35 Burst results for "V._C."

Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

Mixergy

02:29 min | Last week

Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

"I wouldn't have thought that investors would be willing to back accompany where the key part of what they do is outsource to someone else. You realize this was a thing because you worked in a venture capital firm. And what did what were you seeing that made you say i think i have new idea for what i know. I love it. That's a that's a great question So to your point. I was i was a cto and junior partner ida vc fund in biscuit the idea was we cut a check to a startup for three to five million bucks on at that. Point is supposed to jump in helping figure out whatever game whether it's the good market strategy monetization their development design. Whatever it was and something that i'd get plagued with was say okay. Here's three million bucks now build a deb team or expand your one person deb team to a real dev team because we want to see all this stuff that built in the next six months gave you three million bucks six months better be done ready to rock and then six months later. They're sitting there and they're still trying to hire two or three people that can just work well together. Didn't lie on their resume. Paying there wasn't drama k. or they realized. Hey we need front. People need back in people. Need all these roles and it's just taking a long time to hire them so there's dad said things which drove us to say to them. Okay forget about building a team right now. You can do that over time. Just go and hire agency. An agency is the flip side or they're like cool. Give us a scope. Give us a check. Give us three months and we'll come back. And here's your product and good luck right okay for anybody building. Businesses especially businesses her determine agile. You need to be constantly paying attention to what's happening. Throughout the development what features people are liking doing focus group testing all these different things for the actual in product. Should never really be you. Set out to build on day one and there was no agency to do this purity. So it's it's the old best advice entrepreneur ever solve your own problem right. So at that point. I just i grabbed from the fund our vp of investment. Our creative director. You hire them away from the bbc fund hired him away okay said hey guys. This is a problem. We're all facing. Nobody solved it. Why don't we meet the guys solve it. People have the same problem

Ida Vc Fund DEB BBC
Interview With Zach Coelius of Coelius  Capital

The Meb Faber Show

02:27 min | Last week

Interview With Zach Coelius of Coelius Capital

"Zach. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me longtime listener for caller huge fan of the work. You do good man while look. I've known you for a long time. Virtually and in your honor. I poured myself a glass of mud. Water which we can talk about later but we had the founder on the podcasts. I'm trying to remember about a year ago. Attitudes shown links is available. Shane's awesome fun story listeners. It's basically a mushroom coffee. Turn it yvonne. And i have sort of an issue. Which is i love coffee but like to my detriment. So i've been trying to go kinda half mud. Half coffey as a segue to not drinking a pod today in the morning. And it's working so far it's a nice blend so that's awesome. We'll come back to later. We're gonna talk about all things. Angel investing entrepreneurship wing foiling all sorts of odds and ends. You got a pretty say if there is a traditional path for angel or vc. You kind of have it right. It's the founder who starts out doing some companies and eventually start investing. Was that sort of the right path through yet. The only differences the traditional half is your founder start companies. You make of money and then you take that money and he wants to do with it and you start. Throwing things doesn't angel and my experience was founder starts in companies have facebook ripped my guts out and leave me dead in bleeding on the side of the streets and sort of like as i was crawling around trying to figure out what to do with my life. And like what your next i mean. I literally got gut. It is crazy Tell the story was crazy stories. I stumbled into back in two thousand fifteen the very beginning of angel angels syndicates and one of the companies that i had been advising for a long time a company branch metrics mobile deep linking platform and Ben arison who introduced mea through the seed and men when it happened. You guys mind if. I put a two hundred allocation angel. Listen see what happens. And they were like sure. Go for it inside like wrote the memo by awesome. It is literally january fifteen when endless syndicates. Were nothing put it out by email all my best friends unlike. Please look this in twenty four hours later. The allocation was full when i was like. I'm an investor. Now

Zach Coffey Yvonne Shane Ben Arison Facebook
OnlyFans Pulls a Tumblr

Techmeme Ride Home

02:10 min | 3 weeks ago

OnlyFans Pulls a Tumblr

"Only fans announced late yesterday that it will be prohibiting users from posting any quote sexually explicit conduct unquote starting in october but will continue to allow nude photos and videos on the platform. So i guess that conduct word is key there now number one if the reaction on twitter is indicative of anything only fans is way more popular than i thought because everyone was freaking out about this last night number two. Remember when tumbler band porn. How did that work out for them. Number three. I didn't mention it this week but there were rumors floating around earlier this week. That only fans was struggling to find investors possibly due to hosting adult content a pitch deck that was circulating for only fans to attempt to raise money showed that the company was predicting five point. Nine billion dollars in gross merchandise value in twenty twenty one and one point two billion dollars in net revenue so they were looking for some financing that would value them above a billion dollars in aid of probably going public sometime in the near future. Quoting axios the rain group. A merchant bank focused on tech and telecom. This past spring began helping only fans to solicit investors several deep-pocketed firms quickly past not even engaging in serious due diligence. The money it's hoping to raise with partially cash out majority owner and porn. Mogul leo radinsky. While providing management with what one venture capitalist calls more legitimacy by the numbers any other company with growth like only fans would be able to raise big money in a matter of minutes in short only fans has a porn problem even though it never once mentions porn in it's pitch deck something that multiple investors called disingenuous some. Vc funds are prohibited from investing in content per limited partnership agreements. Several investors are concerned about minors creating subscription accounts. Although the company says it has controls in place to prevent that some investors say they could get past the porn but worry that the company's reputation would prevent it from attracting brand partners despite this week announcing a safer work product that features it's growing number of clothed

Leo Radinsky Twitter
Why You Should Work on Your Pitch

The $100 MBA Show

02:23 min | 2 months ago

Why You Should Work on Your Pitch

"Traditionally or typically. People will work on a slide presentation of slide deck to explain what their businesses were problem. They're solving the market there in the challenges that will face and the potential of their business. They do this to raise money. The pitch to investors the bishop vc firms. They might even pitch to family and friends to get their initial capital to get their business up and running. And that's awesome. But i'm here to tell you even if you're not looking to raise money even if you are happy to be self funded. This exercise of pitching your business is vital to the success of your business. Why because you are selling this is a sales exercise if you can't sell the concept of your business clearly coherently without rambling without scrambling for words. It's going to be very hard for you to sell your products to strangers to put together a sales page to put together a marketing campaign. But more importantly as you are working on your pitch in refining it you might discover your product. Your business is not good enough. You need to improve unique to pivot. You need to change it. Typically when you pitch to an audience or to anybody you will get feedback. They'll ask questions. Like what makes you unique while. When i go with you when i go this competitor. What are your profit margins. What's our market share. What's your market size. And if you know the answer these questions like you know your own name. You're in trouble. You need to know these things. You need to know the information. It's okay for you not to know but you need to get the information right cannot know forever and working on a pitch and pitching forces you to be in the position. Really you know what. I need to find these answers if i'm gonna pitch that's why i did it. I started webinar. Injure our software company back in two thousand fourteen. I started pitching about a year into it. I'd go to you know. Start of communities. I would go to co working. Spaces would go to pitch nights and our refine it. I wasn't great in the beginning. And i had a few slides missing and i was stumped on a few questions. But guess what immediately after that pitch. I found the answers to those questions. I wrote down all those things as stumped me. I remembered to fill in those slides. That are missing. In fact i used to record. These pitches on my phone so i could at least have the audio so i can go back and listen to a happened.

What Is Circular Beauty?

Green Beauty Conversations

02:43 min | 2 months ago

What Is Circular Beauty?

"In awe view secuties based on four principles. So i'm going to run you through them. Principle one is that we work with nature. So that means that we. I the minimize the use of natural resources. I roll so that formulations of made with ingredients that not a harvested or that a not grown unsustainably then we use natural resources the benefit the environment so an example would be a sequestering carbon through algae production because essex and there are a few such ingredients coming out on the market which very interesting and sending once we must watch sit principle to is that we then keep those resources in use as much as possible and that means for instance up cycled ingredients or using ingredient byproducts or reusing water energy packaging so with cosmetic products we can keep a loss of resources in use. Packaging is a great example when we actually use it because it can be reusable refillable. Obviously we can't keep the cosmetic ingredients themselves in the formulations in use which is why making a truly secular product will most likely always be challenging when it comes to the formulation itself because cosmetic ingredients are generally either washed down the drain or absorbed by the skin or evaporated all sloughed off the dead skin cells or scraped into the trash weather. Decompose if we don't actually use the products themselves so those ingredients typically can't be kept in close loop system but arguably pc brands could sell relations are quantities. That don't need to be reapplied so much. So then we're keeping resources more acts of speculation rather than creating a closed loop system which might be a bit more of a struggle. there sounds principal to principal three. Is that we. Then design outraced externalities. So that means we avoid waste wherever possible and we all can think of plenty of examples. Where this applies. Vc products we can sell formulations in no packaging refillable packaging so we avoid creasing packaging waste or we minimize waste associated with the extraction of natural ingredients looking which plants can yield the maximum output for the minimum environmental impact of. We can also consider eco-design a formulations particularly when they're flushed down the drain or not biodegradable. And ultimately of course as i said we need to minimize consumption of beauty products in the first place that we design at waste externalities by actually reducing the consumption itself and this has close ties in with the podcast. We did recently on the age of essentials of the age of skin and then finally principle four is that we regenerate natural capital. So if you want to keep using natural resources in your pc products you should be trying to create a net environments gain see constantly have those resources to put in that and i think this is probably the point where the beauty industry struggles the most. Because it's simply not really been on the radar screen. The majority of pc

