17 Burst results for "VP of sales"

"vp sales" Discussed on The Official SaaStr Podcast

The Official SaaStr Podcast

04:33 min | 23 hrs ago

"vp sales" Discussed on The Official SaaStr Podcast

"And how you should walk in a effective way in terms of communications in strategizing with the marketing team given that rolling from to funnel so the lines are getting blurred. Or sure this specially for making personal purchase decisions or business purchase decisions the level to which an individual's able to go down the buyer journey on their own is unbelievable. And so i think the handoffs always been between in my view at least between marketing and sales is when there's actionable interest or actionable demand and so it's not prospect needs to have some sort of back and forth interaction to make informed decision and i think the wrinkled today is structured in labor intensive interaction needs to be and that's the call that a sales marketing team needs to make when they're evaluating funnel and so we're looking at this through lens of frankly grove environment deal marketing have to be tightly aligned on a few things in my book. I think rhyming customer delight as like foundation number one making sure that we are sharing value stories we have an understanding of where these moments were value being driven for the customers but then also just a joint effort in focus on reducing friction to convert. And so they're gonna be times. Where sales should engage with the prospect right from the jump in. We're talking more direct sales motion discovery demo while goalwards not warranted like that is such crappy experience. I know that we've all experienced it in our personal lives making decision where it's like. I see my question answered. And like i'm gonna go not to buy but i don't need this over the top experience and so i think for sales and marketing being really tight on conversion metrics where they are choosing to double down optimize along the way that informs handoff needs to be and ultimately. I think we're seeing the emergence of particularly for these larger user bases the need a more scaled customer experience for sales team which can be complementary but much lighter touch than traditional direct sales model. Leave me when i think about mocking is the messaging. And we look at your experience being Blooms gaining ten price day. The messaging freemium bottoms up is very different than mastering advanced cries..

"vp sales" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:35 min | 2 weeks ago

"vp sales" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Very, very seriously. You know, we just can't come in on the specific of specifics of Tony situation. As the legal process does have to play us. We respect that process. I think most people do most people understand and respect that process, and we'll do the same thing. There will be a time when we can speak to it, and we will as an organization. Similarly, you know who you would expect Tony to speak on. This is a swell. We just can't do it right now. And when we can see the White Sox will we always We always have. But, you know, I appreciate the sentiment from our fans as the reaction from from our fans. We get it, And as we move forward, we'll let this process play out. A lot of correspondents I I have had is, you know Tony's not going to get in the batter's box. Tony's not gonna gonna gonna pinch run or hit And the players that we have Are going to make this season. Very, very interesting. And and as this process plays out it not under Mining any of the things that we We're talking about because we do take it seriously. We're really looking forward to getting these players on the field at some point, so so the fans can can can watch how this this whole situation of trying to win a World Series plays out again, and I really appreciate all the fans and how they have been reaching out to us. So that's Brooks Boyer, VP sales and marketing addressing the Tony LaRussa situation, But it's a big day for the Chicago White Sox. Was a bre, you name the ale M V P just a little bit ago. Freddie Freeman wins the N L M v P that was just announced an ESPN 1000 and the Chicago White Sox have a partnership going forward. Where ESPN 1000 will be the flagship station for every single White Sox home game away Game playoff game spring training. All of your White Sox coverage will be right here. On ESPN 1000 and like we said the last time you heard the socks on ESPN 1000. Here's the 12 pitch to Palmero. Ah, ground ball past. Jakes up the middle, the infield, you re bay has it? He throws out out or White Sox winner in the world championship. The White Sox have won the world serious and they're mobbing each other on the field will be back. You were listeningto Blackman and dollar. ESPN 1000, Chicago's home for sports. Points..

Chicago White Sox Tony LaRussa ESPN Freddie Freeman VP sales and marketing listeningto Blackman Chicago Brooks Boyer Palmero N L M
"vp sales" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

07:22 min | Last month

"vp sales" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Off by that. I mean that was like three years ago. The company was significantly smaller. We were about a hundred to two hundred people now, we're like almost five hundred four hundred do something. So originally it was everyone from the sea level staff. The reason why you're inviting all these people is that you're going bottoms up. So it's not like they are aligned and they're telling me that one. Okay. This is where the company is going. And now this is how we're all going to like strategically execute based on what's coming top down. So you're trying to convince them that this Vision that painting is what they're going to buy into and the reason why you need I don't know the VP sales or the VP marketing there is like if you're a recommendation is like large enough and bold enough a lot of the times table. Is impact on like the types of salespeople you need to hire and like the types of Market you're going to go into and like even the types of marketing activities you're going to do. So you need these people to put their respective hats on and off like okay if that's where the product is going. Like, what do I need to do? So we're all aligned in the whole company is going in the same direction. So what's the outcome of the session life decisions made at the end of it or do people go away and have a think about it and then come back how how does it work after you've presented? So typically we allow for like 15 to 30 minutes of discussion. So sometimes there's some heated debate particularly if you're going in with quite a pointed suggestion or like something that you have already presented elsewhere in law passed, but then typically it is the role of product leadership to kind of consolidate it all into what are going to be our headcount requests for the year. So when that job Lands in whoever's going to make that final approval particular Finance team. They know the story. They know why it's important. So typically it translates into that it translates into orange sign select. You need to disband a team like maybe your recommendation is like this is a dead-end like we shouldn't invest here anymore. That was one of my first ones was like we should kill this product off like start this other thing cuz there's much more opportunity there. So that's typically the next steps is you've managed to get by and hopefully and then all of that goes into your head home town planning and then that gets approved and funded eventually, sometimes it doesn't like sometimes you make a pretty good pace and then people were like, yeah, this is great. We just can't afford to invest in this right now and then maybe a year later you need to do it again and you say hey since last time and now I have even more evidence that this is now increasingly urgent because look at what happened with this competitor and blah blah blah or like Gregor. She's have changed like we really need to make a move on this and suddenly that headcount looks even more justifiable. Now this time it's going to get approved one of the lessons. I learned working in really large companies would never go into these big presentations would see level people if you didn't already know what the answer was supposed to be in there were all all the pre meetings and lobbying people and making sure so when you're talking about things like this where you were talking about two working make your presentation at Finance is going to make headcount decisions and investment decisions. And are you working with them ahead of time or is this the first time they're seeing this month? So I think because the company is still small enough we're going into it primarily cold when it comes to people very far away very far away. I'm doing a rotation marks consuming talking to myself here. Yeah. So because we are still small enough. There's not a lot of premiums that are necessary wage. Unless obviously it's with your engineering team with your ml team. If you've got one with your data team, like with the people that are pretty focused on the the core delivery, you've got loads of discussions. And basically it's it's part of those discussions that go into the deck in the first place. But when you're when you're presenting something that doesn't have a huge amount of impact Beyond just the product work. We don't really do all of those premiums, but I I have can see that in like two years when we're like whatever seven hundred people we absolutely will need to do that. Right I think wage the level of prep is going to be proportionate to the to the chaos around you. So just to square off on this Who's involved in writing it you talked to thought that you're doing it with your product team for for the state of product that you're doing this week. But do you get the your head of engineering and your peers involved in writing the tech as well or they suck? Come in at a later date towards the end of it. Yeah, so they're involved in all the discussions around. Okay, like sometimes you need to make a a trade-off around. Okay. Can we invest in this thing the same time as this one? Actually, there's no capacity in the team to like paralyzed this too. So there's a lot of collaboration in in coming up with an execution strategy game about the overarching strategy right. That tends to be done more by the PM's and maybe if you've got like a business analyst function or a strategy function or sometimes if I am also helps provide like Revenue data and things like that. So it's primarily driven by the PM's but all the other functions kind of come in and help with certain parts during the presentation itself off. Sometimes have engineering present. Okay, given all of this right at the end in the execution part. This is what we suggest the new reporting lines should be or like this is how we suggest. Hey you suck. Said you need a whole new set of mobile Engineers. Like are they going to report into the line of business or they going to report into like some mobile Specialists? Like what is the consequences for the rest of the organization organization? So very collaborative but primarily driven by the PM's and to the PM's work together to have alignment across that bottom of strategy. So every month presenting a consistent message or a consistent direction from you know from the bottom up. Yeah. So that's the role of the chief product officer in our company so he can present like a it starts to be a little bit more top-down now, but he will do like an overarching. I mean with us it's on video identification platform or identity platform and then we will work off that. So we we should all more or less Beyond message, but sometimes one team will be like dead. I really disagree with the top level strategy and I really think we should do XYZ and I'm going to use this airwave time to like make that case and obviously they'll run it past CEO and say like I don't agree with what what we're doing like this is what I'm going to present. They'll be like, okay great, like make that point and then let's see how how people react but generally there's a lot of cross talk and make sure we tell a cohesive story particularly when there's dependencies between like horizontal teams and vertical teams. Yeah as we scale that's becoming.

