18 Burst results for "Valerie Geller"

"valerie geller" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

06:21 min | 7 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Isn't it Jennifer? Absolutely. You know, I had a lot of coaching all throughout the years. There are a lot of people who go into talk radio consulting and there's a woman named Valerie Geller, who I think is, is phenomenal. And she's written a book about radio. And her most helpful piece of advice is she said, when you're doing a radio show, stick an empty chair in front of you. And just visualize the person that you're talking to. And so I think what's different is when you watch television show. And you see people even in cable news they'll say, our audience, or all of you at home. That's not very personal. Let's just mean you're one of the thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of people, maybe who are watching, right? But when you're on radio, when you are talking to you, can you believe this? What should we be doing about this? How do you feel about vaccine mandates? It becomes very personal. It's a one on one connection. You're not speaking to the masses in radio, or at least you shouldn't be. I think in good talk radio you are speaking directly to one person. Yes. And that's how I visualize it and I feel like we create relationships with those people who either call our program or who might see us out or connect with us when we're in public. We feel like we know each other because they can connect. There's also that immediate response, social media is great, but we know it's the place where anybody who can be anonymous and troll, right? In radio, Joe from Corona has to call, given name, give a city, and have a conversation with you. So even if you disagree, you get a chance to get your wax in too, like everybody can have a lot of that conversation. Right. And what media allows people to have that instant conversation. Nobody, you can't do it with television unless you just yell back at the TV. Which I've done, believe me. I've watched you out of MSNBC. To that point, it's also good radio. Can not be faked and you know, we don't have to talk about the specific names here, but, you know, some of the biggest names, you know, who've been doing it for decades. You know, when they're phoning it in. You know, the passion can not be faked. Can it Jennifer? You can't, you can not fake the passion. And when people start to repeat shows, and it's just, you know, it's insert the new day of the week and it's the same show over and over again. That's when you have a problem. That was what was so fantastic about Rush Limbaugh is that every day he lived to be on the radio. He was sick and still did everything he could to sit there every single day and deliver because this is also a medium for entertainers. This is the talk radio format is different than just reading news. You're actually inserting your personality into this. People learn about you through your conversations with them, and you get to have that back and forth conversation with your audience. So it's news, yes, but it's also commentary. And I think that's a really important and you have to entertain. That's what rush did. Barry, John bachelor's fantastic. Barry farber is also a mentor of mine. I worked with Barry up until literally the day before he died. He died. He did radio shows all the way up until he passed away. And he was an icon in New York and he was a storyteller. He knew how to use this medium to connect with people to entertain to tell a story to provide perspective and he never did a show that was dull. It was never repetitive, and he always had that spark impassion and there are a few people that you can think of that that have that and those are the ones that people will remember 30 years from now. Right. You really understand this industry, you're not just good at it, you understand it. You share with me, you know, the latest data on how different shows are doing. Give us your big picture overview. We've now, you know, we're in the third year of this insanity with the coronavirus. How is radio doing? And how is conservative radio doing? What is the future of it? In an age of podcast, which for me, I learned this from my buddy, Larry O'Connor, who's here in D.C., podcast, totally different. Good ones, by the way. I love Larry. One of the great ones. Totally different, because in a podcast, you know, unless it's a Joe Rogan, which is unusual, which is all over the place. I want to know about visigoths for the next two hours. You want the podcast on 1966 Mustangs. It's a very niche thing. And you're not necessarily creating that friendship relationship because it's recorded and it's whatever. So talk to us about talk radio specifically after the last two years. And the future gen. I think podcasts are a big part of the future of talk radio. I also think a video element like you do every day with your show is part of the future of talk radio. But I don't believe for a minute. I've been in this industry since I literally had diapers on. And maybe on the other side, when I have diapers again, a little less that long. From diaper to diaper, but I have heard consistently that talk radios going away. Talk radio is dying. It is. Now, the technology of a.m. radio may be dying. Car manufacturers are starting to leave it out or whatever it might be. But I don't believe the meat word. And I'll tell you why. First of all, conservatives are feeling very left out of the media business. We have Fox News. We have newsmax. We have one American news. What else do we have? We have a lot of online publications. That's great. But where else can talk radio can conservatives go, except for talk radio. So I think that's a really important piece of this. I think talk radio despite your politics also gives a form for people to have conversations about stuff. And I think by nature people are voyeurs, we want to know what our neighbors are doing. You know, if you hear a conversation, not many people will walk by. A lot of people stick that ear out and go, what are they talking about? And so talk radio, I think brings that out where you can hear conversations about what people are really thinking. So I don't believe that the medium is going away. I think it is here. I just believe. And I think it actually might even grow. If radio companies do it right and continue to cultivate talent and not just put out the same old stuff and bring in different personalities and perspectives, I think we have a winning combination. But I do think it'll grow into different forms. I think podcasting and video is gonna be a piece of growing the industry, making it available on all of the digital devices because not many people have a traditional radio in their home..

Valerie Geller Jennifer John bachelor Barry farber Barry Larry O'Connor Corona MSNBC Rush Limbaugh Joe Joe Rogan D.C. Larry New York Fox News
"valerie geller" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:23 min | 7 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Welcome back to one on one with kra LA's Jennifer horn. So let's tease this out because everybody's listening to the show why, because it's not just they want news. It's not just that they want information or the breaking news, they actually also want they actually love the medium itself. So let's delve into that for a little bit. You have taught me a great deal along with one other person who is also a mentor to me and that's John bachelor who I consider to be the master of the long form. I love long form radio. I dedicate one hour of the show. The last hour of the show, like this one to want to long form. And he helped me understand is you did too. With radio. Well, you just said it in the beginning. You said, you're talking to people at the most vulnerable, they're most private they're in their bathroom. They're at home they're making breakfast for their kids. So it's a different meal. Number one. And secondly, and I look at Russia and others who really led the way. Because it's auditory, there's no fancy visuals that you can use as a crotch. It's very intimate and it is about establishing a relationship, which really, if it's done well. And I think this is what you and your co host grant stinchfield and other great hosts to it's a friendship with the listener. Isn't it Jennifer? Absolutely. You know, I had a lot of coaching all throughout the years. There are a lot of people who go into talk radio consulting and there's a woman named Valerie Geller, who I think is, is phenomenal. And she's written a book about radio. And her most helpful piece of advice is she said, when you're doing a radio show, stick an empty chair in front of you. And just visualize the person that you're talking to. And so I think what's different is when you watch television show. And you see people even in cable news they'll say, our audience, or all of you at home. That's not very personal. Let's just mean you're one of the thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of people, maybe who are watching, right? But when you're on radio, when you are talking to you, can you believe this? What should we be doing about this? How do you feel about vaccine mandates? It becomes very personal. It's a one on one connection. You're not speaking to the masses in radio, or at least you shouldn't be. I think in good talk radio you are speaking directly to one person.

