22 Burst results for "VP of Marketing"

"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

06:15 min | 3 months ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Encourage marketers to not how it to death but That's something that i think is true and we really encapsulated that monin last year for sure so many things we would of most times in most people would have been like no way. D- are you gonna make a hand sanitizer. That's just too hard. You can't find what you need. We kind of went against all odds to figure it out and then the last thing is don't talk at your customers but with them again. Something that i feel like i learned decades ago but it became again more prevalent and necessary last year and that cascades into all of the medium social even user experience and telling a story but not only that listening to your customers and not assuming that you know everything i don't know why sometimes marketers and brands forget this but we need to be human and showing that side of ourselves is really valuable to building brand equity even if it's imperfect and everyone had imperfections last year and that's okay but i think that kind of having that relationship with customers not everything is about pushing a sale which some people may find shocking. But i really think the building relationships last year and into this year regardless of your medium or your tactic or your channel is really imperative for the long term and really necessary invest in that quality marketing to build that relationship with your customer cool. That's good i like that. A lot of the wound up. How okay so life has changed during here. I've been asking all my guests about you. Know what have you been doing as far as books movies tv or hobbies. What have you been keeping busy. Since there's no trade shows to get off to share. I have been reading a lot of books. I'm currently reading the nike shoe dog. I don't know if you've read that one. I'm kind of halfway through. I also have two kids so reading sitting down in a quiet space is really just papa but that is next to my bed. Is that book. that i'm reading. Real life station likes netflix and amazon tv. But i have discovered this show. And it's a little bit edgy. And it is called. Ted lasso okay. So ted lasso is a america's football college football coach and he gets recruited to go over to the uk and coach football like american soccer. And he doesn't know the game at all and he is rudely treated by the people of the country and the and the team and the owners and everyone is against him. And it's such a great story of how he is just this genuine good person in its on jason's today guests is who plays ted and he is just as loveable honest real but also smart and such a reader of people i mean i'm only on episode four five but i mean it is just such a great story for managers to watch had team and how to also interact with your boss on because he has to interact with the the owners of the team and also how to deal with challenges and people that don't believe in you and also how to deal with the media. The media doesn't believe in him. And he just. I mean only by episode for winning over left and right and he does it in such a humble and real way and i just. It's it's very like rude and listen. If you get offended by curse words don't listen to it but it is bunny witty and it. I have there so many similarities. Into like how you should run a team and how you could just engage with people there and maybe you would watch and be like status crazy. That's a stretch. But i just feel inspired by ted. And i just think that he. I think the show is exceptional. And so that's kind of my my show that i'm watching right now. It's really good you're guilty. What your offer. It's it's always amazing to see the. There's something thrilling to see somebody in an impossible situation but somebody rising to the occasion. That has the skills to deal with it and watch that will happen. It's the that can be as ironic because you don't think in the beginning that he has the skill as like a goof and then he just surprises and delights you in such a good way and you walk away being like i totally root for him and i root him and he's a good person and i love that component of the show. So i highly recommend it as long as you don't get offended by profanity. That's not a problem that we will check that out. I'll have a link to it over there as well as everything from moaning we've got a video about sanitizer and you can check out their products. And i will throw out there of course cooking being a big time lockdown thing for everyone my secret weapon for stir. Fried chicken is the ginger prairie. You some of that in there and that only listeners of the podcast yet this. I'm not telling anyone that actually my food. 'cause that up listen we're gonna bring you on as an insult answer. John after gets the pizza and tacos is not. Instagram is not looking at food shots to is cooking. it's just fire. it's just amazing. How this has all been a couple of weeks. All right. that's great. We will have links everything in the show notes so people can check that out and of course you can sign up for the newsletter powered by digital moment being customer of their. We're always glad for their support of the show. That's going to do it for this week. Statia thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me all right..

Ted lasso ted lasso nike netflix two kids last year uk John Instagram decades ago this year amazon tv Statia today this week ted jason america episode four five american
"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

