35 Burst results for "Ussr"

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:10 min | Last month

Gene Editing and Recovery from Radiation

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. Weekly podcast about agriculture medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet names kevin volta. I'm a professor and a podcast host. Who cares about science communication mostly around the area of biotechnology. So today we wanted to talk about something interesting. Radiation and radiation has many places in biology. Of course our resistance to it. The problems that can be caused from it as well as its use as a therapeutic agent used to induce genetic variability when we do plant breeding but has some deleterious downsides and they've represented barriers both for remediation of radioactive. Waste as well as if there's issues with the side effects of radiation therapies for cancer. So i was excited to learn about some work. That's happening. The innovative genomics institute out at the university of california berkeley. There's work that's gone. Underway under darpa funding to attempt to use gene editing to solve some of the problems associated with radiation exposure. Mostly in acute radiation sickness. and so. today we're going to talk to dr feodor urnov. He's a professor in molecular and cell biology department at the university of california berkeley as well as the director for translation technology at the innovative genomics institute associated with berkeley. So welcome to the podcast. Dr urnov thank you for having. This is really a pleasure. I was really excited to read about this. Because it seems like such a cool project that's long overdue and i can certainly understand arpaio's interest in this. I tried to frame a little bit of the problem ahead of time. But could you give me a better explanation of. What is the problem with acute radiation sickness. And where do we see it across. The bay from the berkeley campus is one of the best if not the best teaching hospital in america. Ucsf in the chair of radiation oncology. Dr mary fung has told me how frustrating it is to have. Her patients succumb to cancer of the abdomen and of the pelvis. Oh things like pancreatic liver you. Try a variant. Despite the fact that she has a powerful weapon to pure those cure is a big word and the weapon is radiation as you pointed out as all technologies radiation has had a positive side in the negative side the negative side. Of course we think about weapons. We think about radiation disasters such as mobile in in the ussr. Where i went grow was born and raised three mile island Shema but then on the positive side radiation is used to determine how our teeth are doing or our lungs are doing which is particularly timely given. What's happening right now. In our nation and has also a really really powerful medicine to cure cancer. The reason it's not more widely available is what's technically known as dose limiting city and in english. That means you cannot give enough of the cure before it side effects overpower its benefits. So in dr funk's practice the physician. So i'm regurgitating. What i learned from her and other had the honor to collaborate with. She has a patient with a with a major cancer of the abdomen. Or or the pelvic area she can irradiate the tumor and eradicated. The patients do not recover because tissues that are inevitably also effective so the gut and the bone. Marrow where are aquatic stem cells live are irreversibly damaged by the radiation itself. So the patients Die off either lethal diarrhea which cannot be stopped using anything

University Of California Berke Kevin Volta Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Feodor Urnov Innovative Genomics Institute Dr Urnov Berkeley Campus Dr Mary Fung Pancreatic Liver Cancer Darpa Arpaio Ucsf Cure Cancer Dr Funk America Diarrhea
Taking Advantage of Mr. Bear by JL Collins on Tax Avoidance Investment Strategies

Optimal Finance Daily

05:16 min | Last month

Taking Advantage of Mr. Bear by JL Collins on Tax Avoidance Investment Strategies

"I decided it was time to cuddle up to mr bear and let him help me. Avoid some capital gains taxes as regular readers. Here no for the past few years. We have been homeless and nomadic. It's a lifestyle that agrees with us and when we'd like to keep doing for some time however at some point age will force us to settle down. The trick is deciding when that is act too soon and we miss out on xtra wandering wait too long and i might not have the energy left to easily make the transition but sometime in the next five years. There's a better than even chance that will be buying a final years house to that end we've had money growing. In a taxable account invested in of course vitae ax as i track this against the eventual sale to fund the house. I realized that we be on the hook. For a twenty percent capital gains tax until at least this new market selloff suddenly that capital gain was disappearing indeed with an eight percent drop today it would be completely gone so with the market down about six point. Three or four percent figuring that we'd be close enough. I put in the cell order and moved from visa x to our money market fund conveniently by the market's close. It was down seven point six percent almost exactly when i need it. Good luck so with this sale. I now have the capital freely available and will oh little to no capital gains tax at the same time then sold an equivalent amount of e b t lx bonds and bought v tsa stocks in an ira. Because this was done in an ira. There's no tax consequence. The net effect is that i have moved bonds from the ira and stocks into it again. While freeing up money for the purchase with no capital gains tax to be paid at the end of the day our asset allocation remains the same. This is not a bet that the market has bottomed cuna. Wouldn't you have been better off if the market had continued to rise even if you had to pay the capital gains tax of course but as i learned playing poker. You play the cards. You're dealt not the ones you wish you had. If i had a crystal ball i would have sold before the drop and happily pay the tax. But i didn't. This market declines simply offered an opportunity. And i took it. I prefer the market. Never went down. And i always could sell it again. The market doesn't care about my preferences. Why not wait to see. If the market drops further that way you not only avoid the capital gain but gets a harvest to capitol lost. I want to preserve as much capital as possible for the future purpose. Selling break even is the sweet spot for this gambit. Doesn't this run afoul of the irs. Wash sale rules my thanks to the several readers who raises question and especially to john are who suggested i added here. This was my reply to james. The first who raises question wash sales apply to selling at a loss from the article. You linked to quote loss from wash sales of stock or securities. This ruling provides that if an individual cells stock or securities for a loss and causes his or her ira or roth ira to purchase substantially identical stock or securities within a specified period the loss on the sale of the stock or securities is disallowed under the section ten ninety one of the and the individuals basis. In the ira or roth ira is not increased by virtue of section ten ninety one d end quote in my case the objective was to sell at break even with neither. A loss oregon. Because life isn't perfect. There will likely be a small gain or loss when the dust settles. But it'll be too small to worry about. Why did you move into a money. Market fund rather than bonds with v bt lx mostly because it was easier. And i wanted to get the order in before the market closed i might move into bonds later. Wait but are in bonds. Best held in an ira ordinarily. Yes but remember. This was done to free up capital from stocks for potential future spending money you intend to spend in the next five years or so is best held in cash which is a money market fund is or boss planning any further moves as noted in the addendum to my last post when the market was down about fifteen percent on february twenty eighth. I moved some v. b. t. l. x. to v. Tsa ex if the market continues to drop. I'll do more of that. Taking advantage of drops like this are what bonds or four. Isn't this scary. No wrestling grizzly bear in your garden is scary but this time is different right. Nope every market drop feels like this. Time is different some day. If it truly is nothing will matter. Least of all how. You're invested example 1963 brink of nuclear war between the ussr and the usa a truly civilization ending possibility. Great time to buy no war market goes up. War market doesn't matter.

Mr Bear TSA Roth Ira IRS James John Oregon Wrestling USA
Do Not Adjust Your TV

Your Brain on Facts

04:10 min | 3 months ago

Do Not Adjust Your TV

"Their feet a lot of the time though. It's simply a matter of broadcasting a stronger signal than the station is the equipment can be sophisticated but it can also be made of scrap. Parts from things like ham radios. The motives vary widely from frustration. To it's just a prank bro. to we don't even know what heads up. There will be real clips in this episode and some of them are weird with a capital. W t f the earliest signal intrusion anywhere in the world that we know of happened back in nineteen sixty six in the soviet city of kaluga and almost triggered a nuclear war. If you know only one thing about world history in the second half of the twentieth century it would probably be the cold war decades of itchy trigger finger tension between the us and the us are one night. The regular broadcast was suddenly interrupted by a seemingly official emergency warning that nuclear war had just broken out with the united states. Many viewers took the message seriously running for cover and seeing their final prayers thankfully as what happened with stanislav petrov. Nineteen eighty-three when he correctly guessed that the early warning system was malfunctioning. When it reported incoming us bombers you can hear all about that way back in episode eleven for want of a nail government. Officials weren't quick to react a good thing to at the time. The ussr had over seven thousand nuclear weapons at their disposal. Ducted eighteen nuclear weapons tests that year alone. The us had nearly four times as many. But that's neither here nor there. It would only take fifty hiroshima sized bombs to plunge the world into nuclear winter. The soviets weren't messing around. If one official had thought another department had put out jim. It message about the us attacking. That could've been the start of a very fast extinction level event thankfully. The officials didn't panic at least not officially it would later be found that a teenager had hacked the station. His name was never released possibly because of his age and possibly to save him from retaliation from his neighbors or maybe it was a made up. Cover story tin foil hat. Nuclear war became a running theme for signal takeovers and it wasn't confined to the cold war in june of two thousand seven a show called panorama was part of the regular programming in the city of prague. In what is now czechia. The show was meant as a sort of tourist program to display calm scenic areas around the country. Like a tv travel brochure. This particular episode started off as usual with long. Lingering shots of picturesque locales around prague. Without warning the screen was bathed in a blinding flash and mushroom cloud began to climb into the sky above the city. This would be disturbing enough to see on its own but panorama was usually aired live meaning terrified viewers. At home were left. They had just witnessed a nuclear strike on their hometown. The hijacking was seamless. There had been no static or breaks in the tv signal. It was so realistic. In fact that even government officials and authorities believed the explosion was real. Luckily it doesn't take many phone calls or glances out of a window to confirm that there is not in fact a mushroom cloud rising above a blast crater in the middle of the city authorities soon turned their energy to finding the perpetrators. It would eventually be discovered that a guerrilla artistic collective called sto hoven which is known for their extravagant hoaxes and pranks were the culprits. Apparently this was a piece of performance art whether or not making hundreds of people think they're about to die.

Kaluga Stanislav Petrov United States Ussr Hiroshima Prague JIM Sto Hoven
"ussr" Discussed on Hall of Shame

Hall of Shame

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"ussr" Discussed on Hall of Shame

"It. Teaching. Little lessons about things we never knew about. Our history teachers. Do you kind of love that framing. Here you go. I'm GonNa teach you something Hungarian history is something I didn't know anything about I. Know There is a Hungarian Monument Macarthur Park here in La and for today's story, I, got to learn a little bit about what it stands for Okay Hey man here we go. So after World War Two hungry was ruled by a puppet government filled with local hacks who were controlled by Nikita Khrushchev and the authoritarian Soviet regime in Moscow Kind of feels a little too close to home for my comfort in terms of what's going on here. Are already calling them puppets and hack. Okay. We know which side wretches on. Let's go. As the Soviets imposed their rule, there was this growing resistance movement of Hungarian Freedom Fighters Love it and then October twenty third one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, six, Hungarian stage a revolt in Budapest attempting to replace the current. Soviet. Controlled regime with a democratic government kind of like what we're trying to do on November third if I may. So these brave revolutionary stage what they thought was a successful rebellion. But then on November fourth about two hundred, thousand Soviet troops poured across the Hungarian border and with tanks like rumbling through the streets of Budapest, they brutally crushed this revolution. They left more than five thousand Hungarians Dad with thousands more arrested and a quarter million people fled. Tough Talk About Home Very Tugela Russ Staff. Yeah. All of this sets the stage as the horrifying intense backdrop for the nineteen, fifty, six summer Olympics and specifically the Hungarian. Water Polo team. Now summer you're thinking, but I just said November well, the nineteen fifty six games were held in Melbourne, which, of course, is south of the equator and because of the reversal of seasons there the summer Olympics took place in late November and early December which is summer in Australia. See here's my qualm I do have a qualm with this I feel ashamed because it's confused me too. I feel like and maybe this isn't fair but I think that Summer Olympics should take place in place is where summers are nice and habitable and things actually happened in the summer like it's not fair that it had to go there and had to be moved to December now is that your northern hemisphere bias ooh. Melbourne would argue that November December is beautiful summer in Australia. I'm just thinking of you know what? I'm thinking of the World Cup is going to be in Dubai and next year than a year after whatever, and it has to take place in December which everyone is just like wait the world doesn't happened in December but it's asked time because it's going to be too hot in the summer months and I just think that that should be a non-starter like don't put your Little Ping Pong Ball into the group were you pull them out of?.

Hungarian Monument Macarthur P Olympics Budapest Melbourne Water Polo team Australia Nikita Khrushchev Dubai Russ Staff La Moscow
Avoiding war in the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict

TIME's Top Stories

04:15 min | 5 months ago

Avoiding war in the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict

"It wherever you listen to podcasts. The Armenia Azerbaijan fighting could spiral into a larger regional conflict by Ian Bremmer. Intense fighting has erupted nagorno-karabakh a small enclave in the southern Caucasus mountains setting the entire region on edge. This is a fight primarily between Armenia and Azerbaijan two former Soviet republics with long-held grievances over land. The volve of Russia Turkey and others raises the stakes for where a war might be headed. An essence, this is a story of a powerful. Changing history by drawing arbitrary lines on a map that would later spark conflict. The states of Armenia and Azerbaijan were pulled into Moscow or and became part of the Soviet Union in the nineteen twenties though nagorno-karabakh, a mountain region about the size of Delaware was dominated by Armenians. Matt makers made it part of the Jani Soviet republic for decades are Mian complaints about the region's status were ignored and in the final days of the USSR war erupted tens of thousands were killed and more than one million were forced from their homes. A Russian brokered system in nineteen, ninety, four left nagorno-karabakh as part of Azerbaijan but ethnic Armenians with backing from the Armenian government drove most Azerbaijanis from the territory and declared it an independent republic. Low level fighting has continued over the years and an eruption of violence in two thousand, sixteen killed at least two hundred people. There is no peace treaty and nothing has been resolved. In recent years, the governments of Armenia and Azerbaijan have sent positive signals. Her budget president and Armenia's prime minister opened the first ever military hotline between the two countries and twenty eighteen and talks brokered by Russia France and the United States. Produced a joint statement and Twenty nineteen that appeared to set the stage for a treaty. But momentum was lost and an eruption of fighting this summer led to popular demand in both countries for a military reckoning. The likely never know who fired the shot that ignited these latest clashes, but dozens of soldiers and some civilians have been killed Armenia and Azerbaijan have each declared martial law outsiders are scrambling to put out the fire UN secretary general, Antonio Terrace as called for a ceasefire. The web of foreign ties in this story is complicated Turkey's president wretched type air to on eager for an opportunity to boost his popularity and shift. The subject from his country's struggling economy fully backs is fellow Turkic Muslims in Azerbaijan while others call for talks air to one insists that Azerbaijan must take matters into its own hands to Armenia occupation of the disputed region. Vladimir Putin's Russia has maintained relations with Azerbaijan and sold weapons to both countries but Russia has a military base in Armenia and is bound by treaty to defend Armenia in war. This means that as in Syria and in Libya is ongoing civil war Russia and NATO member Turkey have A. Interests here Iran which borders both Armenia and as her Badgen has offered to mediate politically active ethnic Armenian populations in both. France and the United States bring those governments into the push for negotiations. Adding to the sense of urgency to halt the fighting nagorno-karabakh is a corridor for pipelines that transport oil and gas from the Caspian. Sea to the international marketplace. If the current clashes explode into full blown war, the damage could be much greater than in the nineteen nineties. This war would be waged with twenty first century, heavy weapons provided by Russia and Turkey. Air To

Armenia Azerbaijan Russia Turkey Ian Bremmer Russia France President Trump United States Soviet Union Vladimir Putin Moscow Ussr Delaware Matt Makers UN Nato Syria Prime Minister
Enclave on edge: Armenia and Azerbaijan

