do. They have told hungary and poland that rather than just veto the budget that they should take this to the us court of justice and challenge the mechanism but what seems unclear whether hungary poland are really willing to do that. I mean i think this kind of high stakes game of chicken will continue but eat for hungary and poland as well. You know the the last budget cycle as well. The funds annually contributed between four and five percent of each country's gdp and both countries stand to gain disproportionately and and have really really suffered tremendously during this year's economic crash. So i think the leaders are still searching for a way out of this morass and the german you presidency has a great task before it. Now there's a big question of whether there will be a consideration of suspending the so-called article seven proceedings that are going on against both poland and hungary already for rule of law breaches. Which are they could end up in both countries losing their you voting rights but because they're being pursued both at the same time and and this would require unanimity it. They're seen as effectively toothless. So there's a big debate about whether lifting these procedures would help move the impasse forward or actually reward hungary and poland for their boisterous obstructive behaviour. Valerie thank you very much. Indeed that's valerie hopkins at the f. T. now still to come on the program more erotic behavior from the white house and we learned this week that depending on your view of things we have either. Bean visited by an extraterrestrial intelligence or that the long winter evenings in utah are on the slow side and takes us through what we've learned this week. This is the globalist stay.

Hungary poland eu valerie hopkins justice minister europe us czech republic Bulgaria uk Bean utah white house
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Confidence and just estimate look on the international markets like burston israeli. Making things worse cells that it is time to try to get a deal and we think he is trying to pressure the prime minister who let's not forget with someone who wrote two columns a brexit one a remain one and need wrote the brexit one and then sent it in because he thought it could do his own career good and so he is trying to encourage the prime minister. Now is the time to get a deal. We push this as far as we can. Let's get this deal done because the timetable is tight. And of course we've seen the the departure of two prominent levers from downing street. Lee kane and dominic cummings What can you tell us about. Boris johnson's new chief of staff of the name. That's not many people have heard of. I had just come scratch my head about who he was and he was actually the principal. Private secretary at georgia's bulletin. He was david cameron's chancellor from twenty ten twenty sixteen so he's coming. In as chief of staff he previously worked to the treasury for many years. He saw things like the olympic budgets And he's well-thought-out thoughts be highly intelligent quite sociable. He's a father of three. But it's really being seen as a bit of a reset because he's replacing. This jewel team of lee kane and dominic cummings who worked with boris johnson on the leave campaign and they were highly contentious figures. They were aggressive. They were fighters. Dominic cummings had these huge idea of reforming in everything that he could see. He wanted to reform the civil service and whitehall. He was starting bustles left right and centre with organizations like the bbc. And i think he hits become a prominent figure. I've talked to canadians music. I've talked to you know ustralia new zealand media and they know the name dominic. Cummings this is not the name. They should know he'd earned a profile to match his boss at large they of course because of that trip we all remember to barnard castle where he broke the rules he had set himself on covert and he did. That's a round trip to test. Its site with his wife and child in the kyw was all remarkable bank holiday weekend. I think diane rosenfeld is a person who will be hearing a lot less of and that is because he is someone who has worked for both labor governments and conservative governments at when he was a civil seven he's been in private banking and consultantcy since then but he works in the uk. It will for many years. He's not someone who's going to be front and center. He's not going to try and reform everything that he sees with. Grandiose plans that frankly through failed to really launch he is as a signal. I think from downing street's that they want to just get on. It's been a very difficult year. They need someone who can be under the radar and work with people effectively. Vincent thank you very much indeed. That was vincent mcevoy. Anita the leaders of hungary and poland. Who said that. They will uphold their veto of the european union's next budget of one point eight trillion euro which includes a substantial amount for pandemic relief. Unless the block decouples this from deering to the rule of law funds will be denied to members that violated democratic norms which places hungary and poland firmly in the crosshairs. Tough negotiations are expected. An e. u. summit next month. Well i'm joined now by valerie. Hopkins whose southeast european correspondent for the f. t. valerie thanks for joining us this one. Can we start by recapping. The meeting between the leaders of hungary and poland. What was said sure. We'll good morning and thank you so much for having me so yesterday. Prime ministers are more of its key convened in budapest to sort of well. Some people thought they might be trying to find a way out of this budget impasse. But in fact they have dug deeper down into their resistance to the idea of tying the disbursement of funds to meeting basic conditions for the rule of law such is functioning judiciaries transparency accountability etc and. Both of them have already been protecting each other in the so-called article seven proceedings that have been going on for more than a year for both of them. They've pledged to protect one another and so what they said yesterday is that they would like to decouple this. Eu budget from the from the recovery fund. Which is about seven hundred and fifty billion euros. And so that so that they can still access the funds. But i think it's really important to point out and very few people in the budget debate have been doing so that this mechanism that that the other member states agreed to is actually quite weak. So you know. Hungary and poland are sort of fighting this on principle in the sense that they don't they don't want this to set a precedent and they don't want to be subject to further scrutiny. Even though they say they have nothing to hide they say it's a politically motivated process. One of their objections is their reluctance to promote gender equality and women's empowerment as part of the bloc's foreign policy but both countries stressed their commitment to equality between men and women. So why did they take issue with the term gender equality. It's really in. This is a really interesting debate. That's going on right. Now they the hungarians and the and the polls are also quite keen to talk about their commitment to gender equality or excuse me to the equality between men and women. they don't like to use the word gender and they don't like the idea of gender as a social construct hungary actually more than a year ago banned the teaching of gender studies as an academic discipline and they also took went through great pains during the pandemic in the first round when they passed an emergency a very controversial at that point emergency legislation at the end of march. And they also then the next day band the rights of people to change the gender that they were given at birth and this time several weeks ago when they went into a second state of emergency in hungary They decided to propose amendments to the constitution. That would say that every child has a father who was a man and a mother who was a woman so so they take great pains to emphasize equality between the sexes. but they don't like the term gender and they go so far as to to blocking many european union documents press releases declarations that that use the term gender and poland. As well. You saw that as coronavirus pandemic as a second wave really started to crest in poland and the government to cook quite a strong action to restrict abortion rights that has brought many many people out into the streets so both of these governments are instrumentalising. Their culture wars at a time when they're under fire from brussels for law violations but i mean democracy and the rule of law founding principles the eu..

Hungary poland dominic cummings prime minister european union Boris johnson lee kane chief of staff vincent mcevoy whitehall david cameron barnard castle brussels principal diane rosenfeld secretary valerie georgia uk chancellor
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:56 min | 3 months ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It was quite amazing during this pandemic, isn't it? And 11? Does you know whether this is actually going to continue given that we know that in some parts of the continent numbers and now spiking, you know, what would that mean to these construction jobs? I think I would hate to hate to guess at the moment. I mean, I'd hate to be in the Treasury or the finance Department of an African country at the moment and you're having to juggle your having to go to people like me. I m f World Bank, saying either give us some more to find pay back. The loans we've already taken will give us more money on having to say how much we spend on health care. How much do we spend on homes? And you, thank you very much indeed. And you would who's speaking there to his namesake androgen Ponder who is the chief executive shelter? A freak? Brussels. Now the row of that you used budget on in particular €1.8 trillion budget and also a Corona virus Crisis Recovery package, which is linked to that European Commission president wants to link the fund to each member states respect for the rule of law, which has prompted an angry reaction from Poland and Hungary. Both countries are being investigated by the EU for backsliding on democratic standards. Is their ruling party's tightened their grip on the judiciary, media and other institutions to tell us more. We can speak now to Valerie Hopkins thieves in Europe correspondent fellow Natural Times Financial Times. Thanks very much for talking to us. Just remind Alice is a little bit What the U is demanding and why Poland and Hungary are unhappy with us. Well, good morning and thank you very much for having me so the U and Brussels and many member states in particular have watched a Szhang Guerry in Poland. Have been using some of the EU funds that they've been getting over the last decades and for for some corrupt practices, So I mean, this is not only Hungary and Poland, but but these two countries are the biggest net beneficiaries of the EU budget on differ. Both of the economy's its between four and 5% of the GDP and an annual basis. And so the U. Member states and Brussels have sought to Impose a some benchmarks for rule of law conditionality that all member states should meet once if they are to access these funds on and Hungary and Poland have said no, This is not what we signed up for. This is against the treaties there foundational charges of the EU and we oppose this, even though they say that we have no problems with rule of law at home, and you are targeting us in a political manner. Mm. Is this a knish? You then off a couple of countries really falling out of step with Europe because this has the potential to hold up huge amounts of things. The budget recovery funds for fur covered. This is a major issue for the European Union's the hole, isn't it? Indeed, I mean, as you said, it's Czar, budget and recovery package worth €1.8 Trillion, so that these both of these countries also need But also a lot of all of the other member states as Europe is in deep economic crisis, and the problem is to is is that it's raising a lot of concerns about the future of the EU. If to member states can block something as fundamental as important as this. You know, the member states are now scrambling for other ways to get around it. Do they adopt a recovery package with the other 25 members? Do they find other ways eventually Excuse me to cut across you. But wouldn't that go? Fundamentally quite across the idea of the Yuto exploded a couple of countries and just go with the rest? Indeed, Indeed, many of the people I talked to say that in a lot of ways, this is a bit more dangerous for the use cohesiveness than Brexit. For instance, because brings it wasn't changing. How that you is functioning internally, you know, But if the this pushes that you two try to decide things on an ad hoc basis going around some member states, with some feeling that they're left out, it could be dangerous. And the prime ministers of Poland on Hungary met yesterday in Budapest and Polish Prime Minister Margaret He did say yesterday. That also that this was very dangerous on but it could lead in the future to the blocks collapse. But I think that this is also a form of threatening and blackmail coming from Poland and Hungary, who want to have continued to have leeway to do whatever they want with EU funds. And they also be seeing the other way around blackmail from the part of the EU, trying to impose just one particular political viewpoint on on some his members who want to do things slightly differently. Well, I mean, it depends. If you view fundamental you values such as well of large transparency and accountability as as political blackmail. I mean, Hungary and Poland signed up when they joined the EU to support these you values which are in trying in the treaties and They say if they don't want to follow them, I think the you was gonna have a lot of soul searching to do about whether or not you know this. It should continue to Forman ever closer union, which is something that Hungary in in recent weeks has really Deny that that it wants or whether it's just more of an economic union Is this at heart, a political clash? The political elite disagreeing here? I know that A recent poll showed that more than 70% of Hungarians support tying you funding to respect for the rule of law. In fact, I'm so glad you raised this. I was just about to say the same thing. I mean, it's quite interesting that in his remarks yesterday, Prime Minister Orban was trying to make it very clear that that he was representing the will of the people and that and that, you know, he will not accept. Hungarians will not accept something they don't want being imposed on them. What, In fact, 70% of 72% of Hungarians are are very happy to see that and I think that's because you know, especially during the pandemic. They've seen what's happened in the last decade, where hospitals and other critical infrastructure did not receive the investment that they so sorely needed and wanted, So it's going to be very interesting to see how this plays out domestically, but it's also going to be quite difficult, considering that the government and the government supporters control so much of the Public and private media and hungry, fascinating stuff. Valerie Hawkins, Eastern Europe correspondent for the Financial Times, there. I'm James. We've been getting a lot of comments. Well, a couple of them that they're clearly hear about. You know, we made a call out asking people in the United States to tell us what they think about traveling over the Thanksgiving period. Given that, you know, they have been health warning, saying people if they can should stay at home, not travel on somebody who's in New Orleans. We didn't give a name unfortunate that I spent the day off and evening working in a restaurant in New Orleans on Thanksgiving. It was a mate. Amazing the number of people from outside of the city that came to dying, some who traveled because of how inexpensive it wants to do so the masking habits or lack off has been astonishing on adding. We were one of the first epicenters in March that says as we were hearing element bull talking to a number of people who was saying that they were still willing to travel despite the warnings, and there's somebody I don't know if you can see this coming from Oscar You know, trudging. She's responded, Yeah, finally, really unthinkable to hear from some Americans. Oscar says that they will do nothing different this Thanksgiving and traveling congregate as usual. Please consider others and do the needful. People are dying, Oscar says. Yes And it comes is there's a warning here in the UK that has just been given by one of the health advisors to the Prime minister. Boys. Johnson, That was professor with you who told Children during this Christmas period that soon to come that when they go home, they should please not hug their grandparents or people who are vulnerable because of the threats. Against people's health. So we'd love to hear from you comments to me What you think about that? Plus 4 +47786 2050.

