35 Burst results for "V Magazine"

How Twitter Came to Censor the Hunter Biden Laptop Story

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:53 min | 16 hrs ago

How Twitter Came to Censor the Hunter Biden Laptop Story

"Friday evening, Elon Musk decided to do a very courageous thing. Friday evening, Elon Musk decided to leak via Matt taibbi. Link is not even the right word. Report on or distribute is probably the better word. What exactly happened in the 2020 election? With Joe Biden, Hunter Biden, the Hunter Biden laptop story. What was the role of Twitter in covering up the great story of a generation? And what we now have confirmation where we have learned is one of the most unethical should be illegal, government, private sector, operations of collusion that we've ever seen in the 2016 election they tried to smear Donald Trump as a Russian agent. The Federal Bureau of Investigation. Worked with the dirty dossier Department of Justice Marc Goliath Perkins cooey. That failed. Donald Trump still won, but then they used that to be fake Russia investigation against Donald Trump. Go on to 2020, it looked like Donald Trump was going to win reelection. But then of course, remember, the economy got locked down, Fauci infiltrated his way into The White House and despite all of it, it wasn't a clear shot for the Democrats. They were running up against their running someone who was not able to speak in sentences, they were running somebody who was incoherent, unable to campaign, and so as we moved into the 2020 election cycle, we did not know that there was a shadow campaign that was operating. I'm not talking about the mark Elias shadow campaign of the ballot harvesting ballot trafficking, lack of signature verification. I'm not talking about the shadow campaign written by Molly ball in Time Magazine. Now I'm talking about the shadow campaign that was ten months in the making, a year before the Hunter Biden laptop story was reported on. The Federal Bureau of Investigation got their hands on the laptop. And instead of investigating Hunter Biden and Joe Biden for selling out our country, what launched was a preemptive cover up operation. You see, by giving the laptop to the FBI, some of us thought they did nothing with it. There was a belief that, well, you know, you have the laptop they're going to ignore it. They did the opposite of ignore the Hunter Biden laptop story. It worked up the ranks in the FBI and they realized that there was a political Thermo nuclear weapon out there that could prevent Joe Biden from becoming president and that very well might get Donald Trump reelected. They figured and they postulated the FBI working with Biden allies that they probably made a copy of this laptop. It probably was not illegally obtained. So for months, they started to pre bunk the story.

Hunter Biden Donald Trump Elon Musk Marc Goliath Perkins Cooey Joe Biden FBI Matt Taibbi Mark Elias Molly Ball Fauci Department Of Justice Twitter Russia White House Time Magazine Biden
The Everything Bubble Markets At A Crossroads

Bitcoin Magazine

00:17 sec | 1 d ago

The Everything Bubble Markets At A Crossroads

"4 a.m. Saturday December 3rd, 2022. The everything bubble markets at a crossroads after Jerome Powell's speech markets are caught in the middle. Participants are hoping for a pivot. Is the bottom in or is more pain on the horizon?

Jerome Powell
ProofOfWork Is The Only Viable Form Of Consensus

Bitcoin Magazine

00:16 sec | 1 d ago

ProofOfWork Is The Only Viable Form Of Consensus

"2 a.m. Sunday, December 4th, 2022. Proof of work is the only viable form of consensus. Bitcoin's consensus mechanism ensures that work needs to be done in order for transactions to confirm and secures Bitcoin in the fairest manner.

Bitcoin
Bitcoin Will Not Submit To Black Swans

Bitcoin Magazine

00:14 sec | 1 d ago

Bitcoin Will Not Submit To Black Swans

"2 a.m. Saturday December 3rd, 2022. Bitcoin will not submit to black swans Bitcoin's responses to black swans are irrelevant to its continued success as a protocol used around the world.

Bitcoin
Balenciaga's 'Edgy' Lotta Volkova Is Twisted

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:23 min | 6 d ago

Balenciaga's 'Edgy' Lotta Volkova Is Twisted

"There's a woman named lada volkova. She is balenciaga's senior stylist. W magazine once called her the coolest stylus in the industry and by cool, this is the way people talk. They mean that she's edgy. And takes chances and those bold things. In other words, she does disgusting things that people don't. People are too afraid to speak down about because what do I know? Maybe she's so brilliant. She just knows so much more than me. I'm not going to stand up and say this idea is horrible. I mean, it's a lot of October. Because stylus in the industry. And when you get to the balenciaga level of stylish stylist, that's pretty big. Now, a few days ago, the fashion house tried to blame the photographer for the child sex controversy, but now it seems clear that the real fault is with volkova. In fact, the photographer came out and said, I don't know what they're going to do once I take the pictures and you know, I know he's got to be a little complicit when he took the pictures that those things were out, the plush BDSM teddy bears were in the little girl's hand, so I don't know what that means. But I will add them on Instagram, but of course he didn't write back to me. Because I said, what kind of a sick bastard would take pictures of kids like that? I'm sure he didn't even look at it because he's been too busy getting creamed by a lot of people in the public. But it's a big, big problem. And this vocal has been working with working closely with the head of balenciaga, in other words, the fish stinks from the head down. In other words, everybody knew about it and was in on it. Because it was edgy, and who's going to complain, but it's so popular. Do you see that Kanye wears us and Kim Kardashian wears us and Nicole Kidman does add to us? Isabelle huppert does add for us? Yeah, well, that backfired, didn't it assholes? But now ever since people became aware of this perverse ad campaign, volkova suddenly made our Instagram private. I ran through my phone to look at her Instagram, gone. But you can go on the Internet and find some snaps. If you're sadly enough, it's not that hard that they're out there. But you can get a peek at how messed up she is. I mean, you don't want to walk away from your phone and vomit. It's just a very glaring indication of how many people. People in important and very influential positions innocent little children like stray dogs. Some of the pictures I saw had disgusting imagery of children and all sorts of haunting violent sick perverted ways. Like a lady wearing a red latex shirt holding two plastic newborns covered in red red blood. Just sick shit. A toddler lifting up the skull of a dead man. A child lying in the middle of a pentagram while the devil sits on a throne behind it. Devil has his legs spread wide open. He's not wearing any pants. Just a new devil with a kid on the floor. It's actually one of those pictures with an adult woman on the floor. You got a female toddler lying on her side, smiling a little girl's smile, but honor they have this JonBenét Ramsey wig and full beauty contest makeup. There's a little, there's a little boy bound to a chair and gagged. There is a feminized little boy posing like a female in a position I can't even imagine getting in. He's got no top on he's wearing jeans and gold pumps. Then there's the bursting I've ever seen. A photo titled murder and a child's bedroom. It's so disgusting. It looks like an actual crime scene. I mean, it's almost like, I mean, I know, I'd all happen recently that the four murders and I Idaho, but it's almost like they were depicting that. You see a bloodied bed. Covers a role messy, there's a person child, I should say, I can't tell if it's female or male. For the back of the bed, face against the wall, blood everywhere in the bed. And on the bloodied carpet, there are several items of bloody clothes on the floor. There's a record player. And some records and albums around and disarray,

Volkova Lada Volkova W Magazine Balenciaga Isabelle Huppert Nicole Kidman Kim Kardashian Kanye Jonbenét Ramsey Idaho
John Zmirak and Eric Discuss E. Michael Jones' Antisemitism

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:06 min | Last week

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss E. Michael Jones' Antisemitism

"Years ago, I read some of E Michael Jones's books. And again, this is what Nick Fuentes is kind of following, right? I read some of his books and he wrote one called degenerate moderns. It was brilliant. He wrote another one about architecture and another one, I forget. But brilliant stuff, right? And so I visited him in his home and I didn't see the anti semitic side of him until right around that time, a friend of mine, doctor Jeffrey sat in over, wrote a brilliant book, he is a genius psychiatrist, he has a degree in quantum physics. One of the smartest people I know, not a Christian, but he wrote an amazing book from the point of view of a psychiatrist who had dealt with people struggling with same sex attraction. And it really an amazing, amazing book, sat in over his last name. And so I interviewed him and reviewed it ostensibly for E Michael Jones magazine. He hardly printed anything of what I wrote. He cut almost everything. And then he wrote a review that was effectively anti semitic. And I will never, ever, ever forget it. I read it and I thought, this, this can be, this is the whole, the whole review of this great book, which was homosexuality and the politics of truth by Jeff sat in over hinged on really an anti semitic idea. And that's when I realized 27 years ago, uh oh, I don't know that I can spend any more time. You're telling me Nick Fuentes who just had dinner with the president is following you, Michael. Right. That's right. And I'll just explain briefly to your readers. Michael Jones is a theological Jew hater. He doesn't hate them racially. He doesn't believe in Nazi crackpot racialism. He believes that any one of the Jewish people who does not accept Jesus is the moral equivalent of the sadducees and that he takes literally the statement, let their blood be upon us and upon our children. He channels the old old anti semitism of some of the church fathers and some people in the Middle Ages. He takes all that, not as a historical tragedy and abuse, but as an authoritative part of the Christian tradition. And he describes the Jews who did not follow Jesus as the synagogue of Satan and the mystical body of Antichrist. That has existed ever since the death of our lord. And as a sort of satanic counter church. And so he blames Jews for pornography, even though the Marquis de Sade was not Jewish. He blames them for abortion. Margaret Sanger was not Jewish. He manages to act as if the Jewish people by not accepting Jesus became Antichrist. And

Nick Fuentes Michael Jones Jeffrey Jeff Michael Marquis De Sade Margaret Sanger
WH Press Corp Locked Out of Naomi Biden's Wedding, Except for Vogue

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | Last week

WH Press Corp Locked Out of Naomi Biden's Wedding, Except for Vogue

"White House press corps, you know, they were righteously indicted and they fired off a letter. They were demanding access to The White House wedding, Haram Haram. And the Biden said, nope, can't do it. It's a private event. Yes, a private event at the people's house, I might add. So you might imagine everyone's surprise when the latest edition of Vogue magazine comes out and guess who got exclusive footage of the Biden wedding. That's right folks, Vogue magazine. And they did a huge photo spread and they did a lavish write up, talking about all of the cakes and the desserts and the food and the dresses. Whatnot. And grace baker, you know what's interesting is, and all of these Vogue magazine photos. Yes. I'm not seeing too many of miss Naomi with grandpa Joe. No. Can I just say the Vogue cover is a little creepy to me because it's got the bride. Sprawled out her dress is beautiful. It looks rather sexual. I'm getting to that. So she's like laying across the couch and then about the couch. Thank you. And then you've got Jill Biden. You would think it would be the husband behind her, right? Embracing her. It's interesting the hair. It's her own mother and it looks like she's sniffing her hair. It's really creepy. Grandma is sniffing the hand. And grandma's dress is a little short there. A little provocative. Just a little for, you know, that sort of a thing. I might want to close those legs together, misses doctor First Lady Joe Biden. I mean, again, I get it. The bidens, but I'm like, where's the husband? Nobody