chief product officer VP sales Finance head of engineering VP marketing CEO business analyst
"vp sales" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:51 min | Last month

"vp sales" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Felix Vega joined the show. Not too long ago, Jack Harris will be back next week. Tough loss for the Bucks Last night I went to bed. They were winning before the end of the first half, and I woke up and they had lost and I was said so now. I'm going to drink. Yeah, Friday. You know what this is What I have in my hand, a delicious, hazy EPA, and it is from three daughters brewing. And it is the former New England EPA. Why? Why is it a former New England? I pay? Of course. It's theme for the former New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady. And I feel like after I drink this The Bucks will have their luck again and they'll be back to victory's starting next week when they take on Green Bay. Joining us on the hotline. Now the VP sales and marketing director over at three daughters brewing, Brian Horn. Good morning, Brian. Good to talk to again. Good morning. Good to talk to you guys, too. So what we have here is a hazy, juicy EPA here 12, ounce can and it reads kudos to New England for having been home to the rise of great things, But we know the truth. It's always more fun in the Florida sun. How'd you come up with us? You know, funny story we were on our calendar. We actually had New England had the idea because you know, in the craft your world is really it right now, Right in an ideal world, hazy New England style is really kind of all the rage. So we've had a recipe. We've been serving at the brewery for several years and one of my personal favorites, and you're just kind of talking about. You know what You should do in New England style. How can we rap in the whole bucks thing and just kind of all suddenly just came to us and said, Wow, it's just big, basic, simple, just called former doing life. And Brian, this is Felix Vega is so with all the craziness that's going on. It seems like you're still having fun. With your business. How is your business going His own about Teo Crack open my own beer because I will sad. It's Friday. I had I'd said Felix, you grab a beer and you drink it, buddy. It's Friday. Yeah, right. Well, it's been a rollercoaster, obviously for everybody, but you know, over the last month or so, the tasting room down ST Pete has opened up fully, and so we're very excited about that. Three bars and restaurants are opening. And so that's great. We're getting a lot of people in that hospital industry back work in our off premise or what we consider package when you drink out of a can. You know that's been pretty strong people, obviously, with bars and restaurants being closed went to Publix is and pull the lines and ABC stores by there, so You know, it's been up and down like the rest of us, But we're in a good position. We're excited about the future. It's the former New England EPA. A. It is from three daughters brewing, and you should definitely try it. It's delicious, Brian. You bring up the hay zis I have recently in the last year and a half Really The hazy I P s are the on ly. My pee is that I love right now, Like, really, I don't know what it is about. The hazy is what separates why people are so into it Right now. The taste is just it's on point. Yeah, You know, I think to be perfectly honest with you. It's one of the things that has kind of just made its way into the craft your world and because it's just it's juicy. It's got a lot of flavors. It's very complex. You know, you can really do a lot of different things with the beer. So from a craft brewer standpoint, there's just a lot of different ways. You can take that hazing meeting style. And make it your own, which I think is why you see so many craft breweries right now, coming out with soniya awesome different beers styles like Brian. Three daughters. Brewing has to have the idea in the works, and I don't want to get too ahead of myself, especially after Ah loss from the Rays in the Bucks last night, but Stanley Cup champion lightning potential world serious champion Rays and maybe Super Bowl champion Buccaneers and that would be in our backyard at Raymond James Stadium. Can we Are we starting to come up with a concept may be in the works for a trifecta of the three No. Three championship team. Is in the area. A three championships. Three daughters We've already got Several things are lined up. So we're you're ready to go. That is perfect. Brian. If people want to go check this out and try the former New England for themselves a CZ Just go 23 daughters Brewing isn't anywhere else right now. Yeah, three daughters. We also have it. Ah, like Publix is total wining and ABC throughout the camp area. Awesome Esso and check it out and try to Literally one of my 140 years we've done it's probably one of my top favorite three daughters brewing in ST Petersburg. Go check him out there. Awesome over there. Not only great great people to Brian website and exact location where you're out for people. Yeah, we're located right down by the actually the race stadium in 22nd Avenue on Petersburg. It's like you 2 to 22nd Street south and then also on our website at three Growing dotcom. Thank you for sampling the beers with us this morning and have a great weekend. Brian will catch up with you soon. Thank you.