The Importance of Ownership With Mark Mullen, Co-Founder @ Bonfire Ventures

The Twenty Minute VC

01:46 min | 3 months ago

The Importance of Ownership With Mark Mullen, Co-Founder @ Bonfire Ventures

"Malta i've had so many great things. We were introduced six years ago. If you can believe it by the one o'clock boundary hood so many great things from greg. It upfront friday. Usb howard lindsay. Thank you so much joining me. Stay mark great to be here buddy. I wanna start. Though i love he contacts to tell me. How did you make your way in the world of venture and how did you come to co found bonfire over the last few years and he was four years ago will say well really i. When i came out of college. I was already getting into finance. I worked for a bank. And then i became an investment banker. More like a merchant banker because we also made investments for a very famous entrepreneurs name was bill daniels and is currently still known as the father cable. Tv in the us and got a chance to work for hammond of working for the farmer for twenty years he was one of those stories. You don't hear about anymore. Didn't finish highschool lied to get into the navy golden gloves boxing. Champion for two years flew two hundred and fifty missions as a fighter pilot came back to the. Us started selling insurance. Wanted to see a boxing match closer tv and started cable television in one thousand nine hundred eighty three. This is the kind of person. I got to work under. And all the people that worked for him so we had an investment bank about seventy five people that did a in the cable world in. Isp's in towers in broadband wireless etc across the world as well as we owned a bunch of different companies. I ran international. So i got a chance to live in paris and london and so for many years. That's what i did. And we also invested in companies ourselves as well as other funds and so when we sold the firm we sold all the assets have pundits death in two thousand two thousand one then. We had still the investment bank. We sold the investment bank in january. Two thousand seven to rbc capital markets fantastic transactions before the crash happened. I was a senior partner then. And i had to stay three more years. But that's really the taste of investing and got the taste of investing from

Howard Lindsay Bill Daniels Malta Boxing Greg Hammond Navy United States Rbc Capital Paris London
Would You Ditch Your Doctor for an App?

Reset

01:34 min | 4 months ago

Would You Ditch Your Doctor for an App?

"Healthcare in the united states has long been a mess for too many people. But the pandemic forced us to rethink medicine. And maybe there are ways we can make it. Easier and a growing number of startups are trying to find ways to make health care more accessible but to those who can't afford it. Their companies like one medical or a carbon health or parsley. They often require a subscription. But with it comes access to things like twenty four seven virtual care or rapid blood testing and all of these. Vc backed companies indeed saw explosive growth during the pandemic recode. adam clark. Estes has been looking into the growth of telemedicine and these app. Based primary care providers over the last year are these tech forward services helping or harming healthcare. Hey adam hi teddy. So let's just level set here before we talk about these new approaches to primary care. Tell me what the problem is that these tech startups are trying to solve the problem. Is there too many patients and not enough primary care doctors to take care of them. Four primary care a lot of patients feel like they're just going to cheat a specific issue. They're not going on a regular basis and so the doctor doesn't have a full picture of their health and when they do have a problem. Primary care doctors often just write a prescription or for you out to a specialist. So folks feel like. They don't know their doctors. Like maybe folks back in the fifties or sixties new their local

Adam Hi Teddy Adam Clark Estes United States
How Parabens Kickstarted the Indie Beauty Movement

Green Beauty Conversations

01:27 min | 4 months ago

How Parabens Kickstarted the Indie Beauty Movement

"That have branded as paraffin free. Outsell cosmetics branded as natural despite being illegal cosmetic claim in certain regions of the world such as the e u. the parliament. Free claim is here to stay. I one of the indisputable drivers in cosmetic sales being pop and freeze now so popular that the marketing term power been free. Cosmetics might be the difference between getting a vc product on the shelf and keeping a product on the shelf. In fact the power free movement has now grown so big that bbc manufacturers are abandoning these traditional synthetic preservatives in drives. It's also given rise to an entire industry of india. Bbc brands natural ingredients have been around for millennia. Long before the first synthetics effect was invented. People were already making that own beauty products using fats oils pigments waters and most importantly plants. There's a reason much of this. Plant knowledge is still known to us today because lots of it works. Many of us have grown up being told what to do and we sting ourselves on the nestle we grab a nearby dot leaf which plants can stain skin if we use them be true turmeric and which local plants can help with wound healing if we ever cut ourselves however the naturals movement did not take off online because people had been using plants since the dawn of time instead. It all started with a paraffin.

Outsell Cosmetics Parliament BBC India
Sands to Sell Las Vegas Properties for $6.25 Billion to Apollo Global

Bloomberg Law

00:17 sec | 7 months ago

Sands to Sell Las Vegas Properties for $6.25 Billion to Apollo Global

"More on markets in a moment, Las Vegas Sands agreed to sell its properties in Las Vegas to Apollo Global Management and VC properties. The price tag $6.25 billion Lvs Rose 1.3% in New York trading Sands, China here in Hong Kong, creating down now

Apollo Global Management Las Vegas Sands Vc Properties Las Vegas Sands New York China Hong Kong
Boston and Greater Massachusetts are opening up vaccine eligibility to teachers next week

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

Boston and Greater Massachusetts are opening up vaccine eligibility to teachers next week

"Educators in Massachusetts will be eligible to sign up for a covert vaccine a week from tomorrow. Nobody VCs Karen Regal tells US teachers are excited about the move. The Mass Teachers Association got what it wanted. After the Biden administration called for all teachers to be vaccinated, CBS posted on its Web site. It would allow teachers to be vaccinated. And now the Baker administration will open the door starting next week Empty a president Mary Jimmy, speaking outside Watertown High School, calls it a joyful day. In the end, it is going to get us to reach the goal that we all not, which is fooling personally, you know, The sooner that we get this started, the sooner we could get to them personally. Teachers were in the next phase of vaccinations in the Commonwealth. Karen Regal WBZ

Karen Regal Mass Teachers Association Biden Administration Baker Administration Mary Jimmy Watertown High School Massachusetts CBS United States WBZ
Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

John Batchelor

00:22 sec | 7 months ago

Mother arrested after 4-year-old girl found wandering New York street alone at night

"Walking alone in the Bronx late at night is under arrest. 32 year old said Icka Abdul Salam, charged with abandonment of a child acting in a manner in jury is to a child and reckless endangerment. Daughters to Dia was seen at the corner of Prospect Avenue and East Wonder to 56 Street and long would just past midnight Saturday morning. She's down the Cara VCs. Ah, third woman now has come

Icka Abdul Salam Bronx
30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

Cyber Security Headlines

02:55 min | 7 months ago

30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

"Silver sparrow. Malware found on thirty thousand. Max has security pros stumped. Researchers have yet to observe delivery of any payload from new malware dubbed silver sparrow. Leaving its purpose still unknown. This suggests that it may spring into action once a certain condition is met. Silver comes with a mechanism to completely remove itself. A capability typically reserved for high stealth operations and it runs natively on the new. M one chip. It also uses the mac. os installer javascript. Api execute commands. Which makes it difficult to analyze found in one hundred and fifty three countries with concentrations in the us the uk. Canada france and germany researchers are watching carefully for further developments. Solar winds hackers stole source. Code from microsoft azure exchange and into microsoft on thursday said it concluded its probe into the solar winds hack finding that. The attackers stole some source code but confirmed. There's no evidence that they abused. Its internal systems to target other companies or gain access to production services or customer data it said cases involved downloading component source code related to a small subset of as you're into nine exchange components and that the entire attack is a quote moment of reckoning and furthering the need to proactively embrace a zero. Trust mentality new hack. Let's attackers bypass mastercard pin by using it as a visa card research published by academics from e. t. h. zurich building on an earlier pin bypass attack study shows how to leverage victims stolen or lost a visa. Emv enabled credit card without knowledge of the pin uneven fool the terminal into accepting inauthentic offline card transactions the attack dubbed card brand mix up takes advantage of the fact a contact lists point of sale terminal does not properly authenticated cards application. Id to the payment terminal making it possible to deceive the terminal and simultaneously perform a visa and mastercard transaction with the one card in response. Mastercard has already rolled out. Contra measures sequoia capital one of silicon valley's most notable. Vc firms told investors it has been hacked. Sequoia capital told its investors on friday that some personal and financial information may have access by a third party after one of its employees fell victim to a successful phishing attack although it has not yet seen any evidence of compromised information being traded or exploited on the dark web the company did not provide a date for the attack describing it only as quote recent and quote sequoia capital has more than thirty eight billion dollars in assets under management and in the past has invested in airbnb door dash twenty three and me fire i and carbon black it does not appear that the hack was connected in any way to solar winds

Mastercard Microsoft Sequoia Capital MAX Germany France Zurich Canada UK Vc Firms United States Contra Silicon Valley
The Hustle Culture Debate Rages Once Again on Esports Twitter