Hungary European Union Poland Brussels Europe Prime minister World Bank Treasury Prime Minister Orban Oscar United States New Orleans Valerie Hopkins chief executive UK Natural Times Financial Times Prime Minister
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

Fareed Zakaria GPS

09:35 min | 11 months ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Fareed Zakaria GPS

"Need to worry about invasion of privacy? But I think right now that stuff is outweighed by people's desire to know whether they how viruses spread to know whether they have had it to know whether they have seen the people who've had it and I think we'll see businesses re organize themselves so that you can have production lines with social distancing. We'll see service to firms reorganize themselves restaurants have much bigger space between tables. And will I hope use technology in a much much more dramatic way than we've used it now to know who's had the virus where there were hot spots where there's much less bit? Ian? Let me ask you about a bigger picture about this. And I'm sorry we had a little technical difficulty getting you on Which is China is now donating ventilators to New York? Talk about the competition for leadership that is coming out of this which China appearing to be at least more confident in the United States Essentially uninterested well of course on a couple of levels I mean even the Chinese are responsible for the original outbreak with all the travel and the cover up. The fact is their economy is going to be back to pretty much. One hundred percents at least on the supply side within the coming weeks while the Americans and Europeans are still shutdown. They've got the medical supply chain. They have the excess medical personnel. They have the ability to learn some lessons from when the Americans gave humanitarian aid. After pre-crisis lessens the Americans appear to have forgotten. And you know I certainly believe that the Americans are capable of implementing real walk downs and listening to authority with clearly capable of putting a lot of money into our economy eight for relief and restart as we need it. We have completely abdicated. Leadership internationally for the developing world. That'll most need it for our allies like in Europe that we're not coordinating with and the Chinese smell opportunity here. They recognize that the global order will look very different coming out of this crisis than it did going in and we really need to be paying attention to what Beijing is doing right now. Paul let me ask you a quick question. We only have a few. We have about forty five seconds. One thing that worries me but all of us on this Battleline noticed have been to graduate school in social science the days very bad That is coming out. Countries testing differently Is there a danger that we are making predictions on the basis of very very incomplete data? Here especially because everything moves so fast we knew that exponential growth and in the disease but also even on the economic thing. We're now at the point where you know. Monthly economic data are already so far out of date that they're useless and so even really are a weekly figures which are not the right numbers but we were doing what we can't so Jut Look just three weeks ago. People I was in contact with people who were debating whether we needed a any sort of major economic response. It didn't do. We really have an economic emergency into justifies a large package. Unbelievable now right now. We're probably fifteen million jobs down while we were just getting this thing together. So We are it. Turns OUT THAT WE HAVE WE? We're not prepared. Not just for something of this magnitude but we're not prepared for something of this speed And this is a big problem. Thank you all we will. We will come back to you because this isn't going away and thanks in particular next on. Gps always leader Viktor. Orban's has used the corona virus crisis to grab all but absolute power. He was given the POW this week to rule by presidential decree. I'll tell you all about it when we come back. I'm Tony Shibani and I'm Aubrey Edwards. And we've got brandy roads on a w unrestricted dusty. I tell cody. Hey there's this new girl she's really cool. You should check her out Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. It was right over his head. Listen and subscribe to eighty w unrestricted four free. Wherever you your podcast. Just don't worry to face the world on my own Tracy. Morgan is back. You are low rough around the edges. Tiffany haddish's back if we support one another everything's GonNa be okay the last. Og Only Tuesdays at ten thirty nine thirty central on TBS. Donald Trump's US complaints over what he terms fake news which is really news. He doesn't like haven't gone away during the corona virus crisis but one leader has taken it farther much farther. A new law in hungry calls for up to five years in jail for publishing so called fake news related to corona and that is just a minor part of a major measure that will give prime minister. Viktor ultimate power. The ability to rule by decree. His personal whims will have no checks no balances. What will this mean for Hungary? Michael League nutty is the president of the Central European University George Source funston funded institution founded in Hungary. That was expelled by Auburn. Last year and Valerie Hopkins is a budapest-based Washington correspondent for the Financial Times. Michael let me ask you. How did we get here? This is a European country that is essentially slade from what looked like a functioning liberal democracy to something very different of Farid. This began ten years ago when he won power in twenty ten the muzzle depress a cut back on the autonomy of the courts and he came after our free institutions Central European University. Now this seems to me a culmination of Pattern that's developed over ten years and it's developed frankly because the European Union didn't stop because Successive American administrations didn't stop him. And because China and Russia the authoritarian states were only too happy to welcome another authoritarian under their camp. So it's a it's a story of him getting away with stuff but it's also a story of him being simply continuous with what he's been doing since twenty ten fascinating twenty Dan. Of course he wins the election because his His opponent The prime minister said something In in He made a gaffe on TV Valerie let me ask you about this. The judiciary hungry seemed independent The press seemed to be a thriving. Free press what did he do in both cases to neuter them? Well thank you very much for having me personally and I think it's important to know that it's if anybody knows how dangerous and economic crisis is it's Victorian so he has as Michaelson. He swept into power and twenty ten after an economic crash. And I think now. This law is geared towards preventing a similar loss of power and over the course of the last decade. He's really focused on first and rewriting the constitution amending times and then stacking the institutions like the Constitutional Court and also regulatory bodies with people loyal. To him I mean most Hungarians will tell you that actually. The lower levels of the judiciary are still fine and many of them will still make good decisions. But it's the highest levels that that we have to be worried about regarding the press. There's been a real trend of powerful all the guards tied to the government coming in taking profitable interesting independent media outlets buying a majority stake in them and then eventually turning them into government propaganda mouthpieces that was announced that one of the most important to media outlets that still independent. There are still a number of very brave and very wonderful. Local journalists working very hard to their job here was bought by a businessman close to the government. He bought a controlling stake in the paper. So it's very concerning the not happen to the day after this law passed and one of the thing. Is that a November twenty eighteen five hundred media outlets who had systematically been targeted and sort of had their editorial policies effected shall we say donated themselves for three to a foundation. That's now run and managed by ORB on loyalists and they will publish identical news. About how great the government is again. Michael describe what What some Hungarians Call. A Victory Peacock dance though this shows. You how savvy he is and that you know when he's confronted sometimes digs one step too far. He backs off. Well the optimistic view of this suspension of all a parliamentary rule and constitutional rule is that he he he can trade this back if he gets external pressure. But I actually think this is a peacock dance that In which is not dancing back. I think he's consolidating power And is going to be indifferent to what the European Union says was. I think the European Union the French. The Germans are so deep in their own crises that they're not going to mind that Basically one European state has turned into a single party state in front of.

