12 Burst results for "Usc University Of Southern California"

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

09:01 min | Last month

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The program A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it I actually Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies. Well let's try to talk about the vagus nerve and what you observe to talk about the poly vegas theory. I by the way gave a lecture at the usc university southern california. I know where you are. You're at dr professor of psychiatry university of north carolina By the way you can find more information at steven porges. Pr ge's dot com and the book. Which will be on. Our website is the poly bagel theory. gave a lecture not university of southern carolina near you. The university of southern california which is our usc and I tried to tip toe into your material. It was interesting because I do think. I do use it so much. In terms of helping people understand. Emotional regulation and inter subjective experiences. And they were pretty receptive. I even wrote an exam question about it which is about basic theory based in a national in a format that we're all accustomed to talk about what you observe how you got into this. Well i i'll talk about the history of getting into it in a moment but i The theory is extraordinarily logically based. But it's also intuitive. So now you have this balance between really deep science and the history of neuro anatomy off the allergy in the study of evolution on one side and the other side. The intuition of it this is this is how we feel that we act and when you put those layers together suddenly demystify. The unusual experiences people have had especially those who have been traumatized health issues. how i got into. This is really backwards. I think We all get into things that interest us about feelings and trying to understand our our body but we often go into profession so i started off in psychology and i was interested in physiological markers or parallels of psychological processes with kind of a dream that you could put electrodes on people and you Understand a lot about them without talking to them okay so you could understand A lot about their physiological states. And as i started to do my work and this is actually several decades ago i started to ask more serious questions not Simply where there correlates or relationships between ordinary activity and talking to prophecies or emotional states but were the pathways with the neurophysiological pathways. So was actually trying to figure out how the system worked and i had been studying heart rate patterns. This may sound extremely boring to many of the listeners. But i was interested in how the nervous system was reflecting information in the patterning of a heartbeat and this becomes real when we start to understand that our heart is really governed in part by a large nerve that comes out of the brain stem called the vegas so the vegas functions literally as a break and people who are resilient and people who can engage others have good self control. Tend to have good control Vegas influences on the hearts when they stand up. In the heart rate accelerates they can come down rapidly with this bagel influence and got into this The whole legal theory Started in the nineteen nineties. Because i thought i had really done made my major contributions i develop methodologies to measure vehicle activity the heart and i was really having fun Measuring this activity in various clinical disorders from preterm babies babies vulnerable for sits too Hyperactive kids to a whole variety of different populations and i published a paper in a journal called pediatrics. And i got a letter back from indiana technologist and the letter Was really quite interesting. It was the letter. It's i really enjoyed your paper. But it had the following phrase however and those of us who are in the academic world. We always very very you know this is where the however it gets you punch follows right so the point was however when i was in medical school i learned it. The vegas could kill you. And i was In my paper trying to talk about the vegas protective of preterm full term babies and this was a good indicator of the developmental trajectory. And so i realized that well its final statement was perhaps too much of a good thing is bad and whenever someone says that that simplistic explanation really deserves to be quacking unpack attack. Yeah unpack it. Look at it and see what it really means. 'cause obviously you're looking at two different worlds and in school. He's right what people are taught. Is that the brady card is the apnea preterm babies. They're vaguely mediated. They can kill you not adults much but babies well it potentially can happen in adults..

porges Dr borjas Dr portas alan shore usc university southern califo psychiatry university of north steven porges university of southern carolin university of southern califor vegas ge Vegas indiana apnea
"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:12 min | Last month

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome to dr podcast today. I am very excited. I am privileged to welcome to the program <hes>. A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work <hes>. I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the <unk>. Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work <hes>. But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it <hes>. I actually <hes>. Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so <hes>. You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to <hes> behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad <hes>. You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know <hes>. Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really <hes>. To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies. Well let's try to talk about the vagus nerve and what you observe to talk about the poly vegas theory. I by the way gave a lecture at the usc university southern california. I know where you are. You're at dr professor of psychiatry university of north carolina <hes>. By the way you can find more information at steven porges. Pr ge's dot com and the book. Which will be on. Our website is the poly bagel theory. <hes> gave a lecture not university of southern carolina near you. The university of southern california which <hes> is our usc and <hes>. I tried to tip toe into your material. It was interesting because <hes>. I do think. I do use it so much. In terms of helping people understand. Emotional regulation and inter subjective experiences. And they were pretty receptive. I even wrote an exam question about it which is about basic theory based in a national in a format that we're all accustomed to talk about what you observe how you got into this. Well i i'll talk about the history of getting into it in a moment but i <hes>. The theory is extraordinarily logically based. But it's also intuitive. So now you have this balance between really deep science and the history of neuro anatomy off the allergy in the study of evolution on one side and the other side. The intuition of it this is this is how we feel that we act and when you put those layers together suddenly demystify. The unusual experiences people have had especially those who have been traumatized health issues. <hes> how i got into. This is really backwards. I think <hes>. We all get into things that interest us about feelings and trying to understand our our body but we often go into profession so i started off in psychology and i was interested in physiological markers or parallels of psychological processes with kind of a dream that you could put electrodes on people and you <hes>. Understand a lot about them without talking to them okay so you could understand <hes>. A lot about their

porges Dr borjas Dr portas alan shore usc university southern califo psychiatry university of north steven porges university of southern carolin university of southern califor vegas ge Vegas indiana apnea
"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:06 min | Last month

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Welcome to dr podcast today. I am very excited. I am privileged to welcome to the program <hes>. A gentleman who has eye doctor porges. Are you there. i'm here yeah. I want to gush about you for a second because i am a giant fan of your work and the observations that you brought to light. I thought it was time we took your material to the public. Which i know is going to be a little bit of a task because it's very physiological and very technical but this is the future. Are we off line. No we're on. We're on the rock. I know it sounds like i'm not talking. Okay then go ahead and gosh yes. Dr borjas develop. Something called the polly vega theory. And it is that may not be a term that is immediately apparent what it means everybody. But he basically has shown how a part of our central nervous system that has been ignored for longtime or at least marginalized. Maybe at the core of understanding. How i describe this. How are emotional. Landscapes work <hes>. I i came to work. Dr portas through alan shore. I may humble disciple of his work and his his work informed. Everything i do and he is backed by the <unk>. Will be on in a couple of episodes to talk to you about his work <hes>. But he has been able to show you know how the emotional landscape is built how the self is built and how this is a a. We've missed the fact that this is a bodily based experience and that the auto onomic nervous system sort of breaks accelerator of our system has been marginalized in our understanding of this thing. We call motions and feelings. Is that a good way to sort of bring it start actually going if you don't mind me dancing in spring it <hes>. I actually <hes>. Realized i finally realized that you were trained as an internist. And what i would say is to start this. I would say that. What i do is really the interface between internal medicine and psychiatry. Yes so <hes>. You should find yourself feeling very much at home. With the linkage of the on a nommik nervous system to <hes> behavioral mental health disorders will and it. Maybe that's why you ended up in addiction medicine too. Because that's a similar crossroad <hes>. You know it's it's very much you know medical. There's a lot of medical stuff going on. It's there's neurobiology that's completely out of whack there's interpersonal there's dynamic issues psychiatric issues but ultimately it is about the body and the body's relation to the brain and that is something that i think has been when people talk for instance talk. I'm getting off topic completely right away here but whenever hear people talking about you know <hes>. Computers or artificial intelligence. I think wait a minute. Humans have this all other thing that they're embedded in that informed so much of what they're experiencing maybe it's all of what they're experiencing but it also informs what they're thinking how they remember things and how they process information. It's why there's things like intuition and why we have insights those actually our bodies creating those those sorts of moments. I suspect well. We are biological. I mean that's what we are and whatever we do whether it's art or music or social interactions. It's really based on our biology. And this tends to be you know marginalized this importance and as you've already realized that we live in a world that is very i'll use the term cognitive centric or cle biased. It's being the same thing that this little part of the brain that deals with our awareness and our alertness in our consciousness is the major role of our brain and it's not really <hes>. To help our body run and the way. Our body is functioning also feedback and provides porto's of accessibility to different mental competencies.

