19 Episode results for "Us Olympic Committee"

USOC goes nuclear on USA Gymnastics

San Francisco Chronicle Sports - Spoken Edition

03:13 min | 2 years ago

USOC goes nuclear on USA Gymnastics

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. USOC goes nuclear on USA gymnastics, author unknown for sports, the US Olympic Committee is moving to revoke USA gymnastics status as the governing body for the sport at the Olympic level meeting out the nuclear option to an organization that has botched its own reorganisation in the wake of a sex abuse scandal involving former team doctor Larry Nassar in an open letter to the gymnastics community, Monday, US Olympic Committee, CEO Sarah Hersh land said you deserve better. And that the challenges facing USA gymnastics are more than it is capable of overcoming as currently constructed. The US Olympic Committee also has faced criticism for not responding quickly and appropriately to sexual abuse cases. And though the move was cheered by the gymnast whose revelations helped propel Nassar's years of abuse to the four. Thank you re tweeted, Rachel, din Hollander, others viewed it as a ploy to shift blame today's announced. By USOC seeks only to deflect from their total failure over decades to protect the gymnasts in their care said a statement from attorneys Michelle Simpson two-goal and moa Z's who represent Olympia tasha Schweickart and her sister Jordan in their lawsuit against USA gymnastics, and the US Olympic Committee this year, the US Olympic Committee said it was seeking to remove itself as a defendant from a number of lawsuits, including those filed by gold medalist Michaela, Maroney, Jordan Weaver, and Allie rice -ment claiming Nassar did not work for the federation nor were his crimes for Siebel by the committee the lawsuits claim the US Olympic Committee as the umbrella organization that oversees USA gymnastics should have done more when it learned of the abuse. Elsewhere Stanford women are top soccer. Seed defending national champion Stanford is the top overall seed in the women's NCWA tournament and will host Seattle in its postseason opener. Friday the cardinal entered the tournament on a school record forty one. Game unbeaten streak six longest in CWA history. Santa Clara is a number three seed in its portion of the bracket and begins play Saturday when it hosts Milwaukee in the same bracket, San Jose State plays its first game Friday at number two seed UCLA running the New York City marathon has set a record for the most finishers of any marathon worldwide fifty two thousand eight hundred twelve organizers said Monday, the total top the Mark of fifty one thousand three hundred ninety four from the two thousand sixteen New York City marathon, the race through the city's five boroughs Sunday was watched by more than one million spectators crisp fall day, Lisa deceased of Ethiopia and Mary kidney of Kenya where the men's and women's winners. Obituary Gianluca baron a World Cup downhill skier from Switzerland has died in a paragliding accident. He was twenty four the Swiss ski federation said Barron one of its best prospects at how fine. Speed races died Sunday morning.

US Olympic Committee Larry Nassar Olympic USA San Francisco Chronicle Swiss ski federation din Hollander Sarah Hersh CEO New York City soccer Seattle Switzerland CWA San Jose State Jordan Weaver Michelle Simpson Barron tasha Schweickart
AP Headline News Nov 05 2018 19:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

03:00 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Nov 05 2018 19:00 (EST)

"The. AP radio news. I'm Tim Maguire stopped to for President Trump is he campaigns for GOP candidates on this last day before the midterm elections. You tell tells the crowd in Fort, Wayne, Indiana, Democrat agenda will deliver a socialist nightmare. The Republican genders delivering the American dream optimism. The American dream Trump has another rally tonight in Missouri. AP Washington bureau chief Julie pace reports Democrats field they have momentum. Look at the polls which have looked favorable to them for much of the year. They look at voter enthusiasm. They look at early voting numbers, and they feel like that should mean that this election at least in the house is heading in their direction. And yet they can't forget those memories from twenty sixteen when they also headed into election day feeling really positive, and ultimately, we're really surprised tens of millions of people have already voted many of them women and young adults. Bridget Harrison is a political science professor at New Jersey's Montclair state university. All those people aren't going out and voting democratic, but there are large numbers in some places double the percentage of two thousand sixteen or or even greater that are voting early. Trump administration is impose. Tough new set of sanctions on Iran suckers. Terry state, Mike Pompeo regime has choice. It can either do a hundred eighty degree turn from its course of action country economy crumble. The sanctions target Iran's energy, financial and shipping. Sectors Pompeo warns companies not to try to evade them from the with Ryan. And defines of our sanctions will be much more painful business decision than pulling out of a Ron and it being connected to Iran entirely eight nations, including China and Japan have been granted extensions to continue to buy oil from Iran for six months without facing US economic penalties. This is a P radio news, the US Olympic Committee taking steps to revoke USA gymnastics status as the governing body for the sport of the at the Olympic level in an open letter to the gymnastics community USOC C E O, Sarah Hersh land rights at the challenges faced by USA gymnastics are more than capable. Of overcoming organization. Even with a new board of directors made repeated mistakes after the revelations former team, doctor Larry Nassar, molested Olympians. President Trump says he'll announce a candidate replace Nikki Haley at the UN by the end of this week after the elections. President Trump heads to Paris on Friday and was asked about replacing outgoing UN ambassador. Nikki Haley, the president says he'll have an announcement before the end of this week last week. He said former State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert, a former Fox News reporter is under very serious consideration. President Trump says Nauert is excellent. And she's been a supporter for a long time. Jackie Quinn, Washington. I'm Tim Maguire.

President Trump Iran Tim Maguire Heather Nauert Nikki Haley president Sectors Pompeo AP UN Mike Pompeo US Olympic Committee Washington bureau chief Bridget Harrison Indiana GOP Montclair state university Wayne Jackie Quinn
Ep. 8  VP of Brand at Global Sports Marketing Co: Be There When Nobody Else Is with David Cipullo

Executive Coaching | Leadership Development | Change Management Consulting | Lisa Christen in Zug, Switzerland

56:36 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 8 VP of Brand at Global Sports Marketing Co: Be There When Nobody Else Is with David Cipullo