Brian Horn New England EPA Felix Vega Bucks New England England New England Patriots Publix EPA ABC Jack Harris Petersburg Tom Brady ST Petersburg Florida Green Bay Raymond James Stadium VP sales
"vp sales" Discussed on My Quest for the Best with Bill Ringle

My Quest for the Best with Bill Ringle

08:14 min | 2 months ago

"vp sales" Discussed on My Quest for the Best with Bill Ringle

"Leader who founded her own firm McLeod and more in two thousand one. She works with leaders of organizations like Roche, Volvo, Dave, and buster's and others that drive exponential revenue growth, and she's also the author five bestselling books. Lisa's now talk about her book selling with Noble Purpose, which is being released for the second edition. Welcome. Lisa, it's great to be with you today bill. It's great to have you on the. Show say Lisa one thing I love to hear from people who are high performers and who really create new thoughts and ideas in the industry is when you were growing up who somebody who influenced or inspired you. Well, I know that this is might seem like a tried answer because a lot of people would say, this is actually my dad and one of the things that I didn't understand at the. Time as a young child was my dad was a guy who loved his job he worked for a bank. Then later he worked for the FDIC and he believed that his work was making a difference in what I didn't realize a child is everybody does not feel that way about their job and so he really set in to me work should be fun. Work should matter your work should make a difference. And that became part of my core belief system. That's terrific and I say that because my father didn't get to work in the area that he loved, which would have been to work as a forest ranger. I. Think because he loved nature and loved the outdoors and was a biology major when he graduated and started a family, he found that it was much easier to get a job as a chemist. So he worked his whole. Career as a chemist indoors in a laboratory when his real love would've been to be outdoors in the woods and surrounded by nature. So he was a great counter example to me about how important it is to choose work that excites you every day. Yeah I had my mother was a schoolteacher who wanted to be doctor and I think and she was not as happy with her job a today I took from my dad that I. Didn't realize I was absorbing from a really young age was not just that you should choose worth it excites. You 'cause I also heavily influenced by Mary Tyler Moore and I thought I was going to have her job on day. But the thing I took away from him was not just choose the conditions that excite you. But connect the dots about how your work makes a difference because my dad would always come home and tell. US about this business that got this loan and how exciting it was when he worked for the government even say during the SNL crisis, he would say, Oh, we're saving the facts for bailing. It was always about the impact that the work had and I didn't realize that that was kind of a unique orientation that he was seething in May Lee said, you remember a time when that message or that feeling from the example of your. Father made a difference in the decision that you made either early in her career or maybe later on, but you could actually tied back and say, oh my gosh, my my father was really speaking to me at that moment about ten years ago during the recession, we had a business I had been a sales consultant and had my business for the last twenty years but about ten years ago my husband owned US small manufacturing company. And during the recession belly up as a lot of these companies did it was assigned companies tied to commercial construction and what happened for me was we business went belly up taking most of our money with it and we were on the hook for a lot of it had to declare bankruptcy and it was horrible. You know it's one thing to be broken your twenties but to be broken your forties when you got kids about to. Go, to college it was terrible and so what did was that put a lot of pressure on me to step into this role of the sole earner because he was dealing with this whole thing going bankrupt and so where I really thought about was, how do I want to grow my business because at the time I was a consultant I had a pretty good business was making I'll be candidate a couple of hundred thousand dollars A. Year but now the IRS, a couple, hundred, thousand dollars I had to figure out a way make more money and I thought why could run out there and run around and just trying make a bunch of money or I can do this in a way where I'm going to be really proud of the business I created an how I made a difference to other people and was really the voice of my childhood coming back and saying. You don't want to just show up for work in this transactional way you. WanNa show up in a way that is both benefiting other people and also benefiting yourself. and. So that really guided me at that time I. Just want to highlight that because I think that's a choice point that many people face in different levels of intensity in their lives and to bring in that part about I don't want this to just to be about the transactions are solving a financial problem paying off a debt but how can I reinvasion what I do? How can I strategically engage where he could still make a contribution mega big impact make A. Profitable income and also feel better about myself. That was a real game changer I imagine for you wasn't it. It absolutely was a game changer because what happens in that moment we tend to in our society create this false dichotomy between making money making a difference making money is all these sales people out there hustle Leonard off who don't care about anything and making a difference is for social workers and doctors and people like that but nothing could be further from the truth. What happened was is I wanted to solve this problem for myself. I started solving it for other people and the research tells us that people who sell with what we call noble purpose who truly want to make a difference to their customers actually so more than people who just focused on their own targets and quotas. So let's back up a little bit because I'm interested in how you made the. Switch from a corporate executive to becoming a small business owner of when you work at proctor and gamble. What was it that was going on in your mind? Did you see an opportunity what led to the decision to go out and begin a business on your own or they're actually to decisions I left procter and gamble, and which is a great company I left them to join a small consulting firm. And a moment happened to me during the interview. Where my boss was interesting is I just had wrote a piece for Forbes while I talked to John Sculley former CEO of apple, and apparently he faced the exact same conversation that I had by little twenty, five year old mid manager cell, which was when Steve Jobs said to him hey, we're changing the world over here. Do you want to just continue to sell sodas or do you want to change the world was exact same conversation my boss have me to join the small consulting firm, which was we're changing the way people sell. We're changing the way people lead. Do you want to be part of that and I went signed me up? So that's how I left a big company. How I started on my own I decided to be really honest about this. A lot of people start their own company because they see some great opportunity they wanNA capture the market I'm going to be quite candid. The reason I started my own consulting firm is because I was a VP sales who is on the road seventy hours a week and I had a baby and I didn't. Want to be on the road seventy hours a week and I knew I could help companies. So I decided to start my own company and do it on my own terms I know a lot of people can relate to that frustration of feeling trapped in a role being very successful and saying there has to be a different way and you found the courage and resources to make that a successful consulting company. So congratulations on that step. Thanks where did you get the idea of noble purpose because it seems so obvious when we talk about it yet I believe that what it is called in a lesser way is kind of alignment being aligned with your values. How did you elevate that freeze into something that's become so significant and develop such a a rich body of work around it will it started with a research study that I did for a big biotech firm. My team and I win and the biotech firm to study their sales team, and in this case, I will leave the firm unnamed but the sales guy coincidentally named Bill.