porges Dr borjas Dr portas alan shore usc university southern califo psychiatry university of north steven porges university of southern carolin university of southern califor vegas ge Vegas indiana apnea
"usc university southern california" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"It means that we're seeing. We're GONNA see maybe more young voters. which I think would would tend to help Democrats if we're kind of stereotyping the broad swath of young people but again, I would I would also caution people. Also. Don't worry. We're not gonNA take anything you say the bank right now you're free to talk. What you want. Yeah I think what is What is notable is that there are you know twenty sixteen, there were a lot of undecided voters and there aren't that many undecided voters right now. So I, and I think we've seen over the past four years. I didn't send somebody to. Watch the after the after the debate they had those undecided voters and I said every damn. One of those has decided they just wanted to be on TV cut. Don't know that I believe that anyone is sitting there going I really can't decide between you're you're talking about apples and oranges right so if you if you're a trump voter, that's that's you that's fine but it's not like you're. kind of thinking about it. You know and not not sure yet right well, although you you might have these. You know let's let's stereotype it the. the the. White Guy in. Michigan. Who didn't go to college but or did go to college and doesn't really like trumpets been a lifelong Republican voted for trump in two thousand sixteen but she's cove is really kind of thrown him over the edge here. I mean we should note here that. Older people particularly older white people really voted for trump in two thousand sixteen and he has suffered massive losses of that elderly vote or support among elderly people. So like I do think there are some people who who are kind of on the margins with trump. Mark. Aren't there some polls that sort of take that into account? What is the one? Can you explain the one that that USC University Southern California does don't they have one block of permanent voters they have consistently polled to see if they're pins have changed. Yeah. This is a tracking poll. Yeah. Attract what how to tracking polls work help assure a tracking poll means that they? They get one group of people and they stick with the same group of people for a year and they ask them essentially the same questions over and over again and and they kind of it's it's almost like you know taking their temperature over the course of. A year however long it goes and they want to have a certain number of trump supporters in a certain number of. Now Biden supporters and they wanna see how those people feel at any given time. So you can kinda track the move of demographic groups as big events happen. So like one big event that we look at in the in recent polling history when trump announced that he had coveted back in early October and we did see some of those polling averages and I don't. Know I don't actually know you know what this particular tracking poll found but you did see a dip in support for trump right after his his cova diagnosis in the first debate happen and then it was down for a little bit and then it kind of ticked back up to sort of that median. But but those things help us get a sense for. where. Did where did the averages and where did the opinions of these different groups shift and what news event or thing that hassle they've got to be very careful to make sure they're not finding people who are dyed in the wool I mean they have to choose their their pot of people pretty carefully to make sure they're not such party or candidate loyalists that they're never going to change their mind, right? What they probably want to have they probably have some people who are who are probably pretty partisans pretty partisan but I think that there was a famous example in two thousand, sixteen of one of these tracking polls where there was only like. Two or three black voters and one of the black voters dropped out or something or change their opinion and so it sort of wildly through off the metrics entire demographic groups. So you know I think you know if it's not if it's not done entirely correctly it can. It can or if it if there's an interesting fluke that happens you know the. The ask you a question that you probably asked one hundred thousand times also but. Bear with us because I really under why the hell do we even do National Bowling What's the point? Is there a benefit to someone like you who is looking at these polls and trying to glean information from them? Is there a reason that national polling matters at all or is it just as I? The uneducated may believes a waste of energy because we elect presidents that way. Damn Clay. This is like exit existential. Zaki. I mean we got. That's why people were so shocked because if when Hillary lost because she definitely was winning the national vote but every day when I hit my refresh button for my five thirty eight poll page, there are still so many national polls and I think why do I. But there has to be an answer why you must care somehow people must somebody must care. Right? Yes. We certainly care and I think what you're getting at and what probably a lot of people at five thirty eight would say is that we wish that there were more resources devoted to a high quality state polls because those do give us a very clear picture again because we have the electoral, I think I think the short answer for why we have national on state polls is because we have both the popular vote in the Electoral College Right which is like there are some states that matter more in the sense of under the system that we have. Candidates. Cater to those voters more than other voters and therefore people WanNa have really good snapshots of what's going on in those states. At any particular point in time, it would be great if we existed in like a media business world where newspapers were able to pull all fifty states a high quality way, we don't have that world, but I will also say that there is a utility and there's probably. A greater emphasis put on on this because we have mostly national media organizations. Now, covering these elections, not high quality state operations unfortunately because of media consolidation, which is another story but but. But these national organizations place an emphasis on the national polls because there is a sense that we should know what all of America is thinking overall because we do have this debate going on about like the popular vote I of the college should we know the? Should we know the overall feelings of American that just ahead? Democrats frustrated. I mean it just frustrates them when they see that their candidates ahead but it all boils down to Florida or Pennsylvania or somewhere else. So I mean just going to take a state like Alaska completely surprising the crap out of somebody one year and. Nobody pulled up there. So no one realized that it was turning blue all the sudden. Is maybe a left guard that into account and by they might on this right now, I mean. I we spoke with Jessica Taylor from Cook Political report a few weeks ago and she said that was a state that she was watching maybe not on the presidential level not on the presidential level she was talking about the Senate race specifically. But you know that's a state that tends to be ignored by a lot of folks but apparently, they have a Senate race this year that folks may end up being surprised by. Folks Surf. To to that to that end. Why do you think that states like South Carolina Are. Pulling in the way they are where you've got a state that is almost..

trump Senate Jessica Taylor South Carolina USC University Southern Califo Biden Michigan Mark cova Cook Political Hillary America Alaska Pennsylvania Florida
"usc university southern california" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on The Playbook