"Give us some insider information. How do you build those relationships? What are your seat grits for like delighting and wowing your clients, so that they say I got a sponsor with David? It's not so much. The wow, it's the genuineness. I think I think you, you need to connect. And most importantly, I think you need to put yourself in their shoes and in any sales role. It's what is that person thinking, and what does that person need to succeed in their role? What's their selfish interest to it? And that's the number one thing from a while standpoint. That's David gigolo speaking. David is the vice president of brand sales intelligence and consulting for the global sports marketing firm, infront sports. And I'm your host of this level of your leadership podcast. Lisa, Kristen, we're have conversations with exceptional leaders, like David unpack how they created their success and to discover their recommended won't tips and strategies that inspire listeners like you to take your leadership the next level they bit as an exceptional salesman. When I like most about David is that he's the exact opposite of what you think of when you think salesman, he's not that to smooth talker that you feel a little bit unsure about saying, I'm asleep. He never feel like he's being wishy or forcing an idea our product on you. It's just very natural. He's humbling. He's funny and have to say this, I don't know. The like this, but he's silly in the best possible ways. And that's really the reason that I invited David onto the past because there's actually a method to what he's doing. It's not an accident that David's career has taken off. He is a master at selling his he does one thing. He puts the customer first and I know that that's everyone's advice and selling. But what makes even different is the way that he executes. So I found that really interesting when he said he actually writes, a hand written. Thank you note, first of all, who does that anymore. But he has a handwritten thinking when he loses a pitch. So not when he wins in his thinking I am. But when he doesn't get the pitch because he slowly building relationships. That's what David does is he's all about the long term relationships, and maybe it didn't work out. But maybe it will the next time or maybe that person leaves and goes to another firm remembers how David Wadsworth has good sports and that's. Hoped to even builds trust. And you know, trust is everything in sales. That's just one example of what David does, if you want your more tips, about how to develop trust and sales, and in general how Bill long term relationships that brings success. You're gonna wanna listen to the rest of this episode. So enjoy this podcast episode with David gigolo. Hey, everyone. Welcome back to another episode of level up your leadership. I'm here today with David Tupelo. Welcome. David. Thank you. Lisa used to be here. Yeah. Well, we, we have had some fun times together outside of the podcast, because we've known each other for I don't even know how many years now and I've gotten to witness some fantastic. Halloween, costumes. I won't go into any details about nights out or vacations that you've taken with my husband to Las Vegas during March madness days there. Yeah, what happens in Vegas? Stays in Vegas, but I will say, you know, our families our friends, we've come to really enjoy each other because you have a really special personality, you're very fun to be around very funny. And that's why I wanted to have you on the show today. You have this personality that people are just naturally drawn to, and I would love to get some insider tips and information about how do we how do we extract that charisma for ourselves? Yup. For the talent. It's all right. So did your in sports marketing, and I think a lot of people listening may or may not know what sports marketing actually is can you? I just give us a background. What is sports marketing? The common I thought is always Jerry Maguire. Everybody goes to that. And thanks everybody in sports. Marketing is agent. And some are some are very good at it. But there there's a lot more to five hundred billion to one point three trillion dollar industry, no one depending upon how you measure it. And measurement can come from everything from the actual games and tickets and merchandise to TV and broadcast to security, and transportation and seating at the venues. Do you consider the hot dog sold at a stadium part of that industry? And so it goes everywhere including charities is a big part of it. So it really extends extremely wide and people looking to get into this career can kind of pick and choose. It's not just narrowed to being an agent. Well, that's really fascinating. Because I never really thought about the hotdog at the baseball games that I go to. And how did you get into sports marketing? I guess really the question is are you a sports fan? I mean, is that where it all started? Yes, I grew up my whole life. Everything was sports. My father was an athlete in a coach and sports. He played basketball and trial to the professional level baseball had tryouts at the professional level, but, you know, it's been part of our whole life growing up, and then coaching high school basketball. So it's been a part of my every day from morning sound like the old man but it was get up at sunrise, go out and play sports trade baseball cards, in the evening play kick the can release or these different games that are sort of active. And until you get called back into the house at dinner or dark. You're out playing sports or doing something revolved around sports. So my whole life has been that through college. So then you were always a sports fan sports was really like a part of your. Life. So when you were a kid, did you say, oh, I want to be a professional athlete. Or did you say I want to sit in a computer all day? I wanted to just be part of it in some way, and as you're growing up. You obviously want to be an athlete, and then due to my size or partially due to my size. I realized that wasn't happening. But then I looked at somebody like Bob Costas, and wanted to be an announcer, and Bob Costas, or wanted to be a coach. But then as you develop through university and schooling you learn that there are other skills and other opportunities in an industry, and you find some of those opportunities, and I knew longer wanted to be a broadcaster, but I saw their opportunities in business and grew from that you also as you're doing sports growing up, you learn your life lessons of the cliches, but it's teamwork and dedication and loyalty and all those wonderful things that you learn through sport, and you also have experiences, I grew up in white suburbia. And played sports in that environment. But also, it gives you the exposure to different races and cultures and opportunities. I went to a basketball camp as a nine year old and you sleep on the floor of the YMCA, and I was the only white kit in the entire in the entire gym sleeping on the floor. And you realize that you learn life lessons I was given the token MVP I definitely wasn't the best athlete there. But I think they saw the heart and the desire and the obstacles to overcome in that situation and I got a life sized, Dr J cardboard cutout that stayed in my room for years. So. That sounds like the dream winning prize for nine year old basketball. It was a Butte. And so you have all these great experiences. You serve learned about life. It sounds like I mean diversity learning their different people that do different things in different ways and look different from you and you learn all these lessons you said teamwork. We're probably going to come back to some of this, because I'm sure that it influenced, how you work in business how how you work with others, and how you have gone across your career and moved up across the ladder by one to take a step back and just talk to you a little bit about your first jobs that you had because you were with a US basketball team was is basketball. Your I love basketball my favorite. So I saw that you were working for the Washington Wizards US basketball team. And you also worked at the US Olympic Committee. So how did those shape where you wanted to go within sports marketing, 'cause she said, there are so many different places you could go even within sports marketing. I graduated from college at James Madison and fortunately, the got an internship with the US Olympic Committee, hopped in my old, Honda Civic, and drove across the Colorado, Colorado Springs and did a three to four month internship, which was the perfect way to start because the Olympics and the USOC it's very altruistic and it is about the athletes and we lived on the training center with the athletes. So we ate in their cafeteria. We hung out with them. We went out with them. And so it was really fun to be around, but it wasn't necessarily the NBA star, then fell store these were up and coming potential, gold medalists. But were you there with anyone that we would now know their name is sure, I think there were a lot of the swimmers were EMMY Van Dyke in was probably the most famous, I think she's one five six seven gold medals, there were a lot of swimmers a lot of wrestlers alone. Jim. So I mean, most of them have won medals over the years. And this was back in nineteen Ninety-seven. And so it was just a great experience. Because it was so altruistic and natural to sports. So it was a great entry then you move over to the Washington Wizards, and you get into big business and you see the difference, and there's value to both, but they're different and the NBA is a business, and it's a big business, and there's. There's quite a difference in different experiences. But it was a good way to get into the business to see both sides. And so you work both you've seen both sides. You got a glimpse of the love of sport. And also the business of sport. And how did that impact case if they were internships, how did that impact where you chose to then work or chose not to work? Even better, why did the internships? And I had trouble finding a job. And so I went back to the post college life of waiting tables, and bartending and doing odd jobs. I was building putting greens in people's backyards and sort of not a career, which was fine. And when I was about twenty seven I decided to go back to graduate school for sports management at George Washington, University, and the first week, I signed up and started classes and applied for a job at clear channel slash SF exports. Which are, which is a big major agency and they had posted the job on monster dot com. And so they had eleven eleven hundred resumes CV's that were put in there. Luckily, one of my professors work there and put mine on top, and I was definitely not the most qualified of the eleven hundred but got the position and I had to decide whether I stayed in graduate school because I had a great. Job in sports. I ended up staying, but it was great to get the degree, but also to continue working full-time, while I was in graduate school as well. But I have so many questions, I'm sorry to first of all, I always say, this people don't believe me when they say, I can't find a job or I can't move ahead my career and I'm like build your network as a coach. It almost no matter what you're asking for. Well, that's not really true. But so many people as, as a coach, I have to recommend to them build your network, because you don't always have to be the most qualified. It's not just you work hard with your head down, and someone's going to notice, you have to know someone who can put your CV in front of the right person, for example. So I'm glad that you brought that up as a living example, they gave you a chance and you took the chance, a new brand with it. You know, it wasn't that you were a bad hire. And they took pity on you. You were a great hire. And it was all about the network. But to I have to go way back to the story I was looking for a natural break. But what did you learn? Working odd jobs until you were twenty seven and what was the pivot point where you said, I want to go back to school, or I gotta get some form of a career. There wasn't a pressure to go get a career. I mean you make good money by tending in your living, nice life. But at some point, I just said, okay, let's move on and go forward, and I said, schools are good buying of two years to go do that. So I could still have fun for two more years. But unfortunately, I got a job in between and had to do both, so the fun part kind of ended, and I did enter the real world at that point, I don't believe you for a second because sports marketing, and from what I know about your lifestyle where, you know, you're traveling here, and there you're in China. You're in the US. You're in Brazil, you're attending sports events like, oh, I got to go to the US open. Oh, darn I'm quote unquote working did the fun really end Rono. It didn't end. It was still very fun. And I'm working on things. But it you still need the basic principles of business sports isn't any different than any other business, and you still need to learn. How to sell how to market how to market yourself how to market your products? And so the principals are still exactly the same. It's just in what I believe to be more enjoyable and fun atmosphere. Well, let me ask you. I'm just gonna skip right ahead because I want to hear all of your secrets, as I mentioned in the beginning, you're very successful. You've built yourself a great career. You're very charismatic. Everybody likes you. So what are the tips? You take the apply some business rules. But how do you how do you create these relationships with the people that you're selling to overtime? I'd say the, the biggest mistake early on in your career as I said, I didn't start till twenty seven twenty eight even to go back to school. But every they're still the pressure, particularly in the US to jump into your career and get going. But it's completely different now you don't retire at sixty five some people are working till they're eighty five ninety so that's sixty years. And I didn't. Take the long haul when you're young, even though I took my time to get into the business. But then you still have even if I'm five years delayed, I might still have six fifty five years of working. So I didn't take the long approach, and if you look at it strictly from a sales perspective, all you need when you're selling things of higher value, which many sponsorships are is one good. Contact a year and that good enough for having success in the industry. And if you take the long-term approach and say, I'm going to develop one relationship a year or two relationships year that in some industries is good enough and instead of always looking to the networking part as you say networking critical, and it's vital to it. But it doesn't have to be a thousand people at a time it can be five or six people or two people or one person if you go to a conference, I would much prefer to set up a dinner with five six seven eight. People then go to a five hundred person happy hour because it's very top line. And sometimes artifices sometimes not. But it's very top line, no matter what when you're at a happy hour. Whereas when you're at dinner with three four five, six seven people as much more meaningful, and that's all you need in most careers, say your ear saying network is not really about breads. It's really about depth in really developing long-term, relationship and really going deep with a few key people. I think if you take the long-term approach, yes, and it also depends on the industry that you're in this industry. Yes, I think depth is much more important than breadth. So having you give us some insider information. How do you build those relationships? What are your secrets for like delighting and wowing your clients, so that they say I got a sponsor with David? It's not so much. The wow, it's the genuineness I think I think you need to connect. And most importantly, I think you need to put yourself in their shoes. And in any sales role. It's what is that person thinking, and what does that person need to succeed in their role? What's their selfish interest to it and that's the number one thing from a while standpoint? And again, I am in sports, so there is a while, if I take somebody to a sporting event, we have a common bond that lasts much deeper because it is an exciting and emotional experience. And I have that with that person forever. Whereas if I go to conference, and I might have a drink or a nice night out with somebody, but it isn't as deep and meaningful because you don't have that emotional connection. So I have that advantage. But so does everybody else in my industry. So I'm still competing in the same fishbowl. So how do you how do you differentiate yourself what, what's unique about David? Is there anything that you could share? I would say one thing that I've tried to practice or learn is to do things when you don't need things. And I think it's important when you don't get a deal with somebody to send a note and say, hey, thanks. That was a good process. Unfortunately, we didn't get to where we wanted to. But that was a nice process that we both hopefully learn something from or I tried to. And now it's still challenging from a time perspective. But every year, not at Christmas time sending the Christmas card. I would do it in June or something, and try to connect and go through and look it not the entire contact list. But as many people's I wanted to connect with and go find something relevant and send them if it's an article about their business if it's a lead for their sales, if it's something about their family. If it's something about their employees complement their employees. I think those are really important things to do when you