Lisa consultant US McLeod FDIC Mary Tyler Moore VP sales Roche Volvo Bill Dave Lee business owner buster SNL Leonard procter John Sculley IRS Steve Jobs
"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:39 min | 1 year ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"What happened but imagine an end consumer financial business without a credit score today it would be it would be yeah? That's a really interesting thought. And it'll be interesting. I mean now with the you know what is it meaningful. Use Five and people getting access now. The they're going to be require our next year to give access to patient data access to patients and So I think we're getting closer and closer to that. I think you bring up a really great a great point because if we don't do some sort of standardization things will continue to get pretty confusing pretty messy so matt give us an example of a time I'm or you had a setback and something that you took out of that learning from my perspective. When I started two years ago with academic to launch into North America? Gotcha with this new APP. I basically was chasing everything that was you know. And I'm I'm responsible for growing the market so I was chasing everybody who is interested and I did. I did spend a Lotta time with health tech companies early on because they were finding out about us. We were exhibiting at shows and things like that and and there was a tremendous interest interest and I thought this is going to be a great area of the market for us. And I still think it's going to be when it still hasn't become because is I think there's a lot of innovation. There's a lot of new companies. There's a lot of innovators and many of them really wanted to have a health score in their application when they saw what we redoing because it made total sense as part of with they wanted to deliver to the customers and I spent a lot of time on it. But what I didn't realize was that a lot of these companies barely had a product get. I wasn't really dealing with a no disrespect to those companies by the way but no yeah. Of course I needed. I needed to focus my time on. Companies were more mature in what they were delivering. And so I think that now known companies to work with or what would it look what they should look like for me to spend my time so from a mark sales and marketing perspective. I think it's pretty ether. So much going on in the health text base and this digital health world that you just have to be careful where we spend your time. I think that's a great call out and if you had to boil it down Matt to just the qualification process how do you do it now. Stage stage of business or is it. Is it revenue. What do you do to to qualify? One is just asked. You have requirements. I find that sometimes. Now that's one of my first questions but I've found that a lot of companies. They what we have is really cool and what they wanted it but they didn't exactly have requirements to no other. We're GONNA use it what they were. GonNa Holly we're going to put a product together. And then certainly I think would stage there in what size customer base they have if they don't have a customer base but they want to put our technology to hopefully you know when it rolls out at help attract customers I get it but can they afford to do that. And most likely they can't not a great learning and definitely it's easy to get excited about a product and lose time and before you know it you've spent a lot of time going after a potential customer customer and there it goes because they weren't qualified to really great share a Matt. Thank you for sharing that. Oh my pleasure so in this part of the podcast cast. We're GONNA do a lightning round. We've got four questions here. It's the one on one on how to be successful in healthcare with Matt Park and so we got four questions lending around style followed by a book and podcast that you recommend to the listeners. You ready already awesome. What is the best way to improve? Health outcomes improve health outcomes would be to clearly identify how you're going to measure them. How you're going to measure the outcome that you want to be able to report on until you understand the whole equation then you can't create the way to improve it love it? What's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid that? I think kind of what I said before about this. Business is so big. There's so many different aspects to say digital health and you know what it means but it means so many different things so I think you need to narrow your focus if you want to be successful in digital health space you need to narrow your focus. On what area are we going to play and is it the fine space or am I helping to define love it. How do you stay relevant as an organization despite all this change? Well we spend an awful lot of time getting out in in the market. I think last year do even though small company. We did seventeen conferences in the US guy presented at the thirteen or fourteen of them and we did probably that many in Asia and that many in Europe as well so we are like super active out in the market. And that way we get to touch. What's going on and it is changing so fast? It's incredible so you have to be there. Live to hear what companies are saying. What the leaders of the companies are saying? What's one area of Focus? That should drive everything in a health organization. User the patient if it's a medical organization than the patient if it's a corporation corporation it's the employees. It's the constituent it's the end user ended. It is because technology for technology sake just gets his waist. I and you don't realize who's GONNA use it. And how are they gonNA chill about using it and you see a lot of this. Quite frankly with three hundred. Fifteen thousand was an apps out there. It's scary right so you've got to focus on the news. What Book and what podcast would you recommend to listeners? Met The book doc than the one that I'm reading. Right now is cells are the new cure by Wab and Smith and Max Gomez okay. It's really science fiction fiction. It's happening right now. It's incredible forward by Sanjay Gupta so town very and of course I mean I would recommend this here outcomes rockin doc in podcast. It's my thank you thank you. Thank you very much my friend listeners. Don't worry about writing any of this down. All the pearls is that Matt has shared. You could find those at outcomes rocket dot health slash park. That's Matt's last name P. A. R. K.. You he could find all the show notes links to the books recommended links to Dacca do and All they're under one page so matt before we conclude I would love if You could just share a closing thought with the listeners. And then the best place that they could get in touch with you. Sure closing thought is. I think that there's a lot of uh good things happening in digital health and as I mentioned before with a focus on the consumer on the patient on the end user I think the people that are in digital health are in it for more reasons than to make a buck. They're in it for sincerely. Wanting to make an have an impact on people. Oh and I think that it can happen. Digital Health will play a big role in that but we have to be extremely focused and aware on every time we bring something something the market. How will that really impact in a positive way? Our consumer a great message and Matt. What what? What is the best place for the listeners? I get in touch with you or follow you. Yes sure so. I think you know. Just my email addresses Matt Dot Park. Att Dot P. A. R. K.. At Dacca due DOT com. Tom D. Oh come let's easiest way awesome so listeners. You'll find that again at contract dot.