07:39 min | 3 months ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Yeah so we're no longer making the hand. Sanitizer have product in inventory and we it is still available on our website and we also have a page where schools in actually come and request product. And we will donate it and ship it to the spoils. We did that recently. In just in one kind of social media post in some emailing we had sixty five schools across the country that requested cases of hand sanitizer which we happily shift to them. So we still have inventory. But we're not necessarily making anymore because all of those suppliers that back in april and may were out of hand sanitizer sensory stock their inventory. So we can kind of get back into our core competency of the Syrups in periods in the flavors. Yep get back to regular life. How far as the campaigns that you run what kind of stuff works for you as far as generating demand and getting new customers. What types of programs do you work. Well when you look at our marketing plan you have to consider our audience that helps us to put them into three primary buckets if you kind of look at the experience of dining out. Let's say you have restaurant patrons. Omelettes group them as own users into a consumer bucket. Right then you have restaurants bars. Coffee shops hotels those operations that the men news or their patrons in decide what ingredients are in their cocktails. What flavoring is in their coffee. And this is our bucket and they either buy direct from us or from a distributor. Then you have the large distributor bucket so this is food service in coffee in by and warehouse our product than they put it on the trucks and they sell it to that operator who menus the item so we have three different audiences that we have to kind of consider. When we're mapping out our marketing mix on all three buckets of course can be distilled down even further to be more specific and targeted kind of high level. That's our audience but primarily as far as the channels go when it comes to marketing we certainly use email. We also use duct digital so shout out to love them. We are pretty active on social media. We still participate and run print ads and we laced media buys with the different media outlets in our trade so whether it's digital advertising rent were spending time there and we're also kind of dipping our toe into the influence or market the influence our marketing side of things so quality versus quantity in my mind when it comes to influence or marketing on. But it's really finding the influence or or influencers that resonate the most with those three buckets audiences that i talked about and aligned with our tone in our message our brand and then we work with them whether it's A paid campaign or sampling campaign on. But that is a much greater east of the puzzle for us in twenty twenty one one channel that has always interesting is that distributor channel. Because it's such a huge amount of volume going to restaurants and bars and national chains. And all that stuff. But it's really a tiny portion. I'm there's probably like two thousand people that you have to talk to and you've got oliva and really more than sixty percent of it is like four or five vendors. If even that maybe even slimmer but do you focus on that section or is even that g do more of kind of account management for that kind of stuff or how does that work. Yep so we actually. In clearwater marketing team is about sixteen people strong and about four or five of that marketing team is committed their call field sales marketing team and so they they are dedicated to that channel and that involves supporting our distributors. Who have been with us for decades in their huge part of our business on a really help advocate our brand and also includes creating marketing materials for an independent operator or for a national account restaurant chain so yeah that distributor marketplace as well as anything to do with field sales marketing is a huge component for us and represents a large majority of our business plan so you mentioned influence or marketing trying to change the mix a little bit to how about other channels that have done well for you or ones that you are looking for and twenty twenty one to put some more effort against to see if it can deliver for you. I think the other component for us that we really need to take a look at is trade. Shows and sampling are flavors. Historically doing that in person and being on the trade show floor has been table stakes for us. I mean we are at trade shows like you mentioned the chicago trade show. We did a hundred trade shows in twenty nineteen twenty twenty eight and so as we look to the short-term future at least i really think that virtual events or some sort of virtual experience will be opportunity for us but we're a flavoring right. So how do we demo our product in the future. And what is that new angling. I think that is a channel or a medium that we really have to focus on and twenty twenty one still getting our product in the hands of the right people doing it in a novel unique or thought forward way. Yeah you've got a heck of an opportunity there really. Because it's it's a lot of legwork getting product to you're just gonna be shipping it everywhere but the good news is you're gonna save one hundred grand on your booth or whatever so you you have some cash to work with which is fantastic with everything that went down in two thousand twenty. What other lessons have you taken away from that as far as marketing and your role at the company twenty twenty tough and marketers in my opinion and all the marketing colleagues. That i have Across industries just incredibly busy. It seemed to amp up in twenty twenty. You know you you may have some proverbial doors being closed and the economy certainly suffered but marketers still had to find ways to engage with customers customers by the way that we're more likely or impressionable or available than ever before right 'cause they're all at home and so we had to find to tell our story with a different tone maybe are oftentimes a different medium and in some cases with us different product or message so when i think about the most important parts of marketing regardless of covid or not i really feel that some of these that i that i was thinking about became more pervasive in more apparent last year than ever before one. And it's something i've learned throughout my career is nothing should be done because it's business as usual so don't market a certain way because that's the way it's always been done. Assume nothing and reconsider everything if that didn't prove true for marketers last year than something was wrong the other piece and i actually heard this the other day when i was chatting with my colleagues that i think is another really important part for marketers is don't how an idea to death but life right and that so simple but often inherent and marketers that they do how it to. Death marketers tend to be highly analytical. Or even i see a lot of marketers that are really early in their career and they immediately thrown out or they criticize it. Or they're speculative about it because the how just doesn't compute for them right away and so i would just.

two thousand four last year two thousand people april one hundred grand sixty five schools five vendors more than sixty percent five show one kind twenty twenty one three about four three primary buckets a hundred trade shows about sixteen people twenty twenty one one channel oliva
"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