"Title now a lot of people out there don't understand or know what that is compared to like vein or media but in the traditional world it's a business that makes a lot of money helps a lot of people and Dave is learn to have a lot of fun he's done this over nine countries with over twenty companies that he has bought and sold ordinary with a B billion dollar companies and I wanted to come on because he wrote a bestselling book called total rethink and I wanted to bring you on that I kind of get tired loudmouths shock jock influencers people that haven't really done anything in the business world uh-huh and they're making money by this being a brand who was shouting at people telling them you know tell your parents to offer just quit school and so those are dangerous things to do and I wanted to have you on because you really have some substantial experience in philosophies behind how you can build your successful financial career well thanks have me on David but those shock making any money on with with all thousands of acid tell your parents f. off but it's dangerous because if you're already thirteen or fourteen or fifteen year old kid in they look up to you your advice to them is you know you know go on your own and tell Grandpa fuck off that's that's not good advice in my view look work in business cakes understanding of of numbers it takes understanding of sales and marketing it takes understanding of of what markie born after who else is there why going after this fundamental stuff you need to understand in in business in a celebrity cast just tell you you know just go out and do it well it's not so easy I mean granted you have to try and it's okay to fail and I like to say it's okay to fail because your plan B. is often better than your plan is yeah because you know more because you know what happened the penny that didn't work so you have an advantage on your plan b but you know you definitely can't tell everyone to f. off you need a mental you need help wouldn't have that in where I am today without you know being carried on a lot of people shoulders from lot of years in the the people that carried me on their shoulders if I told them to F. off I've been a different different world right now it and I think that the whole world David both on the celebrity podcast as well as in politics is all about shouting you know we we we saw all those environmentalists that came to the UN in New York last week in everybody from Greta Rana up was yellen and everybody that doesn't like in my life breath I've never seen a problem solved by yelling I've seen problem solved by saying let's get together you give me your version I'll give you my version let the the truth is probably that you're actually right I'm partially right we have to find a middle ground that just doesn't work that waiting what that you know I work for a guy named Tip O'Neill speaker of the House and he would come to the office I'd say I was low man on the totem pole so I'd be like Mr Speaker have we do today he'd be He'd say that half day we've got half in that's the way it used to work now it's the left blaming the right in saying big business is evil in the devil the right is blaming the left and saying government is evil that neither is true the both lies businesses what's made America great businesses what what pays the bills in look when when there's a bomb that goes off everybody's willing to call the government to help everyone's willing to call the government when they when the house is on fire so government can do something right they can't living right but big business has also status kate too much from communities and not giving enough so this is a you know have to move a little bit reading this till rethink collaboration even though when I first picked it up on his it'd be a drastic change for you because things are you talking about the acceleration occurring growth occurring and how we have to rethink things but when I read it it was more during the traditional side okay we're going to rethink this but collaboration was really Kim I think one of the things that I fear is that you and your intimate relationships repairs Richard grandparents are in a big fan of not putting faith in what they want from me but I'm also bigger fan and learning from them thank you you won't be lawyer I I understand that but that doesn't mean have to be a lawyer but it also doesn't mean that I'm moving out in separate myself tactically exactly so look businesses you know you've been around a long time businesses fund it it's it's great but it's not just about wishing success is actually stuff you have to do I got a call from the L. D. N- of of Annaborough USC University Southern California and they said look we we have a probably the greatest journalism school in the country the second greatest in the country three thousand dollars a year they're graduated some of them get a job at forty thousand dollars he the model work we developed the Class mean to develop a class that was one third journalism one hundred economics and one third entrepreneurship in it totally changed Dan all of what a journalism student so how many think the old days you get journalism degree and then you go work from the time you build a career the New York Times premium tire lighting state the Washington Post Washington for your entire light those jobs on exists anymore in that's unfortunate because the quality of the news has gone down holy reporting has gone down because people aren't making a whole career out of journalists because there's no money in a more that needs to change but it's not good for society because all about it saying let's is saying since industrial revolution until now it was all about incremental change now it's all about awed rethinking the Mahdi stop is moving too fast because of the Internet because of social media because the way we absorb information in Internet three point Oh is going to make it even faster so you have to clean sheet of paper around everything around the environment row housing Asia them political anything rethought exactly everything journalism TV in to that end we're going to hopefully he quickly do you think these things they're still something that I saw predominantly in the book you know total rethink was values rate is we're we thinking things we have an opportunity to establish values and I was hoping that you could clarify share where you think there is a unseen values comparatively from before to now or where in what values we should be looking at in order to institute some these new thought ideas well one of the that that's a great question David and one of the values that we really need to rethink is value in other people's opinions it doesn't it doesn't mean the left can keep on blaming business and the right can't keep on blaming the government that's those are just true lies you've value other people's opinions in we have stop yelling if people if they don't agree with you just because someone doesn't agree with you doesn't mean that they wanted get yelled at me now we've taken it from from yelling at people to sort of ridiculing people on twitter so it is a national the way problems solve problems can solve this through collaboration the way problems get solved is through empowerment the way problem can solve the inclusion so we we had it's because it doesn't make someone bad that they have different view but we're not going to solve the problem if we just keep on Agian when I was in Washington where I was working politics George Bush number one was a congressman in both he was a congressman in both a Republican Administration and in a democratic administration and he voted fifty fifty four times he voted with his conscious not with the administration they don't do anymore people don't vote with it in that needs to change because it just not gonna work otherwise and they'll continue to be an attack one side against the other one of the things even here's you know there's this philosophy I believe in that the truth always comes out and you and I we are transitioning into the social media world NC frustration that the truth is distorted and we know that eventually the truth will come out over time let's just hope wasn't retired nineteen fifties we run that risk that the truce not gonna come out and yeah that's the truth does come out over time so so so let's go let's talk about the Internet in how the truth got got walked so intent onepointoh started in the seventies was about moving ended the Internet that work for Dod another issue which was a lot of government money wins general researching and we pull back on that which problem 'cause every business plan the you can think of that's made a billion dollars is all based on the internet or GPS in those both stand with government funding that's another story but when when machines can communicate with machines at scale in real time and that's gotta give us a huge huge change that's more than what we have so far now into two point oh it turned into be all about look at me and look at what I have to say there's no basis of truth necessarily in that there's no way to know whether who that person says they are and what they said is accurate or not now it's all about look at me and look what I say in ten three point zero will be all about this is a spot that I'm at this is exactly what's happening they'll all be location based in Ob fact-based but we get there without destroying ourselves we have to get from where we are now for that spot in that there's a lot of things that need to happen like like I fought hard in Congress for number portability so some of your listeners of that a young I can remember this but when I first started the first competitor America it.