Matt Digital Health Matt Dot Park Matt Park North America Dot P. A. R. K Dacca US Sanjay Gupta Tom D. Europe Max Gomez Asia Smith P. A. R. K
"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"So that's a core piece of the Ip and then we have a full platform so now that you know your health score or now that you know Oh your credit score so to speak. You've gotTa have a way to manage it right. You need a way to make it transparent to the end user with Mean how's it changing wiser changing. And how can I manage it and improve it. And that's what the rest of the platform does that super interesting and I think about this as sort of The consumer facing side of early warning scores. Not sure if you're familiar with early warning scores or not matt early warning scores. You mean risk scores. If that's what you mean. Yeah yeah the exactly. So the risk scores early warning orders for clinicians they take like Muse as one of them m e w asked right and they take an aggregated score of of several different parameters. And it's a single number that alerts clinician. If something's going wrong way ahead of time before it actually happens and so basically I'm I'm looking at this is just like wow. This is so cool like this is a way that you can use it outside of the four walls of the hospital before you end up there. Yeah Yeah No. We could actually do that. I mean we could deliver that kind of information to clinicians as well because the health score itself is actually based on really serious science and underneath the health score is a complex set of risk models so the original concept of creating score was to answer the question. What are your chances houses of dying in the next X. number of years so that number can be any number that we plug in their ten years twelve years? Whatever and so in order to create eight to score the founder of the company Peter Animus was able to enlist the help of an MIT professor professor doctor Lawrence Jacobs who was a longtime in time professor there in physics who also happens to be an MVP and now works in cardiovascular research at the University of Zurich? But Peter Peter is able to get Lawrence to help him to create the models it would create ultimately the health score so the house is based on three hundred million million person years of clinical and customer data. And that's a lot of. That's a lot of person-years person-years hard to duplicate. I mean just to have the access access to this amount of information so it really was several years of research and science by academics at create. This pretty cool. What is Dacca? Do mean it actually is sort sort of a made up word According to it is the sound over the rhythm of music I guess as they as they talk about it and Switzerland so eh do okay all right maybe you can think of Dinka do if you know Jimmy Durante. Oh yeah okay. So uh-huh oh man. That's so cool. That's really interesting and your customers obviously being employers in listeners. If you're an employer thinking about your rising healthcare cost cost. Let's face it next to labor and just supplies. Your healthcare. Bill is probably one of the largest and average is eight to ten in percent increase. Cost here what can you do. What things can you apply to help curb those costs that are really limiting your competitive abilities here because we're in a global economy so you know something to think about? Can you highlight a little bit about who uses you guys. And and maybe a way that you've have helped improve outcomes for companies. Yeah absolutely so. Our customers were really a technology company and a technology platform so our platform is awesome really designed to enable entities to shape it to their own needs. So we enable customization very easily white labeling labeling branding as well as you know putting in their own content and managing that so our customers tend to be higher level entity so we deal mostly leave with insurance companies so both health insurance and life insurance companies we deal directly with a large corporate wellness program so directly with the corporations rations and then lastly and very interesting and more recently. We're getting a lot of customers in the Pharma. Business incur focus basically on specific medications and impact the health of specific populations that have chronic illnesses. And if you think think about it if you combine healthy lifestyle better nutrition and exercise with most of the major chronic illnesses. You can have a significant impact and outcome on on those those people's health. I guess I should say if category that we work a lot with his health tech so this is the sort of the greater healthcare ecosystem of technology companies that are designing earning products and applications APPs. Portal's etcetera to solve all of these problems and Dacca dues core technologies and we have a number of component technologies. Also be licensed you're open. Api and then incorporated integrated very easily to other platforms. Very cool very cool and and Matt can you share a story of how your technology has improved outcomes anything out of mind. Yeah yeah absolutely so. In the last a few years we had a in analysis and assessment done of a large group of academia users that were out of one specific country and that that was over the course of about three years of their use of the technology and so we were able to come up with some really good stats showing that the average users key health measurements. And I'll tell you what those are improved significantly so the following information is useful so the variables that we're remeasuring were weight. Waist size systolic blood pressure diastolic. Blood pressure resting heart rate diabetes risk and hypertension risk and we saw increases or percentage of vacaville users that got impacted ranged between ten percent and forty something percent depending on which of those categories. You're talking about and the average decrease meaning benefit because if your heart rate lower. Your blood pressure lowers. That's good so that's increased. But the improvement I should say ranged from three percent of the low end so about thirty percent at the high end depending again on the variable that we're measuring and then we do another measurement because of the the core risk engine that this is built on we measure some interesting things so we produce another measurement that's called healthy years gained an eighty percent of the users I had two and a half healthier gained. Thanks that's a really good a metric. That's awesome hey I'll take two and a half more years. Exactly your healthy healthy absolutely yes healthy years signing up. Yeah that's pretty cool without a doubt out and you'd think about all the things that employers can be doing for their employees or the payers could be doing for the lives that they cover. This is definitely something very very interesting and why not I mean we have dashboards for everything else. Why not have a dashboard for our own house? Agreed and I think this is one of the big things missing in in wellness programs and and then all entities of companies organizations to healthcare system. That are trying to help people improve. Their health is the real time. IMPACT ACT programs doesn't exist. It's very hard to measure and so in wellness programs. I wrote a paper on this last year. And part of it was about the call the the measurement conundrum and because we don't know how to measure the health impact of our wellness programs in a short-term Way So what are companies doing. They're trying to find a way to figure out that claims are going down and all of the people in the in the health insurance business have told me. That's a three to five year project. So you know eventually people realize that's not gonNa work so they tried to figure out that well we can measure absenteeism in presence of employees that would surely show the data that we need to prove that. It's you know our programs are working but with most companies using a PTO system. Today you don't really why people are even absence right and by the way. When they are sick they come to work because they don't want to lose their pto days which they think our vacation days? So that's no that's that's true that's statistic from the HR organization that is fascinating. And so what you guys are doing now is through your Ip. You're helping people with an early indicator of their investment in wellness. Yeah it shows an early indicator because you can run a program. Let's say that you wanted to run a challenge on for the month of February and maybe it was something as simple as walking challenge trying to get population of our employees out walking more and promoting it talking about it at the end of the month of February. Wouldn't it be nice to run a report and say hey people congratulations. We just ended our challenge. It was a great success. We were able to improve the health of the average participant and by twelve points. And that to me is the kind of thing that people need to understand. Hey what did is working. I see my health score going up every day. And that's the feedback that people really lack in anything that they do. Exercise weight loss. Nutrition is that instant pat on the back that hey this is working. It's helping you be healthier if there's anything that that will help improve. It is measurement and for sure it sounds like this is a a novel way of measuring the impact of these programs. I like how you guys section things off into lifestyle mindset and body having. It's pretty cool that you guys have specific measurements that lead to the indicator later and and it's pretty interesting. You guys have done it yet either. By the way it's not novel Davinci came up with this idea if you remember. His picture of the man was arms out out that was basically lifestyle body. Mind what he considered holistic human rights. So that's what we use. That's pretty cool that you mentioned that Matt because it's it's not new however I've had a couple of guests on the podcast say something very insightful. Is that innovation in. Healthcare happens with implementation flirtation and so ideas and technologies exists but when you can actually implement them and apply them like you guys have. That's when the innovation happens in healthcare. And you guys are definitely doing it absolutely and innovation. There's currently three hundred. Eighteen thousand APS health apps in the APP store. Three hundred eighteen thousand thousand APS. Is that what it's up to now. Yeah and it's moving up like two hundred something every day. Okay so imagine the amount of data that's being created about people's health and imagine how different and despair at that data is. Oh my gosh. And imagine if you're a consumer and you're trying to measure all these different things and using different perhaps none of this data would ever make sense if you put it all together. So I believe that there's a big problem. And that is the normalization of health information nation so some kind of standard framework that the health desk rod is going to have to start building absent so that they come together and means something to the consumer that they're trying to impact by the way they're all being built with really good intent and I believe that I believe that really is true and a lot of them can do great things and it's super what the innovation I see at these conferences. It's science fiction on those But we've got to come up with some standardization so and one of the ideas and obviously I'm certainly heavily revised in this area but one of the ideas that helps to make this normal is a standardization of a score. outscore that everybody WHO's involved in healthcare knows knows. Oh what's Your House score while I'm a I'm a seven fifty. That's great or I'm a five fifty. People know what that is. What brought you down?.