Esports Minute

02:23 min | 7 months ago

The Hustle Culture Debate Rages Once Again on Esports Twitter

"So this topic came up a lot over the weekend on e-sports Twitter as dignitas posted a new unpaid internship the job effectively from the description looked almost like a taxi where the internet be required to drive around La and connect with players or staff members. Now, there's of course more to the role than that, but that sparked a debate that has happened plenty of these Sports. And so I thought I'd cover it here should be forced to not make a scent in their first year or two or more in this industry or is that just kind of the price of doing business in Esports? And it was your first say this probably isn't unique entirely too easy. It's internships are fairly common across a lot of Industries. But in the last few years, there's been a push for companies to make these paid opportunities. One reason, why is that unpaid internships are more feasible for people who come from families and due to financial ties with racist systems that makes it harder to bring diversity into companies or Industries where unpaid internships are common. I saw this firsthand. I did make a living wage my first year out of college with a degree. I was looking up to be able to move back in with my parents and not pay rent while I figured it out many of my colleagues from school didn't have that luxury unpaid internships create a barriers to entry for Esports with long-term damaging implications, but on the flip side to this in East words twenty years of History. The scene is never made money Publishers do and many individuals have but the issue is completely backed on the organization Side by Venture Capital Money That's to say e Sports organizations do not have a large pool of profits to pull from so when everything's like this come up inevitably some people But in the space for ten plus years bring up the time when almost nobody was being paid and it's a valid point. This is an industry built on passion. In some sacrifice is still a necessity to work in Esports. But ultimately VC funds have gone insane in the last few years compared to a fledgling industry in 2010 Esports just isn't in the same place wage. Well, unpaid internships may feel like a necessity for where Esports revenues are right now. They're still think we all need to work to get rid of to make this space better for everyone if someone started their own company. Yeah, they'll need to grind it off for no wages, but that's the risk. They took for the company and they have the benefit to show for it. They own the company and internship is a different situation and interns need to be compensated for the growth of this industry at large.

Dignitas Venture Capital Money Twitter LA
Is Silicon Valley "Over?" With Bloomberg Opinion Columnist Noah Smith

Techmeme Ride Home

04:20 min | 7 months ago

Is Silicon Valley "Over?" With Bloomberg Opinion Columnist Noah Smith

"The question specifically silicon valley itself Is it is it. Sort of settled science for economists like why certain cities become hubs for certain intellectual pursuits sir. Capital pursuits are things like that. Like is that well known and well understood no so we have a lot of theories about why this happens. one idea is that you have tacit knowledge exchange when engineers sort of hang out with each other. They tell each other how to do stuff. It's not clear how powerful that is anymore. I mean it's it's important for researchers to be able to exchange ideas very intensively at things like universities but engineer going out to the bar and saying like oh i implemented this that sort of dan that it's probably not nearly as big a deal and can now be done on like stack exchange in whatever get hub and so so that that sort of tacit knowledge exchange is. It's hard to establish it's hard to measure because you can't really observe these ideas going around you can look at patents. That's all you can really look at. But there's lots of problems with that data Another idea so another big reason for cities a these concentrations of knowledge industries is called thick markets. So if you wanna hire an engineer there's lot of engineers in in san francisco right and if you want to work for tech company. There's lots of tech companies in san francisco. So there's just so much more choice within these superstar cities right with all this choice you can lose your job and find another similar job really quickly or you Lose your employees and find another employee really quickly whereas if you're out in you know like butte you can't. You can't necessarily do that unless we move it all trout so so if we figure out how to do hiring and firing and job searchable blah as well remotely as we do in person whole new ballgame because you've you've just sort of canceled out that that thick market effect. We noticed. We also have to do that for. Vc's so vc's famously Want to live like a fifteen minute bike ride from there. The companies they invest in and that that mindset has got to change that cultures. Gotta change to really unbundle the startup cities. Well and i mean you know this is a the example of the moment and and one example. But you know what's the hottest startup in in in the world right now. It's clubhouse clubhouse is in san francisco. Clubhouse is andriessen. Horowitz is basically is one of the greatest thick influence. If that if that's using the term rape that. I've seen in a long time. In terms of injuries and horowitz really helping juice the success of that startup so yeah clubhouse in cleveland right yes and so that's a but but then again Could be because there is only what like eighteen people right right. Go ahead right. So i mean it that that depends on you know. Injuries and horowitz being willing to invest in distributed companies. And i think that they are. I know those those guys pretty well. I think that they are open to the possibility. And i think that there is a slow. There'll be a gradual change. I think they're realizing that They're realizing that. That costs in san francisco are just really high can cutler initialized capital hosted some data from her own fund the other day showing their investment in distributed companies is increasing and the number. The percentage of founders. Who say they would want to. Distribute companies has just shot up enormously. So maybe maybe this cultural changes coming. I think there always be some local a bias But i think that maybe it could be reduced. I certainly no vc's at bloomberg who are working to reduce that Because really i feel like the the due diligence and human touch that you need to keep track of a portfolio company. The necessity for that to be physical and onsite has just decreased so much And i think that the pandemic is maybe making. Vc's realized that. I hope. I think always be a slight advantage to being nearby but i think that can be outweighed by the cost disadvantage

San Francisco Andriessen Horowitz DAN Cleveland Cutler Bloomberg
Air Force One: Flying Fortress

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:10 min | 7 months ago

Air Force One: Flying Fortress

"I really enjoyed the documentary. I got the screener yesterday and watched it right away. This right up my alley to it reminded me of like bob doors Air force one coverage in books. I don't know if you've ever seen what he's done in the past book just he app. In fact i knew very well. He was good guy. Yeah enjoy that it was. It was tough getting access that we did and Particularly in a time that we guys and legal unfettered access so although we only minutes some of the stuff that we showed has never been shown liberal minded so the president airlift group. If you know you can't you can't get access to that. You know i i. I've seen that happen. It's very very difficult but to actually get access to the hangar. Where they're modifying dc twenty five bay I've been i've been In san antonio facility with vc twenty five a in the next hanger they wouldn't even acknowledge that was there you know So as i'm very impressed in is just part of the story is how you got that accent said. I don't know if there's much to say about that but I'm very very curious to save only but it wasn't gave as a majority of it was made. Just thankful that steve. I mean for testing network. Anyway having been in the military and went through the military initially an answers diplomatic channels which is in contact with the white house We met with a couple friends of president. Trump's white has Within emotions and actually unable to president trump and what he willing to tell us access to us and the white house military office and ministration We managed to gas boats which was amazing they use off the dot couldn't louisville couldn't be more accommodating. If i'm being honest. I'm were very tolerant. Case that we gave we stay zeno as we were shooting with somebody and you will see some of styles that a security guy with everyone watching the fix edge over all of the new and boy teach restrained before we do anything with the sense to relate to gain. Access azure There would have been no access without that kind of deal for this. Yeah it was tough to treat us two years to get to the access And that's why this project new full on in this project for some time. That's why it's taking a little contrition is is really the access. Obviously twenty with the president globes as half a lot tougher than than you would imagine and trials of the plane. Got ashley to get on the plane where he actually has some time with. Israel is because he knows a low quality In five minutes with I'm is enough. Oss has been really is and that it was a great interview into politics. He two seventy seven and now he's gone. You know yes full yes. I'm really loves what the there was. Also the access. In victorville into the modification hangar. Where they put on the new doors was advocating for san antonio no so the the planes unchain stole the victim. Yeah undisciplined the victim. Bill is actually use off the so. That's the day the boeing being signed on the dotted line and the plane became the pc twenty five point. It was quite amazing to see that. But that was the official acceptance from bullying to the half of the across the across was handed back the boy from the pilots with some essentially. The pilots flew the plane Across to science as use. I feel played nine. It was at bipolar defense converted into the bbc twenty five. You'll see slow by an eating

Bob Doors President Airlift Group President Trump White House San Antonio Air Force Zeno Donald Trump Louisville Steve Ashley Victorville Israel Boeing Bill BBC
Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