Dave forty thousand dollars three thousand dollars billion dollars billion dollar fifteen year
"usc university southern california" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

The Past Lives Podcast

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

"They were in India having TV each. She was dressed in a Red Sari and sister was dressed in a green shirt and bluejeans so but when I met him in La. A and I did this. Reading turned out both of our kids were USC university southern California so In the you know there are other synchronous cities as well. So we're connected you know we're all connected and when I was reading the book and you went through each and gave each experience a you had a kind of a transcript of the sitting and we could see what the spirit was answering the questions and that that did seem to be a lot of wisdom in their US tremendous share. I mean you know. I hadn't tape recorder on recorded these during the readings and people understood understood that 'cause I can't be in the reading and also be taking notes so I recorded it and then you know when I would go back and I would listen to who would spirit said Incredible you know the the the clarity of some of these responses the answers searchers and the wisdom and the knowledge is so far beyond us. We can't do it ourselves. You know but Yeah you're you're correct the The answers from spirit and from the universe in these readings pretty astounding it. You know I I just did this audio book of life after near death and so I went I went back back I am the narrator so I went back and read it again and as I was reading it I was like wow. This is pretty profound. I had read it for a few years. You know. Some of the information nation is just extremely profound and enlightening. And I'm the author so or can maybe maybe I am just thinking that but I don't know I don't know we just talk about your new book a little bit. It's diary of death. Breath Dula twenty-five lessens the dying. Teach us about the afterlife. So that's coming up very soon. Isn't it. It's coming out in October. And this continues my work in the field of consciousness And the reason I just back up and tell you how I got involved in this work. two thousand and one I my mother died and when it end of life we had hospice come to help us and help her and they were really wonderful and at some point one of the houses professionals Dell's handed me a piece of paper. You Might WanNa read this and I thought you know this probably has to do with medication education or doctors or maybe even funeral arrangements and I set it aside but eventually I picked it up and I read it and it said Ed if the bodies ready in the spirit isn't you don't leave and if the spirits ready and the body isn't isn't you don't leave but if the spirits ready in the body's ready than you leave so I was very struck by that you know the death after the process involving body and spirit. I mean prior to that I never been around anybody who was dying and I think many people today are not. You know. I've I've never been with anyone. WHO's dying and so I didn't really know what was going on? And so you know I thought what about this. You know this is a process. We're not just a body not just a physical body you know. There's a soul there. Also and they have to be aligned for us to leave so you know I thought about it in fact I thought about for fifteen years and I knew I wanted to be of service. I knew I wanted to do something with hospice but I wasn't sure what and it took me a while to come around to doing the training and eventually trained to be a death jeweler in Adetula is now. That's a fairly new term. People often ask me. What is the death Dula? Death July many people birth Dulas who usher life into the world. They're midwives They help women give birth death. Julius are on the other side they they help us your life out answer Dulas kind of book in life Death Dulas are fairly recent phenomena and Because sir sort of knew the work is still taking shape. Some dulas will some Dulas help with families. He's some help with funeral arrangements but my work as a Dula the death Dula is sitting bedside did hospice with the actively dying and so as a death Dula doing what I do. The patients are often usually sleet responsive so In the reason for the work is that the two things number one. We're the eyes and ears of the medical staff staff because they can't be with the patient all the time and number two families don't want their love wants to die alone and so they wanna to know that there's somebody there You know oftentimes in hospice end of life trauma people stay away away. You know they they act like the person has already died or in their frayed. We have a lot of fear. And there's a lot of stigma around death in our culture so so oftentimes these people are alone and now not always sometimes and so A Dula is someone who could sit there here and be with the patient at end of life Now sometimes family and friends come to visit when they do. I talked to them and sometimes they just WanNa gonna be with the patient. So really varies but I think many people when they hear about my new book diarrhea death through. I think they I I think many of them think maybe this is something that I could do. You know they WANNA be of service and It's it's a new field but it's growing very rapidly and now in the book. The book similar to life after near death in that stories of individuals individual cases and Because I because I'm a death Dula as well as a medium. I'm able to see both sides tentative life. Not all debt jalousie mediums. Because I am I'm able to see into invisible not on people in listening to this podcast. believed that. And that's okay you know but for those those who accept that there's something more going on or believed there is something more going on I talk about some of the things that take place at end of life families in spirit coming in to be with the patient at end of life How the soul transitions at end of life? And you know they're they're just many aspects that there's much more going on the invisible world than than most people people realize that ended life I think for most people they walk into a hospital or hospice and and someone is close to death they. They're afraid they see a body in bed. That sun response has been very much attached to the physical world here the physical body. And that's how we kind of identified life so so they see the physical body. That doesn't look very good and they're afraid but the truth is that beyond the physical body. There's a very rich world that's unfolding and most people can't see that so I guess that's why they're that's one of the reasons they're afraid another reason they're probably afraid is because death has become very medical is one hundred hundred. Fifty years ago was people died at home and they were surrounded by friends and loved ones. Today your friends and loved ones can be scattered all over the world and many people end up in hospice hospital. And it's become very clinical in scary and it's been turned over to the medical world so there are many reasons why death is a taboo subject in their stigma. MM attached to it in fear but I hope that this will get. The conversation started about a new way to look at death and for people a to learn about how the work of Death Dula and what transpires it ended life and and in the afterlife. It definitely invite you back onto the cost when the books published and then we can get a lot more detail and get into it much more in depth. Yeah thank you alighted up do that in this. I said also I will send you the link and that way people will be able to preordered the book now although it should be out very shortly cause it's something we've covered with a previous guests. We talked about deathbed visions and shed. Death visions wins. And also somebody might be coming on. Saints Talk About seminoles acidity. I know what you're referring to that does happen with some people. You know that Those last few comments words of communication later completely out of character with the rest of their illness. So Oh yeah it's it's a really interesting topic. Yeah so well. Thank you very much for coming on the PODCAST. It's been fascinating conversation. I'm really pleased. Managed to get it together because we did have some rooms connecting at the beginning. Wi- thank you so much Simon. It's my absolute pleasure. I enjoyed it and that was a great interview with Deborah Diamond..