European Union Michael League China Central European University United States Viktor prime minister Valerie Hopkins Hungary Europe Ian Beijing corona Orban Tiffany haddish Donald Trump New York
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Yesterday. The Hungarian parliament voted by a two-thirds majority to allow the government of prime minister. Viktor Orban to rule by decree the regulations were enacted to help combat the pandemic. But don't have a set time limit and mean no elections can be held. This is deeply worrying for those who believed the authoritarian government may be trying to entrench themselves in this way will join me on the line from. Budapest is Valerie Hopkins his Southeast Year correspondent for the Financial Times Valerie. Thanks for coming on this morning. What exactly do these new Hungarian regulations say but thanks very much for having me and the new law will actually yes it will give Prime Minister or Bun and his government. The power to rule by decree there was a special amendment passed by the law. Yesterday that says that the parliament will focus on discussing corona virus while it will continue to meet and the state of emergency that has been imposed can only be lifted Wants the parliament decides agrees that it should be lifted so the fact that Mr Orban enjoys. A two-thirds majority means that we don't know that people are not expecting it to be lifted anytime soon. There's no concrete criteria for lifting the decree. We had a discussion on four hundred dollars. Had A discussion with the justice minister. You Fargo. Who wrote the bill Who said everyone in Europe? We'll know when the crisis is over but she neglected to give kind of any more clear and serious criteria and the government of Hungary imposed a state of emergency in two thousand fifteen a different kind of state of emergency during the refugee crisis and that state of emergency has continued to be extended not been lifted so even though the number of refugees and asylum seekers and migrants coming through Hungary has more or less diminished since two thousand fifteen so critics and skeptics of of this government are very concerned about what this will mean. I mean is it. Dictatorship by stealth is sensible pandemic legislation to stop the virus or cynical way just to entrench power. Well you know some. Some people have been saying that. Actually Victor or did have had many of these tools already at his disposal. You know since returning to power in twenty ten with two thirds super majority in the parliament. He and his government have been able to rewrite the constitution and Pass the laws even laws that they couldn't get through parliament get them into the constitution later. So what's what's quite interesting is that he tried to rush this through last week Which would have required eighty percent in the parliament to to approve Just because of technical procedures and of course the opposition small and fragmented in Hungary though it may be Refused TO APPROVE. Something that would have no sunset clause and no expiration you know they pleaded and beg. They said it's okay to have a state of emergency you know. Let's renew it every ninety days or something like that And since then the government and the pro government media have been trying to portray the opposition as being with the virus as as not having interest of the Hungarian people at Heart. And so it's it's seen that this is going to be also something to to campaign against the opposition with when the time comes. I should mention that you. You mentioned that there can be no elections held and it's very specific in the law that there can be no by elections referenda or you know small elections but he doesn't mention anything about general elections but there aren't supposed to be any major elections until two thousand twenty two but still the fact that you know if mayor resigns or dies or something like that there can be no elections held. It is quite alarming now. Of course we know that Hungary's currently facing Article Seven proceedings under the EU treaty. That's us when countries a breaching the blocks core values. Is there anything that you can do to censure Hungary and indeed? Should it be doing anything beyond this? Yes I mean. I think raising Raising this as a point of discussion is incredibly important. I think that it's not only about Hungary. But P many people are watching Brussels now to see how they're going to handle this. You know people who are worried about the state of democracy but also people who may leaders who may also want to use this crisis to take advantage of grabbing ever more power so Justice Commission Rangers has said that he's going to review this to see if it's in line with the rule of law. And you know there is a now going to be an entire procedure where all countries legal systems and rule of law levels will be under increased scrutiny from Brussels but I but how you handle this I think will actually be crucial for for how many states perceive their ability to rein them in and you know a prime minister. Orban has really pushed that the article. Seven procedure can only discuss What was the findings of the so-called Sargentini report that passed through the European Parliament? Which was the way that the articles haven't proceedings were initiated? So anything that happened after that he argues is not fair game and I think taking a forceful approach to look at what's happened also. Since then because that wasn't September twenty eighteen will be very important. I mean hungry is just one example looking across the world there are authoritarian regimes using this to further cow their populations. It's a it's a kind of cloak of respectability if you like I mean looking at Russia's specifically or all of this new tech that's come in the the facial recognition tag. It seems that that has given the state many sweeping new powers absolutely yes. It's quite interesting to watch. I've I've also been trying to do a comparative study on how strong men are are using the crisis. But you know when you look at what's happening in in Russia or in the Philippines Thailand you know and even in Israel before the unity government was agreed upon this week. You still have you still remember that. Okay there are other leaders doing this but but this is the European Union and it's true within the EU. I think sixteen member states have imposed states of emergency. Absolutely none of them have done so without a sunset clause or some indication of when it could end or come up for renewal at least Valerie. Thank you very much. Indeed that's Valerie Hopkins South East Europe correspondent for the Financial Times speaking to us from Budapest..

Hungary parliament Viktor Orban prime minister Budapest European Union European Parliament Brussels Valerie Hopkins Prime Minister Orban Valerie Hopkins South East Eur justice minister Europe Russia Valerie Financial Times Justice Commission Rangers Bun Victor
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And also more subsidies for for home buying books what has the been any palpable success well so far it's still really too early to tell but one of the things that that is clear is that there has been a sharp uptick in the number of people who became officially and legally married because I think in order to access the subsidies you do have to be legally married so it's going to be hard to tell whether or not people will send these birds have more children but many economists say that that actually when people are making decisions about how many children to have these incentives are not necessarily the top priority the top priority are good institutions prospects for a for a big future at center and I should mention actually sorry that that one of the hallmarks of these policies incentives last year was announcing that women who bear four or more children will never have to pay income tax again for the rest of their lives which came into effect now this month and you would have some effect yes well it's that you know what what study shows that it's not actually the fourth child that's a big question but but the second or third you know once once new parents really see how hard it is to to raise a kid but Mr Arman did say at his press conference last week that he would like to he's been asking the finance minister to see if he could extend this to women who bear three or more children as well I want him coming I want to involve our guests in asking you questions in a moment Valerie it's worth noting here isn't it that hungry scenes at the center of the European immigration story and that's because thousands tens of thousands of people came through Hungary back in twenty fifteen twenty sixteen when there's that big rush particularly from Syria almost none of them stayed today no no in the Hungarian government at the time and and subsequently has made it very clear that it does not want to host my grins especially non Muslim migrants and the prime minister or burns had again at the press conference that he is worried about cultural mixing and he wants to focus on producing Hungarian babies and not address the demographic decline was encouraged yeah can I ask you a question do you think or bonds a secret feminist because of a woman has four kids she won't have time to work so maybe they want the husbands to work and then I mean the husband to stay home with the babies on the woman to work you think this is going on you know it's it's it's possible I think that the government has has done a lot of work promoting its its policy for towards families and you know there's an appointed secretary of state for for use in family affairs and they've tried to to put themselves in the vanguard of demographic policy in Europe posting huge summits here last year and and really going abroad as well to to talk about this but I I think that Hungary unlike hungry has some of the lowest rates of sixteen women in parliament actually Turkey has more women per capita and its parliament in Hungary does and or bond this is his fourth term and this is the first German which he's had female ministers many not many feminists points that we'll have another question about sort of storing this Paul of Christian rhetoric you know which is a deep deep pollsters the to key in Eastern Europe you hear that it has purchased in Poland for example but does courting on Hungarians to claim that so called Christian identity to how does that play out yes it is definitely a big topic here and and you know our prime minister or bond who in twenty fourteen made headlines by talking about his vision for ill liberalism is now has now sort of pivoted to using the term Christian freedom to describe his alternatives view for for the type of society that he wants to build one thing that I think is very interesting about this story is that it may be the the the junction where he is nationalist a message and his pro Christian message actually collide because you know the majority of the Hungarian Christians are actually get Catholics in the Catholic Church is against in vitro fertilization this is a problem declining birthrates that loads of European countries struggle with Germany has gone some way to solving it by accepting loads of immigrants although never went public about that being a reason but but all the other successful examples else wed the Tungri complain to and learn from do you know well I think that that Hungary has actually realize that there are not so many success stories and I think it's trying to to to build its own so I mean in the in the twenty eight year member states ten of them saw falling populations last year and actually the EU as a whole is at the top of the list for population declined by twenty fifty so I think that you know a lot of the EU countries are slowly waking up to realizing that they will they will need to take active measures to to figure out what to do whether that's immigration which is more immediate or this kind of long game long version of Mr our van is definitely someone who has a long game as someone has now been in power for three consecutive terms over the last ten years ominous trying to to build that kind of strategy but he often you know he they've organized big summits in Washington DC with key members of the White House and as well here last year there was a big demographic summit without other prime ministers from central Europe so and now you know that the European Union for the first time has a commissioner for democracy and democracy and it's it's clear that that the prime minister has actually played a big role in setting this agenda within Europe I think thank you very interesting loads of insights Valerie Hopkins for the Financial Times in Budapest this is weekend.