Sebastian gorka Jennifer horn Gavin Newsom Salem Los Angeles America Phil Boyce Newsom Pelosi Gavin West Coast Salem California Jennifer Sacramento San Francisco
Jennifer Horn and Sebastian Discuss the Power and Magic of Radio

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:23 min | 7 months ago

Jennifer Horn and Sebastian Discuss the Power and Magic of Radio

"Welcome back to one on one with kra LA's Jennifer horn. So let's tease this out because everybody's listening to the show why, because it's not just they want news. It's not just that they want information or the breaking news, they actually also want they actually love the medium itself. So let's delve into that for a little bit. You have taught me a great deal along with one other person who is also a mentor to me and that's John bachelor who I consider to be the master of the long form. I love long form radio. I dedicate one hour of the show. The last hour of the show, like this one to want to long form. And he helped me understand is you did too. With radio. Well, you just said it in the beginning. You said, you're talking to people at the most vulnerable, they're most private they're in their bathroom. They're at home they're making breakfast for their kids. So it's a different meal. Number one. And secondly, and I look at Russia and others who really led the way. Because it's auditory, there's no fancy visuals that you can use as a crotch. It's very intimate and it is about establishing a relationship, which really, if it's done well. And I think this is what you and your co host grant stinchfield and other great hosts to it's a friendship with the listener. Isn't it Jennifer? Absolutely. You know, I had a lot of coaching all throughout the years. There are a lot of people who go into talk radio consulting and there's a woman named Valerie Geller, who I think is, is phenomenal. And she's written a book about radio. And her most helpful piece of advice is she said, when you're doing a radio show, stick an empty chair in front of you. And just visualize the person that you're talking to. And so I think what's different is when you watch television show. And you see people even in cable news they'll say, our audience, or all of you at home. That's not very personal. Let's just mean you're one of the thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of people, maybe who are watching, right? But when you're on radio, when you are talking to you, can you believe this? What should we be doing about this? How do you feel about vaccine mandates? It becomes very personal. It's a one on one connection. You're not speaking to the masses in radio, or at least you shouldn't be. I think in good talk radio you are speaking directly to one person.

Jennifer Horn John Bachelor Grant Stinchfield Valerie Geller LA Russia Jennifer
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"I've got public radio clients everywhere from utah. Washington dc. I'm working with a british short people in england. They're nine and ten hours ahead. And you just figure out the time factor and you work via audio zoom and anybody who says to me valerie. I'd like to be better. will you help. Can you help be just like my dad is a surgeon. If a sick person came to him and said. Dr can you help. You can't resist the call if somebody comes to you and says can you help me be better. Can you help polish me like diamond in helped me be all. I can be this industry and with this work and working with creative people. It's just been a joy and an amazing thing in a row challenge. I could not recommend your books anymore and you're just a phenomenal human being. Thank you so much for sharing your story with us chachi. I wanted to just jump in while. You're thanking me. I'd like to thank you. Thank you to cianci and thebenz town for supporting this book for sponsoring the book and my sessions in africa and south africa purchasing books for people who would never be able to afford it on their own and now they have a book and in very very small places and very poor places in difficult places in africa. These broadcasters now have a chance to become more powerful and engage with their audiences because of the gift that bends town and you charging have given them of making my books available. So i would like to just thank you and and again. It is a great honor and pleasure when you asked me to do this. I thought who would ever be interested in my story. You know to me. It's like a it's not so interesting. But what what i do feel i can do is offer tools to every single broadcaster who's interested every communicator. Every podcast who would like to get up to the next level and learn techniques so.

cianci valerie utah dc england Washington africa south africa
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:44 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"Take the gig at wabc. I mean while that is radio drama therefore area. It was fun and and again the relationships that i made at at kfi in coast. I treasure to this day. I mean i met you chow. Jamming karen sharpe. I mean these amazing wonderful people so you get to new york. What was it like walking through the doors of wabc for the first time. Well you know. I had walked in to a radio station that had a lost a beloved. Pd john manelli. Who had left. And so i was feeling some very very big shoes and we were needing to find a morning show and rush. Limbaugh had just started in new york. He had zero zero zero ratings. In new york city. The take on rush was that he was some yokel from the midwest. And why would somebody have him on new york. That i had been listening to rush for quite some time at At caffeine i knew about him for gift became prior to that. So i knew it was worth fighting for him so i actually wanted to put russia on morning drive with kathleen maloney and they did a demo and it was amazing and we. We had russia on two hours locally and then he and his to our national show at the time in we hired a new morning show and rehired. We had lynn. Samuels on the air with us. Lots and lots of really interesting people. Bob grant and i walked in and it was an amazing team. I new york top top people and really had a great time and so for me You know again after. Wabc where do you go. What do you do and for me. After programming atop station in new york city it became the world. I really wanted to Work with broadcasters all over the world. And i wanted to see the world and i had developed a lot of methodologies of training and part of the fun of being a program director managing your own station is getting to find and develop new talent. I got to put joy behar on the air when she was working as a part time teacher..