don't have a need. And I think that comes comes back around over time again, if you're playing the long game of this, that will come back around doesn't mean you're going to get a sale that year hit your numbers that year. But I think if you help people and do it when they're not in need. Everybody sends a congratulations. When somebody gets a new job, it's more important when they're looking for a job to say, hey, how can I help you? Yeah. So being proactive and meeting their needs in being present and taking an interest in their lives and being there at the times when everyone else, isn't there, and that they really could be grateful that you showed up. I think that's much more valuable than the congratulations, when they get a job because they get one hundred more now with linked in, they might get ten thousand more, and I'd like the sportsmanship that you said, even if we lost the game, you're still going to shake hands. Right. You're still going to send a note and say, thanks for the process, and that stands out that good good conduct. I don't know what else to call it, it stands out that people go. Wow. He's a real sportsman. It's really appreciated and it is the old school of send a handwritten note. That's one of the things. Absolutely do. And I recommend to anybody coming up a nice gift to one of your interns, or junior staff is to get them, monogrammed, paper or to send thank you. It's a nice encouragement, if they have it, they might do it. That's a great tip. If I had an intern I would. I'll apply. Wants to be. So tell me you worked all over the world because you were, you are American, you started working in America, but then you came over across the pond. And you landed in England, what was that like crossing cultures? That was exciting and fun. I was working for a company called team services elves in Chicago, and working on public private partnerships, which is outside of the sports realm a little bit. We were working for a governor that is now in prison for selling President Obama's Senate seat in Illinois, at the time and we're doing public private partnerships for them. So, again, the principles of business go outside of sports and it was a fun exciting thing, but my wife and I wanted to do something more adventurous and go do something internationally. And we spent thirty days just traveling throughout Europe and cold calling and ended up with. Forty four different meetings or interviews not all interviews for specific jobs saying, I'm coming here. We traveled across Europe and set up forty four interviews and had three job offers very fortunate and ended up with selecting the one with Liverpool football club. And we picked up my wife did it sight, unseen and showed up and Liverpool England. And, and it was it was an exciting time, but it was different quite different. What's an example, actually, I would love to know if you're working for a football club in British football club, you must have some crazy stories about attending the games or seeing the games, there's got to be something there. I'm sure of it, David the fans in Liverpool are I mean they're crazy. And I'm saying that as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan. I thought they were the most passionate fans in the world. But you show up in Liverpool and they live and die the football club or Everton football club. But everybody in the city, it's constant and it was really interesting because they were owned by two American owners, Tom Hicks, and George Gillett at the time and the fans were not big fans of the ownership group. They didn't think that they were true to the roots of the club, and there were protests and everything. So I came into this role and it's great because you're with a big football club that everybody wants to talk about it. You get treated very well, but you also had to keep a very low price. File because they thought that I was the nephew of the owner or somehow related to the ownership, and you're in this great city and this passionate city, and it was really exciting but you also had to play a low profile or else it could get ugly. I can just imagine you and your wife like putting on a baseball cap and sunglasses just to go out grocery shopping, like I hope no one spots me, did you pick up a British accent while you just try to pretend you weren't Americans. I don't think Scouser Liverpool accent is quite, British quite different. And some fortunately, I did not pick up that accent. It's a foreign language, so okay. So you were there we made it across the pond. You had some interesting experiences while you were there. Great time. But also a little nervous to go out in public. And then what happened that you now landed in Switzerland, I was hired there, specifically at a naming rights for stadiums and arenas background, and I was hired to build out the commercial or sponsorship structure around the new stadium. That was supposed to be built this was in two thousand eight nine ten, and there was a shovel in the ground to start building a new stadium but then the financial crisis hit and everything changed in that stadium. Never got built. So I had a wonderful experience. It was a great entree into global sports into football soccer, and it was a great door opener. Because at Liverpool everybody wants to talk about football. Everybody wants to talk about the club and so you're open, and you're meeting everybody from agencies to brand to meteorites holders. And so it's an incredible door opener at Liverpool with a wonderful. Experience, but the commercial structure around. It wasn't built without a stadium. It wasn't developing and I had done a partnership with my current company in front sports in media, while I was at Liverpool and then some discussion snowballed, and I ended up in Switzerland and so they still you over a little bit. How, how did they will you over or how what made you decide that working at infront was going to be a good fit? Well, it was much more diverse in that you're dealing as an agency, you're dealing with over one hundred different properties and twenty-five different sports in football. You're dealing with one and you live and breathe that. And there's great value to that you drink the Kool aid or. American term. But you, you really live and breathe it, and you get brainwashed into your own little world of football, and that football club, and that's great. And there's a lot of value to that. But then the agency side, you get a much more diverse opportunity, both geographically and across different sports in different business segments. And how you say working international aid you work differently with different cultures as sports, the same across all cultures. Is that like the common language, there are do you have to tailor? When you're in Asia versus when you're in South America sport, is a common language, which is great and allows us to speak that common language, we have a actually a trailer video about why brands should get involved in sponsorship, and we open it with that it breaks religions, and it breaks cultural boundaries and breaks genders and breaks every barrier there is, and it does sometimes it creates it as well. But overall breaks? Barriers, and integrate situation to be in because you can do that. However, dealing with different cultures is, is particularly challenging, I mean, we're a company that has offices in twenty five countries and learning to how to work with each of those different cultures, is challenging and takes a lot of time. Are you brave enough and willing enough to share a faux pas or at time that you did something culturally, insensitive? Are you go? Oh, I wish I hadn't done that. I noted that for next time but you save us having to do it wrong ourselves. Well, don't ask my team because that happens all the time. But hopefully we cover up many of those. I don't think there's been anything that has been to damaging, and you do get training, you know, when we had Chinese training on the proper proper etiquette and the proper things to do. And I've read some of the books I forget that exact title but Balch kiss handshake. Go shake. Yeah. And it's a good book and a great introduction. And it gives you a good overview. I don't think I made any major faux pas. But I'm sure on a regular basis on every meeting basis. I'd do something that is somewhat inappropriate for that culture. But let's say you know, you're offensive they go. Yeah, it's just David being David. And what something like you said, okay, you read these books and they were a great introduction. What's something that goes beyond? You know, we can all read a book or take a class. But then the reality hits that theory versus reality. What are some real life intercultural lessons? You've learned whether it's China or anywhere. I think it's. You can read, but you have to experience. I mean, even when I go back to the states now and you try and explain you can explain it and there's an understanding but not a comprehension and this is an opportunity as well, because if you are living it, and if you can't express that properly to whether it be brands or sports rights holders in different territories, or different countries, if you can get that message across that you do understand, and they have some challenges it's a real business opportunity. I'd say I see a great one with the US in that, yes. There are a lot of different cultures and a lot of different areas of the US, but you're still only dealing with one to two languages. You're only dealing with one set of media and broadcasters. And so marketing is much different. People say, it's much more advanced it's just different. They do go deeper. But what? A lot of times American brands that were working with. They don't understand that in Asia. There's over fifty different languages. Well, how do you market, your brand to fifty different languages? They look at Europe and Asia's kinda one market, but it's not and the education of that and getting that point across is extremely challenging, but also valuable to those brands if you can show them how to do it. So once again, I, I really hear this coming across it's that you're showing value to your customers, and being able to say I'm doing everything I can to be in your shoes, and I'm not just doing generalization. I'm not just saying, oh yeah. I get it. Oh, you have a lot of languages. No. I feel the pain that's associated with it, and because I feel the pain because I understand it and comprehend it. Here are some solutions because I care and because I actually get with the real problem is. And sometimes, it's an education in that they don't even feel the pain because they may not. No. Now, of course, some of the bigger brands, of course they do. They have specialists who understand. But a lot of brands don't just realize that there are fifty languages there, and how do you adapt to that? And what are the best ways to send your brand message across those fifty different languages and hundreds of countries across Asia? So it's not only putting yourself in their shoes, but also trying to educate without necessarily coming across as ostentatious. So. Exactly. Weird. It's not helpful until. So that's a, that's a great question. I'm super curious to know how to you roundabout educate people as it just through a conversation as it just do you have any specific tactics that you use that you could share? I think it's important for FaceTime, you can't get that message across in emails and can't get them across even on phone calls. I'm even a big believer in what's or Skype or FaceTime. Because it helps if you can't be in front of the person, I think seeing seeing somebody face to face and seeing reactions is really really valuable both for your own staff, but also externally. And so I think getting face time is critical because they're not going to understand through presentation, the brand that we are dealing with received literally hundreds, if not thousands of proposals every month on what they can do in sports and entertainment, and you can't get that message across you need to show them your one. Or two pieces of expertise that may separate you and get that message across and FaceTime, is critical said, that's a great tip for how you develop business because you are often developing new business. Do you have any other stories about how you develop business or what's good way? Like how you said, okay we network, I built one or two relationships. How do you develop new businesses? Secret way of, of networking with the people, you want to me, or how do you stand out how do anything that you can share? I'd say that once you do develop into let's say amid or senior level role you wanted us the people that do trust you. And that's a word of mouth and referrals is by far the best. I'm hiring in the US right now. And I put a job description now unlinked in, and I went to my two or three closest context, who do trust me and said, hey, can you post this as well a reference this and say great opportunity with a trusting person and company, and then that spread like wildfire because then instead of just my network. Now I have that three or four or five six times and it's very helpful I'd say leaning on, whether it's business development or sales, or hiring or whatever it may be using your trusted network that you have built through the one on one or two onto opportunities is, is the best way to go about that. Particularly as you get more senior in your career. And what I'm noticing about what you're saying is that actually you asked for help, a lot of people feel like oh, I'm at the top. I have to prove myself, I have to do all this stuff on my own. Is that one of your secrets to partnership and success that you're comfortable asking for some help? It's challenging, because you don't always do it to some of the traits that allow you to progress in your career, also become detrimental as you get more senior, and whether your ego or pride get in the way and it does for almost all at some point, it's a balance, and it's a check, and I recently had some of those checks and it's critical that you do have this checkpoints, because it occurs it absolutely a car so you do executive coaching and a lot of the coaching topics are around basically, I love this title from a book. It's what got you here won't get you there. So all the skills all of the traits, all of the qualities that worked in the past and getting you exactly where you needed to be in your career. It will it did work. It was great. It doesn't work here. Exactly. And that's why I specifically pointed out. That's why might years picked up that you. You were asking for help, because I know this particular challenge the higher up, you get. But I appreciate that you have taken that step and saying, okay, it's funny because I just have to add this one note, this is just going into a speech that was writing. So it's top of mind. If you ask someone for a small favor, they actually like you more. So it could also be a great strategic tool for you to use as you're building your partnerships because they feel like they rationalize to themselves. I must really like that person if I just did them as favor. Exactly. And so they actually like you more. If you're looking to build a relationship one way could be asking for a small paper. Yes. And also than they do come back to you. Sometimes it's not a quid pro quo, especially if it's a deep meaningful relationship is not a quid pro quo. But if you, they feel comfortable asking you for favor, then it just grow again, that relationship grows and grows. So you've just dealt a trusted relationship at a trusted environment that you guys can rely on each other. So let me go to the opposite of that. So when you're in negotiations with many people think of negotiating as a conflict mode, where you're arguing with someone else or you're trying to get something in the other person's trying to get something. Do you have tips on how you handle negotiations? Megotiating is, is a tricky one. I set up a conference internally for our entire sales staff, several years ago with the Schreiner institute, and the guy was a former German police officers slash whatever. The German FBI is, and he would become come in for crisis negotiations. And now he does stuff for the UN and World Health Organization, and he comes in, and again, most of my colleagues on the sports side, where we have at this doesn't really relate to what I do. Well, it does again those principles are exactly the same unique circumstances, but exactly the same and he was really, really entertaining about hostage situations and everything else. And he relating it back to our business for me, as we talked about the cultural is a big big challenge on the negotiations because getting from eight. A B. In, let's say American or British mindset is different from an Indian or Chinese mindset, one is not right. They're just different. And it makes it extremely challenging, and again, I think the fall back on the principles of putting yourself in the other person's shoes. And what are they trying to achieve out of it? There are some other tips, I think, in that the higher up in an organization, you go the fewer justifications you need, you need more storylines. You need a theme. You need a concept that a CEO or CMO can go to the market with and say, this is what we represent. And this is what we do. Whereas if you're dealing with a sponsorship director or somebody on a mid to senior level, they're looking to justify rationally in an ROI perspective on how to do that. And that's fair. That's again, neither one is right? They're all doing their jobs, but you have to keep that in mind when you're talking to the people, the higher up the fewer messages. But the stronger story and the lower in the organization, the more rationalization