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Service on pole Henley welcome back as usual this edition of weekend will be defined by its guests today on joined by current phone Hippel she is director general of the defense think tank Russi an independent defense and security research center here in London and mock Vernon a British psychotherapist and writer he's also a former Anglican priest welcome back to the program both of you you've written quite a lot mark about losing your fate haven't you I think you describe yourself agnostic now and then informs a loss of what you write yes so I certainly I was an Anglican clergyman and it all fell apart for me which Polly was to do with losing faith actually I have quite a powerful sense of the divine and think the all relationship to what you might call the spiritual dimension really is quite crucial in the modern world people feel it in the in our lives and also kind of the sense of what we're all about some what's politics really for animal so I can stick in the sense Austin questions but not in the sense of I don't think it's you know this much there is or in a life pondering it is something that pre occupies you the money yeah well I I feel that Mulder from what goes on in the world and the inside the headlines you might say results from a sense of discontent on ease and so is everybody yeah I think so I think we live in times like this now you know whether it's from climate change whether it's from the sense that politics isn't quite working I'm a crates powerful ripples of disturbance and the part of the web address in nice thinking about how you yourself relate to that Ralph and just constantly demanding that politicians all of its fix things for you Karen you were eight how do I put it a senior civil servant in the state see more job exactly what was a senior political appointee in the Obama administration so I wasn't a civil servant but you know the the vernacular is different in the in the US but yeah I worked there almost six years and it is interesting what mark saying actually because I do think that we need to be in my world of politics we need to look outside the usual suspects because I do think we don't understand this whole global populist movement very well we all have our theories about the marginalized in the alienated at sector but to me it it isn't explaining what's happening properly and I do think it's based on discontentment you know I don't know because you can find a contradictory explanation for prompt probably everything you know in America you're in danger of saying that everyone used to be content right well exactly and and by the way you know if everybody who is marginalized there were was not going out into the street you to pretty much every poor person in the world would be on the streets right so it isn't it isn't about that and many of the people who are protesting or supporting populace leaders are doing so because they don't like the changes that are happening but I don't think any of us understand it as well as we should that's that's my point more than anything it's early in the morning what it is but not everyone at wells on wells some people might be a little more awake than us at Malik do you think that there ever was a more contented to each other about that but I I do feel that we have lost a come the white a frame of reference sent in western Europe that's really what I'm talking about I suppose which helps to situate all lives and so people are skilled at all the market's sole politics basically to offer them salvation to to complete their lives to perfect their lives in ways I think didn't really happen before because people say had religious frames of reference all people have more an admin intimate connections with the local place and if you take those those two things why then life does feel on hooked doesn't mean if one goes on to the street incident I don't think it's always about poor people on there I think that a lot of people whose lives seem to be going well in a material sense or actually underneath it unit feeding the something's not quite right to tool okay nothing wrong with pondering the big questions even at six thirty six G. M. T. at welcome to weekend all guests Karin von Hippel and mauled Vernon much more from them to come into high winds presidential election yesterday the incumbent citing when finished well ahead of a main rival and won a second term in office tie one's relationship with China dominated the election with mist site campaigning against closer ties between the countries she pointed to recent protests in Hong Kong in a rejection of China's attempts to impose the same one country two systems model on tie when we join now live from the Taiwanese capital Taipei by Margaret Lewis she is a law professor at Sentinel Seton Hall University not sure which in the U. S. she specializes in Chinese and Taiwanese lore and she's been anti one specially for this election welcome professor the China issue was the big one and in this election it certainly was one of the main issues but I dislike many elections are of course domestic issues that were also at the forefront of the voters minds and this question about global populist movements what we saw in Taiwan yesterday was a clear rejection of the populist candidates the incumbent is is a liberal isn't she certainly and Far East and turns I think she was the first in that Boston part of the world to introduce gay marriage or equivalent I think that the the Democratic Progressive Party president size party and the opposition and the KMT party do not map clearly on to the sort of at least American ideas some of the Democrats or Republicans but she did pave the way for the introduction of same sex marriage although that was prompted by a decision by the Constitutional Court so there we saw the court's really insisting that there be a change because of constitutional requirements so priority now presumably for her at term in office will be distancing from China how possible cannot be well there's already been a distancing and certainly the first four years of ties time in office we've seen a cooling in relations compared with the mining show error her predecessor however you know that's not just because of changes in Taiwan in fact I think there's been much more drastic changes and what has happened in Beijing sense the mind Joe time she didn't hang as a very different leader than what we had ten years ago there was a lot of attention on Hong Kong and a lot of time when he's with thinking what happens that could very soon happen to us one day what one thing that was really interesting to watch last night at the rallies and other times in Taiwan is that you actually see the Hong Kong protest flags being flown here and people have come over from Hong Kong even though they could not vote to be a part of that the celebration around this free and fair election certainly Hong Kong the protests and the erosion of civil and political rights was at the forefront of voters minds yesterday thank you very much Margaret Lewis in Taipei I believe Karen you've met the president is that right yes I've been to Taiwan a couple times in the last few years so we do some work on that receipt I'm definitely not East Asia expert but it's been fascinating for me to to see some changes and as you were saying the relationship with China is incredibly complicated there what what one thing that's it sounds a bit trite but both China and Taiwan are playing the long game with each other so China slowly strangling Taiwan and trying to block diplomatic recognition by even very very small countries that most people haven't heard of date you know get upset at companies like delta airlines or Hollywood films or or others who miss represent the name of Taiwan they you know they don't like I think it Republic of China I can remember the terminology but the Chinese government gets upset and so puts tons of pressure on companies when they do that which to me is a sign of insecurity on the Taiwan side they're hoping that there are democratic institutions over the long term you know will win and that China might change and it's very hard to say right now who's going to win and just to tune in to your discontent public discontent themed one of the interesting things mark about about this election was a love the the Taiwanese economy is actually doing very well it's firmly in growth the gap between rich and poor is widening usually as it is in so many countries is interesting to note yes so that grates on ease because people look across the shoulders of where I'm wondering when it's going to come to them I also wonder how it will play back into Hong Kong how this result in Taiwan will play back into Hong Kong if the people inside Taiwan looking for looking at home Kong recent elections perhaps I'm getting some some energy from that that maybe it'll play back to let's go to a country now wet populism plays very large in politics Hungary will provide free in vitro fertilization IVF treatments to couples at state to run clinics prime minister Viktor Orban has announced he said fertility was all strategic importance last month his government took over all Hungary's fertility clinics Mister Goldman whose of right wing nationalist has long advocated eight procreation over immigration policy to deal with the fact that the population of Hungary is firmly in decline we join now life from Hungary's capital Budapest by Valerie Hopkins Financial Times correspondent for southeastern Europe welcome Valerie so as long as you're born and bred Hungarian you can now get free fertility treatment then how will they actually vets people and check good morning well there's still a lot that's that's unknown about this program which is going to be rolling out already from the first of February it's had kind of a chaotic rollout first when it was announced late last month I thought it might happen already January first then in the summer so I think that to be honest they're still working out a lot of the details but if it's anything like some of the other incentives that the Hungarian government has put forward in the last few years for to encourage young people and to encourage nearly what couples to be married I think it would be quite restrictive and probably only open to members of the middle class who's been paying into public insurance schemes already for years what these other incentives tell us about them so last year actually if the government announced a whole raft of incentives for young couples to encourage them to to reproduce so one of them was a loan worth thirty thousand euros basically for for couples and the loan would be steadily forgiven them if you had up to three children when it would be fully forgiven another big subsidies for larger families to purchase new mini vans that would have capacity to seat up to seven people.

Hippel director general London Vernon writer
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

23:00 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The globalist first broadcast on the thirty first of October two thousand and nineteen uh-huh hello this is the globalist coming to you live from the Dory House in London I mean for US relations with Southeast Asia then Vladimir Houston and Viktor Shen no bill committee has decided off mid all they did the committee made a mistake will examine Ethiopia's sabre-rattling issue but this interestingly is a moment in California that is very of average for this time of year additionally we'll get the business news the APEC and Cop Twenty five because of widespread protests in recent weeks mystical odds a move that's winning praise from Democrats and scorn from Republicans ahead of a highly unpredictable December poll and now to the top the Japan the United States Australia New Zealand and India will meet in Thailand Indo Pacific with one notable absence Donald Trump who this year didn't even the University of Birmingham Good Morning Scott now trump attended is this a deliberate snub well I think it's more about trump's senses economic agencies the State Department still see the is very different however from a donald trump on a personal level while a couple things one is he doesn't awards when everybody says how wonderful he is but we know from his experience say with the fact that he is in deep domestic trouble with the gathering storm over the trump Ukraine affair oh most consequential region for America's future so I wonder how committed trump Ryan trump's not committed to the region there's a lot of dispute over whether the United States should be part of the trans-pacific nations and bilateral relations rather than multilateral means that conflict with China on or even South Korea doesn't really matter as much when Donald trump is thinking moment I just want to discuss the south China Sea for for a second I mean as we know for not expect rcn to resolve sovereignty disputes and that it's not a court so is there relations is that you have a policy which isn't just completely China is projecting its power in the region not just militarily but economically yeah ACN ACN can't resolve that on its own and it won't resolve down symbols on I wonder if there's an argument that it might actually be beneficial to the others the megyn nobody wants from a trade war and let me just say this I mean the the Americans don't trees in the region to clearly separate the trade war and the economic the confrontation across all fronts that you really have an escalation that is extremely for development which has been official to all and they are not they without rebuffing you think the absence of trump is a boon China. Oh I I he assumed the secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross but who's a man in his eighties who's not really known for inexperienced and and I think the Chinese can continue to take comfort in the fact news and that Donald Trump would prefer basically to project American power through twitter. Well the IT makes a difference who you said as you started off this item where they make a difference and then as a more detailed matter it is important the full delegation Securely Youth Authority if they have high ranking backup and let's be honest on issues far the broader problem that will both affect the summit and exists beyond it yeah it's been canceled now how serious is that well again is the cancellation is not helpful in terms of it removes a form where you can't have conflict that we have identified and right now you have got up position of tension let's be honest a very uncertain American policy and you've got the uncertainty because the world may what's on a day to day basis to deal with these issues Scott thank you very much indeed that was Scott five thousand hours of audio every minute of every show with broadcasts since we launched you'll find well-stocked with clothing books trouble accessories fragrances I'm was eighteen resort guides it's all there for you at Monaco Dot Com. What are you waiting for yesterday? Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Auburn and Russian president least after the meeting Oban said Hungary sought to take a step forward every on the line is Valerie Hopkins Southeast European correspondent for the F. T. go why is it to Orban's advantage to cozy up to Putin since early two thousand Sixteen v Bilateral meeting a no e- You are NATO leader has being above his way to Hungary accountable point eight percent of the E. U.'s GDP prominence they are also of course reliant on on energy imports from of course for Mr Orban's he's interested in maintaining good relations as he broken sanctions the day before Mr Putin's visit there was a high profile. US many years now you know he said Hungary lives on this Berlin Moscow. Istanbul Stephen What's in it for Russia driving wedges Mr Putin is fostering this relationship with Hungary he can and etiquette in in Turkey while again Turkeys member of NATO and of course I think that there is very much it's this personal drive from Putin's point of view that be at Nordstrom to in the Norfolk stream in the south to particularly so he can avoid so there is an economic side to it as well but I think really unfortunately back sanctions and so on but the has been a certain amount of interference in both e ways that Hungary is being quite obstructive lately has been in blocking the NATO targets the native russian-speakers in the East but also cleaning language so because of this Hungary has been obstr- constantly obstructing not that that while the grievances may be legitimate there are there are a number of other countries other issues like the International Investment Bank which is the former comic con living that's paying for other innovations and they also the parliament pledged to a lot of the Western allies have been extremely concerned about the fact that the bank could be used agent activity all over Europe Stephen The point that battery makes their about ethnic stopping ethnic Hungarians in Ukraine from speaking in Hungarian it's actually about trying is the official language of the country this is part of the part of the spat with with Russia before the Russian that's what we wanted to be taught in now spin off his these ethnic Hungarians of are being told really it's pro Ukrainian that's all I did language law and how Turks stream that because of course Russia has to pay crane I mean is this bizarre situation certain advantages for for buying Russian gas so if they were able to take way of putting pressure on Ukraine and in that sense or Ben is being used I've been saying recently Valerie finally has that been any kind of final statement from he said that they plan they made great progress in their relations also he spoke repeatedly about the fact that you know Hungary clear that if if Russian gas comes to Hungary only the Ukraine that's not good for his he became a household name in Hungary was when he stood thirty years ago now to turnaround that to the extent that he's now mentioning Russia China India as as one of the countries that should be emulated in tips Mr Organ from Putin Valerie thank you very much indeed that's Valerie Hawkins Asahi dam could serve as a boot heel on the hose which irrigates it Egypt's the globalist in the world.