karen sharpe john manelli new york kathleen maloney Limbaugh russia new york city midwest Bob grant Samuels Wabc lynn joy behar
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"Best newscast award. I was just a fill in news person. And that was the time. When i was still freelancing for them but i happened to be anchoring day the contest was happening. Danny benign one los angeles press club. Best newscast and. That was a time when i realized you know people. If you're good people find you if you're good you're going to get recognized sooner or later if you just do good work you have ethics you do it consistently always show up with a good attitude and you know i have friends who are in the acting world and sometimes they do a big part in their star. Sometimes they do a small part and that little part they do has so much more impact so always looking at the bigger picture. How i serve the listeners. Today people listening to me. Did they get served and as a program director people listening to my station. Did my audience get served. Today did we inform. Entertain inspire persuaded connect the audience to community into life. And if people feel alone did they feel connected. And whether you're doing that with music or talk or news a podcast on the radio whether it's prerecorded or whether it's live it doesn't matter did you hold up a mirror and reflect life. Did the work matter. Was it relevant. And i always looked at it as sometimes being kicked off the top rung in having to come back up. Sometimes there's great lessons in great reward in that. And i think that there's a lot of ego in radio and the best best people check their ego at the door and just do the work. Those are the best people mazing advice. Tell me about that call. And before i interrupted you that you've got the gig at wabc. What did that feel like. I worked for guy called red wine house and he called and tim answered the phone. And fred had this new york accent and he says to law goes yes and you know who would have been given in the hotline number right. You know but. I told i had told them on the air helping a friend out. And if you need to reach between.

los angeles press club Danny red wine house tim fred new york
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:14 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"-i got him to come in and do the morning show until big boy could get there and they asked me if i could use another name and coming unlike for maybe six till nine or something and then record the last newscast and then go to my real job at kfi. And i wanted to do anything to help liz. Because she was like a wonderful human beings still is and so. I agreed to do this to help out and fill in and it was well. I was at this radio station at six o'clock in the morning across the table. From tim kelly that the phone rang and i found out i had gotten the job as program director of wabc. A new york news can get to live my dream amazing so you actually never made it to the program director role a kfi. No i did not. I was up for it every time. And i would go through the interview process. But there's a dynamic in. It's an old saying. I think it's a polish saying it might be an austrian. Saying it's something along the lines of you are always a child in the home of your parents and sometimes when you go into a station at a certain level in a certain role you're never seen growing up into other roles. They always imagine you're. Cu you as the royal. You came in with so if you're a part timer. You're always a part time if you're doing news. They don't see you in a management position if you come in his management they don't see your is on your person so sometimes you have to leave city and leave town in order to try those new things so for example. I did you news when i was in wyoming but i did talk when i was in denver and so it. It's like when you do one thing win place. So sometimes they don't accept your. How did you i guess. Stay so humble here. You are the news director and san francisco. You're on the board of the ap and your careers just you know. You're you're on the rise and then when you came to los angeles you're your work ethics incredible and i've got a tremendous amount of respect for that but they had doing basically smaller gigs. I'm not saying they're not important. But i would have thought because of your success that they would put you into a bigger role. I think that there are corporate cultures. And probably liz kylie is the better one to talk about that corporate culture..

tim kelly new york news wabc liz wyoming denver ap san francisco los angeles liz kylie
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"In fact i think we were all in dallas there a group of people standing around joel and one of them said. How did you know that this woman you're with now was the one and joel got quiet. Any looked at the guy who was probably twenty four twenty five and you can tell he is. That guy was mr tinder right mr jock radio guy. Cool guy hip guy you know you know a different one every night kind of guy and yet he was asked in joel. How did you know that this woman that you're now seeing is the right one and joel got quietly. Looked him in the irony. Said you stop looking. You say to the person you're with you look at them and you say this person is good and i'm going to just make a choice that i'm gonna be with this person and you stop looking and he's just been blissed out you know. His house burned down in the malibu fire and she stuck with them and and they have a new home now and he's he is deliriously happy in this relationship. It's a very joyous time for him in in a whole new chapter and that was his secret. Thank you for sharing that story at so powerful. And joel i did not know. He was so romantic. Very great story and a good man and really what he's pre was practical too. I mean really. And and he's found a way to make it work and he was really sharing not just radio at wisdom and advice but he was really sharing how to find somebody and be with them in the world and it means doing the hard work does. He's a good man talking about hard work. That guy works some amazing hours. He's always up at Like three a m three thirty and Just always available no matter when you call him. Joel's makes himself available to got day tremendous respect for well. The reason why is because his passion cianci radio and music and the record industry and creativity is his passion. And so whenever you find something that doesn't feel like work. You can't wait to get up in the morning and do it. You can't wait and at night when you when you go to bed. You feel like oh. I can't wait till tomorrow because there's so much to do that. I wanna do and joel is one of those people so true so true and again more great advice i thank you so much for dispensing all this fantastic advice so your relationship unfortunately falls apart in denver. And then you end up in phoenix right I ended up working with. Lee harris. And charlie van dyke and a whole bunch of fantastic people I i heard they were looking around for somebody that might have some talk work and some news work and that was interesting to me so i applied for the job and i sent the tape. In and lee harris was the assistant. He's now the morning anchor on ten wins radio in new york city number one in the demographic in new york so proud of him hard worker and funny funny man but li. I called him up. I said did you get my tape at the time. It was cassette tape said. Well what do you think he goes. I didn't think much. And i said what do you mean it goes. It was blank. I had sent a blank tape such an idiot. I didn't listen back. another lesson. Always make sure the audio is on the tapes. So i had to then send him another blink take it wasn't blank and then i went down and visited and phoenix is really nice and i really likely..

joel mr tinder mr jock dallas charlie van dyke Joel Lee harris lee harris phoenix denver new york city li new york
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