Esports Network Podcast

04:59 min | 7 months ago

Anzu's Plan to Evolve In-Game Advertising with CEO Itamar Benedy

"Any of these Sports networks other properties on this episode of the E Sports Network podcast for bringing back a gasp from about a year ago wage a little more bonetti. He's the co-founder and CEO of on zoo in a more. Welcome back to the Shelf. Hey meets great to be here tomorrow is on the show back in February of 2020 where we discussed the growth of in-game advertising age people who miss that show or too many of our new listeners since then on to his a platform that makes it easier for braids to get into video game worlds and for developers to open up more potential White spaces in their games for Grants Pass. I'll do is work with Publishers like Ubisoft at lide Castle to deliver Brayden moments for major. It's like Samsung Pepsi American Eagle and many more Esports. We've seen it gave ads take Auto larger role especially patiently League of Legends open up space in summoner's Rift and it was filled by MasterCard an Alienware among other partners and just this morning as a record this on Wednesday, February 10th, 2021 rocket League announced that Ford is going to take over there it gave Billboards for the upcoming which are major on zoo also had a big adults with this what the platform recently raised nine million dollars in additional capital in around Kool-Aid buyback Fetchers and hbse Ventures. There is participation by plenty more investors, of course, including Mark Merrill, one of the two founders of Riot games, this follows two other funny raises of three and five million. So in Mark Gratz of the race, first of all, what are the plans for this capital? Yeah, thank you Mitch. So as you said we raised 9 million dollars beatcraft is one of our previous investors are still leading gaming Esports v c. B c is a new VC which comes from the sport world and a lot of touchpoints around gaming and then other investors are wpp the biggest advertising group in the world, which is also like in the existing investor and Sony Innovation fund, you know, Sony is one of the biggest gaming groups in the world and the owner of PlayStation. So that's a privilege to have them on board Mark Romero the founder and chairman of road games on League of Legends. As you mentioned didn't call ins the founder and CEO of super awesome that recently got acquired by epic games and the Chicago Cubs. Yeah, the baseball team go Ventures and gainesville's and illumine Adventures. So a very crowded and exciting structure of invest investors to have on board. I'm a Cardinals fan so we'll let the dog So invested things slide, I guess but grats on all the different people who came together you mentioned before we started recording you were in the position that every founder kind of hopes. They find themselves in which is we have a few people. We have a different options for Capital so we can pick the people that make the most strategic sense for us going forward. What did you find from the mobile the different investors? What were you looking for? Especially as guiding parts of the company to push it Forward? Sure. So I mean, you know what this round was not about it was not about as fast as we could have fine as it like very very fast as what it was about bringing the best structure. Number one number two, it was about, you know to maximize shareholder value. We could raise almost double the amount but we didn't want to make sense. This is the amount of cash we need for next stage Rose and then in the future if it's a year from now or two years from now we can do another round off. For that makes sense. So we were not looking at at you know, these things it was more about we have a lot of confidence in him. Advertising is going to become a major business model for game divorce across all platforms, through PC Mobile and an important ads category four Brands media agencies and the ESPYs and and the question is how fast can that happen or more sneaking about big Brands big Publishers not easy companies to convince them to do something new. So when we meet partners that can help us to make this happen faster than wages. Are we get excited one form to partner is again investment one is a strategic partnership and they can elaborate more of some of the Partnerships we have in place and some of them is people who join our team. So that was what was guiding us and looking at the different, you know buckets of we are investors came from there is some you know, some like VCS and financial institutions. There is advertising and groups. There is game. Groups and there is a sports organizations that have a lot of touch point in going to become an important overlap in my opinion the next two years. And of course there is like with the values that we want to group represents and communicate us companies gauges as the leading investor for equal opportunity and Which choice for us an important to him and announcement to basically said if the world that was how we were looking at it that's a great place to be at

Bonetti Lide Castle Hbse Ventures Mark Merrill Mark Gratz Sony Innovation Mark Romero Road Games On League Of Legend Brayden Ubisoft Alienware WPP Mastercard Samsung Mitch Chicago Cubs Ford Gainesville
Wise Ventures Esports Officially Becomes Version1

Esports Minute

01:27 min | 7 months ago

Wise Ventures Esports Officially Becomes Version1

"Digital media podcasting and video programs. Please reach out to e-sports network CEO marked in using the email in the bio of the show. While most people in Esports expect a brand name to be announced alongside. The organization. Why is Venture Esports has taken a little bit of a different pathway. They were first called wise Venturi Sports after the VC fund that created the organization and then they named their rocket League team version one. Now. They've officially become version one permanently listeners to the E Sports Network podcast might remember Brett Diamond CEO of wise Venturi Sports at the time talking about the organizations branding back in a podcast during the summer. In that show, he mentioned a wise Ventures was a temporary name and he also said version one was also going to be a temporary name cuz at that point it was just a name for the rocket League team. It was basically a placeholder took apparently the V one named took off enough that they decided to make it permanent version one first entered Esports of the Call of Duty League team, which is why they've had this sort of weird branding thing because the Minnesota rocker took on their own identity. The organization is backed by the will family the owners of the Minnesota Vikings in the NFL with a formalizing of the name V one is also adding a vallerand roster the team they signed was previously competing with the

Brett Diamond Venturi Minnesota Minnesota Vikings NFL
The Role of Business in Political Change, with Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

Accelerate!

05:11 min | 7 months ago

The Role of Business in Political Change, with Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

"Christine. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. Let's pleasure talk to you. we're you recently. Wrote an article title inc magazine titled business leaders spoke up after the capital riot. Will their voices remain strong. So first question. I have for you is. Was that really a strong response by business. Yeah i i think that it was at i sort of a subtle response and then all of a sudden the the sort of numbers of responses grew and grew and snowballed so quickly. I just had never seen like this. This letter signed by close to two hundred. Ceo is urging congress to accept the election results and ensure no further delay in the orderly transfer power than the business roundtable the us chamber of commerce. The national association manufacturers like everyone was speaking up and it was almost as rush to just show support of our democracy which is not a crazy idea. Of course the sheer numbers. If you looked at twitter users everyone and linked in you start every business leader just putting their foot down and saying. This is unacceptable I don't think it was overly shocking in that. Like i said like every business wants on kind of order and and any instability is bad for business right like this. It wasn't a political statement. At first it was just a hey like respect the rule of law And and i think that you know business did step up in in a way there. And i thought that that was sort of meaning fall whether it was a hugely political choice. I i think is is still up for debate at so. It seemed like that also came the last minute. I was sort of building to ahead and and seemed to me. In many cases came serve even after the fact and after the factor january six and I dunno seems are opportunistic to me to some degree and that you know how much of the business response was shaped by the prospect of bill. Democrats both senate seats in georgia and and sort the desire to be in the good graces. Now they're going to be the party empower every time. We see the transition of power from party to party. We see And i think silicon valley is a really good good kind of bellwether of this obscene. it Every every transition and now that silicon valley has so much lobbying power to money invested We've seen that shift already Just like we did for years ago. it seemed more subtle than and now it because of the instability and because of the events of january six like it was very abrupt and we saw it immediately we saw. Vc's tweeting just very very much more political than you know the leaders of banks and Very big businesses. But they were. They were tweeting Very politically and i think that they opened up a bit more right and they felt a lot more freedom to if they were already democrats Speak their mind for sure. Well yeah it's so our struck me. Was i guess still surf. How few are individual business. Leaders spoke out. I mean there are certainly the collective groups in the business groups. You've had that letter signed by ceo's but seemed like sarajevo. A safe thing to do is we came into the beginning of january and the the past administrations still seem to be doubling down on their their story about the the elections are one Trying to say it as nicely as possible. It seems to me it's like geez. How did why do january sixth bridge too far now if what you really value is stability above all things in the case of business you know you want predictable markets and the like that you sell into. Yeah it seems seems like almost too little too late given the impact that could have because there are some school thought and we'll get into it. The businesses actually should be playing a larger role in societal and political change. I think that that's really interesting. And of course true. I think that you know for me. As a reporter. I follow what happens on social media And what how these these big social companies work and how the smaller social companies work as well and watching. I think exactly how you say that. Was you know why january sixth the bridge too far. You can say that exact thing for for twitter and trump's account right and her for how facebook responded to the you know political ads and misinformation about the election. You know there were so many times previously when they could have made the right calls there and failed to. And how did it get to a little insurrection of the capital. You know to for everyone to say oh wait. This is too much we should have done. Yeah it's not like the warning signs were there areas.

Inc Magazine Us Chamber Of Commerce Christine National Association Congress Twitter Silicon Valley Senate Georgia Sarajevo Donald Trump Facebook
"v._c." Discussed on Marketing Trends

Marketing Trends

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Marketing Trends

"If you can move someone without without ruffling any feathers you can find one especially at like the s._d._r. B._d._r. level who's just getting into the company and move them into marketing. It's really valuable. I have two people on my team won on that was an s._d._r. Which is more common path and one that had been in a for a while and just didn't want the monthly guide the commission no she works really hard but <hes> she wanted wanted to get into something else and that has been super valuable in building those relationships as someone who's done that i can attest the other piece about it that i think is really critical. Is that you start to develop your the other marketers on your team like oh. It's actually not that scary to like. Go talk to prospects and like like hey. We should do some more ride alongs or like hey that salesperson was like marketing never came on ride along with me in a year and like that's kind of a bummer because it would be nice to have someone along with me. I i think it's just really builds bridges and then obviously you know as a leader you want to develop relationships with the sales leader as well but to actually get the whole team needs to be doing it and so it's how can you make those those connection points but it's i mean it's really hard the hardest things about being a marketing leader is building out those strong relationships. It was sales and product and it's hard and it's a challenge and the best thing i've seen for it. Honestly is switching people on teams that wanna move and allowing for internal transfers. It's just it helps so much now that you're working with completely different buying profiles. How do you go from that. Hey we're focused on one exact vertical and now we're shifting to a completely different persona type of buyer <unk> like the neediness level is totally different going from start to v._c.'s. He sees as like the you know. There's i mean they you know they talked to each other all the time early stage founders n._b._c.'s but it's pretty different how they how they buy how they think about things how how we need to approach them their lifestyle yeah yeah yeah. It's hard to reach b._b._c.'s this week for instance in july short owners are working. It's funny. Just keep on oregon. <hes> no i think one thing that when i started i was like wow we have all these different audiences and we're just sales and summer sort of nascent products denise and audiences for us to be reaching and some are way more developed like our capital product which was the first thing we built sales teams huge and and we've been selling to them for a while was really like let's get a handle on all of our audiences. Let's identify them. As audiences shouldn't necessarily been done without marketing and then we've got to figure out not only what is the positioning and messaging for these audiences but also what are the tactics and they're not going to be the same so we're building out a bunch of work around account based marketing right now for v._c._u.'s news there's only i don't know it depends on who you ask but there's roughly four thousand v._c. Firms in the us and so it's really small so you have to get that experience right you and you can't just hit them up all the time and expect them to like you like you really need to be intentional about your communication strategy and duchess definitely more of an account based marketing approach early stage companies. There's there's a lot more of them and they wanted to be fast. They've got a million things to do. Issuing i could use something they have to do but they don't want to think about. They often actually outsource it to their lawyers. They wanna make a quick decision so we need you to make it fast for them to purchase things so that's where things like drift come in and just getting them in touch quickly and that's a really fast sale cycle which is really different from b._c.'s.