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Are very adamant that <hes> the sovereignty that that would be an infringement uh-huh sovereignty so his point attack on Finland he went and looked you know complained. Finland have no constitutional court you know he went into some of the minutiae of how judges are appointed and and he I mean it's quite common in his rhetoric that he tries to point to a double. Double Standard in the E._U.. <hes> and elsewhere that that that people are attacking Hungary because they have a more conservative they'll liberal view on on how the world should be organizer. How you're organizing state <hes> compared to other other countries and <hes> the Finns we acted quite quite strongly immediately afterwards and I think that it's kind of <hes> setting up <hes> an ideological battle that that or continue to you use in his in his political communication now he was a big supporter of us? You'll Vonda lion in her bid. For the presidency of the European Commission. He's due to meet with her later this week to think that he can expect it to be receptive to his ideas indeed. He was a big supporter and he in his speech <hes> expressed the glee that that Hungary he said and the other before countries were able to squash the candidacy of of who he said were political gorillas <hes> Frans Timmermans Nepal's and <hes> <hes> my mental Jaber from Germany and and he what's interesting is that they really made a big effort to portray misunder lions <hes> victory is the success of Hungary as of the four countries but what they and usually they do so by pointing out I think in his speech he said she's a very practical woman and the mother of seven children and that's been something that he's he's trumpeted quite regularly regularly in what he what or bonded and other have not said is that you know she has been. She's criticized Hungary in two thousand fifteen for its treatment of migrants <hes> she's criticized Poland <hes> and express support for the position in the past I <hes> and she has you know articulates a vision of Europe. That's quite federalist. <hes> I think that he that that they have every incentive to try to start off on the right foot <hes> and and the the what I what I'm often told him would have passed that <hes> they expect this underlay into B be aware of the hack that she's in her position because of Hungary and the other Vinaigrette Grete four countries so Slovakia and Czech Republic and and and to be understanding of their position <hes> and how Sunderland <hes> will will behave in the first meeting or <hes> subsequently and guest but I do think that <hes> <hes> she may we'll probably not stop the rule of law procedures <hes> against Hungary that have been initiated the article seven proceedings. Thanks very much indeed. That's Valerie Hopkins of the F. T. Yeah and it's time to talk business now. With upshot rutty from couth shut quite a focus on climate change this morning our environmental environmental protests shaking corporate boards yeah I mean we see them on streets and <hes> we wonder that they have any impact and I thought this story from the F._D._A.. Made it clear that they can have impact <hes> I'm so there's a group called climate action one hundred plots which was set up only two years ago and it has <hes> investors that <hes> manage about the d three trillion dollars of assets and what this group is done is is taking what we see on the streets and brought them to the attention of corporate boards so they're asking companies like oil companies B._P.. or Shell or even retail companies like Unilever or cement companies needs which are big emitters <hes> like <hes> Lafarge Holcim to change how corporate boards operate they want to. They want them to have someone who's specifically on the board of only to deal with the with the risks. It's that time of change <hes> puts forth <hes> and that sort of top down change is crucial if we are to hit climate goals absolutely then onto a story from your own organ from courts talking about extreme temperatures feeling dangerous climate feedback feedback loop. Tell us more so we had <hes> we had a heatwave. It's gone. I.

Hungary Finland Frans Timmermans Nepal European Commission Jaber Europe Valerie Hopkins Poland Unilever Lafarge Holcim Slovakia Czech Republic Germany Sunderland three trillion dollars two years
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"June in weekly to the bulletin with U._B._S. for all the latest insights and opinions from U._B._S. and experts that's from around the world summer is festival time in Europe and many people like to congregate in beauty spots to engage in cultural debate and listen to Music Isaac. It seems Victor Orban Hungary's prime minister is no different as he made a return visit to a festival in Transylvania this weekend in a previous visit in two thousand fourteen. He attracted much attention by detailing his efforts to build an illiberal state. It was a subject he returned to again as well as talking. The European Union which he says is my grave mistakes of immigration and the economy will join me on the line is Valerie Hopkins Southeast Europe correspondent for the F. T. Valerie thanks for for coming onto monocle twenty four this morning. Can you give us some context why was done in Romania or the prime minister. Every year for the last thirty years has traveled to Tucson Yo ships known in Hungarian or by Latouche not in Romanian and for <hes> a festival that is supposed to be a like a week long <hes> music festival but also political debates discussions and and a meeting place for kind of intellectual elites and supporters of the Party <hes> and their local counterparts in Romania and <hes> this was the thirtieth anniversary of his speech and it comes at a time when Hungary like much of Europe is marking the thirty years since nineteen ninety collapse of the Berlin Wall <hes> and so he goes every year and this is normally where he lays out his agenda for the coming years and and even the coming <hes> decades he he mentioned <hes> the next era of fifteen years <hes> which he said in his speech would be the prime time of his life comparing kind of the transition <hes> of Hungary to a democracy now to a national transition which he referred to as beginning in two thousand ten when he came back <hes> <hes> to become the prime minister for the second time <hes> and has now been prime minister of Hungary <hes> he's now in his third consecutive term and so she laid out he kind of built in his speech he was expanding on his twenty fourteenth beach about liberalism here he really defined it and he tried to shape it and describe it now more I think he's trying to rebrand it as Christian liberty and he really <hes> in his speech kind of tried to pit his vision of of Liberalism of Christian liberty against a so called global internationalist <hes> order which he said you know was trying to diminish personal ties to the state with too focused on individual freedoms and liberties and and <hes> you know that that they were that that these global internationalists are attacking a Hungary and and the things that the prime minister stands for <hes> because he was saying that that incompatible with their idea of of liberalism so he really <hes> was was pushing for his vision and he spent a lot of times speaking about the importance of collective identity collective achievements that <hes> he said individual freedoms can never encroach on the interests of the community <hes> and that that the majority needs need to be respected and he said that that constitutes the foundation of democracy and he had a bit of a dig at the E. U.. Two didn't he he did well. He actually made a very pointed dig <hes> a much stronger more point to dig at Finland which is now holding the E._U.. Presidency and this has been going on now for about ten days ever since Finland indicated that one of the priorities the EU presidency over the next month is to <hes> find a mechanism to tie E._U.. Funding <hes> to rule of law benchmarks you know and Hungary is is a pretty big recipient of EU funds. I think about three percent of its G._D._p.. <hes> <hes> is <hes>. The equivalent has been given to Hungary every year by the E._U.. <hes> about twenty five billion over over a five year period and it is a really important part of the economy so are the one who's that but he certainly certainly <hes> does not want to <hes> be tied to any any rule of law benchmarks you know and <hes> he and his supporters are are very adamant that <hes> the sovereignty that that would be an infringement uh-huh sovereignty so his point attack on Finland he went and looked you know complained..

prime minister Victor Orban Hungary Hungary Europe Finland Romania Latouche European Union Valerie Hopkins Southeast Euro Transylvania F. T. Valerie Berlin Tucson thirty years fifteen years three percent five year ten days
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on FT World Weekly