05:22 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"Saw eye-to-eye and he was so much fun and so filled with life energy enthusiasm and he he was like i mean i love. He was like a chihuahua. And just had all this energy and you know running around and he still like that. I mean decades later. You know he's still like that but he he really. He had the best intentions and smart ideas and he had been a second-generation broadcaster. His dad was a broadcaster and so he grew up literally. Grew up At a council you know and very very talented talk show host himself and then like so. Many directing is almost more fun than being on air. When you can get as big a kick out of somebody else's work as you get out of your own you're always trying to find people and develop them It's why a lot of us went into programming. Because we wanted to be the ringleader and the marion string-puller not just the marina when you get to tampa. What did you hire you to do there. I was on the air producing and hosting my own talk show from six to eight at night and i did that for about a year me. Some advice that drew had taught you. Because i've heard ken charles. I got to interview him about a year. Ago and netflix was the producer. My call screener and he he was also going to law school so law school and producing my show so you go to law school by day and at ninety cut slide in and screen my calls. I don't even think he shaved yet. I mean he was at cure. What a great story. So you drew and ken all at the same station at the same time. Yeah it was like. And you don't even realize like looking back now. When i get together with kim charles. It's it perry michael simon and cannon i had lunch right before covert hit and we were talking about the old days and and you don't even realize how much fun it is until you workplaces. Where maybe it's not so much fun and you know that time. There was a crocodile in the parking lot because on the swamp you know i think it was through had to come out with a fire. Extinguisher can came out in the fire extinguisher and we had to. We had to fight. You know wildlife. Yeah it was an amazing experience. And you know i learned a lot. I learned a lot about doing the daily show. Scott shannon was across the bay on five. And i listen to him every morning and picked up a lot of tricks from him that just always being an entertainer and learning how to pivot. Whatever you have planned drop it and do something better. If it comes along and i learned that from scott shannon just you know learn learn. Learn you head back to denver. I was dating somebody and So i and i missed him. And so i went back to denver and of course i got a job at. Kp l. and kale k. Owned by mall right. At the time and the minute i got back. You know the relationship from afar. We were pining for each other. We missed each other. And you know we just start seeing each other when i left to go to tampa and then when i came back. How do you put this nicely. The spark was there. Just wasn't there. I wish it would have been but it wasn't there so i didn't stay very long. Sometimes that absence makes the heart grow fonder. I here's what i learned chachi. And i can't speak for anybody else but i really learned for me. Long distance relationships do not work. Part of a partnership is knowing the mundane the day to day the parts of life..

ken charles kim charles perry michael simon chihuahua drew tampa Scott shannon netflix scott shannon cannon ken denver
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"That took a long time and that was an ongoing process. And still to this day. I still think we all struggle with it. Great advice and was there any time where you call your parents and you just were. I've had enough. I wanna come home okay. So the first time. I got fired and i called my modest and ma. I lost my job and she said well what did you do. I said nothing. We did nothing. They changed the format. They were broadcasting this and now they've decided to go quote unquote in a different direction and they have fired eleven people and my mother was shamed she was completely shamed and she couldn't tell her friends and didn't tell anybody in the family and she was mortified in my father was like how could this happen to you. You know you work hard you do. Well you succeed. How how could they had no clue of it. By the fourth or fifth time station had changed format or i had gotten fired or you know it happened. My mom was telling her france. Oh it's no problem. You know valerie always does really well. In the demographic. She's always gotten another job is she. Never been out of work for more than a month. So we're not too worried about her. She knows her stuff so it took that transition of being able to convince my parents that your only job security in radio for many many years was your ability to secure your next job and so if you do good work and you make sure you have good relationships with people that you work with and also people that apply for jobs if you treat them with dignity and honor even if you do not hire them you know you respond and you make sure and like a garden caretake all relationships because that kid who wants a tour of the station today may actually hire you in five years so to be nice to everyone and try to open your heart to all kinds of people and to listen to people you know..

valerie france
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"They had steelcase. And you know they had all kinds of different Things going on in grand rapids. When detroit got hard hit grand rapids was okay and it was halfway between detroit and chicago and i made wonderful friends and had an amazing experience there and then after grand rapids. I got the opportunity to go to the west when you get to grand rapids. That's your first on air gig right like as a host. That was my first paid on air where somebody paid me money to talk and i worked with lori. D. young who actually is in baltimore is a country. Radio morning hosts to went on to have an amazing career. And i got to work. With dave logan and all kinds of amazing people and really learn the craft and again met lifelong friends produced and hosted my own show. You know ended up just trying to immerse myself in the community as much as possible the controller at the radio station. Who was just a lovely lovely woman. She was going through a divorce and she had this great big house on a street called thorn apple river road and it was so beautiful and she had a huge garden and she had two little kids and she had spare rooms so i ended up rooming with her and getting to be in the middle of family. While i was doing my talk show. So i met her friends and they were teachers lawyers. Doctors shop owners got have conversations with people that. If i had just gotten an apartment somewhere house somewhere i never would have had so. It was through sarah. She really opened up that town for me. In a way that was very very special just by living in her house and by the way getting a whole basement to myself in the mid west which is phenomenal. And i really had a great experience and when that job ended i remain grateful to this day to to having had that experience charley right. Who was on the la came out there. I mean there are a lot of people. Because we were trying a lot of fun things treating. Am talk radio like personality. Fm morning shows all day long before anybody had the idea to do that. I think a lot of people view including myself as just this incredible talent and amongst the top consultants on the planet with so much knowledge and do so well spoken. I mean it's actually kind of a little bit intimidating when i speak to you. Because you're just so articulate. And did you have i look you and when i speak to you you exude confidence and it sounds like you were brought up with all this confidence in love and support around you. Were you nervous. When you're they're cracking the mike for the first time and really kinda cut in your teeth at the radio station. I would love to hear more about. Just kind of some of your vulnerabilities at that point. I think the vulnerabilities are more the politics of a radio station. Like when you walk into a radio station. It took me a long time to understand. You have to be really really nice to the front desk receptionist. That's a person who has wielded great power. Sometimes somebody would get fired because the owners waste. Hairdresser didn't like the morning men and those were the things that didn't seem fair or right to me and the lesson. That was hardest for me. Because i wanted life to be fair and it is not in the lesson that was hardest for me to learn and once i learned it it changed my life and it was really later on. It was ed shane late edge. Shane who was the country consultant. Who sat down with me and he said there's what's right..