06:48 min | 3 months ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Say. It is unlikely that they're restaurant will still be in business six months from now if they don't get any sort of government support in ninety percent of full service restaurants in the survey reported declines revenues falling. Almost forty percent means are huge numbers. That just have had a resounding effect on our industry and it kind of cascades back to monin right so all their locations that we sell to the operators food service coffee shops that were selling to the triggers that our inventory and warehousing are product are all cutting back. Staff is furloughed right. Almost six million lost their jobs. And so we monin. Like i said the reverberations were felt on so many levels. Sales were down more than ever before our company was faced with this change landscape. And it's not just across marketing. And i'm sure so. Many companies felt the same thing but manufacturing completely had to think about different ways of doing things sales marketing obviously supply chain and things were no longer business as usual and our this family owned company. That historically year-over-year reported positive month over month sales growth. We were in this unfamiliar state and his challenge of how do we generate sales at keep employees engaged right had keep employees busy during all of these this landscape of nationwide closures. And so everyone's kind of the chinese proverb you know in a in a time of crisis. There's some sort of opportunity right Out of adversity comes opportunity. And what happened at our clearwater office during these months set forth by was really the epitome of finding opportunity in aren't even think that's the right word but we could no longer approach the task was with the mindset of like. This is how we've always done it. We were forced to kind of like lexi's muscles that we didn't know we had and we had to figure out like i said how to keep employees engaged how to keep the manufacturing lines up and running and really what happened was we saw that. These people materials were in high demand and the cases of the new illnesses were continuing to rise. And so just a handful of us kind of sat down one day realize that with just use late adjustments to one of our manufacturing lines we could actually bottle medical-grade hand sanitizer. And we're we have really good relationships with our customers and we're hearing customers saying like we cannot get hand sanitizer from our typical supplier. Obviously is all over the news. We her we hear of a brewery that just started making hand sanitizer and that kind of propels us to me to ask the question. Is this something that we can do to help. And so we bought a few change arts the things that we needed for our bottling line and we dedicated an area at our manufacturing facility or hand sanitizer right like i said we had the bottles we had the caps. We had a staff of engineers at knew what they were doing. We had a qa team and so we seize the the opportunity again. It's that's not really the right word. It was just the timing was right and we could hell. and so. We immediately like gas pedal that and we went May label design. We source ingredients. We had to get the necessary approvals and certifications during a time when the ingredients were actually really hard to come by because everyone that could was trying to buy the alcohol and everything they needed to actually make the sanitizer but we source the ingredients and we did what we needed to do and we the entire facility on across. All departments had to come together and adapt to very quickly. We were making in shipping out one liter bottles in cases of hand sanitizer. I mean weeks. It all came to fruition. We have more than ten thousand bottles of hand. Sanitizer that we made over. Let's call it six to eight weeks and the majority was donated. We donated him to first responders schools hospitals and senior care facilities but in addition like. I said we had heard from our industry from our customers that they needed the hand sanitizer if they were serving to go on and they were still open on a limited basis they needed hand sanitizer and so we we donated hand sanitizer to our customers. That was just kind of almost like a pay. It forward kind of thing. We just kind of took all the product that we were making the majority of it and donated. It came to a point where we could. Actually we put it up on our website and did start selling it to help kind of meet the bottom line that we needed to but such a great case study for a company that like the little engine that could kind of turning around and making something that could really help out the community. Yeah i was already purchasing stuff you guys like every other month or whatever and sure enough. It was yet. There's no hint sanitizer anywhere. And so i threw a couple bottles and with my order. It was all perfect. We'd also like to thank lincoln marketing solutions for their support of marketing over coffee. Let's pretend for a moment that you're about to launch a campaign. It tested well. Your entire team is happy. Everything's going according to plan except for that one thought in the back of your head. How do we ensure the people i want to target will be in the mindset to receive my message the answer linked in because when you mark linked in your message reaches people who are ready to business and that means you're advertising campaign will work as hard as it can as soon as you launch it over sixty two million decision makers lincoln and they're thinking about their business. It's one of the many reasons more than seventy eight percent of b. marketers rate linked in as the most effective social media platform at helping their organization achieve specific objectives. We're using lincoln all the time we talked about it on the show regularly you can see are streaming shows so what on marketing analytics. Every thursday. in chris's you ask answer. Videos are up there all the time. It's our number one choice for social media and business. Nobody does it better than lincoln. Layton can help you reach your short and long-term business schools. They offer tools for brand building and lee generation. Not only can you target and reach a professional audience down to their job title company name and location but you can engage people you already know based on who's visited your site or who you've contacted in the past you can even customize your campaign based on the action you want your customers to take an objective that you want to achieve doing business unlinked in the world's largest professional network can help you reach your marketing goals. Here's the deal for marketing over coffee. Listeners do business where businesses done get a one hundred dollar advertising credit towards your first linked in campaign visit lincoln dot com slash mo that's linked in dot com slash mo terms and conditions apply. And we thank them for their support the show now i mean is it still part of the product mix and and what else has had to change over the.

ninety percent six eight weeks more than ten thousand bottles one liter bottles one hundred dollar six months more than seventy eight percen one com one thought chinese over sixty two million decisio chris lincoln dot com couple bottles Almost forty percent one day Almost six million lincoln
Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Audioburst's VP Marketing Ari Applbaum - burst 02

B2B Marketing Now

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Audioburst's VP Marketing Ari Applbaum - burst 02

"No data we trust and looking how to measure but I do think in in marketing wage some times get tough to measure is that in some things maybe audio even and then you could because it's as well but there's some human components to it. So, you know, how do you say You're All About Numbers all the time. Sometimes you do lose that art form of eye condition. So it's like you kind of almost have to trust in the in the good the good job of marketing and just hope for the notes. That's really that's really important. And I think that one way to to measure the that that you can measure is ask ask your employees, right? So I'm always give any place when they come back from a conference. Okay. Did you feel a difference in how people did people know about the company did they react differently and if you measure and take notes over time, you can

"vp marketing" Discussed on B2B Marketing Now

B2B Marketing Now

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on B2B Marketing Now

"Off but how can you know for for any of the marketers listening out there who are in corporate perhaps, can you share a little bit about what they can learn from start-ups because you have this very interesting experience going from the startup world to corporate and then back to start up and maybe even vice versa. Like is it is it the same mentality? Is it the same mindset and what can we learn from one another game? Yeah, that's that's interesting. You know, I'm I'm no growth hacker. I started in PR but I quickly adopted some of the thinking of growth hackers, you know interestingly. If you if you look at Google Trends and search for things like making things viral growth hacking there was a spike in around 20 14 15 16 something around then home and everybody, you know, I remember at agencies constantly clients saying, okay. What's the trick? Right? What's the shortcut? How are we going to hack this? How are you to make this go viral that's stopping Executives clients. I think they're understanding that there's this element of luck that can't always be replicated in these, you know, one-off success stories of companies that skyrocketed in a month and there's this girl maturity of late that yes, you have to use the latest tools, right? You have to test you shouldn't plan for months. You should you should try, you know, trial and error take the agile approach to marketing job. And definitely start marketing from day one, right? So it's done gone are the days where you develop a product and then when you're ready to sell you start marketing it marketing has to start from the very beginning that needs to be a feedback loop and I think most people get that and they don't expect miracles. They expect hard work that will get shortcuts. So how that ties into your question is I think that today is the mindset of both

Jerusalem Rudolph Boston Jonathan Rivera Jonathan
Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Audioburst's VP Marketing Ari Applbaum - burst 02