Matt professor Lawrence Jacobs Peter Peter Switzerland Jimmy Durante University of Zurich vacaville Bill MIT Peter Animus Davinci
"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"To live healthier more active lives. He's had a really great history really a veteran and software. He was around even before there was windows so so this guy knows what he's up to and his experience has gone through the continuum of the provider side but also especially the employer benefits side through hr software that helps manage care of people and now at Dacca. Do He's doing some pretty cool things. In so including He measurement indicators to help you stay they healthy so I thought it'd be a great place to have a conversation about the things that they're doing there and couldn't be more excited to have you on the podcast Matt backsaw assault Pleasure to be here absolutely. So what is it that got you into the health space to begin with well. That's a good question. I've always been really interested and more and more so over the last years in things like nutrition and exercise. I've always been very conscientious and really wondering you know when the healthcare our business was gonNA get more focused on how that get people thinking about in care of themselves so it's always been on my mind have done lots of research on it over the years and and was really just coincidental. Just as I was thinking about changing jobs few years ago that I was approached by Dacca do and it's a Swiss company Eh based in Zurich Switzerland and to me that was already interesting because I've lived overseas in three different countries that I speak fluent German. And that's always the kind of a hobby of mine interest so that was interesting and then the fact that they were doing a digital health platform and wanting to launch in North America. That was super interesting wanting to me. Because that's really what I do and have done. Best over the years is startups in the software business and I started up companies denise for US companies. I've started up European operations in several different countries over there with different. US companies. And then. I've started up a different companies knees and divisions of companies around the US too so having the chance to start up the operations risk was company in the US that was really exciting especially in the health sector. Yeah Yeah that's for sure and you obviously have a really amazing background in in helping companies off the ground here and abroad Dacca. Dues is special so you WanNa tell us a little bit more about what they do and why it's different. Yeah this is really an interesting company so first of all we. It's a digital health. Platform Latte form to engage people in healthy lifestyle new better nutrition exercise. Mindfulness things like that. But more importantly they spent several years ears before rolling out their first product to create their core intellectual property which we call the health score and the health score is unique unique. Because it's a real time health score. Think about a credit score for your health or exactly what I was thinking about and I call it your batting your batting average of health. So it's it's changing in real time and this is what makes it really unique. It changes in real time. It's composed of over a hundred different data points about human health that we track and those roll up into three subcategories of health that we call lifestyle body and mind so we're looking at holistic health. Not just one aspect aspect of health or not just.

Dacca US North America Matt backsaw assault Zurich Switzerland
"vp sales" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"vp sales" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"They communicate. You think you're going to be a star? It's gonna be hard or you know, it's it's a hard level of. Anyway, you know, every every dream is gut. It's you know, Darth Vader in and things which are hard. You know? So it's whatever but back into dozen four I was trying to make sure movies, and I was completely fading at it. I went on vacation to Guadeloupe was a friend who and I had a Sony camera. And I took a photo of a girl, and he showed me Photoshop for the first time my life because it was a lot of choice behind was beautiful girl. But it was a lot of stuff in says, you know, there's a software up you can you raise the people behind them. Like, no, you're serious. So yeah. So you showed me Photoshop the first time, and it was a huge. It was the biggest ha ha a funny moment of my life because I realize until I can figure out how to be an actor or feel make your economic create something artistic which is take photos. So when back when back to work as VP sales of my company of my brother's company, but after work, I started taking photos just. For getting some art in my life. And I did this for literally six years, you know, while training training and training until I had a a pretty bad ass collection of Paris. You know, injuries in the making shooting almost every night washing. Jerusalem was every night the six years straight, and yeah, that's that's how I got into photo end later on teaching and now I so I moved to Hollywood because I didn't opportunity to team up with people here, and we made a movie called the hully woods came out on Amazon prime last year. Nice. It's it's a comedy about French guy me being Hollywood and trying to make it in folding in love with a beautiful girl. But who's to totally given up a dream on being a being an actor? And I have an angel fulling me around in Hollywood visited of crazy, dude and only I can see him. And he's giving me crazy advice to make it in Hollywood as secure comedy. And that was the. I where he so I produced it with Canham can on France help me produced a either give us all the camera. The lands is everything a hundred and ten thousand dollar was gear lash it would be. Yes, it was crazy. So it was a full sponsor by cannon. And then so I was the lead actor, and I was the producer. And what I now I'm working on to other projects where I I might play a small part as an actor. But it's made me me as a filmmaker is like my first Dubuque as a filmmaker. So that's that's really why here in Los Angeles. There's no, you know, there's the reason why I'm here and just making movies..

Hollywood Photoshop Darth Vader Guadeloupe Los Angeles VP sales Paris Dubuque Canham Amazon Sony producer Jerusalem France six years ten thousand dollar
"vp sales" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

"The subject and eighty megapixel. Hi rez. Mode at one sixtieth of a second a larger better EV F and use those B L H one batteries the same that are in the EM one Mark to now my thinking is since Olympics created this flagship body here, the EM one acts along with my friend, David Etchells from imaging resource having talked not too long ago to Ocoee mirada whose Olympics America's VP sales and marketing and you're onto telling him that that company is definitely not going to be doing full frame in the future and also their history as a company is focusing on smart cameras on purpose. I think it's pretty darn clear for now at least probably for a number of years that they wanna stay small. However, you want to read that next. It's inevitable. Not only are smartphones becoming more and more capable every year one. And even to cameras are going to be a thing in the past. And why is that well for one people have taken the larger phones, surprisingly they thought everybody would want a smaller phone to carry around. That's not true. The screens have gotten bigger and bigger and with that there's more real estate round back to play with. And if you got that extra space, and you're part of a manufacturer's imaging team, you start to think crazy thoughts like well. We put two cameras on the back third or maybe a fourth. And if it makes sense to do. So you do it after all that's another feature to tout. Right. But again, it needs to make sense. You can't just put it in there just for putting it in their sake. Now, as you may know, I finally stepped up to the iphone ten s max, which I really really love and there's three cameras in it one on the screen side for selfish and such and to round back. But. According to an increasing number of reports apples hard at work it making three cameras on the backside. A reality reality that already exists out there with a number of other smartphones. Now digits reporting based on info from the quite reliable at on leaks on Twitter that apple plans to quote, use a triple cameras setup housed in a square camera unit. With a rather large camera bump, and quote renders based on the current design firm details in the engineering validation tests, the EVT's stage revealed three cameras so picture a pyramid. Not straight up and down but facing to the right. So there's an LED flash above that not to the right of that. Right. Most camera and a microphone directly below that. Hopefully that made sense now other smartphone makers ten have the cameras in line traffic, light style rather than the orientation that Apple's seems to be going with ear. But that's okay. Honestly, I don't. Care, what ordering tation there in so long as they're useful to me. And they don't get in my way, this is all subject to change, of course. And this camera unit isn't likely to be in a shipping iphone until sometime after they announce it in September of twenty nineteen. So that's still many months away. Now now digit speculate that we're going to see this in the high end model replacing the iphone ten s max that I got. And while it's not known what the third camera would be for Bloomberg noted recently that apple was eyeing three D cameras sensors from Sony, which would be able to create three D depth maps by measuring how long it takes for light to bounce off of subjects..