job justification in our ally. You need it most. People don't differentiate like that within the organization that, you know, the higher up. They are the more strategically that they are thinking or the way that they're thinking about how they. Craft this message to their sake holders. How do you go about building this brand story? But you have to have a story, even from the first one now that story will change as you. Learn more about the different brands that you're dealing with. But you have to go in one of my beliefs, as you go in and shoot. And you might miss the Mark. But if you show creativity and thought that gets you through the door to then craft that message I'd say too many people nowadays, come in and say, oh to whiteboard, and they put the onus on the person that you're pitching to, to come up with the story and come up with the solution. Yes, it is a whiteboard. You know that they know that, but come in with the solution come up with a proposal and again, most of the time, you will miss the Mark because you don't know exactly what that organization specifically want wants to achieve. But if you miss you show the creativity, and then they trust you a little more and you just dovetail into another story. So I like that because you're, you're talking about being proactive and again always giving to the clients. So you're not just showing up and saying, all right. How can I help you? But you're saying I've really thought about this. I care. I've put effort in work. Going to be creative about it. I'm always curious behind the scenes how how many interational does it take even if you know it's going to be wrong. How many rations do you guys go through before you'll pitch to a client? And I'm sure varies a little bit. But yes, it's where you are in the process amid on the first one everything on entails in general. You're balancing the dedication of time to customization or tailoring a package. And that's probably one of the biggest challenges are in tire. Salesforce has is what is that ballot? Is it a numbers game or is it really great ideas? And again depending upon what you're offering or what you're pitching it can vary. Sometimes it is a numbers game if you're just looking for brand awareness, if you're looking for signing up people to buy something or just get acquiring names through CRM database, then it has to be more strategic and more detailed so that balance is really, really critical. And. So the first time you give it a go. You show your thoughts and there aren't too many at rations just because you don't have the time. But when you go back, you'd better be prepared. And those interational may be two three four five six different integrations, because you put different eyeballs on it, and, again, you're going to miss the Mark and you never know what the other side of the table. Catch their I have learned that when you're going through a presentation. You think you have the best point that you're making, and then they pick up on one minor thing that you're like, oh, okay? Great. Yeah. That's. I was planning. So sometimes clients see something and just say love that let's go and run with that I'd love to hear a story when a client is not so favorable if you can share. How do you deal with the difficult clients, so you go in you go for a pitch and, you know, it's gonna miss the Mark, but has there ever been a really difficult client, or a story where it wasn't easy to handle? I've never had a difficult client ever. They're all wonderful. I love everything one of you. No, of course, they're all like I said, they're all different and they may be different for objectives of what they wanted to even their business or they may be different, again, culturally getting from a to be. We have different scenarios where some brands are looking for brand awareness. We just recently activated for my parent company, Wanda and his Chinese conglomerate, and they did a partnership with fica and their goal was to bring their brand to the world and just create brand awareness. Whereas in another case worked with Abbott Laboratories to pharmaceutical out of Chicago and they were switching their brand, so they wanted brand awareness, but they were going from a B to B to B to C product, offering and their brand awareness was not just putting their name out there. They chose the world marathon majors, which are the six biggest marathons in the world. And that is not a TV product. That's not a Hugh. Huge visibility product, but they wanted to talk to a specific audience and educate them about what they were bringing to the market. And then they took the principles of marathons and the challenges and of marathons and they brought it into their normal advertising and their traditional advertising. So sometimes you leverage, the sports property to show and reach balls, and then other times, you're taking the principles of what that sport or what those athletes represent and bringing it to your general media advertising. I think what I'm hearing you say, as you have a such a great sort of empathy and understanding for each of your clients, that, even if they're acting difficult or having difficult demands that you're able to shift and flex to meet their needs. And so you don't necessarily see it as difficult. You just see it as they have a different perspective or objective, or point of view, or they're a different culture. Whatever that, they're just it's just different and we'll just flex to me. There needs in whatever way, we can just the key is to make sure you understand what those needs are and not always easy. Doesn't always work, but the focus is to learn their needs and bring this to life. And when you're focused on these clients, it sounds like you really almost get like I don't know, if this is the right word, but for me, it's like emotionally invested, you get to know their company, their brand, what they want what they stand for it. You're trying to really figure out in their shoes. What's going on for them to how do you deal with the disappointment when you don't win Ron tails? You get used to disappointment in most sales usually the success rate in sales for most industries is much lower than you would want. And so you have to get used to the ninety nine phone calls, emails discussions and only having one decent discussion or traction. And so you get used to that now doesn't make complacency. It's almost the reverse of sport in that, if you're an elite athlete. You remember the losses. You remember the time that you didn't hit the winning shot or you came in second by one second or half a second. You remember those and those are devastating because you're used to success and sales. I think it's the opposite. You're used to failure and the power of the successes. You have is so exciting and so rewarding that it's just shifts over, and it's different and you have to live off of those successes. Again, most industry some industries, you have great success. But in what we do. It's ninety nine percent failing and the successes have great power and influence and reward that you have to live off of those, I love this mindset where you're like I'm not really focused on the failures. That's just you know, average run of the mill the name of the game. That's what's going to happen. Right. It's almost I think of like batting averages not like professional baseball players are batting one hundred you know. So you just kind of say, okay, I'm going to get up a minute take swaying. I we have to do all these sports metaphor. I'm gonna take swing. I'm probably going to fail. That's all right. Because I really only need to be great at a few, and those few will be amazing. Right. And but you wanna fail smartly every time so you're failing ninety nine times. Again, it's the balance of time and effort and energy, but every time you do wanna take away something or learning or even just knowledge of why they said. No. And so it's important to take something away, even though you're failing quite often, so failing smart. I like that. And what else do you think besides this mindset of being comfortable with failure? Failing smartly, maybe reflecting on what's going on. What are their skills, would you say someone would need to be successful in sales, or in sports marketing, I'd say, even beyond sports marketing, just in anything I was say that there's two main things at least in my view and driving curiosity for any career curiosity will win out. If you're curious, you'll find your own success. It's not financial all the time. It's not holiday days. It's, it's whatever you make of it. If you're curious about any topic, I think the combination of curiosity and drive, and you'll have success in your career, no matter what, and that's always whenever I talked to universities, or talk to younger people in the industry. Those are the two things, and it's hard because curiosity doesn't come naturally to everybody. But if you find things that curious about dig deeper, curiosity will grow within you. I see curiosity is sort of a bit of an antidote to fear. So if you're afraid, you don't want to explore, you don't wanna see what's out there. You don't wanna know you just wanna stay safe. And so if you can be open and brave, and curious and courageous, and you're driven to really succeed. So what you're curious about your really learning taking to heart implementing moving forward. I can see where that's really the key advice to in any field to moving forward in their career. So fear works for inaction, not action. And I always tell my girls and young boy, fears the shouldn't have fear and fierce dangerous. But what I mean by fear works for inaction is when you're working with people, and you put fear in them, all it does, is make them go into a shell and not do more. So you can't put fear into your employees. It only works to give them bravery and the ability to come out of their shell. Fears the one of the worst things in in business. Absolutely. And it's funny, I sort of say a couple of things about fear to my girls as well. I first of all, I tell my five year olds choice as to call on her courage. So said, even though if you feel fear, that's okay, call on your courage, and let's move forward. But I make a distinction. There are two different kinds of fear. There's physical fear which, you know, if you're going to jump off a cliff, you should be scared. But then there's the psychological fear. And I think that's what you're talking about is the psychological fear weather. It's imposed by or management or a team member or it's just by yourself, or I'm just afraid to fail or I'm going to look stupid when I give this presentation or I don't want to call because I don't wanna get rejected. That's the fear that really hold you back from action, and it certainly the opposite of curiosity and drive, which is what's going to get you to move forward in your career. The feeling of fear can be good and push you. But if you let it overtake you, it's bad. And it's the wise, Bruce Springsteen once said. Fear is a dangerous thing in one of his songs, and it is yes. Well, you know, I have to say the C you because this is what US Olympia NHS us. They don't say if you ask them, but for the Olympics or you nervous or I'm not nervous. I'm excited, so they take those fierce signals in their body, but this negative emotion, and they reinterpret them in this new way, and they're like, I'm not nervous. I'm excited. I'm not afraid I'm motivated, right? So you can reframe a little bit of your fear and use it as a motivator. Let me ask you this. What, what would you say in summary is your number one piece of advice for listeners for how they can level up their leadership smile? I do. You're doing it. You're doing it helps you and helps the people around you and I mean it's a simple thing. But I actually even before presentations or going into something, you know, I'll put on a song that makes me smile or I'll think of something that makes me smile because it does change you know, it's proven endorphins. Go to your head and it changes you so smile. It's pretty simple. I like that. And you know it also in terms of you talking about building relationships smiling also creates a bit of a connection. So that's a nice one. I'm gonna walk around smiling all day. People might be like, why she grinning, like an idiot, but I'm going to say I'm taking David's advice. You do anyway. Yeah. I'm a natural smiler people who listened to the podcast regularly always hear me laughing, while my guests are talking. It's probably overpowering. So let me like we've talked about so many different topics. They've really feel like I've picked your brain. Is there anything that I haven't asked you, though, that you'd like to share with listeners? I have too many. No. Again, if I if I talked to a class, I bring I have a last slide of just things that whether it's life or career whatever, and that they're simple. But I'll share a few. You can edit it out if you don't like them. When you travel bring a safety pin, the always have a safety pin on you put a pair of scissors next to your kitchen sink. You use them all the time, WD forty and superglue or your friends. Scenario. Take time to do basic skills that, you know, you're going to do through the rest of your life. And those aren't necessarily what you would think go watch YouTube video on how to search the internet, you do it, every time every day, probably five to ten times a day, take a half an hour to figure out how to do it efficiently. That's going to save you a ton of time. I just I have to give you a side now. I just taught someone when they're searching they could do a minus sign. You know they're millennial. I mean it's not like you know, someone who didn't grow up with the internet, and I said, so now I'm going to say you know, take thirty minutes. It would save you how many years over here. I don't do all these learn to speed read that's valuable I haven't, I can't call myself a speed reader, but I know how to skim. Well, it's easy. Go look online Tim Ferriss has a class on it. Learn how to travel Tepelea. You're going to travel in life. Learn how to do it officially and cheaply learn how to take pictures don't always take pictures from so far away. And I know one of your pet peeves don't send somebody a thousand pictures. Send them the ones that are relevant to them that look nice. Don't make them go through all of them. I helped my mother-in-law's lesson. I know. Low blow. Don't select a career that you're passionate about select a career that allows you to do your passions. So if you want free time, if you love golf, you don't have to have a career in golf, but do a career that allows you to golf, or travel, or cook, or whatever it is read, read, read or nowadays, listen, listen, listen to Lisa's podcast. But I think that is what I tell everybody in industry, what by the time after three or four years in industry, I felt like I knew everybody in industry, even if they didn't know me which they didn't I felt like I knew everybody because I saw the quote until I saw the stories about them, I think reading is critical. And there's plenty more. But I'll stop there. These are all great pieces of advice. And I want to add one less thing about reading, which is so many people are looking today for this edge this performance edge. How am I better that, you know, or how do I steer clear as the machines are coming and artificial intelligence comes and creativity and innovation are tops on everyone's less one of the skills of the future. What do I need to succeed in my job? And people are very surprised when I say innovation and creativity and new ideas, they come from having this background from lots of different places and reading is the fastest cheapest easiest way to have a ton of various experiences, which you can then later connect together to come up with this, quote, unquote innovation, but you have to have seen travel is a great one to do as well. When you experience something new your brain can connect it back to something old. That's been there. So maybe you go to travel some. Or you've read this new book, and now you save him. How does that change the way? I've been doing my job now and you can bring innovation in simply through new experiences new ideas at one more than. No, it's why Michael Jordan was so great is every off-season. He picked up one new specialty whether it was a turnaround jump shot the next year. It was the three point shot the next year. It was a defensive strategy. Well, same thing again. If you're playing the, the long play of your career of whether it's thirty years or sixty years or eighty years pick up something new every year. Learn something new kind of make it a goal of yours. Each year to pick up one more skill set that just adds to your repertoire, and then who knows where your career goes anti ties back to something you said earlier, which is your infant along. How along hall have some patients? You don't need every skill now or tomorrow, pick one skill learn it do it. Right. And then pick up a new scale learn do it. Right. Because over the long haul, you're not burnt out. You actually know how to do things and you've acquired this massive skill set and easy and can be fun amazing. Thanks so much, David for joining me here. Today. Thank you. It's been fun. Thanks for listening to another episode of level up your leadership. If you're interested in learning more about today's guests and the topics we've discussed check out the show notes, and WWW dot Lisa. Kristen dot com slash podcast. If you enjoyed the podcast, please go to tunes to subscribe while you're there. It'd be great, if you could rate and review the show, and if you really like the show, I would appreciate it. If you shared the word on social media, as always thanks again for listening.