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:57 min | 5 months ago

Enclave on edge: Armenia and Azerbaijan

"Armenia and either by Jan, rejected international calls for a ceasefire yesterday after deadly clashes broke out on Sunday pushing the two countries to the brink of war. Both have declared martial law and total military mobilization. At least one hundred people have been killed in the fighting which is involved artillery strikes and air power. The two former Soviet republics are locked in a decades-old conflict over the disputed province of Nagorno Carla. This marks the second time in less than three months that the countries have come to blows. This time edging closer to all out war one, which could ensnare of Turkey and Russia. We haven't seen detail death tolls from the by Johnny side, but the overall death toll now seems to be well north of one hundred peaches. Ski Is our Turkey correspondent that would make the fighting in nagorno-karabakh the heaviest since two, thousand, sixteen, when at least two hundred people were killed and on pace to be the worst since one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four, the end of the war between Armenia and Azerbaijan, and what is that fight about it is about a region known as nagorno-karabakh disputed province legally recognized as part of by John. But controlled by Armenian forces to go back in history. Now, going to cut about had been a part of the Kingdom of a bar via over two thousand years ago and has been real sins by a succession of Empires. But under the Soviets nagorno-karabakh was a part of by John and as the USSR crumbled clashes erupted between the Armenian majority of the region which sought union with Armenia or independence, and the by Johnny minority and these devolved into the brutal war in which about thirty thousand people were killed and about a million displaced. Included episodes of ethnic cleansing and several atrocities. The war ended with a ceasefire in nineteen, ninety four, and as I mentioned or mean forces have held onto nagorno-karabakh itself, end to seven districts surrounding the region. So it's been despite the ceasefire still disputed since then correct not only has been disputed. There have been regular skirmishes the one in two, thousand sixteen, and as recently as this year in July, the sixteen people were killed in. Areas north of GonNa cut above thousands of Azerbaijanis responded to this also to the death of renowned as her by Johnny General by taking to the streets demanding that their government retake all of nagorno-karabakh. So why is it the conflict? This time seems to be escalating. So quickly, analysts see the signs of a much broader military offensive by as by John and a return to a much broader conflict than what we saw in previous years. Some of them told me the saw this as a much better prepared campaign with more troops and fighting on all parts of the line of contact or the frontline, and we're seeing is in addition to heavy weaponry, infantry helicopters and masses of drones on both sides. There's a threat that fighting could spill over into civilian areas and also into areas where pipelines. Deliver gas and oil from by John to Turkey through. Georgia. So it's clear on the ground then that this is a much more serious conflict but I mean, what set it off? There's a belief on both sides that there is no political solution, the new Armenian Prime Minister Nicol. Chagnon in his speech last year called for the reunification of the crowd about Armenia. Azerbaijan side feels that the only way it can recover at least parts of going to cut about or the outlying provinces is through force. Perhaps because of covid nineteen, there has been next to no international mediation of the conflict since this spring and that is said to have led to the clashes in July and the failure to mediate in the aftermath of July may have precipitated. What we're seeing today people in the region say that to some extent they saw this. Coming for miles and international community failed to prevent it and what is the international community's response. Now that it's escalated, the U. N. Security Council has called on the two sides to put an end to the fighting the European Union, the United States and Russia have also called for a ceasefire unlike other international actors Turkey has urged by John to push forward and edge of type air to one Turkish president said on September twenty eighth that peace would only come to. The region wants Armenia withdrew from Nagorno cut about his spokesperson added the next day that Turkey was quote unquote fully ready to help Azerbaijan, recover the enclave reports indicate that Mr Government has sent Syrian mercenaries who help Azerbaijan. It is also providing drones to the other by Johnny Army and our media accused Turkey of shooting down one of its warplanes, which is a charge that Turkish officials have denied and you mentioned Russia calling for a ceasefire how is Russia involved escalation? On the part of other by John or further, Turkish involvement could also drag in Russia which sells arms to Azerbaijan, but also has a mutual defense pact with Armenia. So in theory because not going cut about is not legally part of Armenia Russia is not under any commitment to defend Armenia in case of an attack on they're going to cut about and so far. In fact, Russia has only gone so far as to ask Turkey, to back its calls for a ceasefire. If Armenia dust come under attack by Azerbaijan or by Turkey, it seems Russia will have no choice but to defend Armenia and do you think that's the way things are heading I mean is there a way to calm the tensions here so far calls for a ceasefire have fallen on deaf ears it may be that Azerbaijan will succumb to Russian pressure and that both sides will. Lay Down Arms. It may be that other by John will simply settle for partial gains especially in the seven district near not going to talk about and declare victory, which would placate public opinion at home but this may yet get out of control.

Armenia Turkey Azerbaijan John Russia Nagorno-Karabakh Nagorno Carla Johnny Side Johnny General Johnny Ussr SKI Johnny Army Nagorno Chagnon Prime Minister Nicol
Travel To Bulgaria

Travel with Rick Steves

04:30 min | 6 months ago

Travel To Bulgaria

"Bulgaria is a small and mysterious country. It's one of those lands that Americans just don't visit very much. It's long faced east impact in communist times it was famously subservient to the USSR. But. Of course, there's lots more to see in Bulgaria and you can learn about a fascinating culture. When you go there to Bulgarian guides, joined us in our studio to help give us a better insight and a little better appreciation of the cultural. Bulgaria. We're joined by Stephan Bush job and you're. Stephanie thanks for being here. Thank you our pleasure now. Americans we don't know as much about Bulgaria as we know about Poland or Germany or Italy, or Greece that. It's not in the news it's signing country of about seven million people probably, not not a lot of Bulgarians have emigrated to the United States like Polish people. So many know when I think of Bulgaria I think of a back in the communist times a little country that was more friendly with Moscow, than the other countries in eastern Europe in fact, your leader little sort of an communist dictator two-door shifts of Shipka He. Actually proposed that Bulgaria joined the USSR and become the Sixteenth Republic. Is that true that? Yes that's still in the early nineteen sixties shifts for wanted us to be so close to the Soviets. So he proposed to become the sixteen republic. Why so subservient? The USSR you know because as a small country, we have always tried to find our big brother because you're right there in the middle of the Habsburgs and Russia and and. The meat of all those crossroads and your. Little so easy to gobble up if you're a big giant country absolutely, but fortunately, the Soviets were in the middle of the Cuban missile crisis saw they were busy and they were not interested in having trouble themselves Khrushchev or whoever was the dictator say There's a joke in becan communist time. The biggest animal in the world was the Bulgarian pig because the head was in Bulgarian. The body was in Moscow I. Was that funny. So many years ago he mentioned the pick when you have the body of the pick of the good meat is there. So we produced Oh the good stuff food and it was expected to the Soviet. Union. So practically, this is the reason why still nowadays in Russia they remember all those fruits and very funds legal, Gary, all good stuff that came from Bulgaria. So the big shot in Moscow and wind as well. Of course, all the Bulgarian wine. Oh, the best bogere in one when Russia. Well today you don't have that problem. You've got wonderful traditional food and drink and and Yuri. What is one thing we should remember about the food of Bulgaria when we visit incredibly fresh everything is fresh. What's been out of the garden? What's IT traditional? A traditional meal I I remember some beautiful soups. You must have a salad. You must argue with Salads and a little bit of Brandy. As world it goes with the Salads. We always have the strong alcohol first, and then we go to the wine and then we go to the beer you start with the strong alcohol yes, we do. We do. Why is that Stephan? It is deep tradition. What my parents belief is that when we have a trunk alcohol to open your perceptions the food, this is the best way to taste it when you have a few sips of follow traditional. Brandy. Code. Of Akia. So when I'm cooking, if people have the strong alcohol, I can actually eat my food. It helps it helps a lot. Gary is the only country in the European Union that has this surreal alphabet I was in Bulgaria when you're on May twenty fourth, that's big celebration. Why does Bulgaria have this unique alphabet and what's the cultural background of that? I remember that day because we were actually fuming Bulgaria episode into our in my hometown. So it is really important to understand these different alphabet because this is an alphabet which helped to spread the Christianity because it's surreal religious named after Saint. And who was his side and his brother Metallica's Methodius and Cyril. So they innovated this alphabet so they could write down the holies holy scripture scriptures and people could read them exactly in idea to have the Christianity. Kuo's to the heart close the. So to understand the holy wisdom to understand the words written, what century was that this was in the eight, hundred, eight, hundred, fifty, five,

Bulgaria Ussr Moscow Poland Stephan Bush Gary Stephanie Khrushchev United States Sixteenth Republic KUO Metallica Yuri Habsburgs European Union Europe Italy Greece Germany
"ussr" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

06:16 min | 6 months ago

"ussr" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"They decided to instead try to undermine him with the use of the state judicial system. And they brought these various charges against him. Ranging from embezzlement to fraud to accusing him of stealing some piece of pre Dr. Accusing him of defrauding French Perfume Company, even saying that he had something to do with killing an elk, all efforts to try to bring charges against him, which would diminish his stature in the public eye but also disabled went from being a candidate As you pointed out right after he announced he was gonna run against Putin, long behold charges are lodged against than prevent him from running as a candidate known coincidence. JEREM show. Literally locked him up so that he couldn't run right. But to show the force of the figure, he's become in Russia you know he also got released after there were mass protests that were mobilized. So there's been this kind of. Kind of dance seemed or balance that. They've tried to strike where they try and diminish him. As you said, they try and take them off the field literally and figuratively take off the political field during election times but also. been concern of. About the the massive kind of boring of protests that some of these measures have have taken. So you know he's a he's a serious figure. This has gotten a lot of attention and I think there's a few things that we should all be very concerned about here. One is the repeated efforts of course of the Russian government to try and silence critics the the where this new volunteers episode fits within the long history of Russia's efforts to silence opposition figures and the extreme lengths that they'll go to to do that to the to the point of using. Banned chemical agents on both it seems in this case on their own soil against a citizen of their country. But also as we've seen in the recent past in two thousand, eighteen against those who have fallen into disfavor in the Kremlin's is on foreign soil, and here that's the talking the case of Sergei Scrip, all his daughter, Julia. Who in two thousand eighteen were found unconscious in a park in Salisbury England and it was determined after a know investigation by the Brits into this, they were poisoned with a nerve agent that hit was left on their doorknob of their home of scrawls home now scrip all no angel right? He was a double agent. WHO's a former GRU. That's the military intelligence arm of the Russian government is former G. R. U. Officer and he turned into. Am I six. British. Intelligence asset. So he's playing both sides right in fallen into disfavor with the Kremlin and he was in the UK in two thousand and eighteen having been traded in a spy swap with Russia. So clearly, Russia was exacting revenge with this effort to poison him and they were doing. So in a very noisy in public way, right? They sent they sent agents from Russia to the UK those guys used Russian passports and were caught on. CCTV twice while they were walking around in Salisbury before they. Conducted this operation so clear that the Russians were. Wanted to make it known that they had the capability to do this they did this against scroll in his daughter and used what was then found to be this nerve agent Nova Chalk which turns out to be a very similar if not in the same nerve agent family as that, which has now been found by the doctors in the system of Navalny high while he's been in Berlin. Yeah. It was developed by scientists onto the Soviet Union and they had a stockpile of it, and so we know that the rest state would have accessed. But yeah. As a screwball great example. I think amazing aspects of that older many amazing aspects but one is that he actually went over the UK spy in. As part of a spice fom. So we swapped somebody to the Russians that they wanted to protect. We got him or the Brits got him so they can protect. In the Russians, come around afterwards and try to kill the is it's really not not cricket. Cricket Nice Nice. He's the trade. It's incredibly brazen right. So just shows more and more the lengths to which the Russians will go to to kind of exert their power to exert their influence. We'll talk more about that when we talk about the situation in Belarus in a minute but. Obviously one of the things that I think we should all be very, very concerned about in this in this no Vanni. Episode but you know we should. We should also discuss the the whodunit factor here. Right Absolutely we know that he's got a bunch of opponents in Russia up to and including Putin. So in the in the mystery element of this, who who do you think done it? Yeah, we'll look. So. That question, you have to go back and look at the background that we just discussed. Not only do we have the poisoning, but we have this whole record of. The Russian state. Jenning up investigations and prosecutions to try to just. Disabled them as as opposition candidate, which you know when you think about, it would sort of be like president trump China Jenoptik investigation against his political opponents Joe Biden. A wait a minute. That sounds vaguely familiar to sin to sin. Sorry but it really is it. It's. A blatant misuse of the state's authority to dispense justice for bloke reason. So you have that that's obviously state action. Then you have this mysterious poisoning right on the heels in the midst of that state effort to try to disabled as political opposition leader. So you have to think i. Leader the current leader, the Russian government of Vladimir. Putin and look..

Russia Putin nerve agent Russian government UK Kremlin Russian government of Vladimir embezzlement French Perfume Company Soviet Union Sergei Scrip Salisbury Salisbury England GRU scrawls Joe Biden fraud
"ussr" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

Chicago Dog Walk

05:43 min | 6 months ago

"ussr" Discussed on Chicago Dog Walk

"He he's basically we'll do whatever it takes. So he took the part of Ukraine that he liked until the West really kind of pushed back and they put crazy Obama's administration put crazy sanctions on them like really crippled the economy, but it's been like. It's been a calm and in that part of the world where it's like, okay, like you influence. Ukraine. What's IT GONNA do in Belarus he was rumored to be doing shit with Estonia Lithuania Latvia all those countries as well. Poland scared to death of him and and that's where we are now with with Belarus because he's not exactly he doesn't know what to do. Or maybe he's just waiting and seeing because none of the opposition have come out and said like we don't like Moscow like we want to have a good relationship with Moscow just fucking hate this guy. and. So with Ukraine when he sent in special forces, he spent sent in all these people to like get what he wanted. He's kind of be like I don't really necessarily want to support Lukashenko either so they're kind of have a kind of an icy relationship since August about this whole thing to and you know. Putin has pipeline that takes oil and gas from from Russia. Senate right to the of everybody in Europe, they make fuck ton of money. For. Their entire Connie. And Lukashenko as being like, I'm just gonNA divert those pipelines. If you don't support me I'm just GONNA divert those pipelines of steel, all of it and steal all your oil and gas. So then Putin's like well, maybe on like if you do that may we'll just come in and take over your country and there is also a movement or people who were like, Hey, that doesn't sound too bad. We'll just be a part of Russia like we had talked about it before we've never really been our own country is just like this last thirty years. We'll just become. Russia and maybe that'll be better than being our own thing and so there is like there are people in Russia who believed that then we have this the woman's Lana who's Has said I wanNA have a good relationship with Moscow with Putin and all that? So I think Putin just kind of waiting. and seeing like he'd be fined have Lukashenko in their if Lukashenko plays ball, he'd be fine lettings, Lana win and then having the free and democratic elections because why? Putin, has like an army of Internet trolls propaganda people who can influence elections or you're talking about, why doesn't you know people just handpick somebody patsy while he can do that effectively like through the Internet now so they find a guy or a woman who? Will Give Food and whatever he wants, and they'll put their army they have that army of Social media bought and things like that to influence election, and then what do you know didn't have to invade but basically have the country. Good Lord Good Lord exactly. and. That part of the world it's It's that is like the front lines of this geopolitical battle against against Putin. So it is. It is crazy like no one really knows how it's GonNa work out..

Putin Belarus Lukashenko Ukraine Obama Moscow Lana who Poland Senate Europe Connie Estonia Latvia Lithuania
What Moon Landing?

The Ladies of Strange

04:15 min | 7 months ago

What Moon Landing?