FT World Weekly

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on FT World Weekly

"I'm getting Rochman today, we're looking at the Balkans, an area that dominated international attention twenty years ago after the wars in Bosnia and Kossovo. But it slipped from the headlines in recent years. Joining me to discuss the region, and at some certain prospects are the T euro penatta, Ben home, an Fokin correspondent, Valerie Hopkins. Ben the F T this morning described the Balkans as the most volatile region in Europe. Why would he say that? Because historically, it has been a region that has been full tired of by competing power blocks. You know, the ultimate empire the Austro-Hungarian empire the Russian empire and that has left kind of overlapping, national, and ethnic and religious divisions. And we are still living with the legacy of that, and sort of overlaid by an incomplete transition to democracy and the rule of law after communism and. Then probably on top of all of that you have corruption. It's deeply rooted. So Ben before we continue. Let's just define the region. How big is it? And how significant so we're talking about the western Balkans region roughly twenty million people about the population of the Netherlands, but with a really tiny economy, about the size of Slovakia's. And we're talking about Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herzegovina Albania, north Macedonia, and Kosovo, of course. So it's a pretty small number of people with a pretty small combined GDP. It's not significant, but it's always been a source of instability as we've known for the last century. Valerie, Ben referred to this as a kind of incomplete process and some of the countries in the regions, maybe all of them have hurt. The delta Modeste nation will be joining the EU I'm thinking, particularly of north Macedonian Albanian, but they're finding very hard. Yes. Well, that's true. They've been hoping to join but also the e u has been hoping for them to join I mean for the first time this was articulated in two thousand three in there. I e you some. In Thessaloniki, all of the countries of the western Balkans were promised a credible path to accession we're given unequivocal support from the Member States and one year ago after north miss Adonia and underwent quite comprehensive changes north Macedonia, to its name, and two other reforms and L Bainian committing to a very onerous judicial reform were promised that they would get a green light this year. And as we saw yesterday that decision was punted again, for a couple of months, at least until October and from their point of view, how much of a disastrous. Well, it's quite a big disaster. I mean, enormous Adonia which recently changed its name in order to end a decades long conflict with Greece over their name, which Athens believed implied territorial desire over the Greek region of the same name, the whole public support for the agreement and public support for the government is riding on the guarantees towards progress towards the EU that are written into that. So north Macedonia, has moved forward in terms of its NATO membership. Several countries, I think, have already ratified the NATO accession protocol for them. But, you know, the European Union membership is what the public really wants and at a certain point, it may become untenable for the leaders of the country to stay in power if they can't deliver on what was promised them, and that would be a disaster for them. And for Europe. Yeah. Mean Ben you've been pretty critical of the youth decision. What's the argument for saying the eaves being sources that it had a unique? Novo paternity to put these two countries move firmly on the path of judgement. EU rules values and sort of binding them into the EU orbit, we have to remember that sort of enlargement process. If you just put aside the various problems that we've experienced over the is in the grand sweep of history. It's been a remarkable success for the EU it stabilized the region, it's brought prosperity and it's dissolved the division between eastern western Europe and the argument just to recap for those who don't totally recall took the EU from what fifteen countries to now. Twenty eight to twenty eight. Yeah. And so, in argument is probably the most effective European Union foreign policy, and it has helped put countries on the right path, and stabilize democracy and promote reform and promote the rule of law. But perhaps there are now plenty of people in the EU think we've reached the end of that process and the legacy problems from previous enlargements have come back to haunt the EU. Maybe the enlargement the accession process was not rigorous. Enough. And so now there are plenty of people who are having second thoughts about it. Yeah. And I mean just to play devil's advocate, I suppose if you are European politician, you will say, well, sure the future of these countries matters, but as he was saying Elliott's twenty million people in the, you have the rise of populists across Europe and places like France, the Netherlands, Britain's voted for Brexit. And it doesn't appear that accession to countries like, oh, near is popular. So perhaps that wise, not to do it quite possibly. But I mean, I think the calculation has to be how long can you keep these countries on the path to accession without ever actually giving them accession at the end of the day? And that solvency something that the EU has tried with Turkey and it's backfired arguably spectacularly, although you could also blame premise, Erta one, perhaps originally topper one for the kind of backsliding in democracy, and the sort of drift away from the European mainstream, in Turkey, but I mean that is clearly the calculation it would be good for Europe if. If Albany could be put on the path to membership even if it never actually meets the criteria to join fully, and you mentioned Obama. Valerie back from there. Give us a description of where the country is in terms of its economy, and its politics because when I was growing up out, mania was like the most isolated place. It was North Korea Europe. And the idea that it might even be close to joining the paean union in some ways, seems miraculous. Well, indeed, it is. And it's quite far off. But I think, you know, to build on what Ben said many Member States have grown tired of the process and have learned that they need to impose further and further restrictions. We see that many of the countries that have joined in recent decades still have problems with their judicial systems. So we're talking countries like Romania Bulgaria, yes, Hungary. If I may say, so the conditions and the demands that Brussels and the Member States have made on countries, which are hoping to join have actually become much more onerous Albania, my story that I did while I was in Toronto was about the extremely onerous. Writing process that all judges, and prosecutors are being subjected to which has left. The country's supreme court with only two judges. One of them I think is being vetted this week. So it may have only one judge so far, only one judge survived because the two tional court, I believe, has only one judge, which is actually quite stabilizing, on the political. See now as the parliament has moved to impeach the president for calling early elections. And no one in the court can judge on this. I don't wanna get too deep into their politics. But I would like to say to that Albanian has also accepted to host the first FrontEx mission FrontEx being the US Border police agency because during the two thousand fifteen migrant crisis, the EU sort of realized woke up and remembered that actually all of these countries in the Balkan route are inside of Europe that if you have weak states week, police weakens to, to Sion's at that will have consequences for the security and safety of the rest of the block. So there should be more interest in improving those institutions and the best way to do it all. Of the academic work that's been done in the Balkans shows that the carrot of enlargement, and of a real credible accession path is the best way to inspire reforms, but how is the economy doing? And how connected is opening to the rest of Europe, now compared to those days of isolation. I mean silly, anecdote but, you know, I come across our Bainian in London now buildings around the corner. So to some extent, they seem to have been integrated little bit. Well, absolutely. I mean, quite a significant portion of Albanians left the country in the nineties jobs, better opportunities. And I think it's rare to meet now lenient who doesn't speak at least two or three languages. But now, people are coming back business ties between mania and especially Italy, Switzerland UK are very strong and the economy's growing, I think actually in the Balkans. The economies are growing much faster than the EU average about four five percent. They still have a long way to go to catch up, but there's quite a lot of vitality and what about this issue of organized crime, which is thrown at all the countries in the Balkans. But I think particularly. Albania for those sitting in Brussels or elsewhere, saying, do we really want country in that condition inside the EU, how serious is the problem? Well, it is a serious problem. And it you know, it also goes to show that again you can't separate the Balkans. Even with the Albania or north as Donio, anyone not being inside of the EU criminals will always find a way to engage in their activity. It seems to me in some of my discussions with police dodges prosecutors that sometimes this threat is overblown. For instance, the Dutch parliament, several weeks ago passed a Bill asking their government to withdraw visa-free travel for all Baynes, dude organised crime. And then when you go and inject a Dutch officials, they say actually, this is not necessarily for violent crime. A lot of people are trying to get on both. Maybe they're trying to come to the UK but actually they're not necessarily being arrested for trafficking in drugs, or persons Ben turning to the other country. We were talking about north Macedonia that I suppose, makes the point that this is also still an issue. To some extent, war and peace. I mean they had extremely tense relations with Greece for sometime. Yes. They have done over the dispute over the name after the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. And that, of course, has prevented Macedonia, north Macedonia is now 'cause integration into the Atlantic community, the NATO. So I mean, it really was a huge that Ford when Zorn's Iovan Alexis, it press the Greek premier achieve this deal, and it still highly contentious in Greece. And we have a general election next month in Greece, where you are likely to see the return of a center, right? New democracy led government and new democracy has been very, very critical of the naming deal with north Macedonia. It remains to be seen whether they will actually go as far as to block their entry, but I suspect Athens will be a lot less accommodating in the future than it has been over the last couple of years. And if I recall correctly at the time, there was some evidence, which the Cyprus government acted on the Russian espionage Intel. Emergence agencies trying to stoke up opposition to the north Macedonia settlement does that raise. Also, I suppose a subsidiary issue, but crucial one which affects Europe's judgment, which is that to the extent that this area is not integrated with the rest of the EU becomes the sort of floating space..

EU Europe Ben Macedonia Valerie Hopkins north Macedonia NATO Greece Albania Athens Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herze Brussels Netherlands Bosnia North Korea Member States Rochman Yugoslavia Kossovo
Europe's Balkan dilemma