David US baseball Washington Wizards Las Vegas NBA Europe basketball Asia Liverpool David gigolo Chicago Olympics China David Wadsworth David Tupelo US Olympic Committee football Bob Costas
AP Headline News Nov 05 2018 22:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

04:00 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Nov 05 2018 22:00 (EST)

"Oh, this phone drives me crazy. Excuse me. I'm the sprinter and from sprint new iphone ten are with an amazing liquid rat and display. This is amazing. If I have a few photos look at that color. I love this this I have I'm going to need that back. Switch to sprint and get iphone ten are sixty four gigabytes for zero dollars per month with an eligible trade in in a spring flex lease. Visit sprint stores. Sprint dot com slash I phone or call one eight hundred sprint one zero does per month for eighteen months after three hundred twenty five in credit applied within two bills. If Gansel earlier named balanced since tax up to credit, thirty dollars conviction. Coverage and offer not everywhere. Restrictions apply. AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. President Trump holds a trio of campaign rallies as he campaigns for GOP candidates on this final day before the midterm elections tells a crowd and Fort Wayne, Indiana, Democrat agenda will deliver a socialist nightmare. The Republican genders delivering the American dream optimism. The American dream. Number of tornadoes have touched down in Louisiana severe weather threatens the south east overnight. The storm prediction center says at least two homes have been damaged center meteorologist Robert at Roger Edwards says up to seven million people are in the path of the weather through early tomorrow morning that line of storms will increase in intensity through the night as the air. Mass ahead of it gets more moist and unstable and is that happens. A tornado threat will increase in that line of storms again should spread across parts and order, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee election officials in the states say they're preparing for the possibility of power outages at polling places, Louisiana. Mississippi officials say they're voting machines have backup battery systems and paper ballots are at the standby should there be needed buffalo Catholic. Bishop. Richard Malone is added another thirty six names to a list of priest with substantiated claims the sexual abuse of a child that brings a number two seventy eight he says the investigation must be allowed to run. Its course additional investigators. Now who are working on their cases as much as we all want resolution. Our investigations must be thorough. And while wanting to speed up the process, we cannot sacrifice the truth for speed pressure. I'm alone is intensified in recent weeks. After revelations is former executive assistant secretly copied and leaked internal emails to reporters after becoming concerned. He had left accused priests in the ministry is AP radio. News, North Carolina. Police say thirteen year old girl kidnapped this morning for a mobile home park. Lumberton police chief Michael macneil says Hannie Aguilar had taken her aunt's keys to start their car outside the mobile home before they were to drive to her bus. Stop a witness saw a male subject dressed in all black. And we're in a yellow bandanna approach miss Hannah. No, Allah, angler ace thirteen and forced her into a green. Two thousand into Ford Expedition McNeil says police are interviewing witnesses family and friends canvassing the neighborhood and checking area surveillance cameras US Olympic Committee, taking steps to revoke USA gymnastics status as the governing body for the sport at the Olympic level in an open letter to the gymnastics community. USOC CEO, Sarah, hurston writes at the challenges facing USA gymnastics are more than it's capable of overcoming. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio.