"In the nineteen sixties, two things were happening more things are happening to. One it just two things. disclaimer were bottle of wine in the first one is the Cold War, which was basically between the US and the US are that started after the end of World War Two and nineteen, forty eight and lasted until nineteen ninety-one notice how I know when World War Two was. Throwing shade at the orange. I've had wine I'm a little snarky year. Then I'm not upset the way. The second thing was happening was the Vietnam War, which lasted between nineteen, fifty, five, and nineteen, seventy five. I did not think that was when on. Okay. But seriously I didn't realize the lasted that long either I thought it started like late late. Late mid to late sixties and went into the seventies. Yeah. Holy moly history is important because not only does it give us context as to why things happens, but it also serves as a blueprint showing what not to do if anyone literally anyone decided to pay attention in history class but whatever Got I. Him. So I'm fine. So in the nineteen sixties, the US was dealing with two things one they're trying to get the upper hand in and the other they're trying to distract the public from. Does that make sense had wine? Yes. Okay. Basically, it was a perfect time for the US government to distract everybody Hooker Luna verse. Where you're mass please. And this is why they decided to fake the moon landing. Where's the wind. please. Oh happy day. This explain why it started drinking. I'm so happy right now just help it off girl you're in need it I wanna make sure Rebecca some two but no, I don't just doing with to me this is a subject but I chose up my own free will thank you so much. This is going to be amazing. Okay. But why why would we do this? The US was currently racing the USSR to be the first to the moon and the fastest way to do that would be to fake it's. Kinda like when you're never mind. There it is. Oh, we made it two minutes. That's where we learned it from. The Moon and Do to the bad press the Vietnam War Gotten General the moon landing would serve as the. Distraction at the time luckily in this day and age that only have hundreds of people been able to see through the thin veil that is as opposed moon landing but have also been able to poke holes and this historical events. Can we make sure that you know take this is poured slash s please. You can't tell that from my voice I can I only sound this way when it's bullying? Sixties radio. Broadcaster Boys. Here for all of it. So now we're going to dive into reasons why are evidence as to why the moon landing did not happen? Okay. GimMe all of it I is there's no wind on the moon correct in the flag was waving. Yep that's pretty much where we're going. Imagine this iconic scene, the year is nineteen sixty nine. Neil. Armstrong. Neil. Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin are on the face of this lunar body preparing especially made us flag plant on the moon as they're securing the flag in a never ending show of colonization Oh my God something curious happens the flag starts waving in the winds, which is weird because there is no wind on the moon. The Moon essentially does not have an atmosphere meaning. There is nothing to cause old glory to way proudly in a patriotic breeze. That's

United States Neil Armstrong Rebecca Buzz Aldrin Ussr
"ussr" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"ussr" Discussed on What A Day

Is the Link Between Depression and Serotonin a Myth?

One Life Radio Podcast

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Is the Link Between Depression and Serotonin a Myth?

"This is from What doctors don't tell you coincidentally it's a magazine from the UK What is her name? Lynne McTaggart founder of it and her husband and I'm sorry I can't think of his name But I I it's in here. That's so disrespectful. Find it hold on. Okay Up Brian Hubbard. Your is her husband's name And so it says in many of the suppressed oppressed studies S. S. R. is performed worse than Placebos. Okay we're talking And and that's just part of it. And then they talk about inflammation it's it's it's as if depression isn't a chemical If depression isn't a chemical imbalance what is it. One theory gaining. Traction is that it has to do with inflammation and I'm thinking of the book the inflamed mind and all these other things that I read everywhere and I do believe that I do and I've seen it firsthand from people in my family that have taking CBD or tumor just lost some weight or started eating better and their mental health improves as well. Absolutely once you mitigate inflammation through diet through lifestyle through sleep then things start to to to even out a bit more because your body's inflamed Cintas fight or flight state as it is so then you couple that with things outside of it in life and it's going to just make it worse and here's here's a little more on the SS ours are is the SS arise. Yeah and they're like what are you talking about. That's an old song isn't it. Never heard of it and the USSR. Billy Joel the Billy Joel. The Beatles back in the. US Bilko. Isn't billy Joel. I may be wrong. Mo Bros out but we'll do a challenge challenge. We'll have somebody google anyway. What made me think of it? I have the worst sense of humor I really do but Bu- back before our eyes antidepressants were developed Just two one hundred people per million listen to this just before they developed are accessorize this which are antidepressants. Before they were developed. Just two hundred hundred people per million were diagnosed with depression but this exploded to a hundred thousand people per million ten percent of the population when the drugs were launched on the back of the chemical imbalance theory of depression. That's crazy right. Okay let me read on. It says in one thousand nine sixty five Harvard psychiatrist. Joseph Shield Kraut Kraut. Put forward the theory. That depression was caused by low levels of neurotransmitter and two years later other researchers singled out serotonin and so it says if a chemical is linked depression than the drug industry could produce another chemical to adjust the balance and so research began to research into SS. Our eyes as began but neuroscientists were doing their research to and they were unable to find evidence that supported the theory. Clinical researchers didn't fare fare. Any better studies have depressed. People found that their serotonin levels were the same as in healthy controls and even when when Saratova Serotonin levels calls were D- habilitated Excuse me I'm really butchering this. You know okay you know what I'm having. I had my teeth cleaned this morning. And what does that have to do it. But I'm having like this is weird thing with my lips. No I'm serious like my lips aren't pronouncing words right anyway. Okay so let me go back. So so even when Serotonin levels were deliberately lowered. The participants didn't become depressed. Convert conversely depress people given very high doses of Serotonin didn't see any improvement in their symptoms. Even the psychiatric profession quietly agrees. It's Bible that the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders doesn't list Serotonin as a cause of depression. While the American Psychiatric Press Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry Sites serotonin deficiency as an unconfirmed hypothesis right. But we also know now about genetic expression how you can turn genes on and off so just because you maybe you might have the gene for depression or anxiety or whatever your your lifestyle your diet your stress levels and you'll recovery can turn on or off those genes in childhood childhood trauma that they address like see. I told you I can't tickets. But that's the thing like they were. They're looking at one thing they're looking at Serotonin. Of course you're not going to fix visit with one with a silver bullet right. The you have to look at the entire holistic picture of this thing. Yeah holistically so under the M. I didn't. That's that's such such such a great point it is because that's what we do here. We talk about holistic and alternative. How so it goes on with this inflammation? Depression isn't a chemical imbalance. What is it one theory gaining? Traction is it has to be inflammation and we already talked about that. But researchers at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana tested the theory that when they assessed early childhood had experiences and depression among one hundred seventy seven young offenders at a juvenile detention center in Russia many were suffering from depression and the researchers discovered vert a correlation between the severity of their condition and the extent of childhood trauma such as punishment hostility parents on justified criticism and lack F- respect. Absolutely that's a subconscious programming especially when your child we don't even realize is happening right. I don't know why I'm depressed. Nawab sad all the time. Well you know so And that goes for For Schizophrenia too. You can be predisposed to that. It's in my family genes. But why did I not get it. And why did my brother My brother Jerome Jerry. Jerry data will. Jerry was sexually molested as a child when he was an altar boy with the Catholic Church and so and that caused a split your body holds trauma holds traumas going and it happened repeatedly. He was an altar boy for many many years. Okay and it was. It was a repeated thing and He had a nervous breakdown when he was seventeen and he and his life immediately you know was he and he's never had a driver's license all these things that we all take for granted And he has suffered tremendously But in one institution after the next now he's in a really great home where he gets great care and Houston and but so many so many people don't understand that those childhood traumas they. Can you carry them with them with you for your life unless they're healed and talked about that so one of the doctors that I'm working with now don would WHO's a neuropsychologist? Has a program program called inspired performance institute he goes back in helps clear. TRAUMAS like that. Childhood TRAUMAS Folks that have been Exonerated from wrongfully incarcerated for murders and such And that's what it's all about is about clearing those subconscious traumas of things. That happened to us. Like it's you your your your brother right might might blame himself for being an altar boy. It's those little things they go back to. They don't think about that. They don't understand it until they go back into it because brain sees it as as if it's happening right now until until they can clear that in reprogram the way the brain sees that event they're going to be stuck in that repetitive

Depression Inflammation Billy Joel Lynne Mctaggart Traumas Brian Hubbard American Psychiatric Press Tex Google Jerome Jerry United States UK Joseph Shield Kraut Founder Ussr S. S. R. Beatles Houston BU University Of Notre Dame Harvard
Satellites Track Status of Nation's Food Supply

PODSHIP EARTH

10:45 min | 1 year ago

Satellites Track Status of Nation's Food Supply

"Have you ever wondered. How much food is growing right now? Across the globe. Satellite data is for the first time giving us nearly real time data. Uh on which trump's are being planted which crops might fail because of climate impacts like drought or disease and how many because of rain for us to being cut down for grazing land. Using this information we can better path famines reduced price volatility and work out how to feed a planet of nine billion people by twenty fifty. That's a WHO small undertaking and it will have huge impacts on everything from water usage to soil health to help us. Navigate is fascinating new science. I sit down with Dr Inbound. Becca Russia the director of NASA's food security and agricultural programmes. Dr Becca Russia is also the CO director of the center of Global Global Agriculture Monitoring Research and the University of Maryland in bow was rented by the US State Department for her work on food security and Technologies winning being the US Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Science Prize Innovation Research and education awarded by the White House's John Holdren the former assistant listen to president. Obama for Science and technology in bows background does in soil scientists in remote sensing and she received a PhD in Geographical Sciences. His from the University of Maryland in bows one of the world's leading experts on using remote sensing for global crop forecasting in addition to being achieved the balance. My cousin and one of my favorite people ever in Bell and her husband Dr Guido Portillo a molecular physicists. have to amazing daughters Natalie and I need it. I caught up with him about last week in Tel Aviv. which is where she was born? Yes born in Israel shortly after moved to the states until I was five and then came back from age five to eleven then moved to Kenya and then moved to the states in one sense cents. I feel very much like an outsider. In a very in another sense I feel very much home like I never left. And it's the first time I bring my two daughters here which is quite emotional for me for to have them here. Seeing where I grew up and a big part of my life and who I am so do you speak Hebrew with them in bow I do. I speak Hebrew with them and so for them. I think it's been An interesting experience to come to a country where everybody speaks what we speak at home and usually nobody else speak so kind of our secret language. So it's been fun to to see them connect and in some way feel very much also that this is part of of who they are two and what things you miss the most about Israel the sun in the winter having twenty degrees in January or end of December the familiarity of people and kind of the directness of people. Anything I missed that I also kind of get confronted with it and in other ways my friends really good friends. Family food vegetables fruit the so Tokyo food food in battle. One of your your light. One of the leading experts in the world on remote sensing in crop prediction. Why full you is is crop and food security such a big issue on a planet which currently has seven and a half billion people on it food security is probably one of the biggest challenges we face in this coming century today day? There's over eight hundred twenty million people food insecure around the world. That number is on the rise again. Due to several reasons one is increasing populations and increasing in demand on meet another big driver's been climate extremes and large droughts as we look forward and and different forecasts predict that we need to increase our food production fifty percent by twenty fifty and there's some variability around that number. But I think some of what's been driving that is one increasing populations to increasing middle middle classes in places like India and China which means there's a much bigger demand for meat. And if you think about the amount of food you need to produce meat versus Vegetarian anti at that obviously has big demands. It's quite an alarming trend and at the same time. Obviously there's a lot of technologies and changes in terms of our production. What we need to do is to be able to increase our food production on the same amount of land? There's not a lot more land that we can really bring into cultivation to meet that demand so that's pretty alarming like increasing food supply by fifty percent by two thousand fifty which is only now thirty years away with how growing the amount of land. How are we going to do that? Part of it is increasing increasing. The intensity of of our captivation of it has to do with the technology of seeds. And I think we're continuing to see increases in yields are low. Not as fast as that was in the past. Some of the big increases we're seeing today is from increasing the number of seasons since I think if you look at Brazil for example with two mays seasons. That's increased tremendously the amount of food. That's being being produced looking at different varieties and more whether it's drought resistant varieties. That's going to get as part of the way there at least to your specialty is helping countries knit together. Analyses of determining what the future food production season is going to look like. Why is that important to know a lot of what I do and try to understand what food production is GONNA be for this current season as it's developing and that's really important because today our world is it's very much globalized interconnected? So what's the quantity of of wheat that's going to be grown in. Russia has an impact not only in Russia but it really has a global impact. Let's really important taft. Transparent information to have global information of how much food is being produced at at any given time that has an impact on how a government decides to to plan their actions. I am policies. It has an impact on humanitarian organisations and trying to forecast where there might be food shortages. And how do you mobilize as soon as possible. and has obviously a big the impact on markets and international food prices given the importance of all that. How did we use to track? Whether it's a country that has a system of farmers. There's reporting everything that they grow in tracking it that way. Various statistical surveys to make sure that there's a statistical representation to that and obviously some countries do a better job at that in a better accuracy and timeliness than other countries. Do I mean the start of satellite monitoring for agriculture. Goes back nearly as early as satellite. Remote Sensing doesn't in general in the seventies and how the US got involved in. This was a big drought in Russia. One of the big wheat production next countries at the time of USSR the US wasn't aware of that drown in that impact and in what ended up happening is the US sold. We'd at subsidized prices. Essentially and then had to fight back in the international markets at much higher prices because there was was a shortage who was I did at Sparta Program at the time that Usda and NASA had together called Lacey and the objective of that really was to try to monitor what was going on outside of the US in the major food production especially we at the time we in corn production and the idea was that satellites were really the only way ah the US could look at other countries in the world getting a sense of what they were producing. And if you look today at what. The vision is for Satellite Remote Sensing and agriculture. It's not all that different. Then when it was over forty years ago. What is different? Today is our capability to finally reach that goal. So you had this vision forty years ago being able to know what another country's crop would yield like what change in satellite so that we now actually have that granular level detail to be able to know with better accuracy. So few do things. One is the quality of satellite data itself the frequency the resolution and resolution. If you think about it is what objects you can discern on the ground from a pixel which is how we look at the imagery. It's the satellite data being open and free at at multiple resolution. New satellites that have come into play both from the European side. Something called the sentinels which today imaging the world at ten meter resolution close to every three to five days which is looked along with land sat satellite for example from the. US giving US close to every three days view the world. So where would you say ten meters just to break it down to that. Means every pick cell is ten meters. That's right it's ten by ten meter resolution. So that means you can can discern quite a lot and if you think about looking at the whole world at ten meter resolution. That's a huge amount of information. And so we've had huge advances in terms of the satellite data also commercial satellite and a lot of cubesats that are going into space which are now giving us close to daily data three-meter resolution and then our compute power to be able to process that kind of imagery and advances in modeling and computational technologies to really be able to utilize that data has been a huge revolution in terms of what we're able to do so go all these lights. NEW ONES IS ACCU- ones. Those are like really teeny little satellites. That are going out. That's right. So they're often termed as shoebox size satellites. They have been sending up in in fleet so I think today. They're close to four hundred or more earth-observing satellites that are called cubesats so the data quality is not as high. They don't have as many spectral bands for example as as some of the other satellites but they're cheap to send up and they've also revolutionized the space of commercial satellite. So those aren't free. They're much more affordable than than they would have been in the past. What are you looking for right? So we're trying to basically look at signals us of crops so one of the things we're trying to understand is where are the crops of the world being grown and there's still huge certainty around that one would think that we would know that very well and And there's still a lot of room for us to improve that second of all is which crops are being grown wear and if you think about it every year that's changing so there's a lot lot of crop rotations and so what that really means you want to be able ideally to know what's being grown in each field during the growing season so that's one of the the big objectives is to be able to classify Within the season where things are being grown to be able to both discern how much of an area is being grown. That's one part of the production equation and the other side is what the yield is going to be and so what we WANNA do. It's really important to have time series of data to look at it through time to look at the volition of the development of crops. But but when you said earlier that we don't actually know where food is being grown. What does that mean if you think about it as a map of where the the world's croplands we have several of those maps but we're trying to continuously increase the accuracy of that? And if you think about crop expansion or changes in where croplands are for example title Brazil and and huge expansion of croplands. There is really important to be able to update that as frequently as possible in particular in in areas where there is a lot of change and we still need better information on where the global croplands are and then more specifically within season a crop type maps.