B2B Marketing Now

01:53 min | 5 months ago

Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Audioburst's VP Marketing Ari Applbaum - burst 02

"Off but how can you know for for any of the marketers listening out there who are in corporate perhaps, can you share a little bit about what they can learn from start-ups because you have this very interesting experience going from the startup world to corporate and then back to start up and maybe even vice versa. Like is it is it the same mentality? Is it the same mindset and what can we learn from one another game? Yeah, that's that's interesting. You know, I'm I'm no growth hacker. I started in PR but I quickly adopted some of the thinking of growth hackers, you know interestingly. If you if you look at Google Trends and search for things like making things viral growth hacking there was a spike in around 20 14 15 16 something around then home and everybody, you know, I remember at agencies constantly clients saying, okay. What's the trick? Right? What's the shortcut? How are we going to hack this? How are you to make this go viral that's stopping Executives clients. I think they're understanding that there's this element of luck that can't always be replicated in these, you know, one-off success stories of companies that skyrocketed in a month and there's this girl maturity of late that yes, you have to use the latest tools, right? You have to test you shouldn't plan for months. You should you should try, you know, trial and error take the agile approach to marketing job. And definitely start marketing from day one, right? So it's done gone are the days where you develop a product and then when you're ready to sell you start marketing it marketing has to start from the very beginning that needs to be a feedback loop and I think most people get that and they don't expect miracles. They expect hard work that will get shortcuts. So how that ties into your question is I think that today is the mindset of both

Google
Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Ari Applbaum

B2B Marketing Now

02:30 min | 5 months ago

Building a Stellar In-House Marketing Team with Ari Applbaum

"In the in the audio industry. It's it's really interesting. I think the stars are perfectly aligned, you know, there's been an incredible explosion and content you want to guess how many podcasts or listen to non-apple. You know, I I feel I do not know but I'm almost intimidated to know because I'm like, where would this one stand exact so there's actually one and half million podcasts which is double what they what they had last year. Right? So this this explosion and podcasts that's on the one hand. There's not much content that's being produced and you know, how much effort and time and and and money is poured into this content and it's really good and on the other hand we're surrounding ourselves with devices that make audio consumption so easy so airpods, for example, Mark Anderson wrote let you know number one investor in the valley. He wrote last year that it's deceptive because we think it's a little thing but really it's huge. People walk around these with these things for hours. It makes audio so much more accessible and Echoes, you know, smart home devices and connected speakers. We had zero last year then we got our first off have four in the house. So what does it mean to be surrounded with all these devices and all the content that's available on the other. So I think you hit the nail on the head when you said the problem is about cutting through the noise. I think that's what keeps a lot of people a lot of marketers up at night with video with audio with a lot of formats is how do you cut through the noise for us? It's a huge opportunity. So I'm not so concerned about that because we're that in a blur that bridge between the content and the user but I guess if if I have to talk about my fear it's you know, the race to who will be the bridge who will be the enabler the name of that. So if the big guys Amazon Google Apple even Spotify take it on as a core Mission how quickly can they run to make up for the years that we already invested this in this and the other thing that keeps me up wage. Is the global recession right covid-19?

Mark Anderson Apple Spotify Amazon Google
Ari Podcast - burst 01

Ari

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Ari Podcast - burst 01

"Hello world from octopus headquarters. This is radically transparent off post original podcast show on B2B marketing. Now, I'm Jennifer Guzman director of social strategy. And in most episodes of this podcast will eat your B2B marketing leaders will share their practically transparent Truths Behind being a modern-day marketer and what it takes to grow ideas take risks and impact change joining me on this podcast episode of radically transparency Applebaum vp-marketing as audio burst re welcome to the show. Hi, it's good to be here. I'm a big fan and I'm excited to talk to you today.

Jennifer Guzman
"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Spark

Marketing Spark

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Marketing Spark

"John Russia VP marketing strategy at bomb bomb. Welcome to Mark. Nice park John. Thanks Mark. Appreciate you having me on let's start by talking about bomb bomb bomb bomb who are the target audiences and why do people need at some basic questions about what you do during your day bomb bomb was born at of kind of a condition. That's that's grown and grown as as our world and the way we communicate has changed. So, you know the past Mark, you know, if you.

Mark John Russia VP marketing
"vp marketing" Discussed on The Growth Hub

The Growth Hub

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on The Growth Hub

"In your previous, a big issue is the democracy team is split across multiple time zones from like you mentioned places as such as Idaho a Eua, the UK Singaporean so full so. When some of you working others are asleep. So how were you able to collaborate communicate well together as one team across all these times. Yeah I think. It's great that we. Are Spread out as as much as we are. It's almost like the Buffalo Marketing Team never sleeps in a sense which is, which is Kinda cool. There was a saying the sun never sets on the British Empire later, send number set son on the buffet market. And what's Nice about that is that you can I can do a full day's work. If I'm working with my team in Singapore. Let's say that I can do a full day's work. Let them know what I finished. They can pick it up there and do a full day's work and when they log off and I'm almost back online again is almost just a continuous cycle of. Progress which feels really great. Of a practically speaking, how do we actually do that? There is a lot of. Extra written. Communication. Needs to, happen. And that is something that we. We do chuck for in the hiring process, get support to have a strong. Communication. Skills. We hire folks just for that reason. I think it can take a lot of time otherwise if you're not. Comfortable. Communicated not rated mysteriously. There's a lot of there's a lack of tone sometimes you're emailing folks serve. In quick updates. So if you're not used to that type occasion that it does take longer to make sure your messaging everything right way sharing nothing's share. The tricky thing is like you don't get A. Can't leave room for questions because you'll be asleep when your team may have many you the questions like clarifying question so you need to be really clear. You passed off. but for us, it's it's a pretty smooth process. Again, we'll talk about the tools, but some of those tools make it so easy for us will add you know check box here with dates. They know exactly what to do and win. We can comment in line on each other's words. So you can see exactly the feedback on the specific bits. Yeah I think technology has afforded us the luxury of working quite efficiently as a remote team like I come into marketing many years ago I. Don't know that we could have been as effective. Can a given the way it ticket yet evolves. So we're very fortunate a lot of great tools that we have people who are. Responsible deadline oriented results oriented..