"usc university southern california" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To ma'am am I making this up ma'am yes I think so yes just trying to another. trying to make Notre Dame look bad we were what what what I thought was funny in the indictment they listed all of the various colleges involved in new had Stanford and USC university southern California which warms the heart of Notre Dame person knowing that they were listed in there and and you know university of Texas at Austin which we'll talk about the last hour maybe but they list all these colleges and they called them all a highly selective private university or public university depending on the case and the one they had in there was the university of San Diego which I'll just call yeah it's a selective universities out they really dissertation here I think is at university in the egg well your dissertation sure Hey Hey why is it highly selective. well yeah we have a guest on the line add to die and Kelly Williams bowler is a name from the past and not my path not much well a past in the past news past and she's been a guest in my graduate forensic accounting class at DePaul University because when this admission scandal started recently started surfacing Kelly's case and story resurfaced it was a twenty let twenty eleven case and I came to know of Kelly's case because I watched the arm documentary that used to be on Netflix caught the arm the honest truth about distante dishonesty did you ever see that with Dan area alley his his his research yeah I saw a bit of it yes so her story was one of the stories that was profiled and so Kelly are you here with us tonight. yes I am thank you for having me on thanks C. fella Callie sinners yet you know she's get just her name's cal okay now how my gonna keep this straight how about your Kelly one and on the phone is Kelly too and our voices sort of sound the same so you won't know who you're talking to I think I figured out I'm I can see your lips move affect and I'm right here so Kelly thanks for joining in and it's nice to talk to you again it's been a it's been a minute since I've seen you. but absolutely but thank you for having me on I'm sure you're wondering when your name is going to eventually be out of the news are good. it crossed my mind you know with with it we'll have to you know so what we're going to talk. a little bit about your story and what happened to you and why your name is still mentioned today. okay I'll take you back in two thousand and nine I will write it take you back a little further a couple years prior I'll say almost about two years prior sh I P. two to two thousand eleven I had my daughter in my school district and they have been there for two year the first year everything looks fine but the second year they have higher than the best care I thought I should and I guess he followed me around for two weeks that's what I understand she and basically that's when they said that they have and I quote clear and convincing evidence that I did not live in districts so they want me to remove my daughter so of course we were panicking and try to give up the car grandparent power of attorney well I did get it explain everything to the judge we will get that at our local juvie court sh and so we did and we had it we continue for the year but I get the. may be around may or June they had what to quickly ask you know Kobe like deny it or whatever so they did in June I received a letter from the judge she said you know what to do we moved the kid angle back to your district so we did a little bit also look to the district. eighteen months later. eighteen months later I received an indictment and did not want last because I never been in trouble before it was Ohio it would be a postcard in the mail it was Ohio pursuit Kelly we all are not I don't know what that one I called my father and he was like well forget all over so I did if you look at it in your box he at once on the same day so that's with the practice thinking yeah so then we went to court we found out that it was Copley Fairlawn city schools she and that that with the indictment okay so that's when everything began. course that will go over that with the two thousand eleven. and I that you know charged and grant best cantaloupe document and I don't want to you know which jail for a day three years probation you know forty hours of she is twenty eight now seven sorry seventy hours of community service twenty hours right okay you want me to get healthy to write a letter also write a letter once thought then to the judge mine actually remember everything it was a nice long long not unit of being that I had to you know to and I did it my father he also with the GL one both with the jail it was already issued it because of that our district situation and of course you know I don't know how much you know okay he went to jail and then what happened with him was initially charged with the same thing but they couldn't because my father in law the girl on the idea sure he did it they are you the fact that man you got that out the house the been there but she twenty plus years so what happened was they could get a month actually this part of the project and things not bother which bill he was taking he was using so scary and they said that he should have been using disability and he didn't know he did not know the difference between the two he thought that he was doing the right thing at a certain age that the over harbour. but basically they say that she. he he fell eighty thousand dollars a medical insulated sensitivity tree and he died never came all sh so with all of that. you know after that happened then of course you know I've been I would always an advocate for equality of educational we are working to fix them I've been in the system and I don't know how much time to make sure I have everything here can try the. we caught everything that happened all the steps because it was a lot it was eight years ago. Kelly let me is this as you follow the news and I'm sure people are sending you articles daily about the parallels between your Kays and what's happened to Felicity testament and she was sentenced to fourteen days do you think that her sentencing her sentence is comparable to what happened to you or do you think her treatment is different than what happened to you. I mean you know it the that they're who they are and that if they lose the they have been projected on many different levels you know as you know I don't know if you doubt you know I wish I you know which is a basic mom in the area well I got a mug shot we're all over the phone sh she has yet to much that has yet to be. we see no one has seen a mug shot this one of the other thing is that she was able to go home the picture for situation thank you her daughter find great her daughters by her daughter is Cologne sh she was able to call home picture all her business prior to this date is she supposed to import. for her since the thing are are are not going to be with her actual certain the tie sh with me she hit the. you know the gavel of whatever caught on the on the on the jazz at table I went off to jail immediately shackled me and I went immediately but there are different and it is apples to oranges now okay but she at the same time is like what you get the the difference in certain AP I did not show me already if they were going to release any mark shot because she thought it might damage their reputation sure. if I may I did just that. show a couple of differences there now as I understand it Kelly to I'll call you your case was in state court in Ohio correct not federal court absolutely absolutely right okay now did you stand trial or did you plead guilty. I stood trial okay so Felicity plays the guilty and generally in court again Candace begins by makes appearances as an attorney you plead guilty you generally get a lighter sentence in fact more favorable treatment especially in this case we she was the first one out of a team that sword trying to encourage the others now were you also the only person that the school district went after or were there others. I don't know if it was others at that at that particular hot chocolate well one of the actually the alas each and you know. and I knew the lady still no where she did not live in the district but she was able to continue. you know keeping our kids her kids in it gradually the act so I don't know exactly what happened and how that happened it was quite a few others that Nick the gay straight back yes we are you know graduated but of course. you know I would never had. I mentioned that I said anything showing but it was. quite a few that would be that did not what I did so Kelly we're gonna take a quick break can you stay on the line with us so we can talk a little bit more about your story absolutely okay thank you so much John you listen to Kelly pope and bill Cressy withdrew crime tonight I'm joined us back and and divisions I'm twenty. what does building a better bank look like it starts with building Capital One cafes warm.