grand rapids dave logan detroit steelcase D. young lori baltimore chicago charley apple sarah la ed shane Shane
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"Which i think's just an amazing skill set but i don't know if my parents my dad probably would have allowed me to do that but my mom no way. So i'm i'm really impressed by that and i'm sure it it certainly helped give you courage to go out and and really Go on this adventuresome career right. what's passengers. I was eighteen. When i did our bound you had to rate. There's an awful lot of waivers that you have to sign on an helmets. Warn and safety to be worn on everything. I was envisioning like a girl scout being left to yourself i was definitely over eighteen but it was the thing that i really wanted to do and it was a really interesting set of adventures but i think you know the one thing my dad's when it became clear i wasn't going to be a lawyer although i was very very interested in law. I wasn't going to be a teacher. Although teaching was dumping than i had a passion for him was interested in. But they're the way that i looked at those jobs. I didn't see replace for me in those jobs. But maybe if. I could combine things or find my own way and what my dad said when we really sat down and had a serious talk about it was he said. I don't care what you do. I care that whatever you do you try your best and be your best. Give every anything you do give it a thousand percent of what you have do not slack off do not just always keep trying and keep growing and be the best at what it is you decide you want to do. And that was probably one of the greatest gifts my dad gave me. What a great support system and encouragement. Walk me through in chronological order. How your career get started. I know you now. You call the joe. Pine showed a very early age. And you obviously must be very crews matic. Now some some very chris matic as as a kid and you just excel with being on the air. It sounds like immediately and you get to tour radio station. And you're namur with it and you land your first gig. I believe at caged z. Here in la correct. Right working for nikki. Wine did the sunday night public affairs. Show and nikki would let me occasionally go out with a tape recorder and interview people and it was an awful lot of getting coffee in as a paid unpaid internships. You know it was a lot of whatever people needed I did but i did get to see how sunday night public affairs show was run. We got to meet a lot of people. The movers and shakers and people were doing interesting things in los angeles and i just had a great time doing it but i ended up working with a guy called larry eerden who had been at cami. T. and w. emmy and larry had gone to grand rapids michigan and started a news talk radio station w..

chris matic nikki Pine la larry eerden los angeles emmy larry grand rapids michigan
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"You got some water or were by a river that you were in the middle of nowhere all by yourself and you had to live for three days in century yourself and at the end of that i really knew in my heart that if you don't try and if you don't go for what you wanna do you're never ever ever gonna know if you could have accomplished it and it's better to try and fail than not try and so at that point. I decided i didn't wanna live anybody else's life or any other life that had been pre prescribed. I really wanted to live the life that i was called to live and do the things that gave me joy and gave my life purpose meaning and in the beginning it was writing and journalism and radio and any kind of creativity and i really wanted to be able to be in a position to put that out there for audiences in. It's always been really exciting for me but it it sort of was that pivotal time when you being shaped as a human being and again. My parents had a lot of interest. They loved art. You know ballet art museums music. We were dragged off to every cultural thing in l. a. And now i'm really glad about it and then later in life much much much later it turned out that with twenty three and me. I was able to find some of my relatives through dna. And i had worked a lot in sweden. I found out i was part scandinavia. So maybe it's dna way. I feel so happy working in sweden and norway I found out that not one not two but three of my cousins are radio. My biological cousins are radio. Broadcaster turned out. I was related to judy. Licht to add married to jerry dulles amina the guy that they based the bad man series on nerds outings. No and she did good morning. America in new york for thirty years of another cousin lorraine rap lose a public radio talk show host in syracuse. And i have another cousin. Who is a weatherman in vermont on tv so it. I think that there's something to be said for dna so there's a upbringing which had this incredible upbringing in los angeles. And then there's what's in your dna programming and somehow radio and television got into the dna programming and the people of my tribe by my biological relatives. It's been an amazing journey. What a remarkable story. So you really kind of you had an amazing nurture around you with your parents and being supportive and allowing you to pursue.

sweden jerry dulles amina lorraine rap scandinavia Licht norway judy syracuse vermont America new york los angeles
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

05:04 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"Was this magical thing you know you could hear music. All the stations cage jay rock. I mean every kind of music and all kinds wonderful wonderful people and fun and and it was just very exciting and so were brought in other worlds. And the first time. When i was really little i was probably six or seven. I used to listen to the joe pine show and one night he had done a radio show about it was call in about how children should be seen and not heard in. You should never take him to a restaurant. So i listened to that and it infuriated me and he'd given out a phone number so i remember late at night walking down the hallway. Picking up the phone and calling in to the joe pine show and he put me on the air and he's he said you know. What do you want kid. And i just said. Look when you're little everything in your life is dictated to your told when to go to bed what to wear who play with when to go to school. What to eat. Everything in your life is dictated to you. The only thing we can do is make noise so leave us alone and just don't bother us if our parents choose to take us to a restaurant and he had done this diatribe diatribe about how children's should be kept at home so that adults could enjoy the meal and infuriated me were kids. We should have the pleasure of having somebody other than our moms. Make us lunch you know. So he and i got into it and he basically said kid you can call my show anytime and so i became like in la a regular kid caller on the joe pine show and i would run into people chachi like years later like you were that little kid on joe pine amazing sadly he was a big smoker died pretty early on of lung cancer throat cancer but his show really shaped i think A lot of my thinking. Because i'd never heard an adult talk like that and so it just really opened up whole new worlds so he eventually invites you to come visit station correct. I did take station tour. I did indeed take station tour. And in fact i i'm go visit stations all the time. There was never a state like if if there is a radio station. Let's say our family was on vacation and we would pass by a radio station. I i'd seen we could stop in you know and of course later on one time. My car broke down. When i was driving cross country between radio jobs and i was in mobile alabama and i was at a really old toyota and it just broke down and i saw the st The tower and i saw the radio station..

joe pine throat cancer lung cancer la alabama toyota
"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

Chachi Loves Everybody

04:37 min | 8 months ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Chachi Loves Everybody