Vogue Magazine Haram Haram Biden Grace Baker White House Grandpa Joe Naomi Jill Biden Grandma First Lady Joe Biden
NYPD arrests 2 in Antisemitic plot

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

NYPD arrests 2 in Antisemitic plot

"To New York men were arrested for threats against the Jewish community after authorities spotted social media posts about attacking a synagogue Christopher Brown from Long Island was arrested at Penn station Friday night mayor Eric Adams says he made online threats to attack a New York City synagogue This was not in idle threat This was a real threat After arresting the suspects law enforcement officers recovered a Glock semi-automatic firearm According to the criminal complaint the 21 year old operates a white supremacist Twitter group and tweeted should I become a husband or shoot up a synagogue and die along with the gun there was an extended 30 round magazine a hunting knife ski mask and Nazi armband in New York City in 2022 22 year old Matthew Mara was arrested with brown the two pled not guilty at arraignment the FBI says there's no information This is a continued threat Julie Walker New York

Eric Adams Christopher Brown Penn Station Long Island New York City New York Matthew Mara Twitter Brown FBI Julie Walker
Candace Cameron Bure Reveals the Reason She Quit Hallmark

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Candace Cameron Bure Reveals the Reason She Quit Hallmark

"The actor Candace Cameron beret is facing backlash now why would an actress face backlash? What did she do? Did she make some anti you name it comment? What did she do did she say men do not give birth? Which can definitely get you. Blacklisted, fun can use the term in Hollywood. No, let's find out. She's facing backlash following her recent comments about her new TV project that she said will prioritize portraying traditional marriage. That is bad news. Cameron bure, 46th, the former full House star showing you ever watch full House. And yes, you did too. All of you did, good. I'm sorry. Oh, you went to school with her? Wow. Made the remarks in a recently published interview with The Wall Street Journal magazine, a reporter asked whether great American family, the new cable network she joined after she left the hallmark channel this year, would feature same sex couples as leads in Hollywood movies. According to the journal, Cameron beret said, no. I think that great American family will keep traditional marriage at the core, she told the magazine. On its social media pages, great American family describes its programming as quote celebrating faith, family and country.

Candace Cameron Cameron Bure The Wall Street Journal Magazi Hollywood Cameron Beret Hallmark Channel The Journal
Chris Evans named Sexiest Man Alive by People magazine

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chris Evans named Sexiest Man Alive by People magazine

"Captain America actor Chris Evans has been named People magazine's sexiest man alive With the latest Chris Evans reaction to being named the sexiest man alive my mom will be so happy However he jokes it does leave him ripe for harassment from his friends Evans played Captain America in ten marvel films as well as Johnny storm in two Fantastic Four movies He also was the voice of buzz light year in the light year movie While Evans who is 41 tells the magazine he's thinking about marriage and having a family he does not want to talk much about his private life Still he's flattered because he says when he becomes old and saggy he will look back and remember this

Chris Evans Johnny Storm People Magazine Evans Captain America America
Selena Gomez Opens up About Her Struggles With Bipolar

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:10 min | Last month

Selena Gomez Opens up About Her Struggles With Bipolar

"We hop over to Selena Gomez. Selena's opening up even more about her struggles with bipolar disorder, she said she had suicide thoughts and checked into four different treatment centers, Jesus. She says, I think when I started hitting my early 20s is when it started to really get dark. When I started to feel like I was not in control of what I was feeling, whether that was really great or really bad. She didn't interview for Rolling Stone magazine and she recounts having extreme highs and lows for weeks or months before she understood that she was bipolar and she got her diagnosis. And at times she said she'd have symptoms of mania, like feeling the need to buy everybody in her life a car. So she could share a gift. I understand that people feel the way. I bought cars, not that I had one smidgen of the money. This girl has, but when I had a taste, I bought myself a car, but Joey a car. I mean, yeah, it was like, let's go. Let's have some fun before this runs out. Stupid shit. But plenty of stories to tell. And then she'd fall into a deep state of depression and not be able to get out of bed. And in her darkest moment, she said, I thought the world would be better if I wasn't there. And that's what one of my friends told me about who had thought about suicide in his life. Because I had used to have this attitude of like, how do you kill yourself if you have children? How do you want to, how do you do that? How do you lead your kids behind? Whether you do it with a gun or a bunch of pills or jump off a roof, how do you like the kids just know daddy gave up? And my buddy said, it isn't like that. He said, when you want to kill yourself, you really feel that everybody around you would be better off with you gone. And that's here what she's saying. That's what Selena's saying. And it's so sad for somebody so young to say that. And after a 2018 episode, she says she ended up on a ton of meds, which helped her psychosis, but made her feel unlike herself. I swear to God, nobody in Hollywood has a happy story to tell anymore.

Selena Selena Gomez Bipolar Disorder Rolling Stone Magazine Joey Depression Hollywood
When AJ Gave up the Biggest Scoop of His Career for Jack Nicholson

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:26 min | Last month

When AJ Gave up the Biggest Scoop of His Career for Jack Nicholson

"The next morning he was gonna shoot the cover for John Kennedy junior's magazine George and he didn't want to shoot it. He was out too late. He was with Ashley, then he met us at spy bar down in Soho. We had a ball. I mean, oh God, I'm getting on so many tangents. The point is, he never showed up for the shoot and John Kennedy junior couldn't do anything about it because it was the weekend he was in the island off Georgia about to get married to Carolyn bessette. And that's the night that Jack told me, I'm in town for the kids wedding. I said, oh, who's getting married? John John. And Jack just gave me everything. He told me to get married. They're on Cumberland island. He didn't know. He just gave me every fucking fact. And after that dinner I called my friend rosemary who represented John and I said, hey, I know the wedding is this weekend. I know where it's at. I know it's in tumbling island. Just tell John and Carolyn, I ain't gonna write about it, but just let them know I'm thinking about them. I want them to have a good time. AJ, I don't know what you're talking about. It's not true. Of course she knew it was true. And of course, John and Carolyn always loved me for not telling that story. However, I lost the biggest scoop in America. But I didn't care. Because I loved hanging out with Jack. I love making John Kennedy feel good. This was toward the end of my reign.

John Kennedy Carolyn Bessette Jack Soho John John Ashley Cumberland Island George John Georgia Carolyn Rosemary AJ America
Who Cries for the Soul of a Dead Pigeon?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:25 min | Last month

Who Cries for the Soul of a Dead Pigeon?

"I am curious when in your life did you know you had that ability? 12 years old. 12 years old. 12 years old, I started writing poetry. Did you write? Did you write poetry to a girlfriend? No, no, at one point every day. I saw a dead pigeon in the road and I wrote a poem called who cries for the soul of the pigeon. And began writing poetry every day. I published my first poem in 17 magazine when I was 14 years old. You grew up in the United States? In a small town New Jersey, yeah. And you moved to Israel when? I wish it was in my 20s, my early 20s, but I started going when I was 15. So obviously you're completely bilingual when you speak Hebrew is it within Israeli accent? I speak English with an axe with a nondescript accent. People say, well, you're not from here, but it's not an American accent. They say, how come you still have an accent you've been living in Israel for 50 years and I'll say, well, listen, look at can we kiss and he's been living in America for about 85 years and he still hasn't accidentally cut me a little slack. People don't people really know shim on Paris had a heavy accent and often begging to have a heavy accent. But somehow Americans don't go to black, but you know your Hebrew is COVID and get on Israeli talk show because it's very different than American talk shows. They're everyone screams at each other and you have to be able to like use your elbows. So we'll take you seriously, so I can do that now.

Israel America New Jersey Paris
The Government's Colluded Efforts to Install Regimes of Censorship

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | Last month

The Government's Colluded Efforts to Install Regimes of Censorship

"Remember when the Biden administration talked about creating a an office to police disinformation there was an uproar, they shot that down. But the project not under that name has proceeded with full steam. And more and more information is coming out to show the extent of collusion between the Biden regime and these supposedly independent and private platforms. Notably, YouTube and Facebook, but also including Twitter prior to the Elon Musk acquisition. Now, there was a very important article in the intercept. The intercept is a kind of left leaning magazine. It was one of the founders was Glenn greenwald, who then left the intercept in part because the intercept was blocking discussion of legitimate issues. But nevertheless, every now and on the intercept surprises you and here they surprise you, they surprise us with a bombshell article, bombshell because of the level of detail that it shows about the collaboration between Biden between the Biden administration and these platforms. I'm just going to touch on a few highlights of it here and then I might go into it subsequently in a more elaborate way. First of all, Facebook and Twitter created a special portal for the government to request takedowns. Now, let's think about this. This is not a case where the government is just sending them an email saying, hey guys, this guy's putting on misinformation ban Alex berenson or banned this guy or let's get rid of Alex Jones. Twitter and Facebook say, all right, we're going to make we're going to make this system easy for you. Here's a special portal. You just get into the portal. You list all the guys you want to be restricted or kicked or kicked off or banned. We'll take a look at it. So from the portal itself, you can't tell who's making the final decision. The Biden people saying do it and Facebook and Twitter just doing it or the Biden people making a recommendation and then Facebook and Twitter comply with it if they want to. But either way, the collusion is fully documented here.

Biden Administration Biden Facebook Twitter Elon Musk Glenn Greenwald Alex Berenson Youtube Alex Jones
Apollonia Accuses Shiela E. Of Profiting Off of Prince

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:49 min | Last month

Apollonia Accuses Shiela E. Of Profiting Off of Prince

"Apollonia went on Facebook and really destroyed Chile. She said, she's a phony, she's somebody who desperately is taking advantage of the relationship she had with prince now that he's gone, despite the fact that apparently allegedly he refused to talk to her, the last 5 years of his life, I do not know anything about that, but that's pretty interesting. It's kind of tough to choose aside. Because I know apollonia fairly well. I don't know she'll eat. I kind of have to lean toward apolloni. But it's just kind of, the whole thing, well, you know what, what can we expect? Prince was such a lady's man. Prince was such a guy, such a pussy hound. Pardon the expression. This guy had pink strawberry around him constantly. And if you don't know what that means, I'm sure you can figure it out. But according to Rolling Stone magazine, in addition to being featured in the show that's airing, well, when I say tonight, I mean Tuesday night. Let's go crazy. The Grammy salute to prince. Sheila E. has a new single out called lemon cake. What she says is a tribute to prince. That's the shit that got apollonia real pissed off and she started getting ready to battle when she read that. She went after her on Facebook. She said, you know what? Sheila, you're so desperate to be relevant. Prince refused to acknowledge you for 5 years before his death because of your lies. You can't continue to fool our prince fans any longer. Because I'm here to tell you it's over. Time for the truth. Wow. You know, this is apollonia accusing Sheila E. of profiting off prince's name and his trademark, including some accusations that Sheila E. held some prince themed benefit concerts for music schools that never came to fruition. This is the inside inside shit that most of us will never know. But apollonius swears, prince was so angry because of all chilies alleged lies. Apollonius says Sheila E.'s bio was filled with lies. And apparently he sent her legal letters because he felt she was slandering him.