Kelly pope Felicity Ohio Nick building Capital One attorney Candace bill Cressy John eighteen months eighty thousand dollars fourteen days seventy hours twenty hours eight years forty hours three years two weeks two years two year
"usc university southern california" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"H. S. C. R. P. highly sensitive she reactive protein was what that stands for and one that's a bald one your inflamed and if that's above two you're damaging your heart and your circulation of the ball three that really increases your risk of stroke and heart attack so not only are you damaging your arteries and blood vessels both in your heart and in your brain but it's becoming really dangerous so my HSE RP I get a check twice a year to make sure under control so when it's inflamed the inflammation causes a pattern of destruction shed blood vessel walls the body a large could get away with that to a great extent for a time but the brain can't she the body's blood vessels have gaps between the junctions there's their souls that one your blood vessel walls are called endothelial cells and your really tough extremely active high energy cells and they cold your blood vessels like a rug shoulder to shoulder and it's their job to push open the blood vessels and when they get damaged at least and serious complications like blood clots and strokes and heart attacks and pulmonary embolisms really dangerous to when no when we when we talk about the blood vessels in the brain there are even more solidly colder not only do they have these endothelial cells but the endothelial cells don't have gaps between their junctions they're very tightly knit together plus there's extra cold initial installation now why would the blood vessels in the brain be more insulated and cold then the blood vessels in the lecture in the arms and it harder because you have to protect the brain it's called the blood brain barrier it's designed to keep bad things from entering the brain what happens certain patterns of inflammation dental long term chronic means long Kerr chronic inflammation that affects the heart and kidneys in the idols of shutter it inflames the blood vessels and blood vessels in the brain shrunk to get leaky because now they're saying things in the brain of Alzheimer's patients that don't belong there like the body's white blood cells the immune cells from the body go around sure collisional over the body but in the brain are not supposed to escape from the blood vessels and enter into the brain tissue if they do it's a disaster so they're finding that the inflammation and affects the blood vessels in the brain now the blood vessels in the brain became leaky they're not supposed to leak anything to bring anything to bring needs and house ways of accepting things like active transport where they actually the brain actually picks it up and carry them to bring so if the brain's blood vessels are leaky now things can escape from the blood vessels and enter into the brain sure they're finding the body's immune cells into the brain and they don't recognize you bring tissue and they become activated and they're just going to bring they're also finding germs in their defining different viruses like the herpes virus you get on your lip herpes one or different bacteria have entered the brains of Alzheimer's patients and are destroying brain tissue so there's a number of studies now showing that leaky blood vessels may trigger an Alzheimer's so not only does research will reduce the inflammation that damages the blood vessels in the first place and actually pissed blood vessels so here's one of those studies recently from the university of southern California and it's a five year study of a hundred and sixty one adult and the people with the worst memory problems also had leaky blood vessels in their brain regardless of the presence of toxic protein it didn't matter about the amyloid in the towel Opeth each what mattered was it's in the journal nature medicine what mattered was there blood vessels in their brain became like so here's a follow up study from the Keck school of medicine sexual medicine at USC university southern California in Los Angeles I found just the they found that the brain of people who developed Alzheimer's there there is leaking national blood vessels the blood vessels become permeable things a leaching out of the blood vessels and entering into the bring things like stray sells like commune cells or bacteria and viruses or heavy metals like in a lead mercury and aluminum and other unhealthy stuff of substances are entering into their brain and killing their normal day killing their new so here's Russ virtual appears to restore blood brain barrier integrity and I'll show ritual she's this is Georgetown University Medical Center here's what I'm getting at I think rest virtual should be part of our plan for lowering our risk of Alzheimer's and that's a bold statement from to make because I can get a lot of flak for saying that because that's how it is in medicine and science and nutrition people always like to give you a hard time I don't mind the I've got wide shoulders I could take abuse so in any event smoking high cholesterol high triglycerides high blood pressure a lousy diet they all damage to blood vessels in the brain inflammation damages blood vessels in the brain and they become leaky they're not supposed to be like this post a trap everything a blood vessel so can a to bring so these bad things are entering the branding killing brain cells so here's a study from Georgetown University Medical Center even then I'll summers patients what leaking blood vessels the rest virtual wish was restoring the integrity of the blood brain barrier now what his what they found no these studies were in conjunction with the Mayo Clinic to Cleveland Clinic university of show thank what was it called you that one inch Austin university of South Carolina medical university at the medical university of South Carolina that's what is controlled our university of Florida Gainesville Mount Sinai Albert Einstein college of medicine a Cornell Columbia I mean she's huge research institutions Johns Hopkins to so many good places involved in this research any film that yes leaking blood vessels or part of the pattern the blood vessels get damaged angel leaching into the brain to killing brain cells dishes even if you have the plaque and attend one of these if they can get the blood vessels back to health it may prevent memory loss she does plaques and damage to the nerves in the brain that are part and parcel downside risk but it seems that the core of it is really the leaking the city's blood vessels so now they've proven that rush virtual approved integrity to each blood vessels of called the blood brain barrier research tool is the most powerful visual active nutrient that's absolutely safe in other words it restore circulation to the heart to the legs to your sexual organs to your skin all up to your muscles but especially in the brain it's improving circulation to the brain but yet it's proper circulation because it's reducing inflammation of the brain and healing the blood vessel walls and bring sort of brain is getting the oxygen and calories in the vitamins and minerals of all things it needs but it's not getting the viruses and bacteria and the inflammation so that's really really unbelievable so I take to rush virtual a day I take off I happen to taken together and so I don't forget I changed it so I take my referred for breakfast is everyone should while I forget to take things with dinner to be honest with you Mike my life is so crazy with my schedule at work.