"If you try to do what's right and try to avoid what's wrong. That's great but if you don't deal with what is you will not make it and so a lot of my career was learning trying to do the right thing and sometimes dogmatically so but it wasn't until you with what is that you can become successful president dave cianci. Dennis loves radio and radio friends. Hey everybody because he loves everybody. My next guest is a former program. Director of new york's wabc. She's trained presenters and producers throughout the united states. The bbc reuters the associated press the. Abc australia cbs npr and dozens of stations and groups throughout the world. She's also consulted for three documentary. Films for pbs and authored. Four books have been translated into nine. Different languages please. Welcome valerie geller. That is such an impressive resume. Valerie and i'm so happy to have you here. Well chachi thank you so much. And of course you know our careers sort of Dovetailed forever like for about thirty seconds at kfi coast. That's right were there. And that's where you and i first met. And you were such a promising young lad. And i'm not the only person that is just so proud of you for achieving promise. Cianci were so proud of you for bankstown. And all you have accomplished in achieved and and your creativity moving forward and being able to navigate the ever changing waters. That our business you know. I'm really flattered. So kind to you to say i really greatly appreciated. I've of watched you and studied your career and just so impressed with everything that you've accomplished and it is. I really honored to speak to you and appreciate you taking the time. It is truly truly my pleasure. Tell me a little bit about growing up here in los angeles. Not a lot of people are actually. I feel like a lot. Not a lot of people are raised in la. Feel like a lot of people move here but they're not raised here. What was it like right. will you were raised to. Weren't you know. I was raised about a hundred miles east of here out in the desert. So your palm springs area right. Eight right I grew up in west..

dave cianci valerie geller kfi coast Cianci Dennis npr associated press reuters pbs cbs Abc bbc Valerie bankstown australia new york united states los angeles la palm springs
"valerie geller" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"My way in the area and into your head and maybe even into your heart. In this hour. Oh, wait a minute. No throwback Thursdays later, I was Alice. I can play. I can practice Maybe a little. There's just practicing for the girl's matter of fact, for General Victoria. I was seeing you know what it was what was his home someday? My prince will come and I'm not even sure why I was saying that soon. I was talking to Jennifer about situation in California, which is dire. So let's get it's our job here. Remember there was a consultant that I really like. His name is Valerie Geller, who says to create powerful radio. You must speak visually, and I think we're really very good at that here, and that's why we're all here. Because we can paint a picture with our words that will get you to imagine what's going on. As I'm looking at these pictures from the wildfires, the looking at the vantage point of friend of mine took a picture. Going over the Golden Gate Bridge. And the Golden Gate Bridge at this is four o'clock in the afternoon. Yesterday the sky is completely orange. There is not you can see the clouds. You can see the sun. You can't see anything but smoke orange smoke covering the entire area of San Francisco. So you can imagine what if there's a story or a book or a movie about some kind of apocalypse? It would start with a picture of frame like this. And then you think about how we were. I don't want to overdo this. But I really do think this is one of those things that we need more not just for the point of information. What do we do about it? What are people in California? What is that? What the people doing about the fact that the people who's supposedly running the state by doing a thing what our people in California thinking are goingto do something or you just gonna sit there and let these fools mumble and bumble and screw you over. Because PG and e WR Whatever the other electric company is, doesn't want to clean up their mess. So we've got these fires burning down half the state. I'd be pretty. I am pretty outraged because I'm thinking about my My daughter and my son and my grandson. Not that they have to breathe out here and down Los Angeles, But there are titled Radio. I'm in Los Angeles and the air is terrible in Los Angeles right now, it hasn't What it went from being very, very hot and sunny. Tio us not seen the sun for the last couple of days. I mean, you could you look out the window. You think that you're living in Seattle because we're having a marine layer, But once that burns off, it's all smoke, and it's just It's gross. Everything is gray. Everything has that orange hue and it's It's not good people are I mean, we have air quality mornings telling people to stay indoors already, so that's part of it. People are told to stay outside of air inside. But what's the leadership philosophy? People know there isn't that's the point. We have no people determining the future of the fate of the state who are only interested in their personal gain. On DSO. You and everybody thinks about stuff with that in their mind. So how were you working on you? How do you have purpose today in making your life better? That's we have to get back to the individualization. Of Americans are of all of us human beings because we all are causes in the wheel. If you will of Ah, you know how the world works, and this is not. This doesn't work. It is not just not working, and I'll give you an example of something that's important to me. I was talking, Tio. I don't for whatever the reason. I'm talking to a lot of people in California yesterday, and one of them is a farm guy who is a beekeeper. And so under the you know, we don't think about the animals so much we think about human beings. But the animals are being affected by this fire. And something is simple is thinking about bees and what the bees the bees can't exist. They cannot live. They cannot breathe in their own mechanism with this sort of stuff in the air. They can't so they die. And a sort of tribute to the beat. I mean, we don't like being around bees most. What's your first reaction when you see a bee around? Honestly admit this to yourself, Don't you reach for a can of spray? And don't you want to spray me, Teo kill it? I don't know. I just run away. I will scream. Yeah, I run away because I'm allergic to bee stings by good. No, I don't. You stay. I stay calm. Actually, we have a lot of bees. My dad has a lot of bees near his pool this year. Well, let's say you're a contractor. And you're working in outside, even for inside an addict or something. And you encounter bees because they're all over the place that I have, and this is yesterday in the farm. Well, your arms action. Yeah, well, but the guys reach for a can of Hornet spray, And I said, Well, don't do that. Well, now, here's the difference, though, stands a wasp or a hornet. Then I have no mercy. But ah, b know. And even though that you know they could do a lot of damage to my own health. No, I would not kill obey well, but you gotta be. That's part of what I'm saying here and putting together Excuse me and overall picture of consciousness. We all depend On sort of each other people dio and the universe has been created by being or buy something that's far smarter than we are and the connectivity. Of things like bees. We can't We have no food if it isn't for bees, And yet our first instinct when we see a B is to get the spray or a swat and try to kill it. And yet the V is helping us live. And I think that's just part of what I'm trying to get at here. How everything is connected. And yet we separate ourselves from other people by saying, Well, that's his job or her responsibility or this isn't no. It's all of our responsibilities to be taking care of ourselves and others as we can. Ah, no, I think that that's something gets lost. I used to be is an example. But there are plenty other examples of that sort of thing. By the way, just isn't aside. I thought it was interesting that Eva Longoria's is not Longoria's Longoria. Is helping to support farm workers during the Corona virus situation She's been advocating for farm workers for the last 20 years or so she's now partnered with the American Farm Land Trust. And that outfit called Tillamook Re. Marie couldn't In there all for farmers effort as part of this Telemachus going to donate 10% of their sales this month to help farm workers and farmers have been struggling financially. See, we look to the government to do this and you've heard me talk about this 100 times. We talked about it once because of my own experience as a farmer and being around cows being on the farm all my life. You know we've become. I think it was yesterday, the day before I didn't analysis here and my having sorry about my voice. And on the American family Farmers show that I do podcast in American family farmers show.