FT World Weekly

14:18 min | 1 year ago

Europe's Balkan dilemma

"Today, we're looking at the Balkans, an area that dominated international attention twenty years ago after the wars in Bosnia and Kossovo. But it slipped from the headlines in recent years. Joining me to discuss the region, and at some certain prospects are the T euro penatta, Ben home, an Fokin correspondent, Valerie Hopkins. Ben the F T this morning described the Balkans as the most volatile region in Europe. Why would he say that? Because historically, it has been a region that has been full tired of by competing power blocks. You know, the ultimate empire the Austro-Hungarian empire the Russian empire and that has left kind of overlapping, national, and ethnic and religious divisions. And we are still living with the legacy of that, and sort of overlaid by an incomplete transition to democracy and the rule of law after communism and. Then probably on top of all of that you have corruption. It's deeply rooted. So Ben before we continue. Let's just define the region. How big is it? And how significant so we're talking about the western Balkans region roughly twenty million people about the population of the Netherlands, but with a really tiny economy, about the size of Slovakia's. And we're talking about Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herzegovina Albania, north Macedonia, and Kosovo, of course. So it's a pretty small number of people with a pretty small combined GDP. It's not significant, but it's always been a source of instability as we've known for the last century. Valerie, Ben referred to this as a kind of incomplete process and some of the countries in the regions, maybe all of them have hurt. The delta Modeste nation will be joining the EU I'm thinking, particularly of north Macedonian Albanian, but they're finding very hard. Yes. Well, that's true. They've been hoping to join but also the e u has been hoping for them to join I mean for the first time this was articulated in two thousand three in there. I e you some. In Thessaloniki, all of the countries of the western Balkans were promised a credible path to accession we're given unequivocal support from the Member States and one year ago after north miss Adonia and underwent quite comprehensive changes north Macedonia, to its name, and two other reforms and L Bainian committing to a very onerous judicial reform were promised that they would get a green light this year. And as we saw yesterday that decision was punted again, for a couple of months, at least until October and from their point of view, how much of a disastrous. Well, it's quite a big disaster. I mean, enormous Adonia which recently changed its name in order to end a decades long conflict with Greece over their name, which Athens believed implied territorial desire over the Greek region of the same name, the whole public support for the agreement and public support for the government is riding on the guarantees towards progress towards the EU that are written into that. So north Macedonia, has moved forward in terms of its NATO membership. Several countries, I think, have already ratified the NATO accession protocol for them. But, you know, the European Union membership is what the public really wants and at a certain point, it may become untenable for the leaders of the country to stay in power if they can't deliver on what was promised them, and that would be a disaster for them. And for Europe. Yeah. Mean Ben you've been pretty critical of the youth decision. What's the argument for saying the eaves being sources that it had a unique? Novo paternity to put these two countries move firmly on the path of judgement. EU rules values and sort of binding them into the EU orbit, we have to remember that sort of enlargement process. If you just put aside the various problems that we've experienced over the is in the grand sweep of history. It's been a remarkable success for the EU it stabilized the region, it's brought prosperity and it's dissolved the division between eastern western Europe and the argument just to recap for those who don't totally recall took the EU from what fifteen countries to now. Twenty eight to twenty eight. Yeah. And so, in argument is probably the most effective European Union foreign policy, and it has helped put countries on the right path, and stabilize democracy and promote reform and promote the rule of law. But perhaps there are now plenty of people in the EU think we've reached the end of that process and the legacy problems from previous enlargements have come back to haunt the EU. Maybe the enlargement the accession process was not rigorous. Enough. And so now there are plenty of people who are having second thoughts about it. Yeah. And I mean just to play devil's advocate, I suppose if you are European politician, you will say, well, sure the future of these countries matters, but as he was saying Elliott's twenty million people in the, you have the rise of populists across Europe and places like France, the Netherlands, Britain's voted for Brexit. And it doesn't appear that accession to countries like, oh, near is popular. So perhaps that wise, not to do it quite possibly. But I mean, I think the calculation has to be how long can you keep these countries on the path to accession without ever actually giving them accession at the end of the day? And that solvency something that the EU has tried with Turkey and it's backfired arguably spectacularly, although you could also blame premise, Erta one, perhaps originally topper one for the kind of backsliding in democracy, and the sort of drift away from the European mainstream, in Turkey, but I mean that is clearly the calculation it would be good for Europe if. If Albany could be put on the path to membership even if it never actually meets the criteria to join fully, and you mentioned Obama. Valerie back from there. Give us a description of where the country is in terms of its economy, and its politics because when I was growing up out, mania was like the most isolated place. It was North Korea Europe. And the idea that it might even be close to joining the paean union in some ways, seems miraculous. Well, indeed, it is. And it's quite far off. But I think, you know, to build on what Ben said many Member States have grown tired of the process and have learned that they need to impose further and further restrictions. We see that many of the countries that have joined in recent decades still have problems with their judicial systems. So we're talking countries like Romania Bulgaria, yes, Hungary. If I may say, so the conditions and the demands that Brussels and the Member States have made on countries, which are hoping to join have actually become much more onerous Albania, my story that I did while I was in Toronto was about the extremely onerous. Writing process that all judges, and prosecutors are being subjected to which has left. The country's supreme court with only two judges. One of them I think is being vetted this week. So it may have only one judge so far, only one judge survived because the two tional court, I believe, has only one judge, which is actually quite stabilizing, on the political. See now as the parliament has moved to impeach the president for calling early elections. And no one in the court can judge on this. I don't wanna get too deep into their politics. But I would like to say to that Albanian has also accepted to host the first FrontEx mission FrontEx being the US Border police agency because during the two thousand fifteen migrant crisis, the EU sort of realized woke up and remembered that actually all of these countries in the Balkan route are inside of Europe that if you have weak states week, police weakens to, to Sion's at that will have consequences for the security and safety of the rest of the block. So there should be more interest in improving those institutions and the best way to do it all. Of the academic work that's been done in the Balkans shows that the carrot of enlargement, and of a real credible accession path is the best way to inspire reforms, but how is the economy doing? And how connected is opening to the rest of Europe, now compared to those days of isolation. I mean silly, anecdote but, you know, I come across our Bainian in London now buildings around the corner. So to some extent, they seem to have been integrated little bit. Well, absolutely. I mean, quite a significant portion of Albanians left the country in the nineties jobs, better opportunities. And I think it's rare to meet now lenient who doesn't speak at least two or three languages. But now, people are coming back business ties between mania and especially Italy, Switzerland UK are very strong and the economy's growing, I think actually in the Balkans. The economies are growing much faster than the EU average about four five percent. They still have a long way to go to catch up, but there's quite a lot of vitality and what about this issue of organized crime, which is thrown at all the countries in the Balkans. But I think particularly. Albania for those sitting in Brussels or elsewhere, saying, do we really want country in that condition inside the EU, how serious is the problem? Well, it is a serious problem. And it you know, it also goes to show that again you can't separate the Balkans. Even with the Albania or north as Donio, anyone not being inside of the EU criminals will always find a way to engage in their activity. It seems to me in some of my discussions with police dodges prosecutors that sometimes this threat is overblown. For instance, the Dutch parliament, several weeks ago passed a Bill asking their government to withdraw visa-free travel for all Baynes, dude organised crime. And then when you go and inject a Dutch officials, they say actually, this is not necessarily for violent crime. A lot of people are trying to get on both. Maybe they're trying to come to the UK but actually they're not necessarily being arrested for trafficking in drugs, or persons Ben turning to the other country. We were talking about north Macedonia that I suppose, makes the point that this is also still an issue. To some extent, war and peace. I mean they had extremely tense relations with Greece for sometime. Yes. They have done over the dispute over the name after the collapse of the former Yugoslavia. And that, of course, has prevented Macedonia, north Macedonia is now 'cause integration into the Atlantic community, the NATO. So I mean, it really was a huge that Ford when Zorn's Iovan Alexis, it press the Greek premier achieve this deal, and it still highly contentious in Greece. And we have a general election next month in Greece, where you are likely to see the return of a center, right? New democracy led government and new democracy has been very, very critical of the naming deal with north Macedonia. It remains to be seen whether they will actually go as far as to block their entry, but I suspect Athens will be a lot less accommodating in the future than it has been over the last couple of years. And if I recall correctly at the time, there was some evidence, which the Cyprus government acted on the Russian espionage Intel. Emergence agencies trying to stoke up opposition to the north Macedonia settlement does that raise. Also, I suppose a subsidiary issue, but crucial one which affects Europe's judgment, which is that to the extent that this area is not integrated with the rest of the EU becomes the sort of floating space. And there is no evidence that not just the Russians but also the Turks and even the Chinese are taking an interest in the western Balkans. Absolutely. I suspect it's possible to maybe overplay, the extent of Russian influence, although it has been substantial an acute in some places such as the authentic your and Montenegro and this attempt to stoke up resistance to the referendum on the name changed Illinois with Macedonia, which the Greeks are pro Russian country, actually expelled him Russian diplomats accusing the spine. The Turks are obviously increasingly involved in Bosnia to governor, and Albanian in Kosova, and the. Please spot an opportunity to extend their influence through commerce and through infrastructure spending. So, yeah, we're replaying centuries of history where this region has been kind of plaything for the great powers. And of course, I suppose it's easier for Europe to ignore to the extent that these above Ling cute problems, but lots of problems as long as it doesn't actually break out into violence. Now I mentioned at the beginning of the program that the broad or can region. We were at war twenty years ago is there danger of the old conference coming bubbling back. Or is it more that we're talking about serious, but subsidiary issues of people flows economic crises organized crime, and so on, is there danger of real all while I think you'd be foolish to rule out the danger of a return to conflict in this area in the sense that forty years ago, you might have done the same thing but history has shown how quickly this place can erupt into. James, and I suspect that remains although I'm sure it has reduced in the last ten twenty years, and there is more at stake for the region's inhabitants. If they have a clear path to e membership, which will bring guarantees of security, and better economic prospects. And the end of the day, I have the firm feeling that it's often corrupt politicians who have their own economic interests at heart, who are perpetuating the kind of ethnic divisions in this region. More than popular convictions. And Valerie euro correspondent on the ground. So how stable or unstable does it seem to you? Well, I do agree with Ben that seemingly innocuous crisis can escalate. And I think that in most of the countries, you really do have this kind of boiling, the frog situation where I is correspondent struggle with sometimes seemingly small jumps in a story, actually could carry larger consequences later. But I think rather than conflict, the major risk is just that the country will empty out with people losing hope. That they will be able to create a better life for their children and grandchildren. For instance, in Bosnia, which is a population of three and a half million in the last three or four years. I think two hundred thousand people left since January some thirty thousand people have already left the country. And that's when I talked to people, it's really a matter of losing hope that they will join the European Union and have a better life. So these countries will suffer catastrophic demographic decline. And western Europe will find if they didn't integrate them, they'll show up on the doorsteps. Well, many of them, actually are getting jobs in western Europe, which are empty, you know, these are educated workers doctors dentists health worker, social workers, so it's not the same as migrant crisis. Most of them are going legally with work permits, but they're leaving their home countries for good. Okay. We'll, we'll have to leave it. Thank you very much indeed, to buttery Hopkins in the studio and to Ben holes. Well that's it for this week until next week. Goodbye.

Europe European Union BEN Macedonia Bosnia North Macedonia Greece Nato Albania Valerie Serbia Montenegro Bosnia Herze Netherlands Athens Valerie Hopkins Brussels Kosovo Adonia Slovakia Member States North Korea
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Layout in assessing to time line as you can. But how do we get from this one, scandalous video to now? Five government officials haven't vacate their posts. Wow. Well, this has been one of the most exciting weekends early weeks in Austria. I think in its postwar history on Friday night, as everyone's heading home from work, all of a sudden, the social media networks, every renting with news, a news of a leaked video of the vice chancellor of Austria, Hines Christians have the far-right Freedom Party and his young protege in a villa any beats drunk, it'd be being the Spanish island where this video was filmed. Exactly just blathering on and on to a Russian woman, who they believed was the niece of a prominent Russian oligarch, and I'll just insert here that I have not had the opportunity to verify exactly what is being documented on this video. But what it has done is resolve of these questions in Austria about the extent of Russian influence in Australian politics. Is that right? Absolutely. And I mean it's funny because these are actually fake Russians. This is these are not necessarily people that were sent from the Kremlin we. Don't really know the providence of the video, some people believe it's an activist collective other people are speculating that some secret services of various countries were involved. But the most important thing to say is that vice chancellor struck. It hasn't denied any of the assertion, right. Well, let me ensured a practical question here. Where does this leave the government of Austria whose church today? Oh my goodness crisis keeps deepening by the day yesterday. Some of the parties called for a vote of no confidence. The chancellor Sebastian courts was hoping that he could get rid of interior minister kinkle, who has also been the center of several scandals himself during the course of the eighteen months that they've been government. The other ministers of transport defense and labor said, we're gonna leave too, so you're describing all sorts of behind closed doors. Machinations going on here, but bottom line. Australia prepares to go to bed tonight. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz is still in. Charge of the government, but he doesn't have much of a government now that his coalition has fallen apart. Exactly, how is this playing as you're out in about interviewing people on the streets of Vienna? Well in Vienna. People are extremely concerned, although Vienna has a very long history as a social democratic city. It's known in fact as red Vienna. But, you know, the first poll since the scandal came out yesterday and the Freedom Party lost a four to five percent, but they're still pulling it eighteen percent. So their core supporters remain, loyal and support their anti immigrant anti Jimmy t agenda in this all anybody's talking about. Oh my goodness. You can't avoid it. I mean the cafe on the ground floor of my apartment building has painted up on its windows. We're going to be everyone's moved on from the shock to the speculation of the providence of the video, and the question of whether or not then vote of emotional confidence will go through Valerie Hopkins of the financial times speaking with us from. Vienna. Thanks so much. Thank you very much for having me, the investigation into the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka has now spread to neighboring, India the suspected mastermind those attacks had spent time there. Authorities are looking at whether the region could become a new front for global jihad and bears. Lauren Freyer reports from southern India, where she met families of some ISIS recruits, these are the photos. How old is she say exceedances been to some reefs through old photos of her daughter's dance recitals as a girl? She was booking. She studied to be a dentist then three years ago she converted to Islam and moved to Afghanistan. Authorities say she joined ISIS for a while, she still sent her mother voice messages. Channel get. Yeah. Hi. Yeah. My Granddad that all the way from. Yeah. Being do smiles at a recording of the granddaughter. She's never met and wonders if she ever will six months ago, her daughter's phone line went silent. This is where been do's daughter came away to dental school, and was she and her husband fellow convert to calm are believed to have been radicalized the northern part of India's..