Eua Idaho UK Singapore
"vp marketing" Discussed on The Growth Hub

The Growth Hub

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on The Growth Hub

"Now, joining us today on the show as Kevin Louis VP of marketing at buffer, and we're talking about how to run a successful remote SAS marketing team. Now, buff is famous for being a fully remote organization, and in this episode, Kevin Chaz buffers remote what playbook and gives us a peek inside into how that. Global Team operates buffers. Marketing team is made up of folks in the US South America Europe Asia Australia and Kevin talks to us about how they do strategic planning on an annual and quarterly basis using a framework called bets. What a typical week looks like a buffer how marketing team runs across five continents and the tools and tech stack they use Kevin also talks to us about the role of transparency in remote work, how to overcome challenges such as loneliness at also how to manage individuals remotely when you don't meet face to face. So all this and more is on episode number forty, nine of the growth of podcast with Kevin Louis, VP of marketing at buffer. Welcome to another episode of the growth podcast and it's my pleasure to welcome Kevin lead to the show who is vp of maxine at buffer zone came in. Thank you so much for joining us today on the growth of podcast. You're welcome thrilled to be here. Thanks for having me. Yeah, I'm super excited by this episode and today we all about how to run a successful remote marketing team and I can think of few people to talk about this topic with as you buffet team a famous for operating as a full team in SAS. You really made this cool and you made it open and accessible to a lot of teams set in the ball when it comes to. Working remotely. So I think to start things off and give everyone a bit of context. Can you describe your marketing team? So how many people on the team one of the roles in wares everyone located? Yes. Happy to. So we are either nine people or eleven people depending on how you count on the other two people numbers, ten eleven, our cross functional roles that we've hired in the last couple of years there's a murphy designer and a marketing engineer. So they report into each those disciplines..

Global Team Kevin Louis VP Kevin Kevin Chaz VP of marketing Kevin Louis maxine vp South America Europe Asia Aust engineer
"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

Strike Gold

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

"That everything else that we do later is going to be so much more effective because every google ad words and facebook ad or every Lincoln article that we ride is now consistently on brand part of telling the same story over and over again and so the fish..

google facebook Lincoln
"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

Strike Gold

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

"Sure. Experience. Spirits. They complied executives to stakes by. Calling. Them seasoned seasoned professional. Should only is in your stakes, not not your executive. So so I guess I would be I would fall into that category of season. If I were stay I'm currently at Nyayo the leading conversation intelligence platform for sales teams. this is my fifth gig as a a VP marketing been doing this for a good part of the last fifteen years. Prior to that I had five years experience as a product manager which really helped me understand the relationship between engineering and product and market, and that's that's when I decided that I prefer focusing on the people part and simplifying and explaining and communicating the product park to them. But I experience as a product manager is definitely instrumental in everything that we do today. I've had the privilege of working with some amazing teams Based out of Israel that's where I was born and raised about three years ago I started working for Gong. As VP marketing in the Israel. And exactly one year ago I relocated here to San Francisco. It's this week. Literally one years since I relocated seems like just a couple of weeks passed but it's been crazy right Other than that between my fourth and fifth BP Marketing Gigs I did a couple of years of consulting. So I helped twenty plus Israeli startups either build or shift their marketing organizations. That was a really interesting period for me just to be able to see that lateral view of how things are being done at different companies and sort of inspired me to figure out what things could work in common They're not as many as people would hope but but some are at that time I remember those week. Three different customers asked me pretty much the same questions about their next trade shows in how they should prepare and that inspired me to sit down and write a book about it. So I. Did I wrote the fifty secrets of trade shows success I published it on Amazon and on the day was published it was the number one downloaded book in the Industrial Marketing Category. So that was a fun experience.

VP marketing Israel product manager executive Amazon San Francisco
"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

Strike Gold

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Strike Gold

"IO UDI shares insights about why branding is not a luxury, but a necessity would also shares why talking to your audience is key the secret to content marketing that moves the needle and secret to how they made Lincoln work for them. Just a spoiler there's no ads involved. You're listening to strike gold with John Conroy. And today we have a special guest. Letter Gore. Would he then of course the VP marketing at Gong Dot? Io. Udi. Glad to be here. How are you? First of all I'm doing very well it's a beautiful sunny morning in San Francisco. We had a wonderful weekend. Can Get way to get another productive work week in front of us. That's the most cheerful way to start the week that I've heard in a while. Really I just think like ongoing vacation would be in that sentence, but that's just. I. Know I'm excited. I love any. Any parents can appreciate this when you come back after a long weekend with your kids go back to work to rely. WH His right. My favorite part about that when people come up to you when you come back and they go how how how's the issue vacation starts? Now. Hundred percent like this is the easy part they're getting leads building a company. That's is the weekend that's I do that all day on the weekend worth thing is. Right like nobody no marketing agency can solve that. So woody. For. The people.