California Los Angeles Golden Gate Bridge Eva Longoria American family Farmers Valerie Geller American Farm Land Trust PG General Victoria Jennifer San Francisco consultant Seattle Marie Teo
"valerie geller" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"I'm glad that you will set towards the front I mean we did actually tell people that but even under people my name's Emilia view it's absolute pleasure to welcome you oh Hiya yeah and also James Jeez intimate now to get us dod you have your autumn of significance not something that explains a little bit of personal us know about them gives us a star gets us into the conversation of who they are what they do without them having to recite this James can you please explain splash your autumn of significant can explain my item of significance which a frostiest packet but this is no ordinary frosties packet this is the frosties his packet that is actually a radio when I was six I think you had to save up the tokens on the back back of the frosties packet in order to get a free radio and I got the radio and I was just staunched all of a sudden there were all of these different voices voices there was this different music it was a real opening into a world that I didn't know existed and at the end of the first I actually felt really he sad because I suddenly thought I've probably used up all of the music in this radio and I'm going to have to go out and get another radio because I did I thought there was just a tape in there just going round and round around I didn't understand that it was actually broadcasting from other places I just thought it was a little little tape and I thought I've used it too much but a wonderful thing and that sort of really opened my ears to what you can do with audio what you can do with radio and and of course these days what you can do with podcasting and I find it interesting that my daughter who is now six she doesn't have a frost his packet radio she has a you hand me down ipod one of the APPs on there is the apple podcasts APP and she's listening to a podcast called David Williams marvelous musical podcasters very good and great for kids talking about classical music and she listens to again and again and again again and she loves it so hopefully I'm getting her excited about audio's well I think that is a perfect story sitting this about podcast because I was I was going orange us you know what is about podcasts I mustered inspires you but you did mention in your presentation the intimacy of podcasts Yes yes you know intimacy is important but I think also it's just the fact that anyone can launch podcast it's that level playing field that we don't have anywhere else if you want to launch a newspaper has hugely expensive hugely complicated if you want to make a website where you can make a website but nobody will see unless you promote it unless you can actually get the word out there if you want to be on the radio you've got to convince you know somebody in in Melbourne and Sydney due to put you on the radio and all of that kind of stuff with a podcast you can be there you can be in all of these wonderful platforms you can be an apple podcast you can be in pocket cost you can be an end a whole whole range of other ones and all you need is just to talk to a podcast hosted away you go and I think that's what's so exciting that actually anyone one can be there from the biggest content companies to just one person doing this as a passion project of their of their own as long as it is very exciting but full those people those there's one person in the room that wanted to start a podcast one of some of those key things that you I think what should they be aware of what makes a great podcast is consistency doing being known four something if you go into a McDonalds you know what you're going to get might not be very good but you know what you're going to get everything McDonald's you go into and and your podcast should be like that you should be very consistent listen should also be something that respects your audience is time as well so ideally isn't full of fluff waffle quite a lot of people ask me how long should your podcast be you can go through lots of detail and you can go through the average commute which Australia there's about thirty minutes so you can say well maybe it's less than thirty minutes or you can have a lookit what podcast the working well in the Charts Pokhara aren't working in the charts and all of that kind of stuff but actually my aunt's is a podcast should be as long as it needs to be but not a second longer so actually polishing cutting out the nonsense making sure that you have a really good quality post produced piece of audio is really important and I think that's something that a lot of podcasters kind of get wrong when they first when they first I starting and they just assume that their audience is going to stick with them even if what giving isn't particularly valuable and I think just editing down is a really important cool thing on the radio a long long time ago and when I was on the radio you had to fill out and you know you had a slots to fill and that was your slot that's very different when it comes to poke gusting and really a great podcast can be twelve minutes a great podcast can be three and there's so many the different types of podcasts is there any sort of style of podcasting that you're aware of that is easier popular to sort of start with it depends pens on your ability to Edison to strip right and stuff like that many people do podcasts as interviews interviews interviews a relatively easy although being a great interview is really halt but interviews a relatively easy to record it's easy to edit those it's easy to produce something like that and finding the time to do that is quite quite easy in comparison to for example doing some audio fiction and you know getting lots of sound effects and actors in a room and all that kind of stuff so if you are thinking of launching a new a new podcast Carr's which is an interview podcast there are lots of people that have very very tight interests and actually making sure that those people are well catered for you you know he's he's really interesting somebody that has just started doing a podcast about media sales now the media sales world is not a large worlds but to my knowledge there haven't been any podcast about you can clearly see that that will be something that really super serves that particular audience so is there any questions at this point I've got to pee more but is there any questions are you burning in the audience that you've got that you'd like to write a love it hi James Thank you it's been very interesting other any stats around loyalty to podcasts People once they tune in do they stick do do they move on do they come back how do we grow loyalty growing loyalty is an interesting one in terms of statistics that's quite hard because the only people that have those stats up until recently at least have been the podcast apps that said I linked to quite recently a piece of data from a podcast host called simple cast what they're doing is they're spotting people coming back and listening to more than one episode assode and they are actually calling a stickiness school so all of a sudden you can begin to have with that particular podcast hosts you can begin to see the people are sticking with your podcast and listening to more and more episodes of that and also actually seeing why that might be the case I for example subscribe drive to the New York Times daily but I probably listened to one out of every ten episodes because I only listen to the stories that I'm interested in and so quite a lot of this can come down to just as simple as what's the title of that particular show is that enough to get somebody to go have a listen into about one good Stacey James Hello and welcome to at late it's wonderful to have you here and come from a radio background so creating content it it comes naturally to me but creating content radio as you would know his quite different to creating content podcasts. I'm now focusing on the business US world and I'm just wondering in your experience you have some Dada was insights into the crowded interview podcast market that your food to earlier as the how to make interview podcasts pop Valerie Geller who is a very good radio and indeed podcast consultant she has a mantra and part of the Mantra is tell the truth make it matter.