Vienna Austria chancellor India Lauren Freyer Chancellor Sebastian Kurz kinkle ISIS Valerie Hopkins far-right Freedom Party Freedom Party Spanish island Kremlin Jimmy t Sri Lanka Australia Afghanistan
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KCRW

"Brought to you by brilliant earth rights, five thirty five. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish and Mary Louise Kelley the government of Austria is in chaos. It started with a leaked video that appears to show, the country's vice chancellor promising government contracts to a Russian woman in exchange. He would buy stakes in an Austrian newspaper and use it to support the vice chancellor's party. That party would be the far right freedom. Party founded by former Nazis after World War Two until today, it was part of Austria's ruling coalition now. The vice chancellor is out, and so are all the other Freedom Party ministers. I'll tell us more about what this means for Austria. And for Europe, we're joined from Vienna by Valerie Hopkins of the financial times. Hey valerie. Hi, thanks for having me. Glad to have you with us. So layout in assessing to time line as you can. But how did we get from this one, scandalous video to now? Five government officials having to vacate their pros. Wow. Well, this has been one of the most exciting weekends and early weeks in Austria, I think, in its postwar history on Friday night, as everyone's heading home from work, all of a sudden, the social media networks, every renting with news, a news of a leaked video of the vice chancellor, of Austria Heinz, Christian have the far-right Freedom Party and his young, protege in villa, any beats drunk visa being the Spanish island where this video was filmed. Exactly. Just blathering on and on to a Russian woman, who they believed was the niece of a prominent Russian oligarch, and I'll just insert here that I have not had the opportunity to verify exactly what is being documented on this video. But what it has done is raise all these questions in Austria about the extent of Russian influence in Australian politics that, right? Absolutely. And I mean it's funny because these are actually fake Russians. This is these are not necessarily people that were sent from the Kremlin we. Don't really know the providence of the video, some people believe it's an activist collective other people are speculating that some secret services of various countries were involved. But the most important thing to say is that vice chancellor struck. It hasn't denied any of the assertion, right. Well, let me insert a practical question here, we're does this leave the government of Austria whose church today? Oh my goodness. The crisis keeps deepening by the day yesterday. Some of the parties called for a vote of no confidence. The chancellor Sebastian courts was hoping that he could get rid of interior minister kinkle, who has also been the center of several scandals himself during the course of the eighteen months that they've been a government, the other ministers of transport defense and labor said, we're gonna leave too, so you're describing all sorts of the behind closed doors machinations going on here, but bottom line, Australia prepares to go to bed tonight. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz is still in. Charge of the government, but he doesn't have much of a government now that his coalition has fallen apart. Exactly, how is this playing as you're out, and about interviewing people on the streets of Vienna? Well in Vienna. People are extremely concerned, although Vienna has a very long history as a social democratic city. It's known in fact as red Vienna. But, you know, the first poll since the scandal came out yesterday and the Freedom Party lost a four to five percent, but they're still pulling at eighteen percent. So their core supporters remained, loyal and support their anti immigrant anti LGBT agenda in this all anybody's talking about. Oh my goodness. You can't avoid it. I mean the cafe on the ground floor of my apartment building has painted up on its windows. We're going to be everyone's moved on from the shock to the speculation of the providence of the video, and the question of whether or not the vote of an emotional confidence will go through Valerie Hopkins of the financial times speaking with us from. Vienna. Thanks so much. Thank you very much for having me, the investigation into the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka has now spread to neighboring, India, the suspected mastermind of those attacks had spent time there. Authorities are looking at whether the region could become a new front for global jihad. NPR's Lauren Freyer reports from southern India, where she met families of some ISIS recruits, these are the photos, how did she say senior into some reefs through old photos of her daughter's dance recitals as a girl? She was booking. She studied to be a dentist then three years ago she converted to Islam and moved to Afghanistan. Authorities say she joined ISIS for a while, she still sent her mother voice messages. Yeah, hi. Yeah. My all the way from Afghanistan. Yeah. Being do smiles at a recording of the granddaughter. She's never met and wonders if she ever will six months ago, her daughter's phone line went silent. This is where been daughter came away to dental school, and where she and her husband fellow convert to home are believed to have been radicalized the northern part of India's. Careless.

chancellor Austria Vienna Freedom Party Valerie Hopkins India Chancellor Sebastian Kurz NPR Afghanistan far-right Freedom Party Audie Cornish Austria Heinz ISIS Europe Mary Louise Kelley Spanish island Sri Lanka Kremlin
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KCRW

"Considered. I'm Audie Cornish and Mary Louise Kelley the government of Austria is in chaos. It started with a leaked video that appears to show, the country's vice chancellor promising government contracts to a Russian woman in exchange. He would buy stakes in an Austrian newspaper and use it to support the vice chancellor's party. That party would be the far right freedom. Party founded by former Nazis after World War Two until today, it was part of Austria's ruling coalition now. The vice chancellor is out, and so are all the other Freedom Party ministers. I'll tell us more about what this means for Austria. And for Europe, we're joined from Vienna by Valerie Hopkins of the financial times. Hey valerie. Hi, thanks for having me. Glad to have you with us. So lay out in a sustained two time pine as you can. But how do we get from this one, scandalous video to now? Five government officials haven't vacant their pros row. Well, this has been one of the most exciting weekends early weeks in Austria. I think it's postwar history on Friday night as everyone's heading home from work, all of a sudden, the social media networks, every renting with news, a news of a leaked video of the vice chancellor, of Austria Heinz, Christians have the far-right Freedom Party and his young protege in a villa any beats drunk, it'd be being the Spanish island where this video was filmed. Exactly just blathering on and on to a Russian woman, who they believed was the niece of a prominent Russian oligarch, and I'll just insert here that I have not had the opportunity to verify exactly what is being documented on this video, but what it has done is resolve these questions in Austria about the extent of. Russian influence in Australian politics. Is that right? Absolutely. And I mean it's funny because these are actually fake Russians. This is these are not necessarily people that were sent from the Kremlin, we don't really know the providence of the video some people believe it's an activist collective other people are speculating that some secret services of various countries were involved. But the most important thing to say is that vice chancellor struck. It hasn't denied any of the assertion, right. Well, let me ensured a practical question here. We're does this leave the government of Australia, whose church today? Oh my goodness. That crisis keeps deepening by the day yesterday. Some of the parties called for a vote of no confidence. The chancellor Sebastian courts was hoping that he could get rid of interior minister kinkle, who has also been the center of several scandals himself during the course of the eighteen months that they've been government, the other ministers of transport defense and labor said. We're going to leave too, so you're describing all sorts of the behind closed doors. Machinations going on here, but bottom line Austria prepares to go to bed tonight. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz is still in charge of the government, but he doesn't have much of a government now that his coalition has fallen apart. Exactly, how is this playing as you're out, and about interviewing people on the streets of Vienna? Well in Vienna. People are extremely concerned, although Vienna has a very long history as a social democratic city. It's now in fact as red Vienna. But, you know, the first poll since the scandal came out yesterday and the Freedom Party lost a four to five percent, but they're still pulling at eighteen percent. So their core supporters remained, loyal and support their anti immigrant anti LGBT agenda in this all anybody's talking about. Oh my goodness. You can't avoid it. I mean the cafe on the ground floor of my apartment building has painted up on its windows. We're going to be everyone's moved on. From the shock to the speculation of the providence of the video, and the question of whether or not this vote of motion of no-confidence will go through Valerie Hopkins of the financial times speaking with us from Vienna. Thanks so much. Thank you very much for having me, the investigation into the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka has now spread to neighboring, India, the suspected mastermind of those attacks had spent time there. Authorities are looking at whether the region could become a new front for global jihad. NPR's Lauren Freyer reports from southern India, where she met families of some ISIS recruits, the these are the photos. How does she there? Is it senior into some path reefs through old photos of her daughter's dance, recitals as a girl, she was book? She studied to be a dentist then three years ago she converted to Islam and moved to Afghanistan. Authorities say she joined ISIS for a while, she still sent her mother voice messages. Yeah. Hi. Yeah. All the way from Afghanistan. Yeah. Being do smiles at a recording of the granddaughter. She's never met and wonders if she ever will six months ago, her daughter's phone line went silent..

chancellor Austria Vienna Valerie Hopkins Freedom Party Chancellor Sebastian Kurz far-right Freedom Party kinkle Audie Cornish Lauren Freyer Europe ISIS Afghanistan Mary Louise Kelley Australia Spanish island India Sri Lanka
"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"valerie hopkins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That platform to speak out uh i really can't say because the majority has decided to conduct itself in a very unilateral way it doesn't let us know who they're bringing in or when we get minimal noticed of these things so if the republicans are getting just as aggressive as the demo croats in opposing these claims of executive privilege isn't this an aboutface on the russia investigation because i mean we have the republicans basically been trying to kill the investigation i wouldn't you know declare the should have out face as a general matter it's only an about face visavis one witness steve bannon who appears to be on everybody's list at the ball but they're not bringing attorney general back to answer the question she refused to answer the not bringing don jr back if this point to get him to answer the question she refused to answer he was asked about his conversation with his father that led to that false statement about the trump tower meeting after he refused to answer asserting attorneyclient privilege when neither he nor his father is an attorney or quiet here california representative adam schiff the top democrat on the house intelligence committee thanks very much thank you let me tell you now about the death of a serbian politician from kosovo his name was oliver ivanovich he's someone we used to hear from on the show back when kosovo regularly in the news after the us led a nato intervention in 1999 two days ago event of its was gunned down on his way to work in metro vita that's a city in kosovo that's divided between the serb minority in the north and the albanian majority in the south it's still a tense place nineteen years after the war in kosovo valerie hopkins is a journalist who covers the balkans and she says ivanovich was considered a moderate serbian voice in kosovo someone who called for dialogue he's muchbeloved die the foreign diplomats foreign journalists and and many a political figures in kosevo who you know say that he was a man who was very easy to make compromises with that he was very flexible that he understood that actually because of a serbs in kosovo albanians were not that different from one another worry ver very similar in mind mindset but that.

attorney don jr adam schiff kosovo oliver ivanovich valerie hopkins kosevo executive russia steve bannon california representative the house nato nineteen years 1999 two days