John Conroy Gore VP marketing Gong Dot San Francisco Lincoln woody
"vp marketing" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"The I. Today podcast produced by cowed militia cut through the hype and noise to identify what is really happening now in the world of artificial intelligence and learn about emerging trends technologies and use cases from cognition analysts and guests experts. Hello and welcome to the today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen. Mulch and I'm your host modeled Schmeltzer. Our guest today is is Bill Galicia. WHO's the director of Product Marketing at Abbey High Bill. Thank you so much for joining us on this podcast today. Thank you for having me on. Welcome bill and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Abbey sure so I currently work for have you have been there for about a year and a half now. I'm the Director Director of Product Marketing I head up our innovative products group focusing on some of the growth markets that we see and kind of we're Abbey's technology can be we're customers can benefit benefit within different markets and different industries prior to come into abby and I've been in the offer industry and a price offer industry about twenty three years now working for both small Paul Startup companies and large enterprise companies like EMC as well as Colfax previous company. I worked for so my background has been both in product management product marketing focus on enterprise software everything from processing and understanding content to business process automation platforms. I have managed as well to his sounds great and in one of the things is that when we spent a lot of our time talking to enterprises and organizations both in the private sector as well as the public sector you might think of information stuff that's stored in databases and applications applications but as we all know like ninety plus percent of the information that is flowing through the enterprise and the organization is unstructured. It's information that's an documents and emails and texts and voicemails videos and images and even log files you just kind of like lots of the stuff that's just kind of dominating the enterprise between all of that and it makes over ninety percent of the information so clearly that's part of the reason why people are looking at technology is like ai machine learning extract more value from this and try to learn and find the patterns earns you. How are you seeing companies using AI and cognitive technologies to extract more value from this vast treasure trove of information in the enterprise yeah yeah great question and you know if he kinda rewind go back ten fifteen years. You know a lot of enterprises were processing information that was trapped on papers. You saw a a lot of canning going on in back offices high volume scanning in with the purpose of turning that into digital information and extracting the content the data from those documents and putting it into systems systems and paper has gone away. There's been this kind of this thought that well. We don't have you know unstructured content documents to deal with anymore. which really isn't the case anymore or in really what you see is that a lot of the content is now being digitized at the point of origination and being sent in as documents minutes attached to an email as an example or being captured on a mobile device so you still have this requirement where you have all this unstructured information that's trapped within these documents then needs to be understood and extracted and connected into a business process and those processes really transcend many different industries banking insurance logistics excess manufacturing? Some of these processes are back office so you think a good example is really in finance so you get processes like invoices purchase orders and sales orders and some of that is digital so you have companies that work with their vendors and it's all the information digitally transferred but again some of these documents are are captured the source attached as say a PDF or an image to an email sent in and that's really where Abbey's technology comes in the play to be able to understand classify what what type of document is this an invoice from ABC companies from a different company being able to extract the information say from Invoice the header the photo Lai nine details really putting heading into a structured format inputting information into a system like New York P. System Mendon connecting a to a process where he will have approvals and reviews along the way while too so There's a lot of different use cases so some of these are in the back office a lot of our front office where it's directly connected to a customer experience so banking is another good example where a lending process will kick off requirement for certain documents be sent in by that consumer. I mean those are documents that Abbes technology and Dan the used to not only are the technology digitize it but also be able to classify extract and continuously learn on you know what type of document and so those are as well as being able to extract the information and enacted into the appropriate system and process yeah. That's you know a really great point that you bring up that we still have to take documents and classify them. We have a lot of unstructured data. We.

Abbey Abbey High Bill Director Director of Product M Bill Galicia director of Product Marketing Kathleen Abbes technology Paul Startup companies AI EMC Dan Colfax abby Lai ABC
Content Intelligence With Bill Galusha, VP Marketing at ABBYY

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Content Intelligence With Bill Galusha, VP Marketing at ABBYY

"Guest today is is Bill Galicia. WHO's the director of Product Marketing at Abbey High Bill. Thank you so much for joining us on this podcast today. Thank you for having me on. Welcome bill and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at Abbey sure so I currently work for have you have been there for about a year and a half now. I'm the Director Director of Product Marketing I head up our innovative products group focusing on some of the growth markets that we see and kind of we're Abbey's technology can be we're customers can benefit benefit within different markets and different industries prior to come into abby and I've been in the offer industry and a price offer industry about twenty three years now working for both small Paul Startup companies and large enterprise companies like EMC as well as Colfax previous company. I worked for so my background has been both in product management product marketing focus on enterprise software everything from processing and understanding content to business process automation platforms. I have managed as well to his sounds great and in one of the things is that when we spent a lot of our time talking to enterprises and organizations both in the private sector as well as the public sector you might think of information stuff that's stored in databases and applications applications but as we all know like ninety plus percent of the information that is flowing through the enterprise and the organization is unstructured. It's information that's an documents and emails and texts and voicemails videos and images and even log files you just kind of like lots of the stuff that's just kind of dominating the enterprise between all of that and it makes over ninety percent of the information so clearly that's part of the reason why people are looking at technology is like ai machine learning extract more value from this and try to learn and find the patterns earns you. How are you seeing companies using AI and cognitive technologies to extract more value from this vast treasure trove of information in the enterprise yeah yeah great question and you know if he kinda rewind go back ten fifteen years. You know a lot of enterprises were processing information that was trapped on papers. You saw a a lot of canning going on in back offices high volume scanning in with the purpose of turning that into digital information and extracting the content the data from those documents and putting it into systems systems and paper has gone away. There's been this kind of this thought that well. We don't have you know unstructured content documents to deal with anymore. which really isn't the case anymore or in really what you see is that a lot of the content is now being digitized at the point of origination and being sent in as documents minutes attached to an email as an example or being captured on a mobile device so you still have this requirement where you have all this unstructured information that's trapped within these documents then needs to be understood and extracted and connected into a business process and those processes really transcend many different industries banking insurance logistics excess manufacturing? Some of these processes are back office so you think a good example is really in finance so you get processes like invoices purchase orders and sales orders and some of that is digital so you have companies that work with their vendors and it's all the information digitally transferred but again some of these documents are are captured the source attached as say a PDF or an image to an email sent in and that's really where Abbey's technology comes in the play to be able to understand classify what what type of document is this an invoice from ABC companies from a different company being able to extract the information say from Invoice the header the photo Lai nine details really putting heading into a structured format inputting information into a system like New York P. System Mendon connecting a to a process where he will have approvals and reviews along the way while too so There's a lot of different use cases so some of these are in the back office a lot of our front office where it's directly connected to a customer experience so banking is another good example where a lending process will kick off requirement for certain documents be sent in by that consumer. I mean those are documents that Abbes technology and Dan the used to not only are the technology digitize it but also be able to classify extract and continuously learn on you know what type of document and so those are as well as being able to extract the information and enacted into the appropriate system and