United States Dr Becca Russia Russia Israel Nasa Director Croplands Us State Department Brazil Us Asia Pacific Economic Coope University Of Maryland Dr Inbound Center Of Global Global Agricu Donald Trump
A Beginner's Guide To Visiting Moldova

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:53 min | 1 year ago

A Beginner's Guide To Visiting Moldova

"I like to welcome to the show Christina Lescot from a finding elevation dot com which is a mindfulness website but she is also also from Moldova. Originally and come to talk to us about her home country original home country country of origin. Moldova Christina welcome to the show so much for having me Chris I feel like I could possibly said that more awkwardly but the I think that was awkward enough you so you were born in Moldova. But don't live there now. Yes I was born and raised and I laughed when I was nineteen and I'm currently in Canada so I will wear Moldova. I'm not sure that everybody could even put it on a map. Yeah that's a very valid question and fraud years. I was just thinking I should just make a card in every time I introduced myself someone. Just keep them the card hard and they're like. Hey this is where it is because the second question when everybody finds out at them from all the ways where is that so quite used to it already. has anyone anyone ever accused you of making up a country not yet detail. kind of thinking might happen in future. But it's actually in Ulster era. Settle in right next to Ukraine and Romania. So it's a very small country. Okay and in fact as I went to mispronounce ear name you had to tell me the Romanian pronunciation of it so the language there at least the language you spoke was Romanian. Yes we do. I have a few letters that are not used to the American side. Have a few extra letters in our alphabet that we're using it quite often and then why should someone travel to Moldova Raw. First of all would be because nobody really goes there. Technically if you're looking for for a country that it's still very cultural and it's still not tainted by tourism because tourism tends to when people go to one country and they go so in massive numbers the culture kind of gets lost in between in Moldova. Everything is quiet of people go and they see how it is this in this point in time without having to many tourists. So you won't have to deal with very high prices and generally you'll be discovering in culture that you've never really experienced before so if you're the person for looking for going to places that people don't usually go to Moldova as a really crepe place to start and we're talking about as you said a small country about I was just looking at two hundred ninety times smaller than the US us to take a whole year to visit all of Moldova. What would you recommend? We do. Say A one week itinerary. Okay so so you'll definitely be landing in the capital which is canal sue Maybe about two hundred thousand or five hundred thousand people. Oh it's very developed. It's very beautiful so there's a lot of neighborhoods to go around now. There are a lot of popular places in kitchen now. So the the main plays up people go to would be the cathedral and the Stephan the great wanting to which is right in the center of the capital capital and where you have the National Park Swell so technically. This is the main street in the center. This is where they new year's facilities are happening so y Stephan. The Great Park is important. Because he was I would say he was like a king in our country. We call it like a ruler. So he won a lot of bottles and every bottle he won. He would build the monastery. So we have a lot of monasteries in our country that would be if you're going directly to to the center of the city so this everything closed by you just take taxi. Were Public Transit. I would definitely challenge you to it from from there. My second favorite place in the capital that you should definitely try it out and go would be the place that we celebrate at the end of the war so dot would be cold the memorial complex attorney. It's also in the center kind of maybe maybe a twenty minutes drive from the center of the city still in the capital. It's one of my favorite places in kitchen house. So this is a place where we commemorate the veterans and every year the stability's for the the end of World War Two happened there and we also have an eternity fire. So there's a fire there. That never goes away. It's always protected by the military. So you can just go around. And there's different monuments and very beautiful sculptures in parks and it's kind of like a major park. Can you can just go there during the day and see it. Now we're too had other changes on Moldova's Moldova as I understand it became part of the USSR at the end of work too. So that is significant for why Moldova exists map as a separate country now is that it was part of Romania before the war part of the USSR until it gained its independence. Much more recently. That happened in one thousand nine hundred one. And that was I would say there's a big change to Moldova's cultural identity and identity in general especially language so we speak Romanian. But because we were a part of your czar We actually had our language colds curious so technically people would when they arrive they were right or million words but with Russian alphabet and also a lot of people will speak Russian so right now Moldova bovine is bilingual. And I would say it's seats at a good fifty fifty percent like if you go there you do very well refreshing language. You'll what else do very well in any language so even with my grandparents or so. They're more verse in Russian Than Me. I speak Romanian Iranian cameleon language however my grandparents They would write in curiel a car. They would not try Romanian. So that's a significant skinned difference. I'm we should point out for people who are not linguis- which I think is probably most of us. That Romanian and Russian are not in the same family group at all Romanian. Being a romance languages closer to French for instance and Russian is a Slavic language. So that's that's quite different to know this you it's Knowing Spanish and French or something like that they are completely different languages and I would say just. The war had such a big impact on us so we grew up with Russian influence. Russian music movies so I would say right now. There is obviously attention between Westernising Housing and going to the West. So it's always kind of Moldova is just in the middle and doesn't really know which way to go. The country just tear east has just had had part of it annexed by Russia as they try and get the band back together. So yeah I would think there'd be some some tension there so where else should we go after you've seen the city which there's a lot more places you obviously there's a lot of neighborhoods. I'm going to be biased entirely. Okay my favorite neighborhood is China. And that's because that is the place I spend my childhood in just walked in the streets and going to the local market it and discovering the people and there's a big alley that goes for quite a few blocks so usually when I was small. My parents would take me out there and we just walk doc do in the evenings on that massive Allie from one side to the other. There's a lot of restaurants and stores that you can check out this well and while you are in the center of the city definitely definitely try. Our cuisine. Moldova is very popular for having their a traditional food. which for me was kind of a difference because when I came to Canada was looking for traditional food but I couldn't really find it because we are so specific jake like we do have traditional food and every time we go away? We always crave it so we have like different restaurants and places we can go and buy. And I. Don't know Moldovan traditional food so it's going to be similar more similar Romanian. I'm assuming then Slavic so I'm not talking about the noodle dumplings swings and things like that. I'm talking about more stews actually. It's our traditional. Food is Komal Ga.. which is very great? Is this made off cornflower in. Eat It with your hands along with cottage

Moldova Canada Christina Lescot Romania Fraud Stephan Chris Great Park Ussr Komal Ga.. United States Russia Westernising Housing DOT Ukraine National Park Attorney Allie China
Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Tear Down This Wall: Tipping Points

"This first episode of a four part series marking the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We examine the conventional wisdom that the I cracks in it appeared a long way away in a ruinous war in Afghanistan malfunctioning nuclear plant in Ukraine. This is the foreign desk. It's partially about the Aghanistan. But it's partially more about the kind of discussions people are having about institutions inside which you weren't supposed to look so the military leterrier was one of those. The military was sacred military defeated the Nazis. The military was the defender of the Soviet order. And suddenly you have very public discussions about that was a little risque at the extensive research. Shaw it was a bizarre situation where Cold War was still going on and foreign governments the governments of the NATO countries that were warning me and people around me on how I should behave and protect ourselves in our own Goldman and I saw somebody. Reading is best German newspaper bid side and I said to my at my partner into Cau- aw look somebody reading side and it was really something extraordinary and immediately drove to British and really really it has become commonplace to compare the Soviet Union's invasion of Afghanistan John in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine to the United States long misadventure in Vietnam which had only ended for years beforehand. Both was exacted. A terrible ribble cost in lives and money abroad both undermined faith in government at home and both ended in humiliation but was the confrontation between the Red Army and Afghan Mujahideen armed with American weapons really as is often suggested the climactic battle of the Cold War. This was Leonard. Leonard Brezhnev's Soviet leader at the time when invading Afghanistan still seemed like a good idea. Would the party today strongly tastes the following principle fully words. I'm evaluates the unfolding situation and in consultation with the government of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Ghanistan the Soviet leadership taken the following decision which I am officially announcing today. Kalinowski is a professor first of Eastern European studies at the University of Amsterdam and the author of along good by the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan. Tamie picks up the story story in March nineteen seventy-nine there's an uprising in the city of Herat and the Afghanistan's socialist who are in power. Ask them to intervene. Intervene and the and the Soviets think about it and basically say no and if you look at why they say no. It's quite interesting. Because they are quite aware that it's GonNa make relations with the West more difficult it's GonNa make relations with the Soviet Union's allies in the developing world problematic. They're worried about as they put having to fight the Afghan population and so on so they actually reject the idea march. I think what happens. By December is that they lose hope of the the government in Kabul actually being able to control the situation without Soviet help the fact that the communists are sort of killing each other but I think what really worries them is that a CIA can take advantage of the broad background to that of course is they're looking at deteriorating relations relations with the US already they're looking at the revolution in Iran. They're thinking okay you know. The Americans are getting beaten in Iran. They're going to try to look for a way to compensate. They're they're going to do that in Afghanistan so basically I think what happens by December nineteen seventy-nine as they think they have no other choice unlike the US in Vietnam the USA in Afghanistan was not troubled by a free press asking questions but not even the USSR could hide everything forever. We've had this justification for the the last six seven years about why we're in there. We can't just pull out right. We have to explain to people buyer pulling out now. Was it doing damage to the Soviets. Sure they were losing people will and they were spending money on it. But proportional to how large the Soviet military is and the kind of resources that it's used to spending. It's actually fairly small. I I think the bigger issue for Gorbachev one is that it's not improving especially by nineteen eighty six eighty seven. He's convinced that it's not going to get better and to is that. He sees that is an obstacle to better relations with other countries with countries in the Middle East and awesome first and foremost of course the United States. And that's as big a

Afghanistan Afghan Mujahideen Soviet Union United States Democratic Republic Of Afghani Berlin Wall Leonard Brezhnev Gorbachev Aghanistan Ukraine Vietnam Iran Middle East Herat Nato Red Army Tamie Shaw University Of Amsterdam
Discussing the Show Masks (Spoiler Alert!)

The Official Watchmen Podcast

11:03 min | 1 year ago

Discussing the Show Masks (Spoiler Alert!)

"It struck me as somebody that is is pretty well versed in the in the graphic novel. The absolutely have done something like I say that extends stems from that work so you had this almost impossible task. You had to adapt in a sense. Something that you love and respect and probably idolize is getting a lot of people to yes but also then had to depart from it completely and make it something different. It had to be of it and apart from it. How did you negotiate that very carefully? Also completely totally haphazardly. I mean I think that it was a combination of the energy of a of a bowl in China shop and and then trying to catalog everything that you knocked over and broke so that you could replace it and both things had to happen simultaneously because I think that we went in With a high degree of fear and concern and delicate nece and then very quickly we were just like fuck all of that. Let's just go nuts. And then you had vacillate between those polls and the show sort of happened in the space where we were moving in between the polls because our job storytellers is to make something feel authentic to make could feel real and I wanted this television experience. Because it's not a comic book where you're turning the pages where illustrated cartoon characters I wanted to feel real real and authentic at the same time there's some true ridiculousness happening around the the fringes of this so the first thing that we did and And when I say we at the very beginning of this thing it was this guy. Jeff Jensen I and Jeff and I jeff was a reporter for entertainment weekly remember would write these crazy theories about lost cost under the pseudonym doc Jensen not not quite as soon because his last name is Johnson. Doc in front yes. He doesn't fraud easily easily from my understanding is he did not hold a doctorate in anything. Maybe lost in any way he and I collaborated on tomorrow and and did a lot of world building for that Disney thing but when the third time they came to me and said. Do you WanNa do watchmen and I started kind of feel the beginnings of a glimmer of what it would be about. I texted Jeff and I said I have two questions. The first question is like should there. Be a watchman TV show and then the second is should I do it and I think he responded depends ends and depends and then I was like yeah would you. Would you WanNa do it together. And then he came over and He was the first person that I really bounced a lot of these ideas off of and he and I put together. This list of adjectives A like almost like a recipe list of these are adjectives that we use to describe. The original watchmen. C'mon and if our version if we can check these same adjectives against it almost like a mad libs then than we maybe we earned the name and the first word on the list was original And so now there's this paradox were presented with which is. It's an adaptation of this thing. That already exists. How do you you make it original and I think the gaming of that paradox was still thinking about? Did we game but like that was really the challenge in front of us which was like how does this thing feel like. It's it's it's watchmen. But at the same time it could only feel like it's watchmen if it's taking huge risks when and it feels is like you. You're feeling nervous while you're watching it like A. I don't know what's happening and I don't like it and I don't know where this is going to go next and I'm a little bit scared and not it just scared where it's GonNa go narrative Lee but scared that it could jump the shark. When I read watchmen I could tell you? Twenty instances in over the course of those twelve issues shoes just took my breath away in terms of like. You aren't allowed to do that. I can't believe that just happened like my heart would be racing as I was reading. Thank those issues and to to to try to replicate that emotional sensation for the TV show. That's what we were chasing. Sometimes a we succeeded needed other times. Not but that was the brass ring we were all reaching for. So what we're talking about in many ways is the tone of watchmen and its ambition and and it's fearlessness. And when we begin your series right out of the gates it does seem like you hit those well. At least you hit the ambition and you hit the fearlessness. If watchmen the graphic novel was a meditation perhaps on the morality of heroism. It seems pretty clear from the beginning of your show so that your show is about race period the end it is about race. I want to ask you how much this emphasis on race from. The start was away for you to say not only. This show is the show about race. But I need you to know right now. It is about race Yeah I'M A I. I apologize in advance because I'm not really able to to answer that question articulately yet. And in many ways this my inability to articulate answer that question was replicated in the writer's room on a repeated basis and led to an incredible incredible of conversations. Both difficult in insertive revelatory of certainly from from my standpoint. But what I'll say. Is that the most difficult question and I think that a lot of writers have to answer. Where do you get your ideas from or what? What is a moment of inspiration like what's the flash point and and a lot of the man's to the the question the same way that I will which is like something just happens internally with that just like sort of clicks and slides into place and then at least I feel compelled to get it out out and most of the time for me? Those ideas don't like happen in the shower whereas like Oh this would be a cool idea for television show. It happens because I've read something or I'm listening running to something or I'm emotionally affected by something and essentially what was happening in my life was as the leftovers was ending and I was starting to kind of feel the panic of if I am not entirely sure that I'm ever GonNa WanNa do this again. I'm I'm not having any ideas. In watchmen is just coming at me for the third time. But it's watchmen and it's the you know for me. That's the you know. It's the Rosetta Stone. It's where all began for me. Maybe not the Rosetta Stone. Do More like the black monolith in two thousand one you know where stars yeah. It's it's full of stars quite literally perfect and and an intimidating and right at the time that they asked me the third time because that because they they'd they'd asked me two times is prior. You know once probably two thousand eleven just a couple years after Zack Snyder's movie and then again maybe in two thousand thirteen or twenty fourteen and now I'm thinking it's like twenty seventeen and and I'm placing this time around the time that Charlottesville is happening and I read between the world and many Tallahassee coaches book and I'll I'm just going to be honest with you I read the book because every single white progressive liberal in the in show business was like they say like this. If you read between the world have you read it like like the shame just like you so it's just like you have to read it. You really have to read it and so I was like this. Sounds like an astonishing piece of writing and it and it was when and when I read that. I also read case for reparations which was an essay that he wrote in the Atlantic a couple years? Probably before and in case for reparations which completely. It's both wildly intuitive. It's nothing that you don't already know but the way that it is written in the story that Mr Coates tells is like just changes ages changed the way that I saw the world. In in that essay he mentioned Black Wall Street Tulsa Twenty one and the way that he wrote about it it was just I I wanna say just three or four sentences or just a paragraph as you say it felt like the destruction of a world to me and at that time also Black Panther hadn't come out yet but it had been announced that Ryan Kugler was going to do it in Tallahassee. Coach was writing Black Panther and I was thinking about what Kanda and I was thinking that. If we're Kanda actually existed in the the real world if there was this place of African American exceptionalism I guess in the case of Kanda African exceptionalism but a place that we're only black people lived and they were the best scientists and it was utopia. If white people found out about this place they would destroy it. They burned to the ground. So all of those ideas were kind of like swirling around in my head and then I bought. This book called the burning about Tulsa twenty-one because because of having read and I was just astonished by this story on every single level most of all because I had never heard about it and I felt shame and embarrassment and I would talk to other people like I talked to people of Color and they go. Oh yeah and I talked two white people and they go. What and then I'd start explaining of? This is what happened and I would see them. Start to get feel embarrassed. And then and then disconnect which is what we do when we feel like? We're supposed to know something we don't know it and so all of that stuff was kind of swirling around in my head and the fundamental question that we were asking about doing watchmen is should we do it. And if so why now. And so I- reflected back on. The original watchmen set in one thousand. Nine hundred five of the came out in eighty six and although it takes place in an alternate version of of America it was dealing with a a nuclear standoff handoff between the USSR. America and and it's counting down towards inevitable nuclear destruction on both sides. That's what the that's what the heroes are solving for. It feels else that gets a murder mystery but unbeknownst to us what's really going on the answer to the murder mystery. He has done it is someone is actually trying to save the world world And and I was like so what. What's the big cultural anxiety? Now when you close the comic book and it stays with you and the answer was says. There's a reckoning happening in America as it relates to race. It's not to say that that reckoning wasn't happening during the civil rights movement where it wasn't happening in the the eighties or the nineties but right now as especially after Charlottesville and I remember very specifically Craig like when Charlottesville happened that there was this rhetoric that was happening around where people kept saying. I can't believe they're not wearing masks. They're not wearing masks anymore. The white supremacists are just out there and we can see their faces in shocking shocking. And so that was happening at the same time that. Hbo was saying do you. WanNa do watchmen show masks and I was like what are masks. You know like what happens when and you mix a mask with the administration of the law. That's the central idea of watchmen and then the KKK. Wears masks. And I'm starting to see protesters like Antigua's wary mass. This was long before Hong Kong. But it's like this idea of like covering your face is covering your face a justification for protecting in yourself or are you doing something that you probably shouldn't be or both and then all of that kind of went into the mix at the heart of it in the center of it. Is this remarkable the character that is not a carryover from watchmen but your invention Angela. Apr Sister

Jeff Jensen Charlottesville Tulsa America Rosetta Stone Kanda China Disney Wanna Doc Jensen HBO Hong Kong Tallahassee Murder Fraud Zack Snyder Reporter Johnson LEE Insertive
How Does Venus Work?