v._c. oregon us b._b._c. b._c. n._b._c. v._c._u.
"v._c." Discussed on The Art of Charm

The Art of Charm

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on The Art of Charm

"My name is timothy very recently. I decided to make an investment in myself and the first thing that i thought of was taking this boot camp. I definitely should have taken it three years ago. When i i thought about it because there's so many social opportunities and networking and frustrations that could have gotten past if i'd known what i learned this this week for example while out with the coaches and with the other students i would walk up to a stranger and start to talk with them. I'd be a little bit nervous and then the coach would tell me afterwards no they wanted to talk to you. Were there they were enjoying that and so just overcoming my social anxieties and figuring out that going out into a situation a bar or a networking event can actually be it's such a positive thing that other people value and enjoy so i'm excited excited to go back into the world and go to networking events and go to other things that are going to move forward and really know that now i can walk up to anybody i can start start a conversation and i just appreciate them and have them appreciate me and we can both benefit from those interactions. If you enjoy this show and really dig the content the arte charm has one of the most advanced social skills training programs in the world. Learn why corporations military special operations executives -secutive entrepreneurs silicon valley engineers have v._c.'s work with us to increase their emotional intelligence goto the artichoke dot com slash boot camp to learn for more and apply today..

timothy v._c. three years
"v._c." Discussed on Addicted2Success

Addicted2Success

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Addicted2Success

"Mind. When you come up with the idea of like your book or your brand or when you have somebody come to your table in that did talking about a business since idea you've estimate how do you execute on the vision. I will so great question and i hear a lot of venture capitalists. You know i was a member of <unk> fund and i've invested a bunch of companies so i when i was a venture capitalist and no longer investing <hes> because now investing my own projects and that can be it conflict with some of the portfolios so i'm no longer technically venture capitalist molester minute and i hear a lot of people talk about ideas which you know the vision ideas and execution and ideas the most important thing in the world and v._c.'s out. There are doing a disservice to the role by saying. It's all about execution. Who cares about ideas. Ideas are what changed the world. Ideas are what elevators ideas or what changed humanity ideas and most important but did you have to execute on those ideas to bring them to reality right now. What is execution to break down your question. You know because people talk about well. How do you ex- you execution. I don't know in what to do and how do it. Let's break that down a step further knowing what to do k. That's prioritization so doing the things necessary necessary for you to create value that you need to create or that you desire to create or to envision to create now if you that is if that's a company companies as a crepe products or services so the idea company then you gotta break it down and and go down to the level of products and then how do you create the product you might go down to the level of you know calling calling you know writing a ballista the manufatures that you need to interview you you write up a list of the vendors are going to be shared with your product. You're right list of the things that need to be done. In the product for sales copy marketing copy web copy social media copy cheryl's blah blah blah blah blah blah right so that's greatest executioners knowing what.

cheryl v._c.
"v._c." Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"You actually answered it exactly what i wanted you to answer it because my question is what you said is perfect for marketing. You have all of these people consensus definitely has the expertise but i know a lot of those people and they're very busy. How much bandwidth can may allocate to you for various. Start ups especially. If you start to grow yes <hes> so the way that that our program is built around three stages and we dropping the experts depending on where your company is what stage of company a what stage of the cycle urine and what we need on bandwidth <hes> <hes> really we have our mentor network with internal natural mentor network. I'm coming in in a number of different ways. Some of them. <hes> really work with companies. <hes> <hes> based on one on one mentoring situation so those are weekly phone calls. Okay what's going on. Where are you what's happening with. How long does it you having okay. Here's what i think you should do. Etc <hes> other <hes> of are mentors come in <hes> in daily comes in when <hes> <unk> consensus diligence comes in <unk> when there's a specific question around <hes> you know oh you're so security token that you need answered or you need assistance going through <hes> you know you're you're on test net and <hes> and you need some security audits and we'll bring n._c._w. At that point for that specific use case for me <hes> we have other founders who have gone through number one <hes> they they are happy to introduce you to <hes> <hes> they're v._c.'s who invested in them <hes> couple you talk to the consensus ventures <hes> as well <hes> but but who've gone through how you position your start up and what that pitch techniques to look white for this particular v._c. That you've got a meeting with next week in two weeks <hes> and then we'll go through rounds of pitch practice so the band with is not said bandwith is not one size fits all it's really we built in curated a program around a pulling the the the various people within our network based on where that particular company is and what's needed as far as how the <unk> the program is structured. It's really structured in three phases. The first is we sit down with teams and really understand coming. Did the door <hes>. What's the what's the problem. What's the market and what's your solution within within <hes> within that market <hes> and really spend a lot of time to makes sure founders understand their market understand the customers what the pain points are for that particular customer base within that market make sure that it's a large enough addressable market market <hes> and then once we once we feel like an that's done with a team that some of the various <hes> mentors within the network once we once we feel like we've kind of crossed that phase and we move into traction and growth we spent a lot of time with these companies making sure that <hes> they don't build in a bubble but that they're actually getting out of the building talking to their customers and starting to get early signs of traction and growth <hes> <hes> lassie coming into phase three <hes> we spend a lotta time with founders on the <hes> the fundraising side of things storytelling retelling a pitch process preparing your back <hes> and getting ready to go raise a professional capital. I mean if if you're going to be in the ecosystem <hes> you you need you need you you want. I think external market signals. I mean i a lot of what tacky on has been built around is helping really smart. Technical founders get extra of allegation and there's a lot of ways that you can get extra validation. Sometimes it's the your customers. Sometimes it's through mentors and advisors since <unk>. Sometimes it's through your ability to raise capital i and continue to grown on scale your company <hes> but i think especially in this ecosystem we've turned the corner <hes> and and a lot of the companies that i think are that you're starting to see a lot of progress progressive traction <hes> have build valuable solutions for real customers and i think that's that's really at the heart of of really any company but especially our ecosystem awesome i i. I think we were definitely. We've turned that one..

v._c. two weeks
"v._c." Discussed on African Tech Roundup

African Tech Roundup

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on African Tech Roundup

"Business models reflect the different cultural assumptions market by market also give us different ideas about how this plays out continent in the long term in front of me is this list is that digest africa has compiled of africa's ten most funded transport and logistic startups. What would you guys guests out of ten kim. What would you guess the representation of sort of motorcycle related either logistics transport startups featured on that list would be we say six seven six or seven. What do you reckon assortment <hes>. I'd see i see four or five okay so you're closer to no it's also remember. This is a significant trend. I just suppose my question often sort of referencing that is to what extent does funds raised speak to actual business opportunity versus say a bullish trend being backed by v._c.'s who might even even secretly know that this is an an opportunity poss- sort of giving them a vehicle to capture value in subsequent rounds. I i to thirty while ago that the most interesting the most interesting sectors to allies are those where you constantly transfer or convert cash into dominant. I don't believe that motorcycle hitting is is one of them. I think that's the automated opportunities for these players to differentiate themselves within markets as so so the returns to scale that massive i so i mean just like goober more money that one is able to deploy to build a network the modem and as the elected sustain market by the market also. I think there's going to be a loose coalition between you watch us. Each of these players have been able to raise and their ability to capture market gotcha that said one of the reasons i am. I remain skeptical of the of the industry in the very long term is that i don't know that the unit economics workout or the positive you know in the same way that you know maybe working capital chris sacca for uber was very very successful investment uber still a big question mark in terms of is it a successful company yeah global right hitting space been proven to be successful also while i was an investment and back then it would have been super interesting to make the investment in a player which i still. I still don't know i. I still don't know that this turns out to be on his own a successful industry one more data point in this direction is i think it was it was the c._e._o. Of grab or good jack that said that they don't require they don't media right healing business be profitable in the wake of uber's issue <hes> uh-huh so basically trying to distance themselves from the perception of the right heading business trying to say you know we are going to other things on here to be interested in the article. I wrote route. I said that the deployable is pretty obvious that when anybody stopped by delivering traditional service gross quickly as the market permits them him to grow the newlyweds skill to lay on adjacent services the obvious.

africa chris sacca kim v._c.
"v._c." Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Recode Decode