Bill Galicia Abbes Technology Abbey Paul Startup Companies Abbey High Bill Director Of Product Marketing Director Director Of Product M EMC Colfax Abby LAI DAN ABC AI New York Twenty Three Years
"vp marketing" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"So what are what our goal in our main objective is to try to move up the stack or move up the chain of command into the business level because this is this is less about the technology than it is about the business conversation right students. Safety is not an IT conversation students. Nice. That's a superintendent's concerned. And so if we can have those conversations with those people, then I think that is where we're going to get the most traction out, say, over the past seven months, we've started to get that started to see some people opening up because they do want to have these conversations. And the other challenge that we've seen from the bar space is that IT budgets shrinking mending. Binning less on technology, but IT guys don't have control of that budget. Who does the line of business? You're marketing folks. VP marketing may have. She may have more budget to do things that are tied to marketing that may drive IT spin right in the IT director may have the entire year, right? It's so our conversation has to change to reflect that reality in. We had to be become compelling enough and not talk about the technology so that we don't get pushed back to the IT guys. Again. Now in the past when you when you've been talking? I t just for listeners. I think most people know, but OT is operational technology as opposed to IT operational technologies we've alluded to earlier in the conversation has been traditionally opaque and I should say silo, and this is, and this is the networking technology that's on the thing or the system, and this is the this is just just a clarification, but you've been with the IT than you..

VP marketing superintendent Binning director seven months
"vp marketing" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

"Clients stop being commodities than start being brands worth, live, loving, you know, it's all about telling a brand story. It's all about how do you be relevant to your audience? How do you communicate with them in a way that they find valuable that they want to engage with? And they're gonna stop seeing you just another price and see you was a partner. So that's that's, you know, that's what I do all day long. And what are you typically run into a company name? That makes no sense an image that doesn't represent anything a value prop that no one understands is that common. You know what? It's usually it's allow the ladder. You know it's the the logo is, you know, is the last thing I always look at? Yeah, logo is the thing it's all it is is the place holder for a brand. Most people think they're logo. So is the brand all it is pretty picture that reminds people who you are, what you do in why they should care. You know, I tend to look companies in sit there and say, okay, you've been around for thirty five years. You started in this industry, your your, your, your clients have changed. The way you do. Business has changed, but you're still telling the same story Llosa let's sit there and update your story in the sometimes it's complete rebrand with a name chain in a logo change and everything goes with it. And sometimes it's just a refocus or tweak, you'll it depends on what really that particular client needs. And what particular industry do you focus on? Is anything specific or is it just company size or. Yeah. Well, we're, we work with clients that are in the ten, two hundred million dollar range. We work a lot with be to be, you'll I tend to leave the b. to c. two other people. There's people that enjoy that were a lot more than I do in there are a lot better at it, but where we tend to do. As long term value propositions with clients. And that's the b. to b. world. We work a lot with logistics companies, transportation companies. We do work a lot with financial planning and insurance companies, and a lot of it has to do with long term value of clients. And that's, that's the kind of stuff that we tend to get involved with. And what is it engagement look like? You know, who reaches out, what does the process you take them through? The process that we take them through is multifold the people. First of all, who reaches out. In a smaller company, it could be anywhere from the CEO to Yothu. CF had CFO's you'll reach out to me, but mostly VP marketing, HR people, etc. That reach out to me. But the process really comes down to of, we know that we're not communicating effectively as we are. Sales are down, you know, we're not getting the new clients that we want. We, we find that there's new players in the marketplace. We don't feel that relevant any more help. And you know the first process is really about insight discovery. It's about understanding where they are today. You know, until you can understand where a customer is today, what their goals are, what their short-term medium-term in their long term goals are it's almost impossible to help them. So you'll the first twenty five fifty thousand dollars at a time could be spent in just understanding where they are. Y'all. What is their competition look like? How are they currently communicating? How are they communicating that brand, both internally and externally? What are the customers think about them? What? What makes them different from their competition and went to go through all those types of things. Then you can start, you know, crafting and understanding of who they want to be based on who they are and authentically help them get there. You know, because it's a lot of times people sit there say, well, we want to be number one in customer service. That's great. Well, every time I call your customer service line, I'm on hold for twenty five minutes. So there's the first hole in the dike and I've had that conversation with c. ios and you know. So you sit there and say, not only is it a branding issue, but there's probably some operational issues that go along with it and you can't make promises in your marketing. The drop rations can't keep..