Louisiana Mississippi US Olympic Committee sprint President Trump AP Tim McGuire Richard Malone Tim Maguire Ford Expedition McNeil Lumberton Gansel USA North Carolina Olympic executive assistant Indiana
Ep #361: The Executive Athletes Podcast

The Daily Grind Business Podcast

36:42 min | 1 year ago

Ep #361: The Executive Athletes Podcast

"You are listening to episode three sixty one on the daily grind. So, as you know, I decided to rebuild my website, using wicks after years of frustration with just putting up with what I had I decided to start with a blank slate and design my website, the way. I wanted it, and that's why I chose wicks. I was able to choose from over five hundred amazing templates to get the exact feel and look that I was wanting, I was able to customize my site easily and add and move things where I wanted to ultimately optimize, the experience for the visitor. The state has actually been completed for some time now, I'm just doing some final touch ups and adding three hundred and fifty plus episodes, which as you can imagine, take some time, but what would have cost me thousands of dollars and months of time I have completed super inexpensive Lii in only a few short weeks. Furthermore, wicks is actually designed for any device desktop and mobile. Which, as you can imagine being in twenty nineteen is super important, and valuable along with it, the amazing SEO capabilities, that wicks present saves me, a whole bunch of time and money and SEO, as, you know, when it comes to blogging podcasts, video is super important for growth in viewership, ultimately, what I've learned is that building a website doesn't have to be painful. It doesn't have to cost thousands of dollars and a dozen after waste a whole bunch of your time. It can actually be really cheap inexpensive and enjoyable using wicks to get started with wicks yourself today for fifteen percent off and build the site optimized for you and your business and your customers. Go to wicks dot com forward slash podcast. Again, that is w x dot com forward slash podcast. Welcome back to the podcast everyone on today's episode, I sit down with Ken Lubin on the executive athletes podcast. Very interesting conversation, hope you guys enjoy it as always, be sure you have a pen, pizza paper, sit back and really dive deep in today's interview. This is Ken Lubin, the host, and founder of the executive athletes, podcasts, and welcome to this week's episode ONA think everyone that's been listening and thank you for the comments and feedback. They're awesome and are incredible help in this journey to making this podcast, better and better, each episode once again, this is unscripted unedited as I believe, is the best way to get the really know the guest and you may hear a couple dogs barking in the background from time to time we try to keep it out. But you never know what these beasts can do. So this week's guest is calling Morgan and Collins got a pretty unique story. Like you say you knew unique, just like everyone else, but call into professional golfer, who then turned a successful entrepreneur and a few years ago. Call and found themselves caught in the daily grind of business of golf of just life in general. And he felt unfulfilled and certainly he was not making the money wanted to make so he left his job and set out on his own, and I've talk. Many of you guys about this, and really taking that next step and calling stumbled around until he found someone who could show him the way. And that was the key is finding a coach and finding a mentor. And now in his now he has purpose, and he looks forward to every day with renewed enthusiasm. Here's a great religious relationship, a growing business, and an insatiable appetite for learning like most of us, and he started and develop the daily grind podcast to help people who are just like he was and his podcast is pretty unique at Erez five days a week on like ours, who's really one day a week and features some of the world's most fascinating, people is guests include the world's hop on entrepreneurs and other highly influential people call hopes to educate and inspire listeners to do what you have always wanted to do. Maybe that is right in your own book or starting to side hustle. His goal is to motivate educate. Inspire people do that. One thing you've always wanted to do start your own business, so call and welcome. Aboard and we'd love to, you know here who call him Morgan is from your own perspective. Can I don't think he's saying any anybody? I was one of the best interests of ever had. They first of all, thanks, so much revenue on the show. Awesome. I'm looking forward to it. Yeah, absolutely. I mean for people who are being first introduced me, I think can kinda covered everything. I'm really just someone who is trying to better myself every day. No matter what I do with passion, and purpose, and hopefully, help little or some of you out there to really push forward towards reaching a your biggest goals that you have, or, or those desires that you want out of life. So that's, that's mean a nutshell, I love sports, love business, elope helping people. That's awesome. So let's start with your golf career. Tell us a little bit about that in the evolution of that yet you know what from a young age. I love sports. It was really all I ever thought about Ken. That I always wanted to be a professional athlete growing up in Canada that started with wanting to play in the NHL, and then I kind of found goals and for me, I thought that Gulf would be the best avenue to reach a being a professional athlete and reaching the PGA tour and I fell in love with it. I saw huge results at the beginning. I had a decorated junior Amador career which led me into getting a full scholarship to the US where I played two years and openly turned professional and did, so for about three years and. The professional career didn't go as planned for me. I think a lot of times when from young age, you put all your passion and everything all your attention into one thing. You can attach your identity to that. And when things don't go. Well, you feel like a loser yourself in that happened to me. I felt like because I wasn't seeing the results I was seeing a junior in Amador that I was a failure and not just a failure golfing in life, and I started to become really unhappy with the sport didn't like it and had to find a different career path. But, you know, going back to question for you can with golf is just I, I always loved Gulf. I love team sports. But I love the feeling of having it all on me, and just the preparation in just the quietness and being alone with myself on a golf course the club in my hand. That's what really drew me to it. And you had mentioned you know about your identity right? This golf was. Identity. I'm sure for for some time love time. And I think a lot, that's where people, you know. They get caught up in that. And I, I don't know if they know it's their identity, but that's all they really have to live for at that point. How did you make that switch going from being, you know, call him Morgan professional golfer to Cullimore successful entrepreneur? It took probably about two and a half three years after I had decided that goal wasn't for me and I wanted to find something else. Like I said, when you attach that identity to the sports, it takes a really long time for you to like, cumulate yourself to life afterwards. Right. It's like what am I doing? What are my skills like everything new would work towards for people there who are doing what you love her in a job. It's like just that being taken away from you, and you have to start from scratch, and for me, it was a process of me having to more so kind of find myself than he'll, and learn from others and listen to podcasts and read books and figure out what was out there in one thing, I did do. Really? Well as I failed that a lot of businesses that I tried. But the one thing I can attribute a lot of what have now too. Is that I tried. And when I was never stagnant. I never not did anything whether that was taking a job or whether it was trying to start. Business. A my always was doing something and through that education through the action. That's what led me into alternately become an entrepreneur while, and what have what did you do between your golfing career and then into the podcast world? Tell us a little bit about that. Some of the businesses that you fail that because I think those are the best learnings is always believe me. I fail every day I can tell you that. So do I, I wanted to get into on, like the online business world, I started to read re people who did, they'll webinars, and sold online courses? So I thought I would teach golf online, and then I figured out that it wasn't really my passion, I wouldn't be able to help people in or work. So I stopped doing that. And then I saw people making money through building online stores. So I'm like I can do this drop shipping. Game critic shop. Affi- store also products passion products, the people. And again, I did it solely for the reason of money. So when I realized they met. A work that I had to do. I stopped, and then I tried to I got into the car business. So I started working with a friend family friend who was in house financing. So for those people don't know what that is. If people can't afford cars, they would come to us, and we would sell them like thirty percent interest rates on monthly payments. It was crazy. So I thought I was gonna open a car dealership with my brother, which ultimately, we didn't thankfully, then I was a I worked as a server bartender was hotel manager of golf course manager. She's the list goes on, and literally tried everything. And that was all in like I said two and a half three year spans. I never I was gonna I sold international real estate. Like I, I really was trying to find what I wanted to do that is, you know, that's it, though. Because you learn what you know you don't wanna do. Right. I think that's the key. It's true. You learn what you don't want to do in the biggest thing is you pick up skills. So for the goal of business, I learned how to create an online course I learned how to run a webinar in the car business. I learned what it took to put together a deal in all the paperwork that took in how to structure it properly in how a business makes money in bartending in and serving in the hotel business. In golf course business. You've learned personal relationships selling international real estate learned about sales. So all these things that I tried and failed that I picked up a new skill and then that all encompassed into what I'm doing now. Right now that's an tell us about what you're doing now. The daily grind. And podcasts, this sounds amazing. Yeah. You know what it was? I got onto entrepreneurs on fire. So John Lee Dumas had one of the most popular podcast was the first one, I listened to, and he was interviewing people seven days a week and I fell in love with it. And I was working with my father at the time and I ended up being a guest on his show, and it was a thirty minute episode is kind of weird to be quite honest. But I love them like, wow. This is a really unique way to share my message what I do. So I wanted to do it and like anything else I really felt like five days a week for me was away in which I could commit to something in do it longtime long-term because for me at the time I'd been kind of jumping jobs and doing different things and I felt like if I did it once a week would be sort of a win, commit fully to it, so five days a week and a year and a bit later here we are in that stemmed into me. Now, helping people with marketing and working with some professional athletes to help them better be prepared to transition for life outside of sports. And that's was, you know when we. I started started chatting, I think that was a couple of things that brought us together is the podcasting thing. But I think also making that transition from athlete to non athlete. Right. I think you know, I've done stuff for the US Olympic Committee of done. I've helped countless others just trying to make that transition because I know when I struggled from leaving college from the ski world and coaching, and then all of a sudden, like oh shit. What am I gonna do? Now. Totally your identity is gone. Right. You're, you know, you're calling Morgan the golf are hours can Lubin the skier and the cyclist and it's like all right now going to be a head hunter. I'm going to go do this. I'm going to do that. You know talk to us about making that transition. And some of the things you're helping others, you know with that transition, because I know a lot of people listening are in the process of making making that transition as well. Yet the most important thing to do is make that transition now. So if you're in a sport if you're a professional athlete. The biggest thing you have right now is what every entrepreneur every business person could ever want. That is attention. And you can think about this can like when you were skiing in your cyclist, you had banned people supported you