BrainStuff

06:13 min | 1 year ago

How Does Venus Work?

"After the moon the Venus is the second brightest natural object in the night sky partially because this planet is covered by reflective clouds that make it is an optical telescopes can't penetrate eight with the Venetian surface hidden from view generations of fiction writers used to speculate wild about the mysterious terrain beneath those clouds for example Tarzan Creator Edgar Rice burroughs portrayed Venus as a world with lush forests in our boreal cities in a nineteen eighty-four pulp novel but then science intervened B eight at Venus's habitable pretty much imploded during the Cold War in Nineteen fifty-six Radio Telescope observations showed that the planet had surfaced temperatures in excess of six hundred and eight eighteen degrees Fahrenheit that's three hundred twenty six degrees Celsius and believe it or not those readings were kind of low we now know the average surface temperature on Nisa blistering eight hundred sixty four degrees Fahrenheit or four hundred sixty two Celsius it's the hottest planet in our solar system even though mercury is closer to the Sun on the face of Venus the atmospheric pressure is crushingly extreme and lead would melt into a puddle but as hellish as this place sounds actually has in common with Earth the two worlds are quite similar in size if you were to stuff venus inside our planet matric doll style it would occupy roughly eighty six percent end of earth total volume Venus has earth beaten in some key regards though earth displays a slight midsection bulge being wider around its equator than it is from one pole to the other conversely Venus is almost a perfect sphere what gives well when a massive celestial body like a star or planet spins quickly around its axis centrifugal force will give it a more dramatic bulge around its equator however Venus has an ultra slow rotation speed it takes the equivalent of two hundred and forty-three earth days for Venus to complete one full rotation around its axis and only two hundred twenty five earth days to finish a new lap around the Sun so in other words a day on Venus lasts longer than Vanesian year does and get this from our self centered perspective Venus spins backward word most of the planets in the solar system rotate from west to east Uranus and Venus Buck that trend on those two worlds the sun appears to rise in the West and set in the East nobody knows how that came to pass. Astronomers think Venus us to move in a counterclockwise direction like Earth but at some point it's been I have reversed alternatively perhaps the sun's Gravitational influence or a collision with a large object caused the entire planet to flip upside down in December of nineteen sixty two Venus became the first planet to get a fly by visit from a manmade spacecraft exploiting brief window of opportunity NASA's Mariner two probes studied this world up close from distances as near as twenty one thousand miles that's about thirty four thousand kilometers onboard instruments taught us a great deal mariner two firms that Venus does not have an earth like magnetic field and it recorded surface temperatures within the expected range a young Carl Sagan helped design the mariner to probe yes successfully lobbied to have the space craft fitted with a camera because close up pictures of Venus might quote answer questions that we were too dumb to even pose by the time Mariner to launched scientists already knew that there were high levels of carbon dioxide in the vision atmosphere and that composition should give us pause carbon dockside makes up a whopping ninety six percent of Venus's atmosphere scientists attribute this to a runaway greenhouse effect theoretically the planet used to have a more temperate climate that could have remained stable for billions of years back then oceans of liquid water may have covered its surface though we don't know for sure things changed as are growing son became hotter any oceans would have evaporated during this time astronomers think much of the carbon dioxide invasion rocks leached out and traveled guy word while the atmosphere changed it got better at trapping heat creating a vicious cycle that worsens the problem inevitably temperatures spiked and stayed since our own planet has a major greenhouse gas problem Venus could offer us important insights regarding climate change but sending probes to explore it has always presented major challenges on Venus the surface gravity is comparable to what you and I experience on earth what's not comparable is that atmospheric Asher which is ninety two times greater on the face of Venus than it is here faced with extreme temperatures and high pressure it's no wonder that manmade objects don't last long long in the planet's environment when the Soviet venire thirteen probe landed on Venus in Nineteen eighty-two it stayed intact for record setting one hundred and twenty seven minutes before it was destroyed mind you this wasn't the USSR's first Rodeo previous Venero spacecraft's successfully visited the planet's atmosphere and touched down on its outer crest brief though their visits were these probes captured the first ever photographs of the Venetian surface Nasr's Magellan spacecraft provided further insights has it mapped ninety eight percent of the planet's face all in all Venus boasts more than sixteen thousand volcanoes and volcanic features but we don't know of any these are still active highland plateaus deep canyons and meteorite impact craters have also been discovered there although Venus's about four point six billion years old crest is thought to be much younger with an estimated age of just three hundred to six hundred million years Venus lacks tectonic plates as we know them on earth nonetheless Sunday August think that upwelling magma occasionally recycle sections of the crust long before it was an object scientific study or of Edgar Rice burroughs. goals Venus mesmerized our ancestors bright and beautiful the cloud adorned planet derives its name from the Roman Goddess of love into mathematicians mapped it's progress across the sky and Galileo took detailed notes about its moon like phases somehow knowing that Venus is a stifling hot house doesn't diminish its allure with every new discovery inspires curiosity aw

Edgar Rice Burroughs Radio Telescope Nisa Eight Hundred Sixty Four Degre Three Hundred Twenty Six Degre Eight Eighteen Degrees Fahrenh Thirty Four Thousand Kilometer Six Hundred Million Years Ninety Eight Percent Twenty Seven Minutes Eighty Six Percent Ninety Six Percent Six Billion Years One Pole
What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

BrainStuff

06:27 min | 1 year ago

What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks Nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm production. INDIVI- heart radio. Hey Brain Steph Lauryn bo-bottle here in September of two thousand eighteen. A new breakthrough in space technology was uncorked uncorked especially designed bottle that will make it possible to drink champagne in the microgravity environment of space. The bottle contains two chambers one for the Champagne and the other for valve that uses the carbon dioxide in the champagne to eject foamy little alcohol spheres which can then be scooped into long stemmed glasses for sipping and once inside the mouth the spheres turn back hawala into liquid champagne this space champagne as the agency France Press reported is envisioned as an Amenity for space tourists who someday maybe taking pleasure trips with private spaceflight operators. If future recreational astronauts astronauts do get the chance to savor some of the bubbly it won't be the first time that alcohol has been consumed in space the practice goes back to the early days of the Soviet space program when the USSR's doctors reportedly said cosmonauts into orbit with rations of Cognac one former cosmonaut told NBC News. We used it to stimulate our immune system and on the whole to keep our organizations intone later on cosmonauts were given a liquor containing Ginseng a root. That's a traditional herbal remedy for improving energy and concentration NASA in contrast generally has prohibited astronauts from drinking not just in space but also within sixteen hours of a space launch but the agency has wavered from its teetotalling stance at times. They're reportedly was a plan for example to allow the Apollo eight crew to drink a small mall ration of Brandy to go with their Christmas meal of Dehydrated Bacon Cubes in Turkey gravy stuffing but commander Frank Borman decided that they should forego the alcohol on the Apollo Eleven trip to the moon in nineteen sixty nine astronaut Buzz Aldrin did open a small plastic container of wine it was almost certainly the first food or drink consumed during the trip but it was so that he a Presbyterian church elder could take communion according to NBC News as former NASA food fellow burs Charles T borland and in Gregory elva detail in their book the Astronauts Cookbook Tales Recipes and more nothing considered providing astronauts on the Skylab mission in the nineteen seventies with Sherry packaged inflexible plastic pouches with built in drinking tubes but the idea was nixed for fear of negative publicity and because apparently the beverage although perfectly perfectly palatable on the ground fill the cabin with an intensely nauseating smell on a test flight that approximated low gravity with freefall in nineteen eighty-five five and that's our report titled Living Loft Human Requirements for extended spaceflight contemplated the pros and cons of drinking on space flights and in future settlements on the moon or other planets it noted it is unlikely that alcohol is a social beverage will find its way into space at least until relatively large and stable settlements are established published alcohol as a recreational drug may be keenly missed by space travelers since there is evidence that alcohol plays an important social role in exotic environments generally though today's space travelers have to wait until they get back to earth before they have a drink because alcohols chemical volatility that is its tendency to vaporize brise astronauts aren't allowed to have it on the International Space Station. We spoke by email with Daniel g hyo a spokesman at NASA's Johnson Space Center. He said that this ban is due to quote the negative effects that alcohol can have on the water recovery system which draws in water from a number of sources including cabin condensation patia the bed applies not just beverages but to any sort of product containing alcohol such as aftershave or a mouthwash. There's another tricky issue about drinking in space ace. Not much is known about the effect of alcohol consumption on the human body in these space environment which already is known to alter everything from the immune system to hand eye coordination and no official studies have been done so we really don't know whether the space environment would intensify the intoxicating effect of alcohol or how an orbital hangover would compare to to one that results from a bender on earth a while. We don't have much science on alcohol and space for what it's worth. There has been research on the effects of alcohol consumption at high altitudes on earth in nineteen eighty eight study for example. Some male subjects drink a quantity of one hundred per vodka adjusted to their weight for one hundred and seventy five. I Pat Man. That's about seventy nine kilos. It was about four shots and then they spent the day simulated twelve thousand five hundred foot elevation environment. That's about thirty eight hundred meters. They were then compared to other subjects who didn't drink and or who stayed at sea level the drinkers experienced impaired performance on a battery of tasks with older subjects performing worse than younger ones but there wasn't a significant difference between drinkers at high altitudes and those who stayed on the ground although not much alcohol has been consumed in space researchers are studying the creation of it on the ISS Scotch Maker Art Beg said samples of Booze and would up to study how whiskey might aged differently in space and Budweiser's sent along batches of barley seeds a scientific effort to understand the effects of microgravity on beer ingredients. Today's episode was written by Patrick J tiger and produced by Tyler claim to learn more about the history and science of Space Food and and beverages check out the episode of my other podcasts saver called ground control to Major Nam. Bringing stuff is a production eye radio's. How stuff works for more on this month of other tipsy topics picks visit our home planet has networks dot Com and from podcastone. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's Day's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase. Your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Nasa Johnson Space Center International Space Station Nbc News Steph Lauryn Ussr Buzz Aldrin Frank Borman Dot Com Sherry Podcastone Apple France Press Pat Man Brandy
The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death

Serial Killers

08:12 min | 1 year ago

The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death

"We begin our dive into the notorious. Austrian serial killer Dr Johann Jack Survey Ker known as the Vienna Woods killer and the poet of Death Jack Hunter Vaguer was always a sadistic and violent man but for years he was able to mask dark side by presenting himself as an author of poet and journalist in one thousand nine hundred seventy six. Jack was convicted of murdering Margaret Shaffer and received a light sentence by the Austrian courts. Margaret was Jack Second Victim. However charges were never brought for his first suspected murderer but while he was in prison Jack took the time to educate himself he began to write short stories and poems it culminated in his bestselling memoir purgatory. His memoir caught the attention of Austria's elite and petitions soon wet around begging for Jack's release in one thousand nine hundred fifteen eighteen years into his sentence. Jack Vega was set free and his celebrity continued to flourish but just four months into his freedom. Jack's urged to kill sex workers revealed itself and for the next year Jack Prowl the streets of Vienna Prague and Los Angeles strangling sex workers with their their own underwear and dumping the bodies in the woods he was caught in nineteen ninety-two leaving behind him a trail of twelve bodies though there is speculation that he killed even more women who have never been identified Jack Interviewers life even at its beginning was marred by violence when World War Two ended in nineteen forty-five allied forces from the US Britain France and the USSR remained in Germany and Austria. The allies occupied the two countries as they began the long process to rebuild the occupation lasted for ten years ending in one thousand nine hundred fifty five during those ten years the German and Austrian birth rates spiked the procreation wasn't entirely between German and Austrian citizens instead many young women found themselves pregnant with the children of allied allied soldiers many children born during this time period had no idea who their fathers were in Germany roughly four hundred thousand babies had allied light fathers and in Austria that numbers around Thirty Thousand Jack Vegas would be counted among those thirty thousand in nineteen fifty fifty two ratio owned travailler. A young beautiful country girl took a trip to Trieste Italy while on this trip she met an American soldier hurt named Jack Becker. Unfortunately we know very little about their relationship but we can make some guesses based on the time period the aftermath the war forced many women to engage in survival sex work in order to make ends meet even worse. Many of these women were sexually assaulted by Allied soldiers. Either of these could have happened to Theresa. It's possible that Theresa was forced to engage in sex work to survive but it it is also possible that her time with Jack was simply a passionate fling one that resulted in pregnancy while pregnant to ratio returned to Austria and struggled to find work. She turned to petty crime like fraud and theft as a way to provide for herself in the weeks before giving birth to Jack back to ratio was arrested for fraud however for some unexplained reason Teresa was released. She then travelled to Yudin Burg Austria and on August Sixteenth Nineteen fifty gave birth to Johann. Jack faker named after his American father. Please note that much of what is known about Jack's. It's life comes from his memoir purgatory or the trip to jail report of a guilty man and it must be taken with a grain of salt written while he was imprisoned during the nineteen eighties. Jack's writing was solely intended to garner sympathy from those who read it Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode assode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thanks Greg as an adult it. Jack Unterweger was diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder. A couple of aspects of narcissistic personality disorder are exaggerating achievements mints and talents as well as having an exaggerated sense of self importance much of this comes through in the way. Jack describes the harsh upbringing. He faced as a child wild. Jack claims that his mother was a sex worker but nothing has ever been found to confirm. She made her living as one. The general consensus is that she worked as a barmaid and waitress Chris. It is possible that while she worked as a barmaid she engaged in sex work from time to time or that she told Jack that's how he like so many others at that time was conceived saved or it could be pure fabrication it could when Jack was two years old. Theresa was arrested once again for theft and sent to jail. Jack was then sent to live with his grandfather fair demand visor in Carinthia South Austria from this point on Jack claims to have had a terrible childhood. According to Jack Fernand visor was an abusive drunk who forced him to act like a quote court fool a slave. We've educated by grandfather to be a fraud accomplice injects version of events he was barely given enough food to eat or enough clothes to keep warm and according to Jack he had no mother figure around instead a rotation of sex workers in lovers frequented the tiny hut decades later Charlotta. Our Ferdinand stepdaughter would protest that all of Jack's claims about his grandfather were a pack of lies Charlotta had lived with Sheridan ad in the same house a decade and a half earlier in the late thirties. Charlotta never disputed that Fernand had a rough exterior a product product of his country upbringing but she believed the rest of Jack's descriptions. Were fabrications according to Star Lotte her own mother. Maria Springer lived with Jack and Ferdinand for about six years beginning in nineteen fifty two Maria helped raise the boy disputing the claim that only sex workers unfair demands random lovers around as Jack got older. He became something of a burden. He was very stubborn and manipulative. Charlotte claims that he would come up with clever schemes to get whatever he wanted. Jack's attitude soon proved too much Maria Springer and she left in nineteen eighteen fifty eight when Jack was about eight two months later Austrian child services took Jack Away from fair to net and placed him with Fernand sister. Mr The exact reasons why jack was taken away from Fernand are unclear. It's possible that Jack's delinquency and fair demands inability to control troll it were responsible or it's possible that fair. Dan was a little too rough with check now that Maria wasn't around to contain him. Charlotta our does believe that it was during those two months alone with Fair Dinette that the myth of the overly abusive grandfather began in addition to genetics a child's child's environment can play a key role in person forming narcissistic personality disorder or NPD according to the Mayo Clinic in most cases a child who was pampered or received excessive praise could develop the disorder however a consistently negative environment can also lead to NPD. If Jack Really did face the emotional and physical abuse from his grandfather as he professed. It's possible that the

Jack Faker Jack Fernand Dr Johann Jack Survey Ker Jack Hunter Vaguer Jack Unterweger Jack Vega Jack Second Jack Becker Jack Vegas Jack Prowl Jack Away Austria Theresa Yudin Burg Austria Charlotta Fraud Germany Margaret Shaffer Vienna Woods Theft
How Has the Korean War Changed History?