"The trump leadership but i think it's more leadership's ability to kind of take leadership skills and ultimately automatic conveyed them verbally or otherwise people can actually understand and do things quite frankly and joe jumped off cliffs when they probably shouldn't so storytelling tongue because sometimes uh-huh at them speak fiction so it's very great stories can be. I'm very clear about this in the book which is yes. I'm not talking about yes hoodwinking people so there's difference there. I think they believe that a lot of them. Believe with them so some people do right so look. I think look there's bad people and there's no question about that and hopefully we do a good job of trying to figure that out over time but it's really kind of can you basically you kind of take a set of facs and help convince somebody and help them understand how you can get from here to there. Even though there are quite frankly kind of logical leaps that you have to get to it was my eleventh grade. English teacher used to say willful suspension of disbelief is the way to think about and i think that's part of this job. Is you've got to be able to kind of walk through this kind of set of of this chain of events that may not be completely obvious but at least people out and they say okay. I know this person is going to they're going to walk through walls to try and get this done. I believe that people will follow them that they will be able to hire people to actually follow them and hopefully to your point right. They're not hoodwinking people from story but they're actually creating a narrative around what they're intending to do so okay secret. One is understanding sentences. V._c.'s and how they've work was what there's some others. <hes> a big thing that we see people making mistakes on. I try to talk about a lot is how much money to raise and so <hes>. This is a one that admittedly is hard sometimes as a v._c. See to talk about because people believe it's self serving and so i tried to explain it from a non self serving perspective but a lot of people come in those okay look. I'm going to raise eight million dollars and you ask them. Why and they say well. That's because is that's what an eight round is and you know my buddy down. The street race that and the real answer to that question is look. How much money do you need to raise in order to de risk the next fundraising opportunity for you right so we would love all these things to look like the narrative fallacy which they all go up into the right and that means monitoring increasing your evaluation over time and the big mistakes i think people make is they randomly pick a number they haven't it actually tied it to exactly what the deliverables are then they either over arrays and then put themselves in a situation where they've raised the bar so high that it's very hard to get the next round fancy or quite frankly they under shoot and find that you get strand and so again it's a relatively simple thing but something that you know at least when we talked to founders almost nobody has given a whole lot of thought to that or v._c.'s. I mean that's i ah being honest with each other is not one of the hallmarks silicon valley fundraising..

V._c. joe eight million dollars
"v._c." Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Of our businesses is people in the community that need storage for household belongings their cars or autos or or goats or what have you yeah. I mean you're kinda like walked right into my next question. I was going to talk about the initial product and i mean you have to build this sided marketplace. How do you go get the places to store this and then how do you get the customer immerse to store their stuff there so you answered it with the students. That's really cool so was proving out that that student use case was good enough to to raise money money on is yeah intact <hes> i sometimes forget this but the business competitions resulted in our funding so we actually never <hes> started the process of <hes> reaching out to b._c. <hes> we were doing these business competitions and we started to get some good attraction with these students and started to win competitions and after one of them <hes> we got we started getting phone calls from <hes> several different b._c. Firms that had attended some of the business competitions and they reached out and they said hey. We really like your concept. We can tell you a sharp team. We like your vision and your brand where you're going on this. Why don't you come in and have a chat and <hes> when we started talking to those fees we started reaching out to other these days as well because we thought oh you know b c's they're interested in us and i can't tell you how good it is to have have a v._c._r. Reach out to you. You know my experiences with those the restart up <hes>. We're not the same as the experience i had with. You know v._c.'s. I'm just cold reaching out to so it was great to have them. In fact several of our first investors were <hes> those b._c.'s..

v._c.
"v._c." Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"B. space ace but the caveat being you have to be willing to be a user of the product yourself and sort of have this deep sort of business expertise domain expertise in order to do it. It would be fun if some crazy crazy enterprising student out there. Somebody wants to do this to go through. Let's say the top fifty or one hundred stocks and the s. and p. five hundred and try to categorize them in these four buckets because another another question the natural question is i think that upper right quadrant will call it would be the thing that everyone wants to work on another question. Is that whereas most of the value because i'm sure sure facebook mcdonald's. Some of these companies may not be in the right quadrants in terms of what we'd wanna build but are nonetheless incredibly valuable because of base protocol inhumanity. Eh one of the things you always read about is the strength of social connections. Being a clean proxy for sort of quality of life reminds me of maybe the topic. I was most excited added to talk to you about which is this notion of network health so i think actually the question something like what were the questions that you've been asked from v._c.'s in the fundraising fundraising process so maybe you could start the story there and describe why this question of network health was such a good question so the network health question. I talked to alfred at sequoia. Koya alfred lennon sequoia super smart guy one of the reasons for this as he had a cheat code in our conversation which was alfred with the c._e._o. Of zappa's and so i sit down on in like i'm used to just pull the wind up string on my back and we'll talk about my back story and what the i is and how it fits in the world and get on the call and he sits dies like okay great so you've come up with a new <music> version of what happens next and i'm like all right well. I guess again cut out the first open to the preeminence. We really were able to to really get into it. So one point in the meeting he leans back and he says okay so steady is in network and what he meant by that is we have suppliers or vendors and we have retailers we might have third party logistics trucking companies and all the stuff and of course everybody can play multiple roles too so you might be a buyer and a seller you might be a warehouse and purchaser almost stuff stuff he said so. If you have this network how would you measure the health of the network and i start answering as well and i like i stopped and started a few times tmz until i realized that i didn't have an answer the question at all because i started answering with top level metrics in my head ed and then it short-circuited gross merchandise value. What's going to the platform await. That's not that's not health. Maybe the performance of the business. That's you know you talk. Take rate you can all all sorts of stuff but that's not the health of the network and so i said i understand what you mean. But can you give me more asked me. Another question is is nice sort of meeting where it was not. There's not ever cereal so it was not asking. The questions stumped me..

zappa alfred facebook sequoia mcdonald v._c.
"v._c." Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"Why is this person and asks rating. Why is this person penetrating. You're using that objective information above from the n._b._a. i._m._p. Or from what you know however you describe your physiology to be able to connect those doc yeah so that the person that's reading. This report is exactly what to treatment. They administration um. They're not looking at patient had impaired about conversion. They're like i don't know what and you know what the here's the thing. Most people wouldn't even know that there's more to the story so you by listening to the podcast and hopefully pushing it into your practice means. You're going to end up informing arming people in training other people on how this thing works because you say given the role a poster lingual propulsion on moving epilogue to to to horizontal we we at which we did not see we tested we tested effort full swallow to understand the role of the tongue on blah blah blah blah so you're saying i'm just going to drop conversion in and this report. I'm going to tell you which part of it was a problem that we thought it was the tongue and the next swallow trial we did with focused on the tongue to see if it helped appa gladys get the horizontal axis this year. It's a story that you're telling in the report and all in all of these components may be absolutely perfect. This is really important to stay is that you may have have zeros on every single component of the n._b._s. i._m._p. Everything may be working perfectly but the timing of <unk> closure is still so important. It's it's something that's not factored into the n._b._a. S._i._m. P it's something separate. Were you need to be able to understand and appreciate that how long learn i know i've said this before but the timing of these components is its own aspect of the component. It's it's basically showing showing up to the airport clearing security perfectly and being at the gate and our after your flight left you did everything right to get there already left in our so what are we talking exactly exactly and there are there are reference valleys for what is considered in the normal range you for these things and i i would have listeners direct themselves to katrina the just published a new paper where she segmented normative ranges based on the different nc level so thin liquids and for <hes> thicker liquids. It's based on the n._c. Level what that normal range should look like and they think that that's really helpful for commissions to get a sense of how long should the vestibule stay close uh-huh and how long before it closes which is even shorter. It's between like one hundred or three hundred milliseconds before should start to close and so and we know it closes generally early not all the time and every study longer with big with more volume so if you have a one alvarez the thirty now you can imagine learn closures can be open longer for the thirty miles in the one off off because it just needs it exactly so have we have. We sufficiently bludgeoned this topic. I think so i think <hes> i think it'd be interesting if listeners interested to get more into the sensory aspects of sensory aspects of how all these he's how all these structure have sensation matters in how that influences the function of these events and how the brain sermon how the cortex can modulate these behaviors heavy backups gives a lot of insight into how to develop treatment plan and we know that the cortex can modulate it because when you do a mendelssohn then if you do it with us recalls you prolong the rest of us for closure listening to b._b._c. Well not a mendelssohn. Some people say it needs to have their previous pay. I say mendelssohn plethora of us closer. Some say it doesn't care about elevation even learned open but if you focus on a patient saying we want you to we do a mendelssohn with the oversee or what el- v._c. prolonged where you do. The volition will render westville closure maneuver which we publish on we know you can quickly extend extend that for up to two up two seconds yet <hes> because you're the cortex modulating the brain stem so we know that it's behaviorally modified fifty by a speech pathologist who understand theology so it's possible to modify l._v. See wallace swallow is and does fulfill all the criteria for reflects too complicated aided one modulated by the tax okay bye guys <music> <music> <music>.

mendelssohn westville wallace alvarez el- v._c. two seconds
"v._c." Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on The Talk Show