people in the community who would do anything for you, and that goes away, when you retire, that goes away when you find do a new profession, you decide to do something different. But if you start now in, you can take case studies like what Steph Curry's doing Danny green with the Toronto Raptors to these year in Toronto? These guys are starting podcasts and LeBron James, their attention is outside of sport because they are smart enough. First of all, to realize that it's going to happen. But ultimately, what they've done in this is a lot to do with money. But it's something that athletes can do now is they built a team around them. So they're helping them be prepared to transition because, as an athlete, you wanna focus one hundred percent on your sport. That's what made you successful. But if you can surround yourself with the team. Of people who can help you in those different areas will bats really when you can expand out. And when you do retire, you're ready. You're prepared an ultimately can like I believe that you should be excited because you have all these things that you've been working on for so long, and now it's just such a seamless transition. But I think it really the biggest thing people have to do is start now and not wait until after they retire. What, what would you say a college person? Right. Who has those are their identity college of anything, you know, I think you do the same thing. Right. Start now start preparing yourself after college creating your own personal brands, but also the easiest thing you can do is starch create a personal brand is, is create an Instagram account just post every day post, what you're doing. Like if you're in college post your daily routines, like practice work at what you're eating how you prepare for the game. Maybe after in the locker room give like little, you know. Interview a teammate like there's so many different things that you can do. They're actually really super fun. That can help you better be prepared his even in college. Like a lot of people are going to college. Again, you have fans you have teams you have coaches, you have a whole school who's behind you. So if you actually do something, you're gonna have all of that support. And like I said, you don't want that to go away. And then you start something right now. And I think that's what's, you know, crazy, right? Because they think it's just going to be easy, and the second you say you're tired, you're done. It's over. Right. You know, you're forgotten they're moving onto the next person. Yeah. And the stats for themselves. Like, I think the average athlete lifespan is five and a half years ninety percent of athletes will make ninety percent of their money between ages twenty and thirty. And what that means is, when people are other people are starting to start seeing some money in success athletes. Careers are over the amount of money that they make for their. Life is over like it doesn't have to be that way. Not at all. No. And like you said it's probably easier, you know. Easier than ever while it is easier than ever than, you know, to go out and create your own personal brand. And I'm sure you're probably doing that with the daily grind. Tell us tell us about your podcast, the daily grind. It's, you know, it's, it's creating Colin Morgan. But it's also creating this community of entrepreneurs and that's really what it is executive. And it's the same thing that you find here, Ken with your podcast. Like the biggest thing is, is the people that I've been able to meet, and networking like outside of being able to provide people with value like the men of how you that I found and being able to interview, people is, is endless and people always talk about, you know, Email lists or growing a growing fan base. Like I just look at the three hundred plus people that I've interviewed in, like that's three hundred people who were super valuable and not just who I think are valuable, but who the marketplace thinks is valuable and that is an amazing, no matter what you do if you can have people. Around you who are successful in something when you need something real to go simply ask for it, and having the humility I in order to do that, but it starts sort of building that community. It's probably the same thing you found on the show year, Ken, right? It's like it's just a community that you build. It's the people you meet in. It's, it's everything. It's definitely six degrees of Kevin bacon. Right. It's amazing. I've a play this game with friends of mine. But it's like, hey, if you need to get in touch with the president, or if you need to get in touch with this person. How many people would you actually need to call to get in touch with that person? And it's amazing. What your network is? Right. It's, it's creating that network. It's making that network, go viral and believe me, you know, there's things I've done that worked really well. And there's things I've done that have blown up, you know, in my face spectacularly, but I think it's really, you know, offering that insight and trying to really offer enough. I don't know if it's a vice or as much as insight right of what works and what doesn't work, and that's you know, by interviewing people, you get that from them, you know, like I said, earlier, it's easier to copy genius and create mediocrity. But everyone your chatting with someone that's supposed to be there. Right. You're supposed to be chatting with that person for some reason or another. It's true people relate to stories like, people don't relate to someone saying you should be doing this, or do this, or do that people relate to hearing someone else's story and being able to take one thing from it being like allow he was in the same position as as, as I was. And he did this will I could do that right now? Like it's not all the all the time. It's not about trying to get everything out of it. It's just about being able to take one little thing from each interviewer, one little thing from someone that you speak to an oftentimes instead of just trying to bark at someone to say, no find a mentor do this, or do that. It's, it's often through telling your story and others sharing. Their story that people really find that connection when you find that connection, I feel like that's really what Tross you drives you to take the action and, you know, in of the people, you've interviewed, what do you think the common theme of is right? You know, theme of success and becoming an entrepreneur or team of success in life. What you know, if you could say in four or five sentences or less. What do you think that is? You know it's so tough. But the one thing I've taken from it is your thoughts control your behaviors in the behaviors control your actions, and the results, you're seeing right now are direct reflection of the behaviors that you have. So if you wanna change your behaviors you need to change your thoughts. So I can expand on that, if you wouldn't mind can. Yeah. That'd be awesome. Yeah. So ultimately like the way I feel like making changes. There's five steps and I look at fist right? If you when you make a fist takes five fingers, all five fingers. And if this is like the universal symbol for power. Right, if you want to be powerful, if you make like a, a great run skiing. Can you like this pump at the bottom of the hill? Right. Exactly. And if you're angry, you make that this, like, it's just simply what we as humans do so way. Look at it is the first thing you have to do. Number one is you have to admit that you need to change. So you need to admit that what you're doing right now isn't working, or isn't. Fully working in you need to change. And once you admit that you need to change than you will ultimately change a number two, once you admit that change. Now, you start to become really self aware of those bad and losing behaviors and thoughts that you have throughout the day. So all of those patterns that you've created in your life you start to pick up on those things like when you start to have self doubt you go to the coach instead of going to the gym, so you can start to pick up on those negative self-talk in those bad behaviors become self aware when you become self aware leads the number three, which is. Excuse me. Number three is the honeymoon stage. So it's the ring fingers, high say, okay. So this is when you start to replace the bad behaviors with the good behaviors in this is where people see the greatest results early on. It's like going to the gym you see all the biggest impact like the first month right Ken because you start to replace those bad behaviors. Good behavior to eat properties. Are actually work out for the first time this. When you see the biggest results another fourth thing is, is the easiest to break. It's often. Thought of last but is really the second most important thing that you need to do in that have consistency. So now that you've replace those bad behaviors. Good behaviors need to be consistent with it every single day. And to speed this up the glue that holds everything together, which is your thumb, which creates that this, that's having a purpose. That's having a vision for what you need. So those days that you don't feel like getting out those days, you don't feel like going to the gym or doing whatever you need to do. You can go back and say, what do I really want life? You can visualize it. So clearly in your mind that it just drives you to keep moving forward. What do you suggest the people that are sort of searching for they're searching for they're calling, right? You know what? What? What would you tell them be like, hey, I don't really know what I wanna do. The worst thing you can do is think about it. Hi thing. Okay. So I would just say, take action do something build a new skill taken online course you can go to Yuna me and take courses for fifteen dollars to learn about marketing about sales or learn about anything but from that, if you could probably relate to this Ken, I didn't know I was gonna like podcasting until about a weekend and then I really found a passion for it. But if I were to just sit there and think, you know what's next for me. I'd still be sitting there. And what's next for me? I'd still be in the same position. Right. So it's just about taking action learning a skill. It's definitely all about throwing the ball lines off right in overcoming, overcoming outings -iety, and I think like you had mentioned it's admit into yourself. Number one. Number two, it's just saying even if you're scared just do it. Right. It's sort of like the night and the ad. But I think it's creating that momentum. And that's where people, I think a lot of people in Spain. Port in business. Get caught and they get stuck is because they don't have that momentum right there momentum. His always been there for them has been given to them. I think you know, in golf, or an individual sports, you have to create that momentum. I think it's all different sometimes with team sports and team environments where, you know, the momentum is of it's given to you. But it's still, you know, there's a camaraderie around that and the, but in order to survive in that team world's be the best, you know, you're, you're almost your own individual anyways, and, you know, they always have the most momentum and they bring the others up. Exactly can relate so much to sport. Right. And exactly what you said. And for some reason, people think that sports is you have to be different when you're in business or not. You're poor like when you're in sport, you have a coach you've nutritionist if someone that helps you with all these different things. But in business loves times, people don't have anything. So if you can go back and be like, imagine I started playing golf and I didn't have any how. Help would I have played professionally would I have gotten a scholarship? Absolutely not. It takes more than just talent. Right. No. And believe me. Yeah. You know, surrounding yourself number one with the right people. But just jumping in. I think it's, it's just taking action right as step one, and that's where I think that's where the anxiety for most people. Really? That's their issue because they, they don't know where to go and where to begin, you know, one of the things I always talk about if you follow me at all online is getting outside that comfort zone, right trying to become comfortable being uncomfortable because, you know, then then I think it becomes addictive. And then you become bored when you not uncomfortable right? And then you get yourself into all types of other, you know, trouble either go to bed. It's too he started. It's very easy to, to not take action because I mean, we live everyone, so judgmental, right in it's so easy to be pigeonholed with what your aunt says about your, which your friends are going to say about you. But, like just think about that for a second, like you really. That's where it goes back. If you wanna make a change need to admit that you need to make a change first and foremost, like you need to admit that haven't really done everything the way, I needed it to be done in