"valerie geller" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"valerie geller" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"I'm glad that you will set towards the front. I mean we did actually tell people that but even under people. My Name's Emilia view. It's absolute pleasure to welcome you. Oh Hiya yeah and also James Jeez intimate now to get us dod you have your autumn of significance not something that explains a little bit of personal us know about them gives us a star gets us into the conversation of who they are and what they do without them having to recite this. James can you please explain splash. Your autumn of significant can explain my item of significance which is a frostiest packet but this is no ordinary frosties packets. This is the frost his packet. That is actually a radio when I was six. I think you had to save up. The Tokens on the back. Back of the frosties packet in order to get a free radio and I got the radio and I was just staunched all of a sudden there were all of these different voices voices. There was this different music. It was a real opening into a world that I didn't know existed and at the end of the first I actually felt really he sad because I suddenly thought I've probably used up all of the music in this radio and I'm going to have to go out and get another radio because I did. I thought there was just a tape in there just going round and round around. I didn't understand that. It was actually broadcasting from other places. I just thought it was a little little tape and I thought I've used it too much but a wonderful thing and that sort of really opened my ears to what you can do with audio what you can do with radio and and of course these days what you can do with podcasting and I find it interesting that my daughter who is now six. She doesn't have a frost his packet radio. She has a you. Hand me down ipod. One of the APPs on there is the apple podcasts APP. And she's listening to a podcast called David Williams marvelous musical podcasters very good and great for kids talking about classical music and she listens to again and again and again again and she loves it so hopefully I'm getting her excited about audio's well I think that is a perfect story sitting this about podcast. Because I was I was going orange us. You know what is about podcasts. I mustered inspires you but you did mention in your presentation. The intimacy of podcasts. Yes yes you know intimacy is important but I think also it's just the fact that anyone can launch podcast. It's that level playing field that we don't have anywhere else. If you want to launch a newspaper has hugely expensive hugely complicated if you want to make a website where you can make a website but nobody will see unless you promote it unless you can actually get the word out there if you want to be on the radio. You've got to convince you know somebody in in Melbourne Sydney due to put you on the radio and all of that kind of stuff with a podcast you can be there you can be in all of these wonderful platforms. You can be an apple podcast you can be and pocket cost. You can be an end a whole whole range of other ones and all you need is just to talk to a podcast hosted away you go and I think that's what's so exciting that actually anyone one can be there from the biggest content companies to just one person doing this as a passion project of their of their own. And I think that's as long as it is very exciting but full those people those. There's one person in the room that wanted to start a podcast. One of some of those key things that you I think. What should they be aware of? What makes a great podcast is consistency? Doing being known four something. If you go into a McDonalds you know what you're going to get might not be very good but you know what you're going to get everything. McDonald's you go into and and your podcast should be like that. It should be very consistent. Listen should also be something that respects your audience is time as well. So ideally isn't full of fluff waffle quite a lot of people. Ask Me. How long should your podcast be? You can go through lots of detail and you can go through the average commute which Australia. There's about thirty minutes so you can say well. Maybe it's less than thirty minutes or you can have a lookit what podcast the working well in the charts. Pokhara aren't working in the charts and all of that kind of stuff but actually my aunt's Is A podcast. Should be as long as it needs to be but not a second longer so actually polishing cutting out the nonsense making sure that you have a really good quality post produced piece of audio is really important and I think that's something that a lot of podcasters kind of get wrong when they first when they first I Starting and they just assume that their audience is going to stick with them. Even if what giving isn't particularly valuable and I think just editing down is a really important. Hoon's thing on the radio a long long time ago and when I was on the radio you had to fill out and you know you had a slots to fill and that was your slot. That's very different. When it comes to poke casting and really a great podcast can be twelve minutes? A great podcast can be three. And there's so many the different types of podcasts. Is there any sort of style of podcasting that you're aware of that Is easier popular to sort of start with it. Depends pens on your ability to Edison to strip right and stuff like that. Many people do podcasts as interviews interviews interviews a relatively easy although being a great interviewers really halt but interviews a relatively easy to record. It's easy to edit those. It's easy to produce something like that and finding the time to do that is quite quite easy in comparison to for example doing some audio fiction. And you know getting lots of sound effects and actors in a room and all that kind of stuff so if you are thinking of launching a new a new podcast Carr's which is an interview. podcast there are lots of people that have very very tight interests and actually making sure that those people are well catered for you you know. He's he's really interesting. Somebody that has just started doing a podcast about media sales now. The media sales world is not a large worlds but to my knowledge. There haven't been any podcast about. You can clearly see that that will be something that really super serves that particular audience. So is there any questions at this point. I've got to pee more. But is there any questions. Are you burning in the audience. That you've got that you'd like to write a love it. Hi James Thank you. It's been very interesting other any stats around loyalty to podcasts People once they tune in do they stick do do they move on do they come back. How do we grow loyalty? Growing loyalty is an interesting one in terms of statistics. That's quite hard because the only people that have those stats up until recently at least have been the podcast apps that said I linked to quite recently a piece of data from a podcast host called simple cast. What they're doing is they're spotting people coming back and listening to more than one episode assode and they are actually calling a stickiness school so all of a sudden you can begin to have with that particular podcast hosts you can begin to see the people are sticking with your podcast and listening to more and more episodes of that and also actually seeing why that might be the case? I for example subscribe drive to the New York Times daily but I probably listened to one out of every ten episodes because I only listen to the stories that I'm interested in and so quite a lot of this can come down to just as simple as what's the title of that particular show. Is that enough to get somebody to go. Have a listen into about one. Good Stacey James Hello and welcome to at late. It's wonderful to have you here and come from a radio background so creating content it. It comes naturally to me but creating content radio as you would know his quite different to creating content podcasts. I'm now focusing on the business US world and I'm just wondering in your experience you have some Dada with some insights into the crowded interview. PODCAST market that you referred to earlier as the how to make interview podcasts. Pop Valerie Geller. Who is a very good radio and indeed podcast consultant? She has a mantra and part of the Mantra is tell.