"That kind of money into have those kind of growth goals in this kind of market you need like the big enterprise business accounts and I think slack was very smart by focusing focusing on business stuff right from the start you know slack has always been business focused and it has succeeded in businesses up to up to date of today seemingly very well. I mean I don't know what their financial goals are but it seems like what they set out to do they are doing very well and they were business focused right from the start and they have people do use slack slack personal stuff also but they are very they're operating successfully what they what they're trying to do in business whereas dropbox seem like it was a really great personal story then they realized Oh we actually want the money from the business or want slash need the money from the business side of this so we need to pivot this into more a business product but unfortunately they were already so big at that point that both businesses already weren't taking them seriously and the business software providers fighters were already introducing their own dropbox things so they were already kind of getting sherlock over there on that end and then also the personal side of things was is not interested in what dropbox was doing all the stuff dropbox tried to do to push themselves more into business mostly just pisses off their personal customers and so I I feel like that's where I feel like they're kind of stuck between a rock hard place like I understand what I understand why they're doing what they're doing given the situation they're in where they've raised US money. They're trying to become become a big business thing. I it makes sense to do what they're doing. Now given those conditions the real flaw was getting themselves into those conditions in the first a place like instead of raising all this money and trying to become something really big they should have. I think they should have stuck with the personal market but that would have resulted in a smaller company and smaller all our finances and everything else but they they could have succeeded. They could have been sustainable. We're not doing that had a really nice business but that wasn't what they were going for right. It's overcast isn't trying to be the items music store right. Daring fireball isn't trying to be the New York Times you know and if we tried Friday probably fail right like I have a nice business that supports one employee yeah exactly me not that I have anybody else and that's fine for me but if if I had raised venture capital probably probably wouldn't be seen as a good business right exactly yes overcast would be a terrible return for V._C.'s as honestly as many podcasting really adventures are as as I think the unfortunate luminary investors are discovering right about now <hes> as they a one hundred dollars on fire to a podcast APP. It seems to have noticeable market share yeah and I haven't heard I haven't really heard anything about it like obviously got a decent initial injection of publicity <hes> based on some of the you know the names names of some of the people who are associated with the Star power and you know people like to write the heartache of Hey. Here's the next big thing in podcasting. It's you know the Netflix of podcasting or something like that. That sounds good. Oh yeah as a slogan people can write whatever articles they want doesn't make a true doesn't make it doesn't actually make it play out that way right like like we all like the a lot of the a lot of the especially the business.

slack enterprise business dropbox US New York Times V._C. one hundred dollars
"v._c." Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Slate Money

"I do also point out by the way they are things that I think entrepreneurs entrepreneurs should not do and should not agree to as well and so. I'm you know obviously look represents where I come from but I hope at least you found that I'll be interested as your listeners. <hes> read the book that we tried to be generally balanced in terms of explaining what things are giving people. Hopefully the tools to decide. Do I want to make this tradeoff or not. Let's talk a little bit about the other end of it just like the exit you say. This is where a lot of love the the real tensions can arise. You say that Lemons Ripen quickly that if you do a bad deal I'm it becomes uh-huh pretty obvious pretty quickly that it was a bad deal candidly so what happens in that event because it seems to me that like if you're we're in the business world whether you home runs per at bat really all you care about is are you going to be a home run on once it becomes obvious lemon you just sort of like leave them to their own devices vices. They leave if you can find <hes> perfectly viable small company old how it to you but we're not interested. It seems to me that a lot of entrepreneurs I talk to they. They seem to go through an enormous amount of pain with that becomes obvious from V._C.'s perspective that are eleven so <hes> I don't know if we made up this quota. We stole it from somebody money but we use it internally which is look we make our investment returns on successful businesses and we make our reputation on unsuccessful businesses. Basically we think about it and so yes like you cannot you cannot cannot just walk away and abandoned folks when that happens. You know I think even if they want me to well but that's that's. That's why I was GonNa go to which is I think that I think that that is the conversation to have right so if things aren't going going well right. It's any number of reasons. Either you know the products not there the market's not there or maybe the C._E._o.. Isn't into it anymore and interestingly enough more often than not have had this conversation with the C._E._o.. Where they feel like they are kind of running on the treadmill because they think we want them to keep running on the treadmill? Even though I think we both know and agree that the business just isn't going to be what we all hoped it would be and oftentimes you know you go into those conversations with a little bit of anxiety in trepidation because you know I'm kind of saying look your baby's ugly to a certain extent but it's often the case that we actually see things eye to eye which is as I said a lot of this conversation. The entrepreneur is relieved and they say oh. I'm so glad that you see it that way because I feel the same way and I'm not sure I want to spend the next three to five years of my my life doing something that I no longer believe can achieve the outcomes we thought it could so it's not a conversation to be taken lightly and you can't cut and run on these things and I think that reputation will really hurt you in this business but I do think it's a conversation that is worth having which is okay look. We're in the situation..

V._C. five years
"v._c." Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Slate Money

"To be bill and really adding all of this extra value that somehow you have access to little oh bags of magical pixie dust on Sandhill road that no one else has access to and that's why everyone should take easy money bit whenever I see funding rounds. They're ah six or seven or eight different vs in these rooms. They can't all be holding this entrepreneur. How many hands GONNA have to be held right? I think that's a really good question yeah so as you probably know at least was the convention with most of these financing rounds is there often is a lead investor and then there are of course other as you as you mentioned kind of CO investors so on coming on two things there one is I don't want to any way diminish the role of the entrepreneur look as I said before and I said it very clear in the book. V._C.'s don't build these companies right. We shouldn't kid ourselves at all. Everything we're doing here is to hopefully be a good cheerleader and a partner to entrepreneurs so even the hand holding is more of Hey if we can be helpful and you can bounce ideas off us or or in the case of injuries and Horowitz. You know we do have resources that can help on specific things right so if you're interested in customer relationships are interested in Hiring C._F._o.. We've actually staffed people against those things so I think those can be valuable but it's a very fine line that whether or not you have a general yes so we almost always have a board seat and then if we don't though but it's a material tibial investment so for example we do a fifty thousand dollar seed investment. Obviously we just don't have the ability to kind of resource. All those things and you know we don't do that very often but there are a few times where we might make them more substantive investment in the millions of dollars but because of the board construction the company may say hey look. We just can't make well. Maybe we'll just no I mean I guess I'm saying like even if you're the lead like I and <hes> in my head I I might be wrong about this. You're an investor in stripe would never like lead. That's correct. That's correct yeah and so you know. Would you be providing these kinds of services services to stripe in the same way that you would be company where you are leading not in the same way but you know if if stripe wanted to engage everything we do is kind of on the company is driving whether they want to be involves so there's not like a we don't have an android playbook where we say great welcome to the family read this book in Oh by the way we say that playbook because that would just crush and kill all these companies buddies and we basically you know be horrible as investors. We destroyed the entrepreneur spirit. That's there so yes we do have different levels of what I would call engagement with companies like you mentioned with a stripe versus you know I I don't know what would be a good one data where Ben's but on the board for a number of years where the major investor there but a lot of that is driven also in part by the company which is if they want help. Were there to help them them and you know it's our job ultimately just to manage resources internally one of those resources that you you mention you say every time a G._p.. Takes on a new board seat that investment the decision has an opportunity cost in that consumes one of a limited number investments that she can make that basically you can't make another investment at that point at the margin because then that investment would require taking a board seat and there's a finite number of board seats that you know a single G._p.. Can hold you you know sitting on the board is a serious amount of work and you can't say too many. Can you explain to me why does the G._p.. needs to be the person on the board. I mean Andreessen Jason..

Andreessen Jason partner Horowitz V._C. Ben fifty thousand dollar
"v._c." Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Samba changed all that what's more as Microsoft updated S._M.. Be Samba matched them relying on a growing cadre of software authors WHO RELIED ON SAMBA <hes> to keep their own networks running the emergence of Samba in the period when Microsoft's dominance was at its peak the same year that the U._S. government tried and failed to address that dominance was one of the most salutory bits of timing and computer history carving out a new niche for Microsoft's operating system rivals that gave them space to breathe and grow it certainly possible that without Samba Microsoft could have leveraged. It's operating system land and application dominance to crush all rivals so what happened. We don't see a lot of Sabah style stories anymore. Despite increased concentration of various sectors of the tech market and a world crying out for adversarial interoperability judo throws indeed investors seem to have lost their appetite for funding companies buddies that might disrupt the spectacularly profitable Internet monopolists of Twenty nineteen seating them their margins and deeming their territory to be a kill zone. V._C.'s have not lost their appetite for making money and tool Smith's have not lost the urge to puncture the supposedly airtight bubbles around the big tech incumbents. So why is it so hard to find a modern David with the stomach to face off against twenty nineteen goliaths to find the answer look to the law as monopolises have conquered more and more of the digital realm home they have invested some of those super-normal prophets in law and policy that leads them fend off adversarial inter operators one legal weapon is terms of service both facebook and blizzard have secured judgments giving their fine print the force of law and now tech giant's US clicked through agreements that amount to you promise that you won't try to adversary Inter operate with us a modern SAMBA project would have to contend with this liability and Microsoft would argue that anyone who took the step of installing S._M._p.. Had already agreed read. They wouldn't try to reverse engineer it to make a compatible product then there's anti circumvention a feature of Nineteen Ninety Eight Digital Millennium Copyright Act The D._M._C._A. Under section twelve of one of the D._m._C._a.. Bypassing Copyright Access Control. All can put you in both criminal and civil jeopardy regardless of whether there's any copyright infringement DMC twelve one was originally used to stop companies for making region Free D._V._D.. Players or modern games consoles to play unofficial games neither of which is a copyright violation nation but today DMC twelve or one is used to control competitors critics and customers any device with software and it contains a copyrighted work so manufacturers need only set up an access control and they can exert legal control over all kinds of of uses of their products. Their customers can only use the product in ways.