Sheila E. Apolloni Prince Apollonia Facebook Chile Rolling Stone Magazine Grammy Sheila Apollonius
School gunman had AR-15-style weapon, 600 rounds of ammo

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

School gunman had AR-15-style weapon, 600 rounds of ammo

"The 19 year old who killed two people and wounded 7 others in a high school shooting in St. Louis may have offered an explanation for Monday's shooting St. Louis police commissioner Michael sack says Orlando Harris left behind a handwritten note He wrote quote I don't have any friends I don't have any family I've never had a girlfriend I've never had a social life I've been in isolated loner my entire life This was the perfect storm for a mask shooter Sex is Harris was armed with an AR-15 style rifle and what appeared to be more than 600 rounds of ammunition He says Harris had ammunition strapped to his chest and in a bag and that additional magazines were found dumped on stairwells I am Donna water

St. Louis Police Michael Sack Orlando Harris St. Louis Harris
Katie Hopkins Was Deported From Australia

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:46 min | Last month

Katie Hopkins Was Deported From Australia

"You were deported from Australia. Look, we may have covered it on the show, but who cares? People don't listen to this show so assiduously that they will be familiar with everything. I who am here don't remember whether we cover it. Maybe we didn't, because you and I missed each other, I think, on my last time here in America. But yeah, so I was remember lockdowns and Australian lockdowns were some of the worst. Which didn't make sense to me. There's a lot of counterintuitive madness. I mean, the fact that Israel was so vicious on the sick dead baby vaccines, forced everyone to get that. Australia, I never would have thought that they would have been so crazy. Yeah, they were crazy. So two years, you weren't allowed to leave the island. And if you were out of country and the wrong side of that, you weren't allowed to return to your home. So you could be on the road with children and you weren't allowed to come back home, or you could have a dying relative, and you weren't allowed to get there. And at the same time, some idiots from TV Land decided to bring me into the country, and I've never been vax. And that's why you're still alive. Did you hear about the 64 year old gorilla that just died? Well, two days after getting the Pfizer vaccine. But thank you. Go ahead. I was like, what? Yeah, I know. So someone in TV Land decided they were going to make a TV program during lockdown called celebrity big brother. It's a terrible program, and no one watches it, but basically they put some celebrities who aren't in a house together and then people watch them argue. That's how that works. So I was brought into the country during lockdown along with Caitlyn Jenner and at the time she was running the gubernatorial race in California. Thomas Markle, Meghan Markle's brother. You get the gist. This is awful. It was terrible. So they brought me into the country. She was like 6 foot 5. I saw, I saw him in a room and I just thought to myself, you know, in a magazine cover, you can fool people. But in person, this is a gigantic person. Yeah. Okay, so you're in a room with all these lovely people. So I'm brought into the country ahead of that because you have to do 15 days in isolation. So I get taken to my isolation prison, right? And my husband said to me, and you're getting a gist of it because you've spent some time with me. Lovely Mark said, you know, I don't see that going so well for you, little birdie, which is what he calls me. Because like a day in my own company, I don't know why you're laughing the taxes. Because I love the idea that he calls you little birdie. Yeah, he goes, I don't see it going well. Because today in my own company is a lot. I need people.

Australia Caitlyn Jenner Thomas Markle Meghan Markle Israel Pfizer America Lovely Mark California
What Does AOC Know About Masculinity and Power?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:47 min | Last month

What Does AOC Know About Masculinity and Power?

"But I come out of the hospital and I wanted to go right back in. Because I see on the cover of gentlemen's quarterly cheek hue magazine has AOC on the cover with the tag, a conversation about masculinity, power, and politics. Amid post row America. Let me drop everything right now and have AOC talk to me about masculinity. The only thing I'm on a LC to say to me is, do you want salt with you, margarita, or no salt? That's it. We've turned this lame brain into a frigging presidential candidate. And it's all because she's got the best rack in D.C. and every guy knows it. They just can't ever say it. But I'd love to see her two or three drinks into Congress's annual Christmas party. I know she wants to cut loose and be fun. She's Latina. From The Bronx. There's fire in her blood, but she's misusing it. And all these soy men, especially the schlump, she's with are making her believe all she's all smarts and no sets and it's not true. Deep down inside, I know that AOC would rather be a bong girl than sitting with those bitties in Congress. And she could be a Bond girl with the right director and the right camera lens, we'd buy it, but no. GQ, which is run by a bunch of gays and women. Has to ask her about masculinity and power. Are you kidding me?

America D.C. Congress Bronx AOC
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:41 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Are coming from. Yeah, I think it's that digital journalism thing where you want to be the first to break a story. And that's where it's just a minefield, if you try and operate that way, you know? Yeah, but I also get the impression that it's also, it's clickbait, they're fanning the flames of outrage culture and at the expense of society sanity basically is how this saving country music person put it. And they're trying to save country music. Yeah. But no, they had some, it was a really airy day, amazing really insightful post by trigger on saving country music dot com. You got anything else? I got nothing else. I mean, this could have been a two parter, but that's a good Rolling Stone magazine overview. I'm still going to read it, but I'm going to take it for what it's worth. Okay, there you go. But get a subscription to cream. Well, that's it everybody for Rolling Stone and since chuck said, get a subscription to cream, of course that means it's time for listener mail. This is a great email from a mom in New Zealand. Kia ora Josh and chuck, I'm writing you all the way from New Zealand and it's currently ten 53 p.m. and I need to thank you. You, my Friends, are my last bargaining chip, my last resort, and more often than not, the best thing to get a bit of peace. Sounds like an insult, but let me explain. I have two wonderful, beautiful, enthusiastic, intelligent girls, 11 and 9 years old, and a frequent occurrence in our House is a reluctance to go to bed. Sometimes, sleep just eludes them, I get it, it eludes me too, however, if all else fails, what about Josh and chuck? We'll usually get them to where I need them to be. Tucked up and it usually my bed with your two comforting voices, teaching them about animal science and random things. They settle and relax enough to let old Sandman take them away. Although your content is incredibly interesting, your tones are soothing and comforting, like a big hug to settle into and you are often my go to when I need a comfort food podcast and it seems you have the same effect on my girls. Keep being awesome, you're very much appreciated from a tired mom, Bethany, and I wrote Bethany back and asked if she wanted to name her girls. And she said, absolutely, that is Allison page. And she had just written me back after, I believe using our show to get page to sleep. Very nice. Allison page also known as thing one and thing two. That's right, an Allison page. Give mom a break. Cooperated bedtime. Yeah. Let's get it together. Get it together, kids. Well, thank you. Who was the mom? Bethany. Thank you very much, Bethany. That was very nice to let us know that. And I'm glad we could help out and hello to Alice and page and everybody there down under. She from New Zealand. New Zealand. Oh, okay. The down is of under. Exactly. If you want to get in touch with us like Bethany did, you can send us an email. Even from New Zealand, it'll get here. Wrap it up spanked on the bottom and send it off to stuff podcast at iHeartRadio dot com. Stuff you should know is a production of iHeartRadio. For more podcasts, my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app. Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. You know you're the best pet mom when you growl back during playtime, give epic belly rubs and feed them halo holistic, made with responsibly sourced ingredients, plus probiotics for digestive health. Find us at Chewy, Amazon, and halo pets dot com.

chuck ora Josh New Zealand Bethany Rolling Stone magazine Allison Rolling Stone Kia Sandman Josh House Alice Apple Amazon
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Back, chuck. And we're here to talk about now some of the low points of Rolling Stone history. This isn't a hit piece. No, but I mean, I think all of the things that we're going to talk about in the last bit here can be classified under one in one big bucket, which is bad journalism, lazy journalism, abandoning journalistic integrity for the sake of an article, and it's really a shame that they've done this kind of repeatedly. Rolling over on top of showgirl right now. Oh boy, that's a sight. So I guess chief among these sort of high profile instances is the 2014 article, a rape on campus by Sabrina early, which made all kinds of news. It was a story about a gang rape at the University of Virginia at a fraternity house. And the more the story was investigated, the more it came out that not only were there a lot of big time journalistic flaws, but eventually lawsuits and full retraction of the story and police investigations that the story was made up. I mean, journalism one O one flaws. Like the author Sabrina Rubin early did not interview Friends. Who came out publicly and said, hey, what the story is saying is not what Jackie, the pseudonym of the woman who claimed to have been, I think gang raped even fraternity house. That's not what she told us that night. There wasn't even a party that night. And apparently it just became more and more clear that the entire event did not happen. And that The Rolling Stones journalists who they sent out to do this really important story did not didn't do some basic fact checking and as a result just bought the whole thing hook line and sinker. Yeah, and in the end, Rolling Stone ended up either losing or settling a bunch of lawsuits with administration at UVA, some of the students and the fraternity at UVA, it came out during this process that apparently there were text messages that seemed to support the idea that this young woman made this up to gain the affection of a boy on campus. I tried to look as much into it as I could, but in the end they completely retracted the article, which is a really big deal for a major publication to fully retract and say, all right, this article we do not stand by it. We're taking it, we have takes these backs privileges. And they even commission, I guess, to their credit, a Columbia University school of journalism review and published that the findings of that review, which were not kind. No, the review was titled tsk tsk tsk. But even worse thing, Rolling Stone losing face and credibility and millions of dollars is that this was used as shorthand for people who kind of who were like, we shouldn't really believe rape survivors. And that has a chilling effect on actual rape survivors from coming forward and like naming their accusers. It was a huge, huge problem that was created by this that, you know, I think it would even came up in the Brett Kavanaugh hearing somebody basically used it for that. And two. Camille Cosby talked about it on the courthouse steps. Are you serious? Oh yeah. Wow. So yeah, so it was a big deal and it was a big fall down and you can really easily point to that as the biggest mistake in the history of Rolling Stone magazine by far. Yeah, another big one was an article in 2003 from Gregory Freeman about what's called bug chasers, which is what appears to be a very fringe thing where gay men want to be HIV positive and try to have unprotected sex with people they know are HIV positive and basically the same kind of thing. Not a lot of fact checking, he interviewed a couple of doctors who he says they said that they said it was like 25% of the gay male community are bug chasers and both of the doctors said, I never said that at all. Like I said the opposite and then the author later came out and said, no, I remember those conversations explicitly and they're just not admitting to it. And I didn't record the interviews, which you should probably always do. Right. And so that was obviously another big sort of black eye on the magazine. Yeah, and then so, and I think it was they were saying 25% of new HIV cases come from bug chasers or something. Yeah, yeah, I think that mistake. But it's still it's just a ridiculously ridiculous amount. So chuck, this was in the past, right? There was another big one too, another big flub. They sent Sean Penn to interview El Chapo, like the most powerful vicious drug cartel leader in the world. They sent Sean Penn to do it and Sean Penn sent back a dispatch that was really flattering, really sympathetic and really one sided. And so they were really criticized for that as well. But that's all in the past. Rolling Stone is refound its footing correct and everything's all good now. No, apparently not correct. Just recently, I remember just reading this in my subscription, not too long ago. They wrote an article about Taylor Hawkins after he very soon after he died that a lot of the people in the article famous musicians that were quoted came out and said, wait a minute, this is really taken out of context. I didn't mean this stuff. I didn't say this stuff. The article kind of basically said that the Foo Fighters kind of killed him with their schedule and that Dave Grohl wouldn't let up and had a big breeze. It was a big reason why he died. And that was a very recent stain. They also did a hit piece on Maryland Manson that didn't present any of his side of the story. He was accused of sexual abuse by an ex-girlfriend Evan Rachel Wood, and it was very one sided in a lot of people came out and said, the ones who were quoted were like, I gave them paragraphs and paragraphs of stuff and they used one sentence, you know, because I was speaking out in defense of Marilyn Manson. There's also one that was considered having given a moral victory to anti vaxxers, they posted a story about how Oklahoma's emergency rooms were being overrun with people who are having toxic reactions to Ivermectin who are taking that cattle dewormer when they caught COVID and apparently it was just fake wrong. Not only that, they ran a picture of people lined up wearing masks in winter coats and the events that they described were took place in summer. So it was just from top to bottom, a terrible story. And that seems to be what's going on. And I read an article on a website called saving country music. And this author basically points to the hiring of Noah schacht from The Daily Beast to take over and Noah schachmann said, we're going to start making our journalism more immediate, more visceral and faster, louder and harder. And this saving country music person is like, that's the opposite of what journalists are supposed to do. When you do things fast and immediate, your sacrificing like follow-ups, getting secondary sources, fact checking, and that seems to be where a lot of the most recent flubs and biff