H. S. C. R. five year one inch
"usc university southern california" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"Jim Murphy a marine veteran from American hero missions, Jim, before we get to talk about the great things you're doing with American hero. Missions take us back until which you did in the Marine Corps sharia. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it. Yeah. It was a after option Rinker. I did kinda one stint of active duty outlet for tiny third brains and why certain marines and had a great experience there and worked a little bit Washington DC up on the hill for the Marine Corps, and then I left active duty for about a year, and then nine eleven happened and went back on active duty for two years. And. Yeah. I did one deployment to Iraq in two thousand three during the evasion got out came home. And I kind of had a plan in place. By my soon to be wife and I had a plan in place. And I got out and I was applying to business schools, while I was in the Marine Corps, and I was lucky I got to go to USC university, southern California, and I got a scholarship there. And she in that GI Bill made a lot of sense. So I went to university of California got my BA and my whole plan was to go from. Working kind of in government than, you know, kind of a I really want to get into a creative kind of industry at an always been very about toys comic books all that kind of stuff. And so when I was looking around, I was getting my BA had I actually started developing a whole bunch of toy concepts and, and brands and entertainment properties, while I was getting my MBA and the concept. That is now American hero missions, a very long journey from where it started to hurt. His now up at the concept that is now American era missions, I actually was a finalist. Business plan competition. Won a bunch of awards. Always got my MBA but I didn't have any experience. I didn't really have any capital at that point. And I had to go get a job. And I was lucky to go work at Mattel, which at the time and still is by the numbers, the biggest toy company in the world. And I went ni- spent a few years there. And then I went on worked at a bunch of different companies than finally after. I've been working for a while. And I kind of looked around and said, I gotta do my own saying, I'm not getting younger and about three years ago. We launched American hero missions. So that was are those the, the long arc to where we are right now. And how we got to what we're doing it when you quit Christian. But working at Mattel, whatever you can tell us. I mean how cool is at like grew up as a kid with all those different toys and everything. And then as well into adulthood. You find yourself working a toymaker. What's it like? Well, it couldn't be a bigger clash of cultures speaking, frankly, achieve in, in the infantry and then going into a truly, you know, creative throw stuff at the walls, who it works environment, which in, you know, a lot of entertainment and toys, also worked in video games at activision. Couldn't be a bigger classic culture, though. I will say, nothing will make you more kind of wide and realistic about human nature than go on the beating the tree, and then making products for kids for young boys who you know, if you have a four or five six year old boy, they care about running around hitting each other. You know, so I guess so. The gaff wasn't really that big between those two worlds and other ways. It was like, you know, nine day I was I was there were a big bowl of oranges and I was just one weird onion sitting on top. So, yeah. So it's definitely some, some cultural, gaps there at the head to adjust to that grows like Yona people making attention when they show up to immediately and that kind of thing and everyone's wondering what's what's up with this guy? You know, I did you're joking, but I definitely have my moment. You know, like how is this? How do you function this way? But, you know, people do if that lay down, you know, templates years out for doing that, and realize, well, yeah, the world's very different place. So I guess for your audience, you know, it is important to remember the the, the, the. The world you operate in, in a military environment, super gal huge pros and cons on all of it. But don't have high expectations that. You know, I it depends on the environment into just be a lot more patient. A lot more tolerant. There are a lot more foibles out there than you deal. Yeah. Well, you know. There's, there's no true essence of, of leadership in, in manliness, you know, more than a marine, infantry not not disk and all the other great one MOS is out there, too. But just the, the true human down to the bone raw. Human nature just comes out when you're out in the field with a bunch of grunts for weeks and months on end. So you it just takes it down to the basic level of human life. Just it's just primal. It is fiber. And you when you've lived at, you know, specially as an well into adulthood going all the way down to that. And then coming back up to something like that quite quite the culture shock. There's no doubt. But I wouldn't I wouldn't do it any different any other way. I'm very, very fortunate if the experience, I've, I've had and, you know, I mean, it's so much fun. I mean, I got to work on that, man, and superman, I, I did a ton of, like adult collector, I I've, I'm now I've been, I think twelve years running at Comecon going, you know, as a going for work not, you know, so San Diego comic con funny things the world where we're going there and seeing all the security guards at the door, and realizing they were all young marines to try to raise money for the birthday ball, their search or major. It's walkouts say eight able to, you know, just talked to a little bit. Wave at your in the Marine Corps is a yeah, no, my here's a little bit longer. And I'm wearing a he-man t shirt, but yeah, no, I was at one point. You know, so when you're hanging out with all the, the geeks, it Comecon and everything else in your room or into the all, like, do their knees start shaking in order today. Like, wow, you're, you're a real marine anything about anything. Office it because we all said, oh, that's interesting. You know. Yeah. So that reminds me of punisher issue, four twenty three in like that kind of. No just just great people, both sides. And very, very fortunate to have had the experience of I've had so. Across the board. Yet reminds me like being static displayed in airshow and kids antidotes coming up asking me, you know. How my helicopter compares to some video game? They're playing. Yeah. Exactly. So you had with a lot of coal jobs. A lot of a lot of different companies like what was going through your mind as far as? Having a good job doing some cool stuff and be around some, some co stuff you always wanted to be round yet. You're not you're not you're not an entrepreneur. You're not run your business like what can was were you constantly like I need to go rhino business or you just like Ed just I'm not sure what I need to be doing here, any, too, but it's going to be something different. More the former than the latter more always thinking I, I got I got to take the leap. I gotta I gotta jump at some point. I got to figure out how to do it myself and end up the big. If you wanna do something entrepreneurial, the best devices, just go do it because it's going to be painful. It's like you know. Jumping on trampolines full of cheese, graders. You know, like it's not gonna be a pleasant easy experience. So just get it over in. You're gonna learn on the fly because I mean, I, I worked for years, you know, in bigger companies for big marketing budgets, and, you know, TV commercials, and online, campaigns and had big resources to go to shows and put a booth together, and then all that experience was helpful. But I still made a ton of stupid mistakes, when we first launched our company we launched Invicta. What's now American hero missions and I look back on it. Like, how did I do you know, example, a when, you know, like a simple example, is we built our initial product. We built these physical cats. What was? So what we do is we tell stories American heroes and leaders to get kids reading developing leadership skills. And and getting pride in American heroes in history. So, basically, like all Marine Corps bodies caught like TBS Ricketts now or it's kinda dear it's like basically. What do you do? Now, Lieutenant we tell real historical story. So long story short, we, we started doing physical products. And I've made this beautiful kit with an action figure in graphic novel and maps, and that kind of thing and. I, I don't have any money and I, I was standing in the quarter of a friend's booth at New York toy fair, and I managed to get the burns and noble buyer to come by and look at it. And she said, okay, this horrible prototype. I mean by industry standards. It wasn't like I did or crayons. But I mean like having worked in the industry. I know what you have to have some that look. You need to have something instills confidence, you'll be able to manufacture this deliberate, and I put it in front of rich great. Okay. And then she says something to me, okay? I'll buy it. And then she said something to me, I'd never heard before she said, because I was saying that a twenty dollar retail. I'd back by math into that. And she said great, but I needed to be thirty five dollars. I said, okay. All right. Wow. That's not great happens. We yeah. And I raised her exactly. But the problem was that we raise the price since she is my my biggest customer. And then when it got springtime it's out on shelves. It was harder to move through. So, like I look back and I think, oh, well, you know, one day I should have done is just tell her no. Cut your order and half at rather keep it as a twenty dollar retail, you know, like that kind of stuff. So the point is, is that from entrepreneurship is never is not easy. I mean, you know, Mark Zuckerberg and there are certain examples of people that, that, you know, looks like they had a pretty pretty smooth path two billion billion dollar company. But I Madari of entrepreneurs face a difficult path and it's all about persistence, and it's all about, you know, through on your shoulder into a and I have backers and supporters and, you know, they look at me and they keep going. And, you know, I, I was an overnight success is just overnight was fifteen years for me, you know, so this one toy your item that you had were this go to show came up and said, I want to buy it. Did you, you had to actually pay to get it made? And then if you said, how, you know how many how many of it was it that she wanted, initially, like, yes, I mean, she gave me she told me what the order would be. So I had the commitment to the math, you know. Yeah. And so how much money will you talk about? If you don't mind me, asking her, at least how much you know, how many was it five grand or twenty of them twenty thousand over what? I mean, all in the, the, the number of games was about, you know, two hundred thousand dollars in terms of revenue across the board. But the point I'm trying to what I'm trying to get it is. They didn't. They didn't give you the money upfront today. No. So, so lack a lot of folks were Amazon sellers in alike zone on Amazon in a lot of people are always trying to push into retail the retail market and stuff, and sometimes it makes total sense. But a lot of times, people don't realize you gotta come up with that two hundred grand yourself and put it into the stores. And like you said, if it doesn't sell, you don't get your two hundred grand back is I take all it's great to get into WalMart or get into wherever, but you take all the risk and have to put all the money upfront in they just allow you to sell in their store..

Marine Corps Mattel Jim Murphy Washington Iraq university of California California Rinker USC activision Mark Zuckerberg Amazon New York WalMart San Diego Ed Invicta Ricketts twenty dollar
"usc university southern california" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