Microsoft DMC US Sabah U._S. government engineer facebook V._C. Smith David blizzard
"v._c." Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on TechStuff

"Performance later on when vinyl became a practical alternative and after micro grooves made it possible to record more audio on a single side of a desk the word album stuck and it was meant went to describe a collection of related music like an artist's album of music. It's several songs that are all related in some way or maybe it was thematically related but there was no physical album anymore. We just use the word to describe a collection of songs or pieces and we still use that word today even to describe collections of digital music files to get by artists new album even though it may just be a bunch of M._p.. Threes or some other Bob Music file or really I should say compression vile now I know a lot of people who still use the term mix tape to refer to music playlists and in the good old days and I'm being a bit facetious here you would take a blank audio audio cassette tape that is a medium for audio storage that relied on a plastic film coated with a magnetic material and then you would transfer songs over to that mix tape giving someone a mix tape was often seen as a big power move as far as friendship is concerned it in saying I think I know what you're GonNa dig and I curated this group of songs for you and I put them in this specific order and that's the order you would have to listen to the songs end because they were all recorded onto a physical length of tape. You could fast forward or rewind but there was no guarantee you would stop at the right spot to skip over a song or go back to the very beginning of a specific song unless it was the very first one on the tape. It's much easier today. When you can create a digital playlist on one one of any number of APPS or services out there and it's very easy to share those with as many people as you like although a lot of those services will allow people to rearrange playlists so maybe they won't have the experience you intended for them to have the as some folks still call the mix tape hype and I think stuff like guardians of the galaxy really brought that back a little bit <hes> if anyone were the actually giving a physical mix tape now I would be thrilled right up until the point where I realized I had to go out and buy a tape player because I don't don't have one anymore and if I WANNA listen to it I'd have to go out and buy one Oh and related to that is the concept of rewinding which literally just meant to rewind the tape in an audio or video cassette either so that you could go back to the beginning of the recorded media or just to run it back a little bit so you could experience a specific moment again? We still use the word rewinding to describe this process but you're no longer actually winding anything around anything else. You're just going back due to an earlier moment and a timeline pack. Lots of people still use the word taping to being recording as an did you watch game of thrones last night. No I taped it so I'll watch it soon. No one really tapes anything anymore or at the very least very few you people tape anything anymore the companies that once made V._C._R.'s all got out of that industry years ago so if you do still have a v._C._R.. A working one use it gently because it's not likely that you're gonNA find a replacement out there. If something goes wrong but most of us just record something or rather we copy it digitally and no tape is actually involved and there are many other examples. I could have included in this episode. You guys really responded with a lot of fun ones but it's time for me to head out and start my holiday after a record one more episode so I promise the next episode is going to be more substantial because I've got the notes ready to go to be honest. This episode involved a lot more research than I had originally intended because does it cover a fairly wide range of topics but it seemed like a good idea at the time if any of you have any suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff. Send me a message. The email address is tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or drop me.

V._C._R.
"v._c." Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Mixergy

"I actually you know the revenue that I was running at west was seventeen billion dollars gross right in a lot of that was attributed to online conversions so I am I also knew the Internet business so well that I could articulate to executives in V._C.'s Sequoia Texas Specific Marando I could actually converse with him about quantum quantifying in making democratizing the Internet and so interesting salt in it interesting consulting who did the merger they turned into a censure. They had a big startup that they were doing in the wireless proxy server space which was transporting the internet onto rap phones in Palm Sevens Saban's danger phones and they thought that I was perfect director to come on board and I would be perfect face person to do the you'll the dog and pony show the roadshow in front of the big V._C.'s. You knew when you think about you know the late nineties in Silicon Valley man people were destroyed checks five ten million dollars right on the spot. I couldn't even imagine explaining it to people today what it was like a benchers Texas Pacific Sequoia Emmer Indo oh I learned Silicon Valley in my job was selling in. We talked about earlier why I hated my father because he was a liar. A manipulator overselling back end-seller in the reason that that was the warning is the truth was the reason I hated my father was those are the things I hated about myself. As you're raising money from all these V._C.'s sequoia impressive you are being that type of person to overselling over hyping even the west law days.

sequoia V._C. Saban director Palm seventeen billion dollars five ten million dollars
"v._c." Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Masters in Business

"Know they will go very very deep but then collectively as part of a portfolio you get the diversification associated with the multi dimensions so here's a data point from the book that blew my mind quote venture capital is not an especially good investment as of twenty seventeen eighteen tenure returns for venture capital as in the aggregate not specific funds but in the aggregate was a hundred and sixty basis points below the Nasdaq so for eight bucks I could have gone out and bought the queues and outperformed the average event. V._C.'s that's amazing. It is amazing and it's it's a weird asset class in that regard which is the variance between good performance and bad performances really high like sometimes as much as you know almost thirty five hundred four thousand basis points right so thirty five to forty days isn't return difference and I think it's a function of the fact that most of this business is largely zero-sum game in each round of financing and what I mean by that is if we do the Iran which is kind of the first institution on for deal generally that means you know we're the only ones who do do that. There might be some other people but usually one venture firm will be the major major investor there and once that opportunities done there will never be another around in facebook for example right so you know excel who's very good firm invested in facebook. The next opportunity read that somebody had to invest was at some multiple evaluations her in that so those still turn out to be obviously very good investments but there is this kind of nature that you know when a round happens it often accrues to one individual or one firm and then you know kind of things you know fundraise every eighteen or twenty four months and so the next investor obviously always comes in at higher price so when I look at the world of stocks for mutual funds it's a sort of gallician bell curve where you know the extremes on either end get rid of him. There's a big fat fat distribution in the middle. What you're describing doesn't sound like that? That's exactly right. So you know the term that you may hear people use this kind of call the power locker right and what a power law curve is is you've got a very small number that headline that's exactly right. You got things that drive all of return that you get this as long tail of a bunch of stuff that quite frankly doesn't amount to much from a return perspective and we see the same thing in private equity investor and hedge funds as well. It's funny you mentioned kind of the public markets. It's actually interesting. There's been a bunch of studies though of late on the public markets which is it turns out. They actually are more a power law that I think people understand. I think the number is four percent of shocks. I've pretty much that's exact- all the ninety percent of the returns up there. It's so good luck picking those four if you have a time machine it's really exactly right yeah. Let's talk like a little bit about some of the changes that you've witnessed in the industry in the book you talk about why combinator and why that was so influential and really changed the game for <hes> the V._C.. World explained lean to the layperson what Y. combinator is and why why did it matter so much yes a. y.. combinator is what we call an incubator which means they basically kind of take usually a cohort of companies that can be anywhere from thirty fifty sometimes as big one hundred companies and they kind of they basically start their business inside of y combinator they that's where they go to work. They work on a project..

facebook V._C. Iran twenty four months ninety percent four percent forty days
"v._c." Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"v._c." Discussed on Masters in Business

"Know they will go very very deep but then collectively as part of a portfolio you get the diversification associated with the multi dimensions so here's a data point from the book that blew my mind quote venture capital is not an especially good investment as of twenty seventeen eighteen tenure returns for venture capital as in the aggregate not specific funds but in the aggregate was a hundred and sixty basis points below the Nasdaq so for eight bucks I could have gone out and bought the queues and outperformed the average event. V._C.'s that's amazing. It is amazing and it's it's a weird asset class in that regard which is the variance between good performance and bad performances really high like sometimes as much as you know almost thirty five hundred four thousand basis points right so thirty five to forty days isn't return difference and I think it's a function of the fact that most of this business is largely zero-sum game in each round of financing and what I mean by that is if we do the Iran which is kind of the first institution on for deal generally that means you know we're the only ones who do do that. There might be some other people but usually one venture firm will be the major major investor there and once that opportunities done there will never be another around in facebook for example right so you know excel who's very good firm invested in facebook. The next opportunity read that somebody had to invest was at some multiple evaluations her in that so those still turn out to be obviously very good investments but there is this kind of nature that you know when a round happens it often accrues to one individual or one firm and then you know kind of things you know fundraise every eighteen or twenty four months and so the next investor obviously always comes in at higher price so when I look at the world of stocks for mutual funds it's a sort of gallician bell curve where you know the extremes on either end get rid of him. There's a big fat fat distribution in the middle. What you're describing doesn't sound like that? That's exactly right. So you know the term that you may hear people use this kind of call the power locker right and what a power law curve is is you've got a very small number that headline that's exactly right. You got things that drive all of return that you get this as long tail of a bunch of stuff that quite frankly doesn't amount to much from a return perspective and we see the same thing in private equity investor and hedge funds as well. It's funny you mentioned kind of the public markets. It's actually interesting. There's been a bunch of studies though of late on the public markets which is it turns out. They actually are more a power law that I think people understand. I think the number is four percent of shocks. I've pretty much that's exact- all the ninety percent of the returns up there. It's so good luck picking those four if you have a time machine it's really exactly right yeah. Let's talk like a little bit about some of the changes that you've witnessed in the industry in the book you talk about why combinator and why that was so influential and really changed the game for <hes> the V._C.. World explained lean to the layperson what Y. combinator is and why why did it matter so much yes a. y.. combinator is what we call an incubator which means they basically kind of take usually a cohort of companies that can be anywhere from thirty fifty sometimes as big one hundred companies and they kind of they basically start their business inside of y combinator they that's where they go to work. They work on a project..

facebook V._C. Iran twenty four months ninety percent four percent forty days