BrainStuff

08:53 min | 1 year ago

How Has the Korean War Changed History?

"On June twenty-fifth nineteen fifty North Korean tanks rolled across the thirty eighth parallel the line that separated communist North Korea from US-backed South Korea, as a now, declassified US intelligence cable from Tokyo to Washington concluded, the incursion wasn't just a mere raid, quote the size of the North Korean forces employed, the depth of penetration the intensity of the attack and the landings made miles south of the parallel on the east coast indicated that the North Koreans are engaged in all out offensive to subjugate, South Korea. It was the start of a war that is still not ended a full seven decades later. The Korean war, which ultimately would pit the US against China in the first ever, confrontation between the two superpowers would claim the lives of an estimated two point five million military members and civilians including nearly thirty four thousand Americans the fighting would cease with an armistice on July twenty seventh nineteen fifty three but the Geneva conference of nineteen fifty four failed to produce a peace treaty in the north and south remained tense enemies, and that's the way things have pretty much continued, though in twenty eighteen North Korean dictator Kim Jong UN and South Korean president Mundi een announced that they would work together toward a peace treaty. But after the collapse of February summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong those tensions seemed likely to remain for a while longer. In the US the Korean war is sometimes called the forgotten war, because it's overshadowed by the conflicts that came before, and after it the stirring victory of World War Two, and the lengthy, painful ordeal of the Vietnam war. We spoke with Edward roads. A professor on the faculty of the shar school of policy and government at George Mason University in Fairfax Virginia, who's an expert in American foreign, and national security policy. He said modern Americans don't think about it much. Vietnam was more dramatic. And World War Two is more in victorious. Nevertheless, the overlooked conflict has exerted a powerful influence that still felt today according to roads, the war forever changed the course of US foreign, and national security policy. Compelling the US to accept a permanent military involvement around the globe, even in peacetime. It also helped drive, the creation of a vast US nuclear arsenal to deter possible, communist aggression with the threat of annihilation and a global nuclear arms race. Still continues all this happened, according to roads after career. A nation that had been occupied by the Japanese from nineteen ten to nineteen Forty-five was split into two by the US, and the USSR after World War Two, he explains, it was a practical matter. There were Japanese armies that had retreated into Korea from insurer, and they needed to be disarmed. We split that large task with the Soviet Union the understanding that the Soviets would design the Japanese in the north, and we would do it in the south, but as the Cold War developed between the US and its European allies and the Soviets, the temporary partition turned into a permanent one with the formation of a communist regime headed by Kim Il Sung in the north at an authoritarian pro American government headed by Sigmund, e in the south each regime sought self as the real government of Korea and its rival as illegitimate. Kim Il Sung decided to settle the matter by invading South Korea. And in may nineteen fifty finally obtained reluctant approval from his patron these stallion regime about a month later. Kim launched a surprise attack which initially had devastating result. What's the South Korean forces essentially dissolved the UN Security, Council taking advantage of a Soviet boycott of the body, then passed a measure, calling for member nations to assist the beleaguered South Koreans that mandate enabled US president Harry Truman to respond militarily without having to go to congress for a declaration of war. Up until that point, the US hadn't seen South Korea's having much strategic importance erode said, but when the North Korean tanks rolled across the border, the image that flashed in Truman's mind was that this was a repeat of what the Nazis did his responses to stand up thinking that if we had stood up to Hitler early on the world would have been a better place, an outnumbered contingent of UN forces formed, a desperate line of defense around the only part of South Korea, not yet, captured by the communists and managed to hold off the invaders for two months that gave General Douglas MacArthur, who had been placed in overall command of the UN forces enough time to make an audacious and fibia landing at Inchon near the South Korean capital of Seoul on September fifteenth. Nineteen fifty cutting off the over extended North Koreans MacArthur's forces chased the invaders back north across the thirty eighth parallel and by mid October had captured the North Korean capital of Pyongyang, but MacArthur overconfident kept pushing the North Koreans back to the Yellow River the border with China, China. Responded with a massive counterattack of between thirteen thousand and three hundred thousand troops. This time it was the UN forces who were driven back a bloody stalemate on the ground developed as the US pounded North Korea from the air MacArthur, eventually was relieved of his command by Truman and replaced with general Matthew Ridgway. The US abandoned the idea of total victory and shifted to a holding action against the communist forces road said MacArthur embraced the idea that there's no substitute for victory. You beat the enemy, and they surrender. But Rhodes explained after the Chinese intervention, quote, we're still in a situation where there's got to be a substitute for victory because how are we going to fight the manpower of China? There's a realization that we can't fight this war to victory and it's hard for the American people to accept. The longer. The war stretched on the more popular it became back in the US, many of the soldiers sent to Korea where reservists who had served in World War, Two roads, explained they've got homes and families and jobs, and then they were called up and sent to fight another war. There was a feeling that this wasn't fair. Eventually Truman successor president. Dwight Eisenhower ran on a promise that he would go to Korea and seek an end to the conflict and actually did that a month before his inauguration in nineteen Fifty-three. But though, Eisenhower had ended the fighting the Korean war still shaped his policies road said, Eisenhower looked at this as the wrong war at the wrong time using the wrong weapons, he reaches the conclusion that with the Cold War going on with the Soviets, we have to plan for the long haul. We're going to sustain this kind of military deterrence that led to resources being pumped into the development of a massive nuclear deterrent. The could be used to contain the Soviets. Additionally, Eisenhower began attempting to form licenses with more and more countries in an effort to create a unified front to hold off communist aggression. We also spoke via Email with Charles k Armstrong, the Korea foundation professor of Korean studies in the social sciences at Columbia University. He said, the US was forced to take China more. Seriously as a military power. After fighting twist del mate in the Korean war general MacArthur, had severely underestimated the Chinese military's willingness to confront the US and capacity to fight leading to a bad route for you, enforces, the initial months after China entered the war. China's participation in the Korean war. Also consolidated malls rule and asked the hopes of sub Americans. The communist regime could be rolled back and replaced by Changcai checks nationalists. Armstrong said mouse willingness to support the North Koreans directly as opposed to stallions reluctance helped solidify China North Korean relations, and caused the North Koreans to be more distrustful of the Russians for the US China was seen from the Korean war onward as the primary ally of North Korea. And the primary great power that was an enemy of the US in Korea. Armistice, ended the fighting but North Korea now backed by the Chinese remained as a belligerent enemy to South Korea, the ongoing threatment that US forces couldn't just withdrawn come home Armstrong, notes, the North Korean invasion in the emerging Cold War convinced American policymakers that the US needed a permanent military presence in Asia and Europe in order to contain communist aggression. Additionally, the Korean war helped set the table for another even bloodier, and more painful future conflict, according to Armstrong Korea led directly to the US decision to help the French against communist led insurgency in colonial Vietnam, and then after the French defeat to intervene in support of an anti communist regime in South Vietnam, which blocked an election called for by the nineteen fifty four Geneva conference that helps set the stage for the Vietnam war. Armstrong, said the most lasting legacy of the Korean war for the US was these stablishment of a global military presence over the long term and a commitment to confront communism throughout the world during the Cold War. And for Korea and East Asia ideological and military confrontation that has lasted seven decades that included a US force stationed in South Korea as a deterrent to North Korea, which in turn has a massive array of long range, artillery, and rockets equipped with chemical and biological weapons aimed at Seoul. That's in addition to the nuclear weapons and ballistic missile arsenal. The Trump so far has been unable to persuade the North Korean regime to give up.

United States North Korea South Korea China Douglas Macarthur President Trump Kim Jong Un Armstrong Korea Dwight Eisenhower Harry Truman Charles K Armstrong Kim Jong UN Seoul
They faced down the tanks in Tiananmen Square. Now they want their children to forget it

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:45 min | 1 year ago

They faced down the tanks in Tiananmen Square. Now they want their children to forget it

"Thirty years ago. The Chinese government brutally crushed protests in Beijing's Tiananmen Square thirty years later, many have forgotten the deadly truth about communism for the Colson center. I'm John Stonestreet. This is break point for two months in one thousand nine hundred nine students gathered in TNN square demanding political reforms, analogous to the economic reforms instituted by then chairman, dang Xiaoping after some initial indecision, the communist party decided to crack down on may twentieth. The government declared martial law. Moved two hundred and fifty thousand troops into Beijing on June. Third state run television warned Beijing residents to stay inside the next day, the army advanced towards Tiananmen Square protesters attempted to impede the army's advance and destroyed more than one hundred military vehicles and damaged nearly five hundred others, but ultimately resistance would prove to be futile, trucks, and armored personnel carriers. Join tanks and attack helicopters. The army's principal target was a ten meter tall statue dubbed. The god. Of democracy, which was erected by the students and bore a more than passing resemblance to the statue of liberty after first firing warning shots. The troops fired directly on the protesters estimates of the death toll range widely from hundreds to thousands and addition at least sixteen hundred people were arrested many imprisoned for more than two decades and others who were never seen again. The message from the communist party was clear to be rich might be as den once put it glorious, but forget about being free the events of June one thousand nine hundred nine make clear that the communist party was determined to retain, complete political, and social control will given this history with this regime. No one should be surprised at the recent crackdown on Chinese Christians and Muslims leaguers. But what is surprising is how many Chinese today are untroubled by the events of June hundred eighty nine even worse, the authors of a recent article in the Washington Post described a popular nostalgia for? Maza Dong mouse rule was among the most brutal in all of history. This is the Mao whose attempt to industrialize and collectivize China virtually overnight called the great leap forward killed at least forty five million people. This is the Mao who's great proletarian cultural revolution. Attempted to purge Chinese society of capitalism, traditional elements by killing between five hundred thousand and three million people and selling countless more into internal exile. Among its victims were the father and aunt of current leaders using thing who committed suicide as a result of being persecuted, the tragic irony is that any doubt from ou- only helps legitimize the authoritarianism and oppression. Now, expanding under g how can we make sense of this, selective and misguided historical memory will most of the nostalgic are too young to have personally, experienced mouse rule even more, they haven't been taught the truth about our TNN men and approved or state run schools. Of course that same thing. Can't be said a bus in the west who's a memory is often just as selective and just as wrong when it comes to communism writer, Cathy young who lived in the USSR until she was seventeen describes what she calls Kami chic now. She's not referring to Soviet apologised or sympathizers prior to nineteen Ninety-one. She's talking about the two thousand eighteen teen vogue article that urged readers to use. Karl Marx's ideas to understand how Donald Trump was elected president. She's referring to a two thousand seventeen New York Times op Ed insisting that women had better sex in communist east, Germany, or one, hard left publication that recently tweeted for all the Soviet Union's many faults by traversing. It's vast architectural landscape. We get a glimpse of what a built environment for the many not the few could look like. Now, if all we knew about communism where it's histories of oppression and mass murderer that should be enough to disavow us of any nostalgia for it as the authors of the black book of communism wrote communist regimes turned mass. Crime into a full blown system of government. The result was one hundred million plus debts including the martyrs of Tiananmen Square. But that tweet itself about building environments, for the many, not the few tells us all we need to know about the flawed worldview that undergirds this great historical evil to a communist, but society is always more important than the individual individuals must be sacrificed for the utopian and fantastical greater good that lies somewhere in the future, and always just beyond reach whenever it's tried in the past or in the future. This fatal flaw will leave fatalities because bad ideas have victims, the history of communism. Like it's worldview is neither glorious nor worthy of nostalgia

Communist Party Beijing Tiananmen Square Chinese Government Cathy Young Tnn Square Army John Stonestreet TNN Colson Center OU Washington Post Chairman Xiaoping Karl Marx Teen Vogue Donald Trump Soviet Union
North Korea, Kim Jong Hoon And President Trump discussed on Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro

07:25 min | 1 year ago

North Korea, Kim Jong Hoon And President Trump discussed on Ben Shapiro

"Is that North Korea is back in the missile business. According to US news and World Report North Korea on Thursday launch eight launch to short range missiles, marking the second weapons test in less than a week and further training US led efforts for denuclearizing the Korean peninsula. The South Korean joint chiefs of staff announced the launch and a statement saying the missiles were fired from the northwest city of couse, oh and traveled roughly two hundred and sixty miles to the east. There can go shares are currently in South Korea for discussions on how to break the impasse following too high level summits between President Donald Trump in North Korean leader, Kim Jong UN that failed to secure any lasting changes launch comes less than a week. After North Korea fired several short-range missiles on Saturday was the first weapons test since November twenty seventeen Trump has previously cited North Korea's lull in missile nuclear test as evidence that his outreach to the hermit kingdom was proving successful North Korea's ministry afford affairs defended Saturdays. Launch as a routine and self-defensive military drill. Analysts had the missile trajectory and the distance traveled. We're not indicative of ballistic weapons, none of the White House Trump immediately commented on the launch on Thursday. The president tweeted shortly after the Saturday. We'll let you believe Kim quote realizes the great economic potential of North Korea and will do nothing to interfere ended. Adding he also knows within and does not want to break his promise to me. Now, I have always been super skeptical of President Trump's personal approach to diplomacy with Kim Jong Hoon. I really don't believe that the president just by making. Is it Kim Jong Hoon is somehow going to convince them to give up his nuclear weapons, which after all are the only reason it can juggle it still in power. What we have is an intractable situation, which the only thing we want from Kim Jong Hoon is the only thing he will never be willing to give because it's the only thing that prevents him from being taken out. If all Kim Jong Hoon had where conventional weapons there'd be a serious move for regime change in North Korea with nuclear weapons makes it very difficult to talk about regime change, and so Kim is going to act out and he's going to lash out and he's going to get concessions from the west. He's been doing this for for ten years. He's been doing this as long as before before him his father. Did this Kim Jong Il did this loan before Kim Jong food and his father did it before him hills? Some did it before that. So we have long records of North Korean leadership manipulating the western media manipulating western leaders by supposedly getting violence, and then backing off just in time to receive some sort of subsidy from the west the only thing that can really be done in North Korea is to contain them militarily and to pressure China to do something to topple the regime or prepare some sort of. Move inside the military to get rid of Kim Jong Hoon very difficult to do that. When there's very little access to North Korea itself. But the notion that President Trump had broken the impasse that some great breakthrough had happened that Kim Jong had decided to rejoin the world simply because Trump asked him to that. I always thought that was foolish. I thought it was also dangerous because Kim Jong Il had been legitimised on the international stage by the president of the United States seeing the North Korean flags giant gulag states in the North Korean flag flying alongside the American flag in negotiations when we're not talking about an existential threat to the United States like the USSR negotiate with the USSR because you have to negotiate with USSR not because you want to negotiate with the USSR necessarily Kim Jong Hoon wants to be seen as an as an international power player, particularly domestically. So he's not threatened by his own military. That was a mistake for President Trump to grant him all that credibility. And of course, there's been controversy over the handling of outta warmbier and all the rest, Kim traveled to eastern Russia. Just last month to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin to discuss how the two countries could cooperate representing their first face-to-face meeting in North Korean leader's first trip to the country in almost a decade. That is probably not a coincidence that he met with Russia, and then started firing missiles again, I'm sure they've led Putin is all too happy to have North Korea threatening America from afar. Kim in Trump's meeting in Vietnam in February ends at an impasse. Because America insisted that North Korea denuclearize killing gangs mandated that the us provide sanctions relief. I earlier this week. The Pentagon announced it had ceased efforts to recover the remains of American war dead citing an inability to contact their North Korean counterparts. You will recall that President Trump had touted that it said that the big results from this meeting is that America's Korean war dead were coming home. Apparently that was not true. Then a phone call on Tuesday following the Saturday launch from purportedly encouraged South Korean president moon Jae in to continue providing food aid to the north a crisis, both South Korea, and the United States Pyongyang has manufactured saying it's timely, and we'll be a positive move. It is unclear why we want to continue sending food aid to North Korea. When the entire crisis is manufactured by the governments and their goal in having shipments. Made to them is to enrich the regime. The recent launches make things particularly awkward for moon Jae in moon Jae in the South Korean president is part of what is called the sunshine administration over there wants to open relations with Kim Jong Hoon. On Tuesday moon, it touted his administration's achievements in an op Ed writing that the sounds of gunfire have disappeared in the air on CNN the ground around the Korean peninsula. And no that is not correct. Just hours before the defense ministry confirmed the missile test. Moon's official Twitter account posted a picture of his meeting with Kim as the two officials smiled with the quotation piece has become a part of everyday life. Yeah. It turns out that trusting one of the world's worst, dictators is a mistake. Meanwhile, President Trump's administration is very weird and how it operates in terms of foreign policy. One of the reasons that it's very weird is because all of his subordinates basically operate as free agents. And then every so often he sort of inserts himself. Latest example of this. According to the Washington Post US authorities now seized a North Korean ship used to sell coal allegedly in violation of international sanctions that is the first such move by Justice department officials as they ratchet up enforcement efforts against the regime in Pyongyang Justice department officials on Thursday confirmed the vessel. The wise honest is approaching us territorial waters in American Samoa in coordination with US marshals end, the coastguard Attorney General John Denver's assistance to AIG. Emerson the sanction-busting ship is now out of service. So this came just hours after North Korea launched the pair of short range missiles Eleanor. It's funny for a president who declares that. He is a realist is a foreign policy realist, and he cares about foreign policy realism hard nose negotiation when it comes to his actual negotiations strategy, the sort of personal overtures, the what if I make you a video about how nice North Korea will be when you have some when you have some ocean front hotels that sort of stuff is not realistic the realistic perspective on foreign policy suggests realism realism suggests that realpolitik meeting the interest of the states are what is it issue? Look if Kim Jong UN wanted to open up his state and become more economically prosperous. He could do it right now. He's at right. This very instant all he has to do is give up those nuclear weapons and declared that he's going to democratize his country. That's all he has to do. But you'll never knew that obviously why. Because personal power matters most to the Kim family some of the worst blights on human leadership of the last fifty to seventy years. The fact that the Trump administration on the one hand you've got Trump offering the outstretched arm on the other hand, you got the geo J cracking down on North Korea via sanctions, it's pretty incoherent. It's pretty

North Korea Kim Jong Hoon President Trump KIM Kim Jong Kim Jong Un United States South Korea Pyongyang Vladimir Putin Russia Ussr America White House China
"ussr" Discussed on Most Useful Podcast Ever

Most Useful Podcast Ever

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on Most Useful Podcast Ever

"And the reason that quote, unquote, circumnavigation as possible is because you just sail around this this flat disk, and they say that look at works like that beyond the why they even bothered to. Part is a topic of great interest ladder society because to their knowledge no-one has been very far past the ice wall and return to tell if their journey, boys. Farming. That's that's what they say. But no one's been very far very far, and and return to tell so, but how far has someone got they wouldn't know because I haven't returned to. But they don't think that space. So this is what I want to share with you guys. Okay. What if you'll allow me I would just like to read the entire entry to answering the question people have been into space how they discovered that the earth is flat notice the framing of that question. How discover that the earth is flat has that not proven that the earth is right. And so they say the most commonly accepted explanation of this is that the space agency's the world are involved to conspiracy faking space travel and exploration this likely began during the Cold War's space race in which the USSR and USA were obsessed with beating each other into space to the point that each faked their accomplishments in attempt to keep pace with the others supposed achievements since the end of the Cold War. However, the conspiracy is most likely motivated by greed, rather. Than political gains and using only some of their funding to continue to fake space travel saves a lot of money to embed for themselves in light of the above lease note that we are not suggesting that space agencies are aware that you're this flat. And actively covering that fact up they depict the earth is round simply because that is what they expect it to be. That's the entire answer. I guess I would have assumed that there'd be some overlap between moon landing faker conspiracy, theorists and the earth lad, conspiracy theorist, but like so they're one in the same. As what you're saying. I mean, they they would have to be like if you if you believe that the earth is flat. You would also have to believe that no one's ever been into space and has truly seen the earth because just seeing like the earth from different angles would imply that it is not around this. I mean, I guess it's a better explanation than like, oh, it's a trick of the light. Right. There's also a section about why other planets are round, but the earth I was gonna say part. Yes, it's because of the earth is at the center of the solar system. Everything routines around the earth, including the sun. I mean, I think that at the heart of this, isn't it is it like if you believe the earth is round. And we're just like you have to. Right. You have you kind of have to admit that we're not the center existence, and that's probably of setting Tahoma. Yes. Yes. Wow. Is go. Although. The why does being at the center of the universe? Not mean that the earth would not be round also like spaces flat or like, it's a snow globe. Hemispheric? Shallow, gravity does not work. The way that we believe that's part of two. Did you the coordinating? Is there? Some kind of like if you drop a quarter in an airplane or something like that. And get to that. I did.

USSR USA
"ussr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As a bogus. The war veterans are showing tries to justify the occupation. The narrator box that America has been exporting drugs and terrorism from Afghanistan for decades and claves wrongly. This is why the USSR had invaded. Thank you. A patriotic pop song on the screen images appear Russian servicemen killed in Afghanistan. Chechnya and in Syria. All are presented as heroes most Serrano. We grow. These simply leaves eighth grader Grecia believing that Russia won the Afghan war. This reinterpretation of the past isn't limited to schools. Russia's parliament is preparing a resolution that will vindicate the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. It's part of a wider push to glorify Russia's controversial history. The village of abundance rice Alexandrov is shaking snow from flowers on her son's grave. Vice doesn't see any point dressing up. The post storm. You need a hero. She tells me, I need my son. Steve Rosenberg would that report. You're listening to Newsday from the BBC with Connie Lawrence. And one of our main headlines is to do with Afganistan as a Steve is reporting the relationship between Afghanistan and the USSR, but this time the Pentagon chief is in Afghanistan in an effort to bring the government in Kabul into peace talks with the Taliban thousands of Iranians are attending rallies to celebrate four decades since the Islamic revolution..

Afghanistan Russia USSR Steve Rosenberg Chechnya Kabul Connie Lawrence Taliban Newsday America Grecia Pentagon Syria BBC four decades
"ussr" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"The world. Gold plated aeroplane holidays for million quid. Could you hear right? So you have to have something where you can go. Nice holidays. But you don't have to pay a lot of money. You can live in a caravan until you died if you had a million quid, it's the dream. Well, getting jobs. I read a really interesting stuff, which is that eighty six percent of American lottery winners, and this is people who've won the giant pot. So they won millions eighty six percent of Americans with their jobs, whereas the equivalent in Britain forty one percent do. We lazy. The out of fair. The streets. Okay. It is time for fact, number three. And that is my fact, my fact this week is that the tenth correspondence chess Olympiad, which is done entirely by post took so long to complete that the winners of both gold and bronze represented countries that no longer existed. Pretty amazing. So funny. So this is a competition that is still going to this day. I believe they're on the twenty-first, although online on Wikipedia says they're on their tenth. So maybe there's a few different governing bodies ladies on tenth. Maybe is it. Right. Okay. So here's the thing the match that we're talking about with the tenth correspondence chess Olympiad that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven and it takes years and years to finish the games and get to the final and have a winner. In fact, the eleventh correspondence Olympia had started before the tenth even finished. They get four we want to get going. So the winners of the tenth in gold place was someone from the USSR and in bronze was east Germany, both of which were dissolved countries by the time, the winning the winner was announced in one thousand nine hundred five, but these days, I think taught most much is limited to just only two and a half years. Yes. So these days if you still enough to two and a half years than an independent arbitrator comes along says, I think you'll wedding. As amazing. So the system the way it works is that you send a postcard to the person that you're playing against and you have three days to make your move and send another post postcard back. So they look at the dates on the postcard, but because of the male taking so long in certain countries, you might not receive it for weeks months, even so very important that little date that sits on the actual postcard. So yeah. So that arrived is when you start which you can just say that is whenever you want. So people have noticed that if people really struggling towards the end seems to take a lot longer for the. But then the when you send it that's when the post Mark is. So you can't cheat that one. Yeah, I really like the idea that you can use you can use help as well. Yeah. So you can books magazines the internet you can use anything short of running the entire game through chess software program, which is frowned on. It is banned. Yeah. But it means that the better players it's a slightly different skill to playing normal chess, isn't it? So if you play normal chest this time limits apartment if in the person, you play together just goes really wanna play anymore, but in this because it's not really any time limit. So you say three days, it's you have thirty days for every ten moves. So you could take you know, thirty or twenty days on one. Not really worrying about this. I think I would extremely bounded it because it's a classic encouraging people to leave it to the last minute thing thirty days ten so I know I'd forget about it for twenty nine point five days. And then suddenly got to send you know. Move ya. I defined days ago. James come on. I'm just gonna do this. Things more stressful. There's a guy cooed Croydon eight Jarvis who took eight years to complete one move. In his defense. It wasn't his foes he started. He was a British guy. And he started playing correspondence chess with German in nineteen thousand one and they played a lot together..

correspondence chess Olympiad Jarvis USSR Britain Olympia Germany James eighty six percent thirty days three days forty one percent eight years twenty days five days
"ussr" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on KTRH

"Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Okay. Near the end of the show. I have to make an executive decision. I keep talking about this interview. With professor Ken gore. The importance of this issue about the Russians and the Democrats the Russians and Kennedy, the rush the Chinese and and and Franken Feinstein and so forth. Here's a little taste of it. From last night. Cut seventeen go. Russia keeps coming up. There's no context for what's taking place today. What exactly happened with Kennedy and Russia and the Kremlin? Well, the day was the date of the document as may fourteenth nineteen Eighty-three what it is a document that was found in the central committee archives of the Soviet Union. And that would have been when they first started opening the archives when Boris Yeltsin became president after Gorvachev resigned late nineteen Ninety-one and a document was found. It was it says committee state security of USSR across the top, which is KGB and the authors Victor. Weber cough who was the head of the KGB, and he's writing to Yuri Andropov, who's the head of the Soviet Union. So right here. Okay. You've got you've got a document with the two top people in the USSR Chebrov head of the KGB to the head of the Soviet Union, urea, Andropov, and the subject has says a special importance regarding Senator Kennedy's request to general secretary, Andropov Sarai there that doesn't grab your attention. I don't know what does. And it says in the first paragraph that are nine ten of this year. This would have been may nineteen Eighty-three Kennedy confident on John Tunney who had been the California Democratic Senator, and he wasn't Senator at that point. But he had been friends with Ken old old law school classmates, and they said that he was there on behalf of Senator Kennedy making a request to to the Soviets. So he went to the Kremlin. He went to the Kremlin. But he was he was in Moscow. He was definitely in Moscow on on behalf of Ted Kennedy. Now before he continued to say, what's in the document. This was found in the archives. Nineteen Ninety-one nineteen ninety two. It was first reported by the London Times and February second nineteen ninety two. And I assume the American media picked up on it, the news networks ran with it. The budding cable networks with it in my right? Absolutely. They did not they didn't they it into a single thing with it. Nothing. Nothing. I've tried to make my Faulk show, which is only one hour once a week late at night on Sunday a slot that we want to ten PM eastern seven PM Pacific different in some ways. Compelling in every way, it's the only long form interview interview show with one guest rarely to on all of cable today. And the guests different kinds of people all walks of life. Summer intellectuals and scholars and professors, others are athletes people you've seen on TV. If I think they have something interesting to contribute. To your evening or even to society. Generally, I wanna have them on the program. And I'm keeping a list of people who have turned us down. I think you'll find that interesting one day. Because they don't want to talk to me. So. Professor, Paul gore has been focused on many subjects, but this particular for very long time and given all the talk about Russia, and the fact that despite all the talk and all the print. There's never any context provided. I wanted to provide context, and so this is the show I do on FOX you lose interest in this show over the course of the next twelve months. I'll stop doing it. I don't do TV to be on TV. I don't do radio to be on radio. I don't do digital TV to be on digital TV. I don't write books to see my name on book covers. I don't know. It's in my DNA was handed down from my father and mother, I'm about liberty individual liberty. I've never liked being bullied. I've never liked being dictated to. And I've always resisted it. Whether it's an individual a group of individuals or a government. The constitution as ours. The history of this country is ours. Free market capitalism is RS and nobody has a right to take it away. I don't care if they're talking about redistributing wealth, populism socialism, Marxism. What's right is? Right. And what's wrong is wrong? And that's the bottom line. When I grow up I used to watch shows like firing line or even shows where I didn't even care for the host. But where people commonly directly talk to each other about what's going on. We've tried on multiple occasions, ladies and gentlemen to get leading liberals. They'll go everywhere. But on my show. Whether they're intellectuals or politicians. We reached out repeatedly. We've also reached out to numerous Republicans. With whom I have serious disagreements. But whom I've promised to treat with respect. But they will not come on the program because they fear that will ruin their careers. So I do have to figure out how to overcome these things and we do our best. But again, we have people from all walks of life. Very interesting. This coming Sunday. We're probably going to have Curt Schilling on. Curt Schilling is fascinating to me. He should be in the hall of fame. But he's not in the hall of fame. He was a great pitcher. Now, why isn't he in the hall of fame? Because of his views. He's a conservative. He lost his job at ESPN why? Because of his views, he's a conservative. So he's very thoughtful. He's very interesting. And there's different things. I want to explore with him. That I think you might find compelling. We've had the smartest of the smart. We never have done. People in all walks of.