Sabrina Rubin UVA Rolling Stone Columbia University school of Sean Penn Brett Kavanaugh Camille Cosby HIV chuck Gregory Freeman University of Virginia Sabrina The Rolling Stones El Chapo Jackie Rolling Stone magazine Taylor Hawkins Dave Grohl Evan Rachel Wood
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:10 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"It's 2022 when things look different, like doctors visits, for example. Sometimes you don't have to go into a doctor's office to be treated for non emergency situations like a sinus infection or allergy, and that's why Teladoc gives you the chance to connect with board certified physicians right from your home via phone or video. That's right, doctors are standing by 24/7 so you can schedule a visit according to your schedule. You can see for yourself why Teladoc is ranked in number one by JD power in telehealth, satisfaction with direct to consumer providers. Teladoc's available through most major health plans and many employers, but even if you're not covered by insurance, everyone has access to use Teladoc. That's right, if you want to check it out, download the app today or visit teledoc dot com slash stuff to register or schedule a visit today. That's tl a DOC dot com slash stuff for JD power 2021 award information, visit JD power dot com slash

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"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

07:34 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Two assignments. I think Tom Wolfe is the natural graduation point from like you like Hunter S. Thompson Moore in your 20s and 30s maybe. Yeah, but I also read electric Kool-Aid Kool-Aid acid test around the same time. And I was just like, I love hunter Thompson, but Tom Wolfe is just, I think, by far the better journalist. Yeah, electric Kool-Aid acid test is the only thing I've read by Tom wolf actually. The right stuff is really amazing too. The thing about Tom Wolfe is because he's a new journalist, he writes about things where he can be kind of involved or like he's there or it's really kind of like he puts you in the middle of what's going on. Sometimes in people's bedrooms at night when the guys talking to his wife. And he does it so well that you forget first of all that you're not there, but then you forget that he wasn't there either. Right. Like he's working off interviews, sometimes other authors notes. And he just gives me, he's so good at it. Like he was there for all the stuff and he wasn't there for any of it. There's like a couple in bed and it just pans over and Tom Wolfe sitting there in his sear suckers exactly with his legs crossed very interesting. Can you say that again? Other famous writers early on that went on to have outsized careers elsewhere as MTV's Kurt loder. Joe Esther house screenwriter and filmmaker. Of what? Oh, Esther house was, he was fatal attraction, right? Fatal attraction? It just goes downhill from there. Basically instinct. Sliver. Showgirls. Of course. But it's weird. Like he had a real type. His screenplay was a real. Oh, yeah. Like, you know, like, hey, you want to see some boobs, 12 year old kid, come see my movies. That was the show Esther houses Jan. Yeah, absolutely. Lester bangs from creme magazine wrote for Rolling Stone. And then, of course, the legendary journalist Ben fong Torres, who was one of the greatest Rolling Stone writers in their history for sure. Yeah, for sure. And all these people were legitimately great writers. And they were contributing to this music magazine that really just also had its finger on the pulse of really good journalism too. Yeah, so in that article on the Atlantic, they do quite a bit of speculating on when they think Rolling Stone might have started selling out and become something untrue to its roots. And they basically talk about even in the 70s and 80s basically Jan winter saw the writing on the wall and said, hey, we can't just be a boomer archive, and a nostalgia jam. And I want to sell magazines. So we're going to start writing about TV shows and comedians and they always wrote about politics, but really expanded beyond the sort of mission statement, which was a largely music magazine, which also wrote about politics. And it became something else entirely and really became a popular, hugely popular magazine. Yeah, because Rolling Stone as an institution was just keeping up with the times. If it was looking backward to the greatest moments in boomer history, you can thank Jan winter almost personally for that. And so it's kind of weird as Jan winter, who was like controlling everything. He had to let the magazine reinvent itself, even though he personally, you know, I'm sure he did, he went to Studio 54 and stuff like that in the 70s and went to sardis for lunch in the 80s and all that stuff. But he, like I saw an interview with him in 2017 and he just casually tosses out the stones and The Beatles and it's like, it's 2017, man, and this guy's still citing like the big three whenever he brings up music from the 60s, right? Which or who? It was The Beatles. It was The Beatles, the stones. I think I automatically questioned somebody who uses the stones and that's it. And then I'm trying to find this quote. It was like an interview with NPR. But oh, The Beatles, the stones, and Dylan. That's another thing too. If you just say Dylan in the stones, I'd say both those things. All right, chuck. But my point is that Jan winters frequently accused of what's called rockism, which is we talked about it in our Rock and Roll Hall of Fame episode. This idea that rock is white guys using a base and electric guitar, drums, maybe a rhythm guitar and a lead singer, they probably use a lot of hair product, then that's rock and nothing else matters. Apparently, John wenner really personifies that. And one of the reasons why people get snubbed from The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inexplicably is because of him specifically, it seems. Yeah, I mean, is he the head chair? Or is he just on the board? He's definitely high up in it. Enough that he can be like, no, I don't even want them on the ballot kind of thing. Yeah, and if you remember our Rock and Roll Hall of Fame episode, we talk about snubs and a lot of people have had very personal beefs with winter over the years because of this. I'm going to read a couple of choice quotes from his this from the Atlantic article, but from his biography. Yeah. Winner was a little barbarian who's less for money drugs and sex, threatened to outpace his razor intellect and turn him into Augustus gloop falling into the chocolate river of the 1960s. Rolling Stone was an expression of winners pursuit of fame and power, a magazine more than occasionally at the mercy of his editors, unembarrassed appetite for stardom in excess, which made him an object of scorn and purity, and basically he said it was a parable for the age of narcissism. And then one final little bit here, as newsstand sales rose, winner became hungry for still more sales. By the mid 70s, the focus of Rolling Stone had shifted from what the editors determined to be the best in pop culture to what was measurably the biggest. Yeah. And I think that was where a lot of people say he lost his way. It was like, well, what's hot? Let's just write about that. Not what's great. Yeah, I saw there was a dust up years back, I guess, in the 90s maybe, where one of his music reviewers didn't write a flattering review of hootie and the blowfish's latest album. And Jan winner himself killed the review and assigned it to another writer who wrote a much more favorable review. And they were like, well, you know, this record company is a huge advertiser with Rolling Stone, and that's, I mean, that's what he just did that, you know? I think people see him as a founder of this really hip magazine that was like a voice in a reflection of the times, and it kept reinventing itself. And they want him to be like legit and grounded in that kind of ethos. And he just wasn't. People wanted to pigeonhole him like that and he just was not like that. I don't know him well enough and I haven't read his biography to see if he tried to put himself out there like that. And that's why people expected him to be or if it was just because he was so closely associated with Rolling Stone, people mistakenly assumed things about him and then found out he wasn't actually that way. I don't know which is which. All right, so let's take our second break and we'll talk about some of the biggest controversies in Rolling