Apple VP sales and marketing David Etchells Ocoee mirada America EVT Twitter Bloomberg Sony
"vp sales" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Mixergy

"Best as you can possibly do it on a comeback to color in a moment. And find out how you came up with the idea and how you did get those early customers. But I mentioned that you are an angel investor. How did you start angel investing? Had you become one of the best ones in the business. Yeah. That that angel investing start really organically. So I had a bunch of friends who are starting companies around the same time. I was and we would all give each other advice, and one of the things I start giving a lot of advice on was things like fundraising or hiring your first few employees or managing early teams. And so is money they start organically, pending me just asking, hey, do you on invest as part of this round? So it it kind of happened a little bit through happenstance. It was just you investing through friends or were you making any kind of dense it it was just m I friends with them. If I am let's do it more like my friends with them. In is a is it a good idea? But there are also some circumstances where it was you know, you see some people repeatedly at the same events. So like, the funders of Airbnb I kept running into and then I help them a little bit with their series fundraise, or you know, with stripe. I think I just emailed Patrick the CO there when it lost a little bit randomly. I just thought it was a really cool product than what it used it at mixer labs and mixed built infrastructures emailed and said, hey, I worked on some infrastructure. And I think what you're doing is really cool do on his go for a walk and talk about start up. So a lot of the things happen very were Ganic early on and just talking him. And you're giving them advice at that point. We basically just talked about what are different types of platforms and infrastructure and things like that. And then I may be miss remembering this, but I think I'm, you know, they're raising around from sequoia knee, literally just message knee and said, hey, you know, were raising around you on John Basson. So again, it happened pretty organically in that case. You know, what I talked to one of the people who worked for him who said that he? He did he intentionally will delegate almost everything away. So that he could be more accessible to have conversations with people to be the guy who responds to two people on Twitter. I feel like he's a good manager. But I don't get to see enough of what makes him such a good manager like the the type of CO that you aspired to to train with the book, the high growth handbook feels like he represents that my right? I think there's lots of different styles of CEO and side on the there's one like canonical good version or one that is the way that you have to do it. I think you what you find is that each person finds the things that they really liked doing the things that they hate doing. And one of the reasons a lot of founders receives Bernau as they spend all their time on stuff that they hate so really dislike setting sales compensation and sitting endless meetings. Maybe should hire a COO or a VP sales to run that for you. And, you know, find the right way to check in on those things, but not drive this One of the one things of the you. things you. It's one of the things that I didn't. I didn't have done it before. So as less about disliking it or hitting I thought it was fine as done it enough times before across multiple different jobs that it wasn't new or as interesting is doing something completely different. So each person's figure out what are those things that they love one of the things that they hate. And then find ways to spend time on the things that they love..

John Basson sequoia knee Airbnb Ganic Patrick CEO Bernau COO VP sales
"vp sales" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Mixergy

"That's a real. Here's another person who invested the I, I don't think it makes sense that he invested Jason Lumpkin. He doesn't like people like you. Maybe he wasn't clear about it at the time because Jason doesn't need like companies which are really good at sales or is it that he thinks he can help you be good at sales? And that's why he invested? Well, I think the thing with QA is that a lot of a lot of people who were founders have had personal pain points with it. Right. And so you know, jasons jasons whole Rubik for investing at least when he invested in in in late twenty. Fifth, early twenty fifteen. His whole Rubik for investing was I want to believe that the the founder CEO is better than I was when I made that cosign and I won't to really really care about the problem. And so he had every single startup he's ever Bill has been fucked by QA in some way, and for whatever reason he thought that I was best than he was. I wouldn't agree with that, but he, he felt that that's why he investing say. So he's really big. I didn't even know this. He has a co working space here in San Francisco. I learned just about a year ago just for entrepreneurs who are in sales. So if you have sling space. Gary coast selling space. That's what it's called CSS. The CSS no idea I went in space is pretty cool. I think I rent from Regis so Regis has office in his in the same building as he does. So it's kind of interesting to go through it from my house. Oh, you live near there? Yeah. Pajaro hill baby. Yeah, that's a really good. 'cause it's sunny. So here's the thing you mentioned SDR's. A lot of companies don't know about SDR's and the whole sales process. You guys eventually did get good at it. How did you get good at it and what's the process today that works so well. I think this. I mean, I'll give you a concrete onset, but as usual, I think about this philosophically and basically that is no problem in business that is like impenetrable. Every problem is a problem that can be sold with the right experimental scientific mindset. How to generate opportunities to close into deals is just one of those problems and the us we realized, you know, we hide off a sales person of us. Sales person was a fantastic good, and he closed. He became a fuss, VP sales, in fact, and he closed all of the leads that were just sitting around that. I've been kind of fumbling around. We ought to five hundred k. of annual recurring revenue. Just me selling and I'm really not a good salesperson. It'd be somebody coming to your website hitting that demo button, right? Which is is a step forward for someone who doesn't know how to sell you, did it well be requested demo? You do the demo and then you close them on the sale and you got to five hundred thousand in recurring annual sales that way. Exactly. Yeah. And, and so you know, it was very clear at least it. Now, it's very clear that the reason we got to that because the product market fit was strong ride. In retrospect, it felt like she had pain, you know, three and a half years. I mean, not even it was like two years of selling five years of you getting on the phone, doing demos with people. Okay. In retrospect, would you have still done it that way or would you have hired a salesperson faster? Oh, how salesperson instantly instantly someone who could do the demos. You didn't learn enough about the product to make the business better through those calls. It was just sheer, I did. It was just that it was like the if you look at our revenue ram, right? Like the, it's two and a half years delayed from where it could have been, and that's what it comes down to. I don't regret it, but you need to make these mistakes yourself on. I read the lean startup by agrees before I built like five anti lean startups, you know? So you have to learn these poems yourself. But anyway, we had a..