Senator Kennedy KGB Ken gore Soviet Union Professor Curt Schilling Moscow Russia Senator Ziprecruiter Franken Feinstein Boris Yeltsin Yuri Andropov executive London Times USSR Paul gore Andropov Sarai
"ussr" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Okay. Near the end of the show. I have to make an executive decision. I keep talking about this interview. With professor Ken gore. The importance of this issue about the Russians and the Democrats the Russians and Kennedy, the rush the Chinese and and and Franken Feinstein and so forth. Here's a little taste of it. From last night. Cut seventeen go. Russia keeps coming up. There's no context for what's taking place today. What exactly happened with Ted Kennedy and Russia and the Kremlin while the day was the date of the document as may fourteenth nineteen Eighty-three? What is a document that was found in the central committee archives of the Soviet Union. And that would have been when they first started opening the archives when Boris Yeltsin became president after Gorvachev resigned late nineteen Ninety-one, and a document was found it was it says committee on state security of USSR across the top, which is KGB and the authors Victor. Who was the head of the KGB and he's writing to your Android Pov who's the head of the Soviet Union. So right here. Okay. You've got you've got a document with the two top people in the USSR Chebrov head of the KGB to the head of the Soviet Union, urea, Andropov, and the subject has says of special importance regarding Senator Kennedy's request to general secretary, Andropov. So right there if that doesn't grab your attention. I don't know what does. And it says in the first paragraph that are nine ten of this year. This would have been made nineteen Eighty-three Kennedy coffin on John Tunney who had been the California Democratic Senator. And he wasn't Senator at that point. But he had been the best friends with Kennedy old old law school classmates, and they said that he was there on behalf of Senator Kennedy making a request to to the Soviets. So he went to the Kremlin. He went to the Kremlin. But he was he was in Moscow. He was definitely Moscow on on behalf of Ted Kennedy. Now now before you say, what's in the document? This was found in the archives. Nineteen Ninety-one nineteen ninety two. It was first reported by the London Times in February second eighteen ninety two. And I soon the American media picked up on it. The news networks ran with it. The budding cable networks ran with it in my right? Absolutely. They did not they didn't they didn't. They didn't touch into a single thing with it. Nothing. Nothing. I've tried to make my FOX show which is only one hour once a week late at night on Sunday.

Senator Kennedy Soviet Union KGB Russia John Tunney Ziprecruiter Boris Yeltsin USSR executive Franken Feinstein Ken gore Andropov London Times professor FOX Gorvachev president general secretary
"ussr" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Okay. Near the end of the show. I have to make an executive decision. I keep talking about this interview. With professor Ken gore. The importance of this issue about the Russians and the Democrats the Russians and Kennedy, the rush the Chinese and and and Franken Feinstein and so forth. Here's a little taste of it. From last night. Cut seventeen go. Russia keeps coming up. There's no context for what's taking place today. What exactly happened would take Kennedy and Russia and the Kremlin while the day was the date of the document as may fourteenth nineteen Eighty-three? What is a document that was found in the central committee archives of the Soviet Union. And that would have been when they first started opening the archives when Boris Yeltsin became president after Gorbachev resigned late nineteen Ninety-one, and a document was fouled. It was. It says committee on state security of USSR across the top, which is KGB and the authors Victor. Who was the head of the KGB, and he's writing to your Andropov who's the head of the Soviet Union. So right here. Okay. You've got you've got a document with the two top people in the USSR Chebrov head of the KGB to the head of the Soviet Union, urea, Andropov, and the subject had says a special importance regarding Senator Kennedy's request to general secretary, Andropov. So right there if that doesn't grab your attention. I don't know what does. And it says in the first paragraph nine ten of this year. This would have been made nineteen Eighty-three Kennedy confidante. John Tunney who had been the California Democratic Senator, and he wasn't Senator at that point. But he had been friends with the old old law school classmates, and they said that he was there on behalf of Senator Kennedy making a request to to the Soviets. So he went to the Kremlin. He went to the Kremlin. But he was he was in Moscow. He was definitely in Moscow on on behalf of Ted Kennedy. Now now before I continue to say, what's in the document. This was found in the archives. Nineteen Ninety-one nineteen ninety two. It was first reported by the London Times and February second eighteen ninety two. And I assume the American media picked up on it, the news networks ran with it. The budding cable networks ran with it in my right? Absolutely. They did not they didn't they didn't. They didn't touch into a single thing with it. Nothing. Nothing. I've tried to make my FOX show which is only one hour once a week late at night on Sunday slot that we want to ten pm eastern seven PM Pacific different in some ways. Compelling in every way. It's the only long form interview interview show with one guest rarely to on all of cable today. And the guests different kinds of people all walks of life. Summer intellectuals and scholars and professors. Others are athletes. People you've seen on TV. If I think they have something interesting to contribute. To your evening or even to society. Generally, I wanna have them on the program. And I'm keeping a list of people who have turned us down. I think you'll find that interesting one day. Because they don't wanna talk to me. So. Professor, Paul kangaroo has been focused on many subjects, but this particular for very long time and given all the talk about Russia, and the fact that despite all the talk and all the print. There's never any context provided. I wanted to provide context, and so this is the show I do on FOX if you lose interest in this show over the course of the next twelve months, I'll stop doing it. I don't do TV to be on TV. I don't do radio to be on radio. I don't do digital TV to be on digital TV. I don't write books to see my name on book covers. I don't know. It's in my DNA was handed down from my father and mother, I'm about liberty individual liberty. I've never liked being bullied. I've never liked being dictated to. And I've always resisted, whether it's an individual a group of individuals or a government. The constitution is ours. The history of this country is ours. Free market capitalism is RS and nobody has a right to take it away. I don't care if they're talking about redistributing wealth, populism socialism, Marxism. What's right is? Right. And what's wrong is wrong? And that's the bottom line. When I grew up used to watch shows like firing line or even shows where I didn't even care for the host. But where people commonly directly talk to each other about what's going on. We've tried on multiple occasions, ladies and gentlemen to get leading liberals. They'll go everywhere. But on my show. Whether they're intellectuals politicians. We reached out repeatedly. We also reached out to numerous Republicans. With whom I have serious disagreements. But whom I've promised to treat with respect. But they will not come on the program because they fear that will ruin their careers. So I do have to figure out how to overcome these things and we do our best. But again, we have people from all walks. Very interesting. This coming Sunday. We're probably going to have Curt Schilling on. Curt Schilling is fascinating to me. He should be in the hall of fame. But he's not in the hall of fame. He was a great.

Senator Kennedy KGB Soviet Union Andropov Curt Schilling Professor FOX Russia Moscow Senator Franken Feinstein Ziprecruiter Boris Yeltsin executive Ken gore London Times USSR John Tunney
"ussr" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on Overdue

"And that that sweeps in and ends communist rule and dub check as part of that. But the most noteworthy thing that comes out of the Prague Spring as far as like geopolitical relations goes is Gorbachov when he is reforming the USSR in the late eighties early nineties. He is using a lot of dub checks reforms as a as a template. Interesting. Didn't know that. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's what was the was the quote that I found when asked what the difference was between the Prague Spring and Gorbachev's own reforms. Foreign ministry spokesman replied nineteen years. Sure. Sure. Sure. And after the velvet revolution. I think love hovel took over Czechoslovakia. And then later the Republic, and there's a couple like instances in the late sixties where Kandara and hovel or like going back and forth in the paper like arguing about the country's relationship to communism and the country's relationship to Russia. And I think Kandara later took some of that back because hobble was proven right or writer as things went. So when. Go ahead. So when this book was published it was nineteen Eighty-four. And where he wrote it in eighty two and then it was publishing eighty four in French. I loon sentended blue league today deliver tra- beautiful. Yep. And then you get on your he's has for French against Ray enough, three half and never take French again by. And then in nineteen eighty-five. It was published in check for the first time, but was actually published in by like a Toronto publisher because you know, wasn't gonna come out in in check. And then I think there was a check edition published again in two thousand six. I'm going to look up real quick who the translator is for. This addition. Do you have anything else about the book that we should hit? No, nothing that came up in my research. Have some words interview quotes from Kandara that we can maybe talk about like, here's. So he. The joke is very political unbearable lightness, I think is a little political, but he's kind of stops doing a lot of overtly political stuff does that like wants to be known as a writer or a novelist and not like a political writer, but he has this to say about the sort of left versus writes politics that defines the modern like post Soviet era the danger that threatens us is the two totalitarian empire. Khameini mouse Dolon are they left or right till tell Terry and his is neither left nor right and within its empire. Both will perish. I was never a believer. But after seeing check Catholics persecuted during the Stalinist terror, I felt the deepest solidarity with them. What separated us the belief in? God was secondary to what United us in Prague. They hang the socialists, and the priest thus a fraternity of the hanged was born. This is why the stubborn struggle between left. And right seems to me ob- Selena and quite provincial. I hate to participate in political life, although politics. Fascinates me as a show tragic deathly show in in the empire to the east intellectually sterile amusing. One in the west. Yeah, I buy that. We're seeing populism versus democracy, not populism verse democracy, but like autocratic populism versus sort of democracy. A creeping. Kind of power and surveillance, and and a lot of centralizing of like corporate power. I think Shelly kind of that that's happening. So far like, regardless of of who is in charge. And yeah, like, it's it's just gonna kinda sneak up on some ways..

Prague Kandara writer Gorbachov French Ray Selena Czechoslovakia USSR Terry Gorbachev Russia Toronto Shelly publisher nineteen years
"ussr" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on Omnibus

"Well and that because that's still happening it still open to debate right the american experiment is ongoing but it does have competition from competitive experiments and it has been has throughout the twentieth century like the the ussr the soviet experience or experiment i guess lasted eighty years and throughout the ussr it was seen as a direct competitor with the american idea i was just reading a thing about the bible they wrote when they were putting the first star trek on the air i know you talk about star trek heightened show i always like ken why don't we talk more about start i'm amazed that you can make star trek connections to almost anything well the thing the thing that the network the network note on the show is like well if we're gonna do to space show set in the future we cannot say which socio economic system one out that's gotta be absolutely verboten just because it was such a source of nervousness for people i guess the idea that what if we were wrong and the soviets really are better at all these what if this is the end of our economic had jim ni how are we saying that word had joanie how did we decided hegemony is how i'm going to say it you say head to me hemorrhage intimate me head gemini like like the girl from harry potter well and when you think about the star trek universe in next generation they're very proud about not having money so clearly capitalism wasn't the thing that put all those spaceships in the space centre asian eighty nine it's the same year that the wall comes down right it's it's now safe to say that some kind of control the khanna might be working but one of the ways that we think about the story of the twentieth century is and particularly like america's sort of bumpy road was we had tremendous manufacturing capacity throughout the first part of the twentieth century and then that manufacturing started to decline because it started to be more efficient to have things manufactured in other countries where labour costs were lower and initially it was japan was the big threat to american manufact.

ussr jim ni joanie harry potter america japan ken eighty years
"ussr" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"Those words didn't create anything they nearly good an idea into people's heads that such a thing exists and don't forget the lawyers talk about the legal fiction they call their talking opinions so now you have opinions on a legal fiction which it makes about as much sense as a bunch of fat guy sitting at bay finnegans against talking about the last star wars movie and this is the reason that governments can disappear overnight like the ussr did governments disappear the moment that people stop believing in the fiction because they never existed to begin with and this is why i tell people you know when they talked to me about being an anarchist they say well you can't be an anarchist can you be an anarchist we're already in living in anarchy we just don't know it most of the people don't understand that they're living in anarchy but i'll tell you what do you mean living in anarchy the the word means no rulers and there are people that claim to write ruling others they claim to be rulers but they're not rulers they don't have any a thority to be a ruler so therefore what they're telling you is a lie they're lying to you through this piece of paper that it's that we've already determined as a fiction they're using it to lie to you and then they're lying to the goon squad to tell the gun squad to go and enforce their their wim upon the people and the goon squad is stupid enough to believe it because of this idea that they have in their mind that this legal fiction exist this is they believe it because they get a paycheck and i guarantee you if they did not get a paycheck they wouldn't buy into this thing of i have a heroes they're protecting you what do you mean paycheck daryl heroes must do things for free.

ussr
"ussr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Model the lowest number was two hundred seventy five million people going up to three hundred and twentyfive million my question had been i should say in the ussr in china alone so to jump ahead here they did have a model i won't give right away my reactions to this well i will buy reaction was this is the most evil plan ever existed it seems seen it so how could this be the case she was not a hypothetical of some sort of a a model for thinking about the we used to it rand this was the operational plan for the united states forces in the year of a berlin crisis so they did know the answer turned out so i said okay how many altogether them noxious us six hundred shining and within a week we got a table with the rest of it another hundred million in east europe satellite countries the prisoner countries recalled hundred million of them would be killed another 100 meeting in west europe our allies subject to chris trough light medium range missiles shortrange missiles have we could not fight under locate there was no chance hundreds of them just as north korea holes south korea total hostage we can't eliminate that by any attack and japan as well our allies would be annihilated then by full note from our own attack not counting the russian attack which was certain to kill them but the read the fallout from attacks without a single warhead lending over there would kill them depending on quote which way the wind blew depended on season and the weather a third hundred million roughly in areas contiguous.

ussr china japan united states berlin europe west europe korea
"ussr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Russia after the ussr goes down but he didn't live there during glasnost and perestroika he was in germany so he didn't serve pick up on his site geist i think at the time so was quite surprised at it but had in the back of his mind and then eventually had moved to the front of his home hart and then to his gut that america america especially in the post ussr period was all about uh moving in on russia a moving in with nato moving into the baltic states using and abusing a yeltsin and i think a deep down his side of uh of uh vladimir putin is this sense of grievance and resentment at the united states as it begins to look like they're aiming for him he suggested that the bush administration's response of the nine eleven attacks were a turning point but hatton george w bush environment putin been on friendly terms until then bush had said he has looked into his eyes island and then they he used to call them pootiepoot the president of the united states at a special affinity for both nicknames and vladimir putin for a while in there i think putin was the first the first head of state who actually called the white house i think he talked to condoleeza rice but he offered any assistance overflights in other things and hoped i think uh his initial meeting with low george w bush was you know were of russia really felt disrespected in the world at the end of yeltsin its gnp was close to portugal it just it was not it was a nonentity for years and i think uh making russia great again became a very big part of of ladimir putin said early presidency including a reinvigorating joseph stalin's uh national anthem so lycee was talking about making russia great again before george bush was talking about making america great again where he had before donald trump was talking about make the donald trump again he here it it it he he's he's w you know he's trying to get the respect of the united states he wants to be backup on the stage at the g eight in another meetings he wants he wants it not to be china and the united states divvying up the world he was to be.

joseph stalin portugal george w bush condoleeza rice nato germany china donald trump lycee Russia president eyes island bush administration united states vladimir putin yeltsin america ussr
"ussr" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"Things have changed in this country since the last presidential election and even people who were not political are now more political and talk about it because it's there it affects everyone now the same thing was happening in iran and has happened for many decades if not centuries so people are politically much more aware and interested can't go to a dinner party someone's house where vast majority the conversation is not about politics so that was very much my upbringing and then my mom joined a political party that was very much influenced by than ussr which was a northern border of iran so there was a lot of communist influence so it was a communist leaning left leaning political party and she her friends on her were very active in ends had lauded discussions a lot of meeting was it dangerous for her to be active at that time it was some she wasn't crazy active you know she wasn't it was more of philosophy perhaps for her and her friends some of them were in prison but when that my mom and it kind of shaped her views and before the revolution though as these groups grew and all of them collectively there were many different political factions including some that were more religious and some that were secular and all of them collectively work together to change the regime to have the revolution and so that was all in the open more or less and once the revolution happened is when things change that over a few years time the islamic republic stole the revolution essentially consolidated a consolidated power while okay in so you're in the midst of this today i really do see you as a world trade.

presidential election iran ussr
"ussr" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"ussr" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fyre us nature times may seem a little tough your best feathers the simply stay on course secretaries listen to your friends what may sound risky may also be right option jaffer going this week some even looking forward casually appear before you've aquarius with your money is about being selfish it's about being smart advice east love's travel in good times are the guards but they might not last forever so in joe girardi chefs are coming up soon seattle see off their first regularseason game this week nights he said lina in recovery flames the first nhl teams to play in the ussr texas rangers retired their first number and older eyes six 1997 mark mcgwire sign with disease cardinals for twenty six million dollars in this region acid sammy sosa views fifty or more months in three consecutive years joining thanks for listening this station is it a commercial break and we'll be back shortly by commercial break and orchards your favorite station very soon thanks for listening news traffic and weather and business reports this is wbz news radio 1030 boston new england wbz news time seven eighteen.

jaffer lina boston joe girardi seattle nhl ussr texas rangers mark mcgwire sammy sosa twenty six million dollars