Tom Wolfe Jan winter Rolling Stone Roll Hall of Fame Hunter S. Thompson Moore hunter Thompson Kurt loder Joe Esther house Esther house creme magazine Ben fong Torres Lester bangs Jan winters John wenner Dylan MTV Augustus gloop Atlantic NPR chuck
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:44 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Around that time. Yeah, and I think from what I understand when gleason died, he was sort of battling with winner at the time. And that they had fallings out. And I believe, I'm not so sure if it was personal, but maybe it got personal, but it was definitely over the direction of the magazine, I think. I always got the feeling that gleason was a little less likely to be accused of some of the sort of so out things that winner would eventually be accused of. He was a jazz critic that's not exactly a kind of pursue an ambitious money hungry, you know, Wall Street type. Yeah, I think that's a good point. So Ed makes a really good point here. I've seen it elsewhere too, and it's kind of like something that people have realized in the last few years. Maybe last decade or so. And that is that Rolling Stone is possibly the most important mouthpiece for the boomer generation. Yeah. And that it was so important, it's entirely possible that things like Woodstock, where The Beatles, or the summer of love, or all the stuff we associate with the beginnings of boomers. And then onward and onward, that Rolling Stone amplified it to a way that now we think of those things as like historic events, but they might not be. We might think of them as historic events because Rolling Stone amplified it. Yeah, I don't agree with that, but I do agree that it has been a boomer mouthpiece for sure. For sure. But I don't think that one could reasonably make an argument that The Beatles wouldn't be The Beatles that had not been for Rolling Stone magazine coverage. No, no, no. I don't think that's the point. I think the point is, would the would we consider The Beatles as having changed the world if Rolling Stone had never been there? Yeah, I definitely think so. That's just my opinion. Okay. What about wings? Oh, I love wings. Man, jet, give me that all day long. One thing Rolling Stone was definitely at the forefront of even though they did not create what's called the new journalism. And this was basically when journalism went from kind of an anonymous style reporting to putting the writer right in the middle of the story and sometimes the story was even about the writer in the case of a Hunter S. Thompson, who was also at the forefront of new journalism. And it was very literary style writing. It was very not flowery because that sounds kind of haughty, but just sort of a higher caliber literary style writing than typical journalism had been. I love it. I've always been a big fan of new journalism, I think it has its place. And shouldn't be confused with other kinds of journalism, but I've always been a big, big fan. Yeah, it's amazing. And so hunter Thompson, he was so he was so at the forefront of it, he actually spun off his own sub discipline called gonzo journalism. Which is new journalism to the extreme, like when you spell extreme starting with an X kind of thing, right? Why haven't we done an episode entirely on him yet? I don't know, weird? We will someday. It just seems very strange for us. But Jan wenner did not discover a hunter Thompson. He was actually kind of introduced to the magazine world he'd already written hells angels in 1968. He made a name for himself, but the first piece of gonzo journalism is considered The Kentucky Derby is decadent and depraved. That was commissioned by Warren hinkle. Who had gone off and started another magazine and former ramparts chief. Yes, exactly. And Warren hinkle was the genius who put Ralph steadman and hunter Thompson together. And they first appeared together in the, I can't remember scanlines, I think, is the name of the magazine with The Kentucky Derby is decadent and depraved. And so Jan winter saw this, he's like this guy needs to come right for me or I think it might have been the other way around. I think hunter Thompson showed up at Rolling Stone's offices and basically demanded that he be made a writer for that magazine. Yeah, and was certainly one of the most famous writers they ever had, along with Cameron Crowe, of course, was well known as a teenage writer for Rolling Stone magazine. I know, he got a cover assignment age 16 to follow the brothers. And that's what almost famous is based on. Yeah, and he very famously too, it was sort of based on his work with the band, eagles. You mean the eagles? It's eagles. And I always just like to annoy people by saying eagles. That's awesome. Because it's like, who else was it? Or am I already talked about this? It's eagles and oh hollow notes is like Daryl hall has a big bee in his bonnet about the fact that they're not hall of notes. They were always Daryl hall and John Oates. Oh really? And he's like, people just called us that and that's not on any of the records. They all say Daryl hall and John Oates. And the eagles Don Henley is always like, it never was the eagles. It's eagles. That's funny. I'm like, all right, just relax. Another way to annoy people chuck is just to play eagles music. I came back around with the eagles, did you? That's great. Yeah, I mean, I took off. I love them growing up. And I took off probably 20 years. Two solid decades of no eagles. That's great. And then I came back around and I was like, I love this music. What am I doing? You're back off the wagon. So anyway, Hunter S. Thompson, very famous writer for them, obviously. And he did something which other writers in the new journalism school would do, which was including one Tom wolf, was used the magazine as not a testing ground, but as sort of the beginnings of what would become books by writing these sort of chapter like installments every issue. And hunter Thompson did that, Tom Wolfe did that with his early work on what would become the right stuff and the bonfire of the vanities. Yeah. Man, Tom Wolfe, I think, is I prefer Tom Wolfe the hunter Thompson. These days, I think he's so interesting. Yeah, I just like him more. But hunter Thompson's fear and loathing in Las Vegas was it was born out of two different assignments where Rolling Stone sent him to Las Vegas first to cover the mint 400 and then cover that then to cover the convention. The police convention on drugs.

hunter Thompson Rolling Stone eagles gleason Warren hinkle Rolling Stone magazine Jan wenner Daryl hall Kentucky Derby Jan winter Woodstock The Beatles Ed John Oates hells angels Ralph steadman Cameron Crowe Tom Wolfe Don Henley
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

07:51 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"They did the sensible thing. They gave up a pretty significant chunk of their margin to that distribution company, but in return they were able to grow grow grow like from issue number two or three. I'm not sure exactly when they took on that new distributor, but it was pretty soon after the failure of the first issue. Yeah, and then they started selling pretty well. As far as the name goes, they did get a thing sort of threatened legally speaking by The Rolling Stones. Music group, but they sort of got out of that pretty quickly. I think they may have realized, hey, maybe it's good to be friends with this up and coming music magazine. I don't really know for sure, but yeah, that would make sense. Yeah, I saw that I started described as a letter writing campaigner at correspondence between that was initiated by Mick Jagger. To January winner, basically saying, hey man, you can use this, but how about some free advertising and lots of really good coverage and all that. Yeah. That's exactly what I thought. And I guess it got dropped or something like that. Supposedly only that initial letter survive, so no one knows exactly how it panned out. But Jan winter was definitely the kind of person to trade, you know, space for something else, like maybe advertising dollars or cocaine. A favor sure. A favorable review of a record in return for that record company or the parent company advertising and Rolling Stone. He was definitely not only not above doing that. He was actively chasing that kind of opportunity. Yeah, and you know, I don't think there's a lot of people that would stand up and say that Jan winter was the greatest boss they ever had, especially back in those days. I think he might have cleaned up his later on, but in the 60s and 70s, it was very well known that he would, like you said, make these sort of under the table deals. He would play labels and writers against one another. Ad salespeople against one another. He was apparently a pretty cruel editor. He was never the best writer in the world. He wrote some reviews and things here and there. But that wasn't his strong suit, but yeah, he was known as being fairly misogynist and sexist, and sort of all the things you might imagine from a sort of magazine editor in chief in the 1970s. Yeah, like a good example for the first issue in early on in Rolling Stone's life. A guy named Michael Lydon was the managing editor and he used to write for newsweek, and he brought his wife Linda along who was also a writer and an editor, and Jan winter made Linda answer the phones because she was one of the few women working there. Right, that's a good example. Yeah. And this isn't a hit piece. There's a very well-known biography of Jan winner out there that is also while not a hit piece, not very kind to him at all. The sticky fingers one that came out? Yeah. Yeah, yeah, so he had been apparently Jan winner had been shopping his story around for to be written initially by a ghost writer and then finally a biographer and he couldn't get anybody to do it because he was just known as such a control freak and everybody was like, I do not want to be involved with you for three or four years, writing your story. Like he would pick apart line by line captions under photos in magazines. This is in the 90s. He was still doing this, you know? He was that kind of boss. So you can just imagine what a train wreck nightmare he would have been if you were his biographer. He finally got somebody to do it, but that somebody said, dude, you've got to give me creative control over this. You have to be freedom. And like you said, it wasn't a hit piece, but it also wasn't just fawning and flattering. Apparently, Jan winter had kind of hoped it would be. Right, of course. As far as circulation goes, they say that it peaked in 2008 with a circulation of 1.4 million and is around 500,000 today about 27,000 of which is actually, I believe, paper copies, although maybe that's just new stand and not subscription. Yeah, I was wondering if that number reflects their digital subscribership because that's kind of low, actually. It is. And honestly, I never really knew what magazine distribution equaled anyway. So I was surprised that it peaked at 1.4 million, which just seems for such an iconic magazine that just doesn't seem like a lot of human beings reading a magazine. No, I mean, think about it. We're not too far off from Rolling Stone's peak, you know? I didn't want to say that, but that's what I was thinking. I was like, wow. I had a Caesar salad for lunch, so I'm feeling rather chuffed. Anyway, yeah, I don't know what I thought it would be. I figured it'd be like 10 million or something like that. But no, that's still rather respectable. 1.4 million. That's subscribed to a lot of people, I believe. Yeah, it's circulation. I think that includes newsstand sales. But the reason I'm wondering whether the web or the digital subscribers are included in that later number, the recent stuff is because they very famously, I should say Jan winter very famously shunned the idea of moving into the digital realm and even his son Gus was the guy who was running the digital arm. He still wouldn't give them resources to support like a genuine website. Yeah. An example I saw is that Rolling Stone broke some story. I can't remember what story it was, but it was a big story. And everybody had to go read about it on other digital news sites because they hadn't posted anything or the story on Rolling Stone's website. Like it was like that. Interesting. They've also changed format just size wise over the years. They started out as a sort of regular sized smaller magazine or should I just say average magazine. And it was in black and white with a little bit of color here and there like a single color process. And then in the early 70s, switched to a four color process and went to that glossy, large format style that Rolling Stone like to me was really known for. It was always just different because it was a big, large magazine. But also, it was glossy, but it wasn't like that glossy slick magazine pages of today. It wasn't at glossy newsprint basically. Yeah. So that gave it its own feel too, along with the size. Like it was definitely its own thing. Right, but then it went back to the small, and then now is back to the big. Isn't that right? Yeah, in 2008, they went to standard magazine size in 2018. They said, oh, forget it. We're going back to the ten by 12. I'm glad they did. Again, I don't buy the paper version, but I just always associated that sort of iconic ten by it turns out 11 and three quarter size. It's a quarter inch really bugs me. Yeah, you just made me snort, man. Well, good. So initially Rolling Stone was like a national magazine that was centered in San Francisco because again, that was the epicenter of the hippie movement of everything that was going on that was important in the late 60s and early 70s, right? But then January wenner kind of spiritually decamped from San Francisco even before the magazine did. And then finally, Ralph gleason. Remember Ralph gleeson the jazz critic who kind of cofounded Rolling Stone. He kept a column in every issue where basically he was just talking about San Francisco goings on or whatever. And he eventually was like the last tether to the origin, the roots in San Francisco. And when he died 1975, Jan winner waited a couple more years and then moved the whole thing to New York City, and it was officially a bona FIDE national. You couldn't even say international magazine

Jan winter Rolling Stone Michael Lydon Jan winner Linda Mick Jagger The Rolling Stones newsweek Jan Gus San Francisco Ralph gleason Ralph gleeson wenner New York City
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:23 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"What if you were a trendy apparel company facing an avalanche of demand. To ensure more customers can buy more sharp aligned jackets, you call IBM to automate your IT infrastructure with AI. Now your systems monitor themselves, what used to take hours takes minutes. And you have an ecommerce platform designed to handle sudden spikes in overall demand. As in actual overalls. Let's create IT systems that rule up their own sleeves. IBM. Let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com slash IT automation. It's 2022 and things look different, like doctors visits, for example. Sometimes you don't have to go into a doctor's office to be treated for non emergency situations like a sinus infection or allergy, and that's why Teladoc gives you the chance to connect with board certified physicians right from your home via phone or video. That's right, doctors are standing by 24/7 so you can schedule a visit according to your schedule. You can see for yourself why Teladoc is ranked number one by JD power in telehealth, satisfaction with direct to consumer providers. Teladoc's available through most major health plans and many employers, but even if you're not covered by insurance, everyone has access to use Teladoc. That's right. If you want to check it out, download the app today or visit Teladoc dot com slash stuff to register or schedule a visit today. That's dot com slash stuff. For JD power 2021 award information, visit JD power dot com slash