partner Llosa Yothu CF VP marketing CEO CFO twenty five fifty thousand dol two hundred million dollar twenty five minutes thirty five years
"vp marketing" Discussed on The Reboot Podcast

The Reboot Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on The Reboot Podcast

"And the question is each of us if you are not being replaced by a computer you are way more likely to have a job with degrees of freedom and anytime in you history if you have a job with degrees of freedom you're in a studio and the more degrees of freedom in the more it's like a studio so if you want to thrive going forward you're going to have to figure out how to do a job that someone didn't tell you to do 'cause if it's job as someone tells you what to do they'll find someone cheaper than you to do it and i firmly believe that going forward our challenge is to build business model structures where we're not just screwing around when we're in the studio but we actually have a chance to create value in sustain ourselves because otherwise just a hobby there's nothing wrong with hobbies but it's hard to do a hobby all day i'm going to i love what you just share it and if if i can elaborate on it i think that i often speak about the fact that we're at a pivotal moment where we have an opportunity to build businesses that are non violent to the self moines violent tour community and nonviolent to the planet and and i think that what you've just described is as an essential element of building that is now which is if each of us had the courage to go through the soggy of creating a studio turn to the speaking back to the client that i took a walk with the other day he was emulating the startup playbook he was he was he was following the startup playbook he raised the right amount of money and he built the team in here the vp marketing even though they didn't have a product market but he had the marketing right and then.

vp marketing
"vp marketing" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"General to enjoy it's time for national cigar like tation maneuver as well i've got to pull out a very special cigar celebratory cigar celebratory jack daniels libation on this mother's day weekend a happy mother's day to all happy mother's day to cigar mother parent fact she just texted me saying she feels like running a marathon i talked about people running a marathon well maybe just a half marathon today mother and then maybe next week a full marathon but i have pulled out a very special cigar limited edition fact i'm down to just about if i'm not mistaken let's see i think this is the third one i've smoked since it has been given to me this is the monte cristo eightieth anniversary with our exclusive pto kiko tobacco ause now this was launched in two thousand fifteen to celebrate the eightieth anniversary of monte cristo potus usa through big party in new orleans and i remember being handed one of these cigars they were so good i went at the time over to gino rosenfeld their vp marketing at the time and i said you know i need a few more these and she gave me three she said these are very tough to come by rate cigar one size it is a six by fifty four inch for pto square press using rare dominican is made in the dominican republic at the tobacco lara garcia factory the monte cristo eightieth uses an ecuadorian sumatra rapper a dominican allure binder from the two thousand two crop and the tobacco's on here just extremely just great sweet floral quantities but the most unusual is variety that they called kyko the seeds were planted in the dominican republic's nowadays region and although pito tico grows with small leaves and a very low yield i'll potus was able to grow enough of the tobacco so that they were able to make.

new orleans vp marketing monte cristo eightieth monte cristo gino rosenfeld fifty four inch
"vp marketing" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on Freakonomics

"You have a ceo and the ceo talks to the vp of engineering and the ceo talks vp marketing and then talks vp i'm talking about the engineer guy will talk to the vp marketing without having to go through the ceo so you have a very effective team that knows together they're running the company if you don't have that in the ceo believes that they dictate all the shots than than it's that's a really bad model and i and you know boards have to watch out for them so we've interviewed a couple other exit ios like jack welsh and ray dallaglio both of who made the point that speaking really candidly even bluntly to their employees is not only the best way to do business but the kindest way to do business at the you know there's nothing worse than being lied to or deluded about where you stand from what i've read about you carol i gather you would put yourself in their camp as well but i'm curious to know how you thought about talking to employees whether you know just below you and rancor all the way down i i have a reputation good or bad that i do speak my mind and i've always felt that if people know where you stand and what you stand four then they can make a decision about what they think about that and therefore what they wanna do and i always use this example of a friend says let's go to lunch and i say okay great where do you wanna go oh i don't care.

ceo vp vp marketing jack welsh vp of engineering engineer ray dallaglio
"vp marketing" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"vp marketing" Discussed on 100 PM

"Asked sort of a the research would program at end of a series of questions were you board or you hungry was it at night what you know what time of day was it is sort of behavioral were you at home at work on the go and so what happens is at the you've got this collection a snacking moments and maybe that last mission that the research programs in its since to the app that's received by the scout would be just a reflection now that you've thing thought about snacking for month utters that work so what you end up with the researcher ends up with is through remote ethnography a very quick way to understand the life of us nacar and to build many many snacking moments and so it's a it's a technology window into someone's life and if what maybe i should stop there for second but i kinda wanted compared to more traditional ethnography yellow that the only injection that i want to say is it sounds a little bit lake from the the researcher purchase introspective scouts as he described it it's essentially lake being on snapchat with provided context he that's i think that's a great analogy and even what use that for the website if that helps you with your position it might it might be you've you've met camera or vp marketing out i will i will let him know and if he likes it a little note was my idea shared rather against civilians so i think i think that analogy is nights if you think about this just having never heard of d scout we've got a tool that letter a researcher send a series of questions driven in centered around uncovering special moments in capturing that through video and open and in a questions and those participants in their daytoday lives in the moments that there and the places that the really experiencing these things can feedback as a diary in a sense through the app and back to the researcher this is a fascinating idea because of the law coach customer researching guzzler developments in those famous words get out of the building in the challenge that comes up inevitably is honey cable delayed talk to you in if i'm constrained by geography and can't they do.

researcher vp marketing