09:38 min | 2 years ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Alert. That sounds familiar. It's it's a it's a Nancy Pelosi news alerts. Pelosi. Do exactly what she was doing yesterday. She said to the Washington Post reporter, this is news. I am going to give you some news right now. Because I haven't said this to any press person before, but since you asked I've been thinking about this impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there's something so compelling an overwhelming and bipartisan, I don't think we should go down that path because it divides the country, and he's just not worth it. So also as I said yesterday does this also indicate that they don't have anything that they could really go after impeachment wise Ellison, it would be completely symbolic just like the Bill Clinton deal and Bill Clinton disgraced the office. I don't even get me started on that. And you know, parents all over America having to explain explain oral sex to their kids. Don't even get me started on that. But the deal here is. Is that do they have anything? The house. Oh, sure. But maybe the house could vote to impeach. But remember that the house impeaches, but it's the Senate that actually has to convict, and there's no way that the US Senate is going to convict Donald Trump unless there is something just utterly agree GIS in the model report. And it is just a jaw dropping shocker, and I I just I don't anticipate that happening and with all the investigations that are being launched at this point. And what they're going after. I mean, clearly Pelosi's also indicating it seems that we just don't have the goods for any kind of impeachment here. But then also for her to say that the president is not fit to be president that he's not ethically fit intellectually fit politically v. Pelosi was just with rich with with be railing comments regarding Trump, and that's why I'm waiting where Mr President President Trump. Where is your response to Nancy Pelosi? I'm waiting. I mean, it's gotta be coming. And sometimes it does take this long. And then, you know, ban out of the blue you have in our four part tweet, we shall see. And if it happens during the program, and I get a little big Bing Bong, I'll let you know right here on the program. So Nancy Pelosi what's taking so long on this thing. Let's get into this this crazy crazy college admissions scandal, and there are multiple layers to the story, which are just unbelievable until the point where it is in snared to Hollywood actresses I tweeted out earlier, and by the way, folks, you can follow me on Twitter at Todd Schmidt. That's at t o d D S C H N ITT my Twitter feed. I'm pretty active, you know, before the show after the show sometimes during the show weekends holidays. Got scuba diving spring break vacation coming up in a couple of weeks. I'll I'll I'll tweet out some scuba video and photos, so at Todd Schnitt on Twitter is my feet, and I tweeted out earlier something to the effect. It's amazing what parents will do for their kids when you look at the money here. That the ringleader of this college admissions scandal, and as I was alluding to just in the setup on the listing of what we're going to get to this hour here on the program. I told you, hey, we're going through the process right now. And you know, this really really sucks that you have parents that even had kids accepted to division one schools on completely false premises that this is just an elaborate multi layered scam from tests being taken by a proxy to scores being changed by an administrator who administrates or ministers, the text the test all the way to college coaches being paid a fortune, and I'll get into some of the details here to recruit so-called student athletes. That's not really student athlete. You know, my daughter and the other kids that cheap plays soccer with the bus their butts to get the attention of coaches by doing all these games and showcases and tournaments and flying all over the country to catch the eye of coaches, and then delicately. Now, you know, my daughter like I said a bunch of you know, NC double A division. One two and three schools were were approaching my daughter, and she has verbally committed to a very good division one institution. But still listen, my daughter still has an uphill climb. She still has to nail her ACT. She's gonna do the ACT. She's been doing practice test and doing very well. But she still has to get the proper range on the ACT and she's not cheating. She's busting her butt off doing practice tests. And I and studying her off I mean, nonstop what she's calling into this. No one's getting paid to fix her scores. So this is very very disheartening. When you see a story like this. And then she's working her butt off in school to make sure her GPA needs to be where it is. And folks, guess what that includes soccer practice three and four nights a week. So. That I read about these rackets and these these scams. It's absolutely unbelievable. So the details are fifty people. Across the United States. I think the the US attorney out of Boston said, it was fifty people, and they were I believe six different states across the country that the department of Justice is going after I mean, this is a massive admissions scandal for colleges across the country. And what it was is people means parents with Mola with money. Were buying their kids into these institutions? So the total is thirty three parents. They were nailed with charges. I believe there could be even more that will be charged at a later date. There are also big school coaches. And what was laid out as some of these coaches altogether took in hundreds and hundreds of thousands if not millions in bribe money. For some of these students to get into some of these top notch schools like Stanford and Yale Wake Forest USC university, southern California university of Texas among some of the the big names here. But this story is just incredible. To Hollywood actresses have been in snared by this. You have Lori Laughlin. And Felicity Huffman. What Laurie Lachlan Laughlin or Laughlin because I know that that. That name could be pronounced two different ways. I've heard it pronounced the different ways. In fact, I think that the US attorney out of Massachusetts. I think said Laurie Lachlan, but I I've seen that name by guess pronounced a couple of different ways. Then of course, now, Lori Loughlin or Lachlan whatever it is. You know, she was what the full house fuller house. Then you had Felicity Huffman, desperate housewives. In fact, I think Felicity Huffman is actually married to the incredible William Macy and some of the details. Here are crazy and hold on to that thought. I wanna get into some of the the dollar amounts the numbers. The schemes faking faking athletics for some of these kids. To pretend the elite athletes getting recruited by some of these division one top notch universities when they've never played the sport that they were being recruited for. And I mean, some of the faking photos of the kid playing the sport even photo shopping their kids head on an actual athletes body IB. This is mind boggling, especially since where the circles of all of these parents. That we know in club soccer that have been working for years and years to get their kids noticed legitimately and playing legitimately and working their butts off, legitimately athletically and academically. This is crazy. I some of the numbers of the details are gonna blow you away. And I want.

Nancy Pelosi Mr President President Trump soccer Felicity Huffman Twitter Bill Clinton US attorney Hollywood Washington Post US Senate Laurie Lachlan Laughlin president Todd Schnitt Ellison Laurie Lachlan Lori Laughlin reporter America United States
"usc university southern california" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Wait say that again when it's bad things when things are bad you think that it could be worse which is a funky little way being like optimistic like it's not that bad is what you get to say that yeah and i don't know if you've seen the video with jaakko willing it's called good like he says like every time something bad happens good because it's another it's another way to get better and i think just without even knowing how to articulate it before that's that's really was my mindset in ethic that's something that my dad really instilled in me as as a as a kid what's it like to be a student athlete in a top university being a quarterback at like what is it like how tall you six six three i got measured at six three at the combine gave me a look like that the i was disappointed i thought it was taller hook it might add actually just told me he was like the measured at like six to flat at the doctors and he's always been like six four so he's shrinking and he's pissed about it so maybe i am too okay all right so what is it like i mean you're walking around campus you're doing amazing things on the field the big sport campus usc university southern california yeah it's it's fun it's fun to be an athlete it's fun to be the quarterback all that stuff but at the same time it's it can be really tiring in if you know if you let that get to your head because at anytime someone asked for picture anytime someone else last ask for an autograph.

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"usc university southern california" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"usc university southern california" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Art or if there isn't an undefeated or a high enough ranked group of five team now you have a situation where be a usc university southern california could sneak in at at eight spot right 'cause i i'm with you i would have your five conference champions i would have alabama as an atlarge i would have wisconsin as an at large because i think they competed well against what would be an automatic beat ohio state and then if there was no you see ucf undefeated then this is a great conversation of of did southern california do enough to prove at the end of the season that there were the of that does penn state sneak back in just love that conversation in in if there is an undefeated like there is with ucf in that span tactic they deserve every right to have a chance when it's eight teams and what not when it's four in their neville never will be when it's for you want to tell me that it wouldn't be compelling tv for the last three weeks of the season if we were look king in all of these teams that that are right now that we're out of the conversation the penn state so the world the miami's of the world there and i didn't even think about miami words miami fall to have this conversation you you would make the bottom portion of it is so interesting because not only is everybody fighting for but even an even if you lose you championship game you're still fighting for something without out with the at large bids it creates a great conversation of how they see the largest i think this i think it's a total win for college football i think it's why it's inevitable too because the conversation will never stop college football there will always be a point look at college basketball we argue about whose 65 should be oh yeah it's a it's an interesting process we.

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