IBM sinus infection Teladoc allergy
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Usually given credit for. Yeah, I saw it described in, I think it was in Atlantic article. Is that what it was? Yeah. That was a great article. It really was. I think it was called the rise and fall of Rolling Stone or something like that. And Jane, schindel, winner, is described as basically being the she was so cool that her personality was what attracted those cool photographers and cool musicians and just people to the magazine. They wanted to be close to her basically or she knew how to behave around them basically. Yeah, and they had an interesting marriage. He came out of the closet in the mid 90s, much to her. Well, I say much to her surprise, apparently she had heard rumors over the years and things like that. But I think it was sort of a sudden thing for her. And did not go down well, and I believe he's been in a partnership with the same gentleman since then. Yeah, it was a sudden surprise for January 2 because I read that he was outed by The Wall Street Journal without his permission or even. Even a heads up. Really? It just outed him in the pages of The Wall Street Journal. The author even pondered like, wow, is this scandal going to be the thing that sinks Rolling Stone, but it was 1995 by then or 94, and everybody's like, who cares, you know? I don't think that qualifies as a scandal. Yeah, absolutely. So they have this money. They got the 7500 points out that Jan winter kept his Porsche though. It's not like he sold his force to raise money for the magazine. So they got the money together and they hire a bunch of the ramparts people. They in fact used a lot of the same equipment. The magazine was the same size, had a bit of the same look. They had a bunch of unused paper from ramparts that they were able to use. And they even used the offices where they printed it. I think the loft above the office was where they first made their home. So they really had a bit of a head start. Yeah, and so it ramparts had spun off something called the Sunday rampart's newspaper, and that's what had gone defunct, so ramparts the magazine is still going at this time, but they used all the Sunday ramparts newspaper stuff, including staff, right? So they have a winner worked for them. Yeah. And when gleason quit in protest and I think shortly after that, the Sunday ramparts newspaper folded, that's when they got together and did this. And like you said, they did it with 7500 bucks and they were able to print. I think 40,000 copies of Rolling Stone number one. There was a last minute decision to put a production still of John Lennon in from the movie. How I won the war is wearing like a fatigues and a helmet with netting on it and everything he's looking at the camera. It's a very famous photograph. And they said that it was like a perfect mix or perfect metaphor for the mix of politics, culture, and music, all rolled into one. It really was a perfect photo for Rolling Stone number one to cover for sure. I think so. And maybe we could take a break and talk about how that first issue fared. Is that for a cliffhanger? It's

schindel The Wall Street Journal Jan winter Atlantic Jane Porsche The magazine gleason John Lennon
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

08:08 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"So yeah, you know, Ed is very astute to point out that the origins of Rolling Stone is kind of born out of this sort of certainly in 1960s, but maybe even before left wing alt rags that are self published. These sort of poorly printed black and white magazines about the counterculture that never really desired to make money. And most of them were super regional and never went outside of usually the city that they were in as far as distribution. But Rolling Stone was kind of born out of this idea and in particular got a lot of its influence from a San Francisco based magazine called ramparts. Yeah, which was like far, far left radical left politics magazine. There was a headline and I think 1968, maybe even earlier than that, that ramparts ran. It was ramparts offers $10,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of any cop who is murdered a black man. That was on the cover. But it was on their cover and there's like a cop pointing a gun at you, the viewer from the magazine's cover. And that's, you know, okay, shocking, especially for even back then. But it's even more shocking when you realize that just a few years before, ramparts have been lost as an intellectual Catholic quarterly. Yeah, I mean, I don't even know why they kept the same name. It was a complete redo. It really was, and the guy who redid it was a guy named Warren hinkle, and you can't talk about Rolling Stone without talking about Warren hinkle. That's right. He transformed that magazine into that leftist rag that they knew. And obviously big and San Francisco. But it reached national levels of fame, if not like widespread fame, like the writers were like featured on talk shows and other kind of notably, I guess when you're a magazine being written in by other magazine being written about by other magazines, you've definitely made your mark and Time Magazine even had a very famous article called a bomb in every issue. I think it was a cover article on ramparts magazine. And though it would exist alongside rowing stone for a little while in the 70s, it was not a big widespread financial success. And obviously because of his politics, had a pretty just by nature of what it was, a sort of limited audience. Right. And so Jan winner, who was one of the founders of Rolling Stone and who basically personified Rolling Stone over the decades because he was the CEO for years and years and years. He was involved in ramparts through a guy named Ralph gleason who will meet in a second. But the upshot of this is that Jan winter saw ramparts what it was doing, how important it was, and that it never really took off. I saw it blew through at least two personal fortunes, rampart magazine did before. It declared bankruptcy. And he noted that, and he kind of took it to heart for his magazine Rolling Stone, and the lesson for him was reflect the counterculture without actually furthering the agenda and you can probably be absorbed by much more people and be palatable to advertisers too. Yeah, and as far as winter goes, he himself was a college dropout from Berkeley. He is sort of the personification of what we now think of as like the boomer generation. Which is to say that he and probably still does, you know, just sort of law that generation and everything they did as the utmost importance and the music of the time and the movements of the time were truly historic and not to be trifled with and also in a sort of boomer esque way. But you know what's great is making tons of money. And being a capitalist. And loving Coke. Sure. Yeah, I'm sure that was not, I'm sure they were not in short supply. No, they weren't showing off. He was very famous for his ability to put away bags of cocaine. All right, so you mentioned Ralph gleason who were going to meet. He was a jazz critic and music critic who also dabbled in The Rock and roll world. But he was not a boomer. He was born in, I think, 1917. So he was 30 ish years older than Venter, and they met at a Jefferson Airplane concert. And became buddies. And I think January winner really looked up to him and they sort of developed a mentor relationship mentor mentee. Is that what it is? It depends. So if gleason was strictly kind of advising and training and teaching Jan Weiner, that would make him a mentee. But if he did anything to further Jan wenner's career, which he ended up doing, that would make winner his protege. Okay, well, let's just say it was a mix of both. Sure. I looked it up and I really wanted to share that. I got you. There is a distinction. Sure. But they were friends and I believe it was gleason that also worked for ramparts, some, and then when ramparts fell apart, they hatched the idea for Rolling Stone magazine. Well, so gleason left even before ramparts fell apart because Warren hinkle did not love the psychedelic rock era did not love hippies. And Ralph gleason did, even though he was a jazz critic, he definitely got the psychedelic movement and was very appreciative of it and wrote very kindly about it in his columns in ramparts. But they're falling out happened when Warren hinkle ran the social history of the hippies, which was a pretty unflattering cover story about hippies and the summer of love and how basically he accused them of falling down on the job of taking over the responsibility to steer the country. And instead they were just off like dropping acid ensuring their responsibility, which would pan out to be really prescient when you're talking about the baby boom boomer generation, right? And Ralph gleason didn't appreciate that at all. So he left in disgust. He quit ramparts. And that was about the time when winter was like, hey, let's make a magazine together. Summer of love, 1970, who can forget. I know. Oh wait, no, it was 72. 72. Yeah. Because John Travolta play that Woodstock. For that summer of love concert in 72. Oh boy, I always feel bad for people who don't pick up on the inside jokes. Yeah. We'll get some emails. That's all right. It's fun. So again, hatch this idea together. And they really kind of borrowed a lot from ramparts. Not the least of which was their logo. If you look at the ramparts logo, it's I don't know if it's exactly the same font. I'm sure there's they probably technically might have made a new font. But it looks a lot like that font. And not the original Rolling Stone magazine file, because the earliest issues, it was definitely a little bit different, but the one that we all know today is the Rolling Stone font. Looks a lot like ramparts. They definitely hired away a lot of people from that magazine, including some of the designers, some of the writers, some of the, some of the editors, photographers. And even the office space, they raised, they wanted to raise ten grand, but they ended up raising $7500 from a variety of investors, including Jane winter. And her family, who was Jan winner's wife, who actually had a much larger role in the early days of the magazine than I believe she's

Warren hinkle Ralph gleason Rolling Stone ramparts magazine Jan winner Jan winter rampart magazine San Francisco gleason Jan Weiner Jan wenner Time Magazine Ed rowing Venter Rolling Stone magazine Berkeley Coke John Travolta
"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"To the podcast. I'm Josh, and there's chuck. It's the 1 o'clock hour. I just had a nice Caesar salad. So that means it's time for stuff you should know. Do you dress yours lightly or do you like it? Soggy. I do it smartly. No. I start out light and then add as needed. Okay. 'cause you know, I've experienced the regret of too much salad dressing. Right, you can't take it away. No, you can't unring that bell. Rolling Stone magazine. What's your history with this rag? It's a couple, it goes back a couple of days, at least. Oh, you were never into the magazine at all? No, I mean, I've read plenty of like Rolling Stone articles over the years like Matt taibbi stuff. So I'm a hundred Thompson stuff. And of course, you know, every once in a while, just run across a really good article. From like years back, right? But that was it. Never had a subscription never bought it at the magazine rack or anything like that. Oh, okay. You know? I just wasn't into it. I didn't hate on it or anything like that. It just was never into it. Not like you're going to today. I want to hate on it today. I'll just reveal facts. Yeah, so my history, if you care, is I always loved Rolling Stone magazine. And I continue to digitally subscribe, and you know, as we will learn, it is not a magazine without its downs and controversies, oh yeah, for sure. And as Ed even points out in this research, it's sort of been sport over the last two decades to sort of debate when and if Rolling Stone has lost its way. But it's a magazine that I always I just took what I took from it. Right. Like when I was reading at the end of this, we'll get to some of their biggest controversial articles and very poor shoddy journalism. I never read any of those. So I've always just sort of taken from it what I wanted to and not really thought about it a lot until this research. Man, there's nothing more rock and roll than that. But I do want to plug another magazine. What? Cream magazine is back. Oh, really? Yeah, I've seen people be the ones in the know. And I was like, cream was always better. Well, it was. Like my magazine of choice for music since the probably early 2000s was magnets, which I still. Went away, then it came back. And then, but cream is back now, and I think you get a subscribed immediately. You get four paper copies per year, like a quarterly issue, which is kind of cool. Sure. But what's really cool, dude, is if you subscribe, you get access to all of the archives. So it's really fun to go back and read a contemporaneous, Lester bangs, your camera and crow piece. From cream magazine. So I highly recommend here at the beginning of our Rolling Stone article. To subscribe to the new cream. Right. So yeah, the impression I have is cream is the one that really was true to what it was going for pretty much from start to finish. While Rolling Stone was viewed as more of like the corporate version of that. Almost from the outset. Yeah. The reason that it was viewed as that and still is today is because the guy, one of the founders, Jan winner, was super corporate. That was his goal. He was in ambitious hippie hanger on basically who happened to be in San Francisco when the summer of love happened when psychedelic rock broke out when the 60s really were happening in San Francisco was the epicenter. And that's not to say he didn't dig it and was moved by it. But he also saw that this was a really important thing, at least to him, and a lot of other people. And he saw that he could probably sell ads against this. So he did what he knew how to do and he started a magazine, as we'll see. Yeah, that's a nice little intro. And for those of you who don't know, Rolling Stone is the music largely music magazine. But also over the ensuing years is since November 9th, 1967, has branched out into all manner of pop culture and politics and, you know, we didn't want to not mention what it was in case you happened to live under a Rolling Stone. Oh man, is that written down on your notes? No. Yeah, wow. So should we go back in time a bit? Yeah, so oh, this kid in the wayback machine and go back to the 60s in San Francisco in this dusty in here. Contact buzz from some grass that's being smoked. They