Jason Lumpkin Bill SDR VP sales Regis Pajaro hill founder CEO San Francisco five hundred k five years two years
"vp sales" Discussed on Advanced Selling Podcast

Advanced Selling Podcast

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Advanced Selling Podcast

"And it was a vp sales and he asked a simple question what's selling system is the best and by selling system he met the challenger sale sandler spin that sort of thing there was some really cool comments and one of the comments kind of caught my eye got us thinking about this episode which is one what is the best which are opinion on that and before that though should you even have one because one of the guys put a comment reset hey if you're thinking about you know that sales is about tech techniques and phrasing those little things and he said you're you're buyers can hit the snooze button on you so we thought it would be good to do kind of a dual headed episode here about selling systems so we're gonna i talk about should we even have one at all and then we're going to answer for that we're going to bring kind of riff on some of the systems that are out there plus and minus and then we're going to go in the second assode what the advanced selling podcast process or selling system if we were going to build one for you to look like so yeah and maybe in the second episode if you are interested in designing your own methodology for your own business yeah that's where we will give them some foundational elements and some framework so for sure yeah i've got a list here brian of the five or six of the largest sales training organizations that you would say have methodologies these are in no particular order solution selling is big and has been around for a long time spin selling was who was a guy that deal rackham dartmouth or there's local that was a local guy but didn't it wasn't rackham a up fester somewhere anyway miller hyman which they do more than training they do tests and personality tests and a lot of different things the challenger sale which has come on the scene in the last five to seven years and then the sandler sales institute are sandler sales training which has been around for about thirty years so those are five there are a variety million thousands of other subcategories of those those are the i would say the big five yeah and i think most of you who are listening i shouldn't say most of you maybe not i i would be curious to know how many of our listeners are have been exposed to one of these that we had or something else and what they think about this question this could be something maybe travis could put up to the link group to get our own opinion of our own listener of what they think so so what's your what's your opinion bill i on justice the whole selling system should i have one or should now we've got these in front of us miller hyman challengers sandler spent solution i take not of which one you mean of yeah system or no system are now yeah i think you i think we need in sales today i think we need some kind of a foundational philosophy of how we how we work what we believe in what we believe our role to be what we believe the prospects role to be so yeah i think i don't know that i would call it a sales methodology i think it's more of a sales philosophy just how do we how do we look at ourselves and how do we look at the context of a buyer and a seller what's what are we there to do just there to sell all were there to do and of course we think it's not so i think you need some kind of a framework or philosophy but i know i'm familiar with all five of these yes and i don't think any one of these is the best i think they all serve a purpose yeah i would i would agree completely with that and if you're in a company that's utilizing or as bought into one of these methodologies my i response to this is good for you you're doing something if there you're not just handed a phone book phonebook right welcome to nineteen eightynine or listeners don't even say this right i see you're sitting should be six feet vr yeah so you're not just handed a big list to call in the phone and.

vp sales thirty years seven years six feet
"vp sales" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

"It's typically once the product's ready then they get that vp of sales or sales team and then the sales team goes hey we need some leads and then they they hire the marketing guy and you know they're under the gun to get leads and typically or forced to do unnatural things yeah people expect you know you're bringing marketing late in the game and somehow it will magically just switch on and leads we'll start pouring in it doesn't work that way it takes it takes some time to build marketing and to build the brand and to build imagine generation and the earlier you do it and the more aligned it is with your product and then with your sales the better it'll work and the more long lasting effects it'll create so tell us about your strategy there amid calls and i was under the impression it was the the the the technical guy is more the the leader the kind of the guy who does the fundraising puts the team together right right a risk outing meet here as a former technical guy he does have an engineering background and formal education but it's been it's been at least twenty years since he's written a line of code a meat to spend most of his career as a cmo and in his last position in his previous position as a ceo at gong he's one of the two co founders and he definitely heads the business side of things so his days are usually filled with managing a vp sales vp marketing works very closely with our chief operating operations officer and also headed the funding rounds that we've gone through so far and his co founder a loan russia he really manages the technical side of things so alone manages all product research and development he heads the largest of the company that's situated here in herzliya israel where we have several dozen engineers doing a research.

ceo operations officer co founder israel vp of sales vp sales vp marketing herzliya twenty years
"vp sales" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on Accelerate!

"I tried to people's that i still did the bulk even back them and this was back decades we're talking still spent the bulk of my time forming relationships virtually but you didn't you didn't have the addition so you did the field trips in order to sort of my guesses i wasn't doing sales at that point but but i imagine you did the field trips in order solidified their relationships because you couldn't do it over the phone and you lack the technology that exists today to do that yeah the field trips and to be more stage exit events right migrate from sage migration events move from one stage the next while otherwise i was just call i had for you and i got hooked on the on this recording is is yeah back in eighties nineties i was vp sales startups where large complex communication systems bar company our customers were eighty percent in europe in asia so no internet how'd you how'd you find people to call i mean we're we're cold calling right we're making and so we only see those prospects are those customers we might close a five million dollar deal i see him twice yup and and the question is how efficient was that process than just the demand generation party horribly today killed for some of the things that are available today to do that not that again i don't get down this path for people say all you think of harder than or easier them verse heart or not whatever.

europe asia vp sales five million dollar eighty percent
"vp sales" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

"Get a trying to get guest with the podcast that that you know ceos are actually lot easier get than vps sales no but vps assails alike like what what does this have to do a quarter we me alone unless they are a listener they know you you've already have to build a relationship with them first before you what's in it for me and said okay let me tell you you'll you reach your audience all k they don't get it they think of it is up marketing thing and marketing people are like all unit charge me you you know know there of their paranoid because that they think everything's a trick because they spend their whole day tricking people it's kind of their role is like how do we get people to give me their email for my ebook writers like okay but you know that that focus in all it is really critical and you can tell the difference is i get i'm sure you get a lot of emails from like you know the first year secondyear sales people of the first time you they're overwhelm that's the number one thing they tell me and it's like well worry about the number one thing then worry about number two don't worry about number ten the co now we do this we didn't exercising class with in our prospecting class where it's like okay i want you to list on everything you do in a day like everything that you do that you believe is part worked at listed out okay now go back to that list and tell me what percentage of time you spend on that now go through in rank those what generates the most revenue and it's this to me it seems kind of like a no brainer but it's an eyeopening experience because a lot of go man i'm spent a lot of time to shift it does not matter has not going to affect my number it's not going to affect my quota it's not going to give me further into.

tricking
"vp sales" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"vp sales" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

"Right and then okay so what's going to another challenge we see in this once a lot harder to overcome right but it's you know in this modern age of sales and and what we're seeing you know this next generation of sales leaders start to embrace is this experimental mindset right so in a five ten twenty fifty years ago right and and a lot of organization still operate this way where you have a product or service and dear sales manager vp sales are coming down from the top someone's telling you who you need to target and they're they're defining a territory forty based on geography or or some some persona that that dave defined as your ideal customer right and i called bs on that and i think a lot of our clients today are starting to call bs on that and one of the reasons for that is they have the ability to experiment now so if you're giving in a jew given a target market right companysized title location industry keywords those are all very important ways that you're gonna find your prospects but what if that thing that your company is selling could be applied to a new market that no one's reaching out to or nowinski taken that step to do anything with i'm seeing companies come up who are exploring new market segments in new industries and new value propositions further existing software or products or services or they're testing out hypotheses internally for their own product development at their company where you know the companies looking to to build out x wire z and then they're going out and they're testing market segments um you know to to gauge what the reception is.

sales manager vp sales dave product development five ten twenty fifty years