Rolling Stone magazine Rolling Stone Matt taibbi Cream magazine chuck From cream magazine Josh Thompson Jan winner Ed Lester San Francisco
"v magazine" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

The Bad Crypto Podcast

04:23 min | 7 months ago

"v magazine" Discussed on The Bad Crypto Podcast

"But they're not going to start letting their citizens use that. No, they want their citizens to be trapped in their Fiat Ponzi still. They want to force their citizens to do their bidding. So we're seeing that Bitcoin's a tool, thankfully for those citizens, you know, they can escape their Fiat into Bitcoin as well. And it's a tool that's open to everyone, but governments aren't just going to start behaving nice..

Bitcoin Fiat
"v magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Finally on today's show, we head to New Jersey in the United States. Here a new design magazine shines a spotlight on the complex and fascinating history of the garden states and the forces that have shaped it. The publication is called dense. And Monaco's Henry Reece Sheridan recently spoke to its cofounders. I'm Leon Ames. I'm a cofounder and editor of dense magazine. I'm originally from Indiana, but I now live in New Jersey. I've been here for 8 years. And so I think by these 8 years, I have come to be excited about starting this magazine about New Jersey. I don't know if I have enough street cred yet to figure out here and there. Exactly. But yes, that's a little about me. And I'm petty amours of and I'm cofounder of dense magazine. And I was born in New Jersey. I am what they call a Jersey girl and my background is in design. Let's talk about the premise of dense because it's unusual for a design magazine. It's pegged to New Jersey, right? As a state, so it's kind of a design magazine who's fundamental premise a kind of place. Why New Jersey an obvious question and also maybe you can explain some of the avenues that having a geographically themed design magazine opens up versus more conventional design lenses. Well, you can't answer that question unless you also try to get at why we called the magazine dense because they are so intertwined. New Jersey is obviously a physical and geographic state of the U.S., but it is also in our minds, a conceptual place where radical experiments have happened and also are still happening. In ways that don't necessarily fall into the category of design, design projects, if you will, but definitely have had when you scale out and see what social or environmental or cultural impacts these decisions have had. Continue to ripple. And so for us, like any place where you want to push sort of a next generation of anything in the next gen of what we mean by design or design publishing, what better place than to find the most experimental environment to do that in. And it just so happened to be an hour backyard. And it took perhaps a pandemic and Black Lives Matter and as well as a host of other historical conditions that go way back in New Jersey's past for us to sort of see how its bubbled up to today. And so we wanted to really seize this moment and see what the next 5 years hold for such an experimental space. And to kind of really pull the rug out from what people think they know about a place like New Jersey to uncover some really rich terrine for many more people, other than designers, we want to be relevant to people not only within the design field, but also people who may not call themselves designers, but who are in every way possible, designing future scenarios for equity for environmental resilience for future speculative places that people might find themselves who don't typically call themselves designers. And so that's kind of the long answer. The short answer is that when you are the densest state in the U.S., dense with many sort of statistics. And we are the densely most densely populated state in the U.S. we also have the most superfund sites of any state there are also some mortality rates that seem to be also high in our state for the African American community. You know, there's a lot there that starts to become inseparable. And so design tends to like to put things in silos and we're looking at that complexity and saying, well, okay, how do we bring people into it? Not in a way to reduce it to anything, but to hold on to that complexity. Within the kind of overarching theme of New Jersey. You've got this structure where each issue looks at a different component of the state or is themed based on the different component of the state. And the first issue that you come out with is themed around the New Jersey turnpike, which is this kind of monumental highway that connects New York and New Jersey, I got that right? Yeah, and Philadelphia. And in a way kind of over time, it's connected a lot of the east coast, this whole megalopolis, but yes. With each issue, we're really looking at this point in time. That's kind of this portal. So with the turnpike, while it is so much about the turnpike, it's also looking at what we mean by the inception or the we're thinking of it as the opening day and beyond. And so it's not just looking at 1951, which is when the first stretch of the turnpike opened, and each issue is like this where we have picked a date, so to speak in time related to, in this case, the turnpike. But we are very interested in the conditions that have bubbled up in time and how that shapes the way we think of its inception. There's a lot of utopian energy around around the turnpikes and opening and from a pop culture standpoint. I mean, it was the first in New Jersey, the first modern toll road in New Jersey and only the third in the nation and the promotional films. They're brochures like they're really was such a marketing that played into I feel like or that made the turnpike kind of poised to become this sort of pop culture icon. And so our stories that are contributors brought to the table are really looking at, it kind of getting into an excavating not only the utopian, but actually more. Even to today, how it has shaped that was loon aims and picture morozov. Cofounders of dense magazine. And they were in conversation with monocles, Henry reist Sheridan. You can order the publication and find out more at dense magazine dot org. And that's all the time we have on today's show. If you're keen for more design related listening, then catch our 5 minute midweek sister show Monaco on design extra, it adds every Thursday. Today's show was produced and edited by merely Evans. Thanks to our researchers, Nick manes and Charlie Phil McCourt, I'm knowledge isles. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye..

New Jersey dense magazine Henry Reece Sheridan Leon Ames U.S. Monaco African American community Indiana Jersey east coast Philadelphia morozov New York Henry reist Sheridan Nick manes Charlie Phil McCourt Evans
"v magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Into the library of the late great Dutch designer. My name is Shirley Tehran. I'm a social designer from the Netherlands. My name is Liberia. I'm forecaster and publisher.

"v magazine" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"For ten years for someone spend a couple hundred bucks in a three percent commission of two hundred thousand dollar home which is low in for a lot of markets is six grand so you could invest for ten years in a client. It's been a couple of hundred bucks on that client gist in the repeat business. You're making ten grant or six grand off that person let alone over those ten years. How many referrals could that client bring to you from their friends and family. Because you've stayed in front of him and because you've built a relationship with them so if you're in a service based business referral driven it tends to work better. They're very very interesting so tell me about. How do we get the content. How do we even know what to share. Is it like like who comes up with that yet. We do it actually. Oh for you. So i actually believe it or not say i mentioned. We have like three hundred employees so we have writers on staff editors on staff. So we i mean. Our team is amazing. I can't take any credit for it. They are the talent but we put together all the contents then. What we do is most businesses. They don't have time to create a bunch of content. They might think of having their fully own custom magazine. But what we find is most people just need some features so most of our magazines what we do is we feature you and like six different places throughout the magazine mostly in the most visual places that covers the back. Cover's tarot cards in the magazine. Because our concept here is that we'll do all the content for you high value delivered to your clients then brand you and maybe you wanna feature obviously the obvious info contact information low. Goes you know that type of branding but maybe wanna feature client testimonials maybe you wanna feature the listings that you have the products that you do a case. Study of right up on a partnership that you have or something like that. That's then we'll feature that little set input that with your magazine and the magazine comes out six times a year. We have found that six times a year. It seems to be the most effective from both cost and then a return standpoints. We hire a firm called jfk. So i think they're the second largest media research firm but what they do as a third party is they go in and they surveyed the recipients of the magazine so my clients would be the business owners but they go and actually survey the recipient so my clients clients and they try to find out key things they try to find out. What's the power of this marketing. So one of the things they look for is what's to shelf-life life. They find the shelf life in the home to be about four weeks on average. So you're gonna live in the home for about a month. They find the re time to be about forty four minutes per issue in what i share with people on that because i think comparisons can be powerful. So i'm a seinfeld fan. Love seinfeld right and so if you look at a seinfeld episode seinfeld episodes about eighteen minutes long so what i share it. People is. You're gaining two seinfeld episodes worth of time with that prospect with that core client from a branding aspect over the course of about a month which anybody right in marketing knows well..

seinfeld
"v magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Now there are none and the teen magazines that still exists or limping along online on the women's side. Things aren't much better. Glamorous stopped publishing the print edition in two thousand nineteen have mary. Clair's print issue. We found out a few days ago as we were preparing. This episode is also discontinued. What are the reading populations that once turn to these publications reading for fun now and where and contemporary media can we find their legacy now. This is a topic very close to my heart. Because i started out in media at a teen magazine called. Ym and i wasn't completely happy there but it was also a teen magazine Sassy the great durable of its asi. Whichever one in generation x. remembers that made me feel like. I even wanted to be a magazine writer and right now. Today i doubly wants to talk about this pressing issue because had there has just published an excellent piece on the one time editor of cosmo girl and seventeen who now has substance and is becoming an instagram personality. A tusa rubinstein heather. Why is this topic close to your heart. I was also an avid reader as teen magazines. And the time that you're talking about when you graduated college. That was when i was a preteen at end early team but there was a particular like mini boom of them. That's been cosmo girl started. Which is the magazine. Bet a tusa. Rubinstein founded that's when teen people started l. girl teen vogue And i also used to love reading the print versions of women's magazines. It used to be so fine. Like i would look forward to riding on a plane because i would have like magazines and candy or going to the nail reading magazine like just so luxurious and fun and now that seems like a total acronym so a tusa was sort of this mythic figure from my teen years. What really sticks with me about a two. So when i think back to then and reading magazines she was. The editor of cosmo girl and then went on. To seventeen is her editors letters and in particular. She always posted these dorky photos of her. I don't know they just looked so embarrassing to me. Her photos from So dorky her haircuts. Or i don't know what she was wearing and she just you know. Put it all out there even then and that would become a in her life I guess and it's relevant to what she's doing now so something i didn't realize at the time about a to say is she was also super successful just in her media career and it wasn't until i was in college and sort of started starting to think maybe i wanted to work in magazines but i really understood button achievement. That was that she had founded a magazine so young. She found it when she was still in her twenties. But that's also when. I was starting to feel more cynical about teen magazines thinking. I wish i had been part of the sassy generation. And i sort of wonder what would have happened if it had been more of an option for me to work in teen or women's magazines like is that direction. My career would have gone if i were ten or fifteen years older and it. It's interesting to think about. It would have been a totally different life. Resonate with so much of that. And i can't wait to talk to you about it and so coming up. We're gonna talk about the idea that women's and teen magazines created community which is something that people who work at women's on teen magazines would often talk about and the idea that they supported young female writers who might not otherwise have gotten chances to have a media career off. This episode is brought to you by hp plus in a world full of smart devices. Isn't it about time. Your printer got smart to now. Printing is smart with hp fuss and the hp smart up is how all happens. You can print from your phone with just a tab no matter where you are even from your garage slash home office slash yoga studio. That is smart. Hp plus learn more about smart printing at hp dot com slash smart. Thank you so much for listening. I wanted to take effect in and welcome all our you listeners. And our old ones to haven't forgotten about you. If you're loving the show. And wanna hear morris subscribe to our new episodes. Come out every thursday morning while you're there check out our other episodes to like last week's hosts emily packed and shannon palace. Talk about whether disgrace theranos founder. Elizabeth home is actually a girl boss. Okay let's talk about what teed magazines and women's magazines meant to us as young graders so among people who do sort of miss the era of team and women's magazines there is some discussion of the idea that they're like an incubator of community and place. Where young female writers can kind of get a start. There's people from the mid century era. The often mentioned in connection to this so sylvia plath was published in seventeen and betty for dan air at a bunch of her ideas for the feminine mystique in ladies home journal which is sort of like unexpected counter narrative that you find inside these magazines that were actually very much established to serve sort of like a white middle class. You know woman who would sort of follow very traditional path within society but some of these starry examples aside once community and career advancement really what we got from them when they still existed. Maybe it's because. I worked at one. But i just always have so much trouble with the sort of representation of teen magazines as a place where people could connect so for example. There's a quote from two thousand sixteen. That wasn't a refinery twenty nine piece that had a bunch of good quotes around two thousand sixteen about teen magazines in this kind of nostalgia and this quotas from the one time teen vogue editor elaine welter off. And she said for being part of a community that you identify with is so important subscribing to a print title even two thousand sixteen. Which again is when she's speaking to. This reporter is like signing up for club that serves you on a more personal level at teen vogue. We have created a community for our readers to belong to be seen in hurt identify with the stories that we tell.

rubinstein heather Hp Clair Rubinstein shannon palace theranos ladies home journal sylvia plath morris emily Elizabeth betty dan elaine welter
"v magazine" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"What's going on. Thursday with momo hanging out mason ireland show momo you've spent years and continue to spend your as a writer yeah and would you say that you are a writer before your broadcaster. Yeah i think. I'm still writer before broadcaster. Okay so i know you don't read but it's okay i read. Some sports illustrated was first published this week in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and i don't even know if that's still thing our magazine still a thing or a magazine you wrote for. Espn the magazine. Our magazines over that over the royal invented called the internet. I think some people also called the worldwide web. I think that might might be you know eating magazine. Articles like sports illustrated has articles their an actual magazine still. Yeah i think it comes. What's the point of having an actual magazine though. Some people read them. Some doctors offices there for doctors. Those the npr still. I know people just look at their phones and the doctor's office in the airport now and also probably cove. It's not safe. I guess You know people still read. Magazines are still newsstands or still covers. I mean it's it's i. I'll be honest. The what magazines exist for the brand okay. So sports illustrated was purchased by branding company. Like just gonna use the sports illustrated brand because it is a valuable brand. It's not like you can call it. The sports illustrated you can have a party. Sports street hosting a you know a gala of art. Sarah whatever you want this swimsuit edition. You don't actually have to have the physical magazine to do that. Espn the magazine We shifted into something called cover story. I've seen that. That's right on the front and it still has great photography so what people really like is the photography. So if you're a lot of the athletes like don't you want to be a cover shoot. We got we got a cover for you. Cover story right so now the cover instead of the magazine is the website. Yeah it's online. Not the same thing agreed not the same thing but we still need a place for great photography. We still need a place for they. Call it editorial editorial photography Yeah i know. I i made before the pandemic i made the cover of a magazine which magazine It's called the argonaut it's west. La and the photographer was excellent. And that probably will be my first and last magazine cover because they just don't think they do such things anymore. Right is that is that some Publication that you have Supported financially maybe. No you'd have to like play just reached out nice as legit. It's it's like a local off playa vista arena. Those make a lotta among those local publications. Make a lot of money because the advertising like local ads so you re newspapers used to exist on classified ads and there were three main categories real estate car sales and retail. So we got a sale. At macy's we got You know the local honda dealership the The you know people used to list their houses for sale. You know that's where we're used to find it now. All of those things are online which is basically the the ad revenue so now there's people still do obituaries that they charge for those they do. Some local businesses will will advertise in the newspaper. And things like that. But there's not really a lot but if your local business like let's say you just have one location in a spot in the valley or something. It's still a good. It's still good to advertise in the daily news. Because you're going to be targeted targeted towards older people. Older older people who live in the area where your businesses like. I remember growing up seeing something. Called the penny.

mason ireland Espn momo npr playa vista arena Sarah La macy honda
"v magazine" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"v magazine" Discussed on KTOK

"Magazine and go find lasagna and get in her magazine absolutely appreciate that. But the word of the day for today is e enigma. Was called this a few times last weekend at Grand Lake Vibe. Some friends you're an enigma. Okay, enigma, a person or thing that is mysterious, puzzling or difficult to understand. Do you think Medicare? Could be described as an enigma. How we can have open enrollment for Enigma. How does that sound? My didn't say Open enrollment. Open enrollment isn't enigma. Oh, gosh. And you know, we have a lot more time that we can spend with our clients now that are new to Medicare. But come October the 15 through December the seventh. It's just, you know, what is it the patience of job? We have to have that because it runs fast, crazy and, you know, we just pray that everybody gets in. Uh huh. That does. That's the time of the year where I don't come around you guys at all. I don't have to go to the office for anything. I'm not there because I know you guys are Ready to jump out a window last year, Mike with covid and everything. I think you call me grumpy. A couple of times. Yeah, but it just, You know, we're here to serve the people and I've said it a couple of times. There's one way you do this right? Cause there's no excuse for doing it wrong. Well, and last year was Not only difficult on All of our clients, But it was difficult on us, too, because Social Security kept changing closed their clothes. And so they're they're changing the enrollment system about every two months. Last year, it was constantly maybe he was constantly changing. And so it was just it was a new waking up in a new world. And then you know, we have an ice storm in the middle of October and snow and snow and whatever you know, and we lost power. So you know all those things that those were fun to. You're talking about Social security. Do mark your calendar because July the 24th Jose Olivero From who is the public affairs specialist from Social Security will be our guest live on that Saturday? Coming live. He gets to come in live which, uh, They don't normally allowed that. But he's got some special announcements on July the 24th so he will definitely let's say that again. Jose High in studio in the studio, Jose Olivero 20 lied. The 24th. And if you have a question about Social security, how to enroll, you know on Medicare. It's like the governor's coming. Jose's coming. Jose's coming laugh and He just brought us, um You know, some updated information which you can't tell you about until July. The 24th. Yes, mark your calendars you want and we'll have that on our website on our Web. We'll have it on our Facebook. So if you have not gone To the well preserved advisory group Facebook page Go there because we put updates on their weekly about the show and the sponsor of the week and anything else that we're doing. That might be fun. Well this next week. We're going to be in Norman. Uh huh. Yeah. Oh, That's right. We're at the Y M Y M c A on Wednesday from nine until noon at a health safety fair. Yeah, and that'll be fine. Yeah, well, you know, I lived in Norman for I am not getting on the bouncy ball like they did to me the last time. You know that will bounce. I thought you were going to get the dunk tank. Now this is about health and fitness. Not looking like I got dunk. We do that on the longest day when we You know, folks have a good time and enigma. Try to use that as much as I use the word as much as you candidates see how many times she's calling me names again? What are we going to do here? Well, listen, Any gig knows what enigma is, because that's the real name of the Riddler. His his last name is Nygma and his first initial. His first name is East. So he's enigma. Enigma. You know, Mike again, and you're just a wealth of information if I ever get on what is it jeopardy or any of those? Oh, the phone. A friend one where you had a phone A friend? Yeah, Mike and this will be my ringer because I want to win. But seriously, we've had a couple of topics today on well preserved and it is such an honor. To be behind this microphone every Saturday. Giving you options Life has life is full, a lot of choices. And as we age and walk through, you know the fourth quarter of our life. We're going to enjoy it. Almost the fruits of your labor. Absolutely. And one of my favorite phone calls to get is Carrie, I don't know if you're the right person I need to talk to or not. Or if this has anything to do with what you guys do well preserved, but I just don't know where to start. Can you help point me in the right direction and to start Absolutely absolutely. You bet we can. You know, Medicare is confusing. Long term care planning is a lot different now. Very then it did when I started in the market some 30 years ago, so there are options there, and it may not be a traditional Long term care policy very likely not and Patrick with the retirement planning, you know, just a lot of options to look at. We do and we're kind of casual and laid back at our office. We do suits on Sunday. Sometimes sometimes it's during the summer. I do swimming suit on Sunday. I don't even want to talk to you. I am not putting this well preserved body in a swimming suit up. Mike Gannon is dying of hysterical laughter in there. You know, it has been a fun Saturday gel half with Spanish code. Yes, Yes, they have a program July next Tuesday. Well, their ice cream two and three. I know it's called flights, the school and what a great title to find out what the scoop is. So if you would like to register for Tuesday, July the 13th or Thursday, July the 15th. You can give Jill a call at 405354596 just a short drive to UConn. You know, it's not very far at all. No, it takes me 10 minutes. Yeah. And if I'd try not to go during traffic because you go west young man, Uh, you hit 39th or interstate for I know, but I loved all the antique shops on 39th Street going out there. No wonder you're always late. Gotta that tells me Mike. I mean she's doing She probably has this bumper sticker on her car. This is I make right turns at garage says you think I am Marcelas granddaughter and you know, we we laugh and joke about her family. I was talking about my mother in law. You're talking about Marcella. That's what Well preserved is all about, you know, preserving those memories. And speaking of memories, I have my grandkids coming up. We'll see you next week. Well preserved is all about preserving your health, your wealth and the freedom to live the way you choose..

Mike Gannon Jose Olivero 10 minutes UConn Marcella Norman Wednesday 405354596 Last year October December Mike Patrick Nygma last year 39th Street July the 24th Sunday Jill Marcelas