need to change things. I truly believe it starts there, because I think, like I don't know about you, but like that, for me, was the most difficult thing is look at myself in the mirror and to be like, for the last two years of, really flushed, my life, down the toilet, and I need that not happen anymore, right? Let's yeah. And that's where, you know, sometimes they say rock bottoms, the best place to go because it's a, it's a solid foot in to, to, to step on to build something upon through, you know, like you're saying admitting it is, is probably the most difficult thing. But I think once you admit it in your accept it, I think is probably the the best thing, and I know we use sports because -secutive athletes as a metaphor, but I think it's not just sports. It's music. It's art. It's being a program or a business person. Person or whatever it is. Right. It's just where you're passionate is and admitting because we all know when we're doing something wrong, no matter what. Right. We know don't work hard enough on this. We know we didn't eat right? You know for this race or for this event or we all know that. My buddies are out. You know, I should be trained and when they're party in. Willpower. Didn't work that night or something like that. But like you said, is admitting it is, is the first step in once you had mitt it. You can just go anywhere from there. Yeah. And we like no one's perfect. I had those same problems all the time. Right. And like I realized, you know, in social settings, I'm one of those people that dislikes the you'll have a beer with friends, right? And I feel awkward when I don't but knowing that now I can actually may be decide to make a change. Right. And it's when you just continue the cycle over and over and over again, as I think it starts become a little bit. Little bit dangerous does now in what about, you know, your thoughts about starting your podcast, you know, I know a lot of people, I've sort of given my advice, but I'd love to hear someone else's advice on what are your thoughts about starting a podcast in, in going about it? And, and taking that leap into it. Yeah. I mean it really depends it it's person to person it depends on your goals, but. For the simple fact of you being able to sit behind a mic in speak in even if like I truly believe, can even if you didn't air it out ten buddy, even if you just spoke on microphone for twenty minutes, a day about what you were feeling like it's so therapeutic, because anytime you're able to share your story, your share what you're feeling it helps you heal, and if you can take that one step further shared out with people, I mean, that's when you can really start to make a change on people's lives, and whether that be sharing your story or sharing. Other people story is super amazing in it's in business. It's all about attention. Right. And if you can have fans and if you can have people who are by your side, who cheer for you. It's super easy to come up with a product or service to be able to help them. Because at that point, you can have maybe a hundred people or listen to your podcast and send out a survey and say, hey, would you guys struggling with ABC and they're struggling with C will, now you may be create a sir. Service or create a product, which you're going to help them with C and be able to solve that. Now I love that. I love that. I think like you said, it's, it's therapeutic right to, to, to talk to someone to talk to people about it. And I think I can't tell you how much it's helped me just business wise by going back and listen to my own my original podcast. Right of. Hi. Yeah. I do. Right. Or what I don't or what I do wrong or how my voice works this way or that way. And it's crazy. But and I remember the first few I was hesitant to listen to them. Number one, the number two like, oh my God. This is crazy right in finding your voice. I think is, is probably the biggest thing I think if any advisor gives the people who wanna start a podcast or start sort of in the world of social media, just finding your voice and sticking with your voice one hundred percent and in it's all about starting right? Like it's the same thing that I've reiterated from the beginning of the show, Ken like if you want us, if you're thinking about starting a podcast started. Don't worry about how it's gonna look. Don't worry about how you're gonna get your logo. Don't worry about the microphone. You're gonna use. Don't worry about are you going to market? It just start. It do the first one, I promise you, if you do the first one, it will start to create that, that snowball effect that you were even talking about again. I'll definitely. Yeah. It's huge. It's really, it's really now those are the pieces, right? It's just get rolling and it same with working out at same with doing a sales job. It's picking up the phone, one more time, right? Or picking up the phone that one more time, just initially picking up the phone. I remember you know, when I started in sales and started in recruiting. That was the scariest thing ever was picking up the phone, and then, number two, the next thing was actually talking to someone. Next number three was, you know in my head, I was ready for failure. But I think there was probably as much of a fear of success, as well. Right. Because I what, what would happen if they say is true, right? It's true. And I think like we're talking earlier from the mine is, you know, is son struggling because he doesn't know how to win right? It's and that's more people are more people is not that he doesn't know how to win. He doesn't have the maturity of it because people. There's coming in first place and there's winning right? And I think it's when you start getting higher a higher level as a lot harder to win. It's, it's a different mindset. It's you have to think about things differently, and it's a learned trait exactly the learn how to win. You have to learn how to win it takes it takes years of winning to learn how to win, especially properly. And it's like it, it goes back to even golfer. It's like focusing at the beginning, it's focusing on the process, not the results, right? It's not looking at wooded, Jimmy, and John shoot. But, like, would we have in front of me? What can I control because if we look way ahead of us, I'm probably the same with you is skiing, right? Like if you were to thought I need to hit this time or do this before I get down to the bottom of the hill. You wouldn't have executed which you need to execute. It's about focusing, what you can control which is right in front of you. That's exactly right. I think that's what separates the best from, you know, everyone else if. Look at tiger. You'll look bowed your, your look at Lindsay or Lindsey, Vonn or any of those guys, they know how to win no matter what. Right. The cards are stacked against them. They're going to go out and they're gonna lay it out there and make it happen. And I think, you know, there should be a study on that, and there should be people, you know, I'm sure the sports psychologists about it. But I think the fear of success is probably even more than the fear of failure. It is. And I think people have a really difficult time admitting that right. Like they're fearful of success, and you don't want to admit that because you feel like you sound like a loser, right? I get it. Like I almost felt like that before too. You're so fearful of your fear of failing. But, like what if I succeed, like am I not going to have the same friends like with my family, look at me differently? Like people can start asking me for money like it, hold you back from what you're comfortable with Jess. No, it's a, it's a crazy thing. But it's you know, it's something that I've really been thinking about, and pondering, a lot recently is that it's that I think that, like I said holds more people back from being successful than the fear of failure rate the field. We're so trained that, you know what? Oh, good job. Johnny you did. Great now. Oh, okay. Great. But reality, it's like no giada. You didn't win. What, what do you need to do to win? And they think the, the commitment that it takes to become, you know the one percent or the, you know point zero one percent is so astronaut. Hi, it's Asam topic. And there's very few people that are willing to really lay that on the line. Number one, number two have the mindset actually to be able to push through that, right? And I think it's, you know, it's athletes, it's politicians business people. And there's, there's a bit of ruthlessness involves toe. I mean even look at Tiger Woods. Right. Like how many times it he changes swing in his prime? Right. You won like four majors, one year in a row. And then he changed his swing because he wanted to get better, like I think that's so sweet. Like so many people are so stuck in a frayed all I can't change my swing. I'm playing well right now, are you. Tiger Woods rental. Maybe you should do things differently. Maybe you should look at that as an example, and say, do, I keep repeating the same thing or maybe could make a slight tweak make a slight change and I could get a different result. It's so simple to say, but people are so afraid to do it. It's hard. No believe me. It's the way I know it's hard to my business. I know it's probably hard in your business. Right. It's, it's you get comfortable and y'all must have to force yourself outside of that comfort zone. So really, you know to get there and sometimes, you know, you may fail. But like you said, sometimes you may succeed in and then what it's like holy shit. This is actually working. What do I do next? Exactly. People always had the fear of, like, oh, what if it fails? But exactly what you said, would if it's exceeds, man. Like what if you actually do what you wanna do? And it works like wow. Be amazing. And scary. So tell us about, you know, we're coming up on a half hour here. Thirty five minutes. Tell us about where people can find you tell us about, you know, your podcast will, but more and, you know, I'd love to put some people your way. Number one, number two, if any insight that you can give people be great as well for sure. Yeah. If you wanna find me as super simple, you can either. Visit daily grind podcast dot com or you can find the daily grind podcast on virtually anything you listen to whether it's Spotify, jeez, anywhere you listen to podcasts. But if you like personal development, you want to better yourself. You wanna learn from successful, people just like Ken show here. I do a five days a week. So I bring in a lot of different people different aspects different areas alive. So go ahead and check that out. And then if you wanna follow up with what I do more on a daily basis, you can follow me on Instagram, and I'd be happy to share that link with you can on the show notes to make things easy. Perfect. Yeah. Definitely and calling was great to have you on this was amazing. I'm sure we'd go for. Hours and hours here because there's so many similar similar topics to talk about. So thank you very much for being part of the show and be part of the Bod cast can't thanks so much for having me. Man. I love what you're doing with the podcast. I for people listening do Kenna favored hit the subscribe button. Leave 'em a comment shared out with a friend. Anything helps can do a really amazing job for you and your finding value in it. I know it was a fellow podcast. Sir, just reciprocated back in any way, you can perfect. Thank you. Call in. And again, thanks everyone for listening and go out there and crush it. And if you ever need anything feel free to reach out to me at Kennedy executive athletes dot com. Do it Collins said, have a great afternoon.

Ken Lubin Colin Morgan executive wicks Gulf US Collins golf Canada Lii NHL John Lee Dumas US Olympic Committee Instagram LeBron James Tiger Woods Kevin bacon Kenna
Le Show For The Week Of March 22, 2020

Le Show

55:41 min | 8 months ago

Le Show For The Week Of March 22, 2020

"From deep inside audio device choice in soon flies the only way to be a student. You come selfies with the term. And where are you so far five Shows out there? Don't just take our wipe it down without open water fanatic about it from the home. The homeless place where self-isolation is not a mandate. It's a lifestyle. I'm Harry Shearer. Welcome you to this highly private yet public edition of the show and now ladies and Gentlemen News of the warm yes. Climate Change continues even through this. Think of it. Oh listen to you you know. It's been underestimated all these years. No not the talent of the Kardashians methane emissions by humans according to Nature Magazine magazine about nature. It's the name methane emissions to the atmosphere of have increased by approximately one hundred fifty percent over the past three centuries. It's been difficult for researchers to determine exactly where these emissions originate heat trapping gases like methane can be omitted naturally as well as from human activity. We eating more being. What University of Rochester researchers Benjamin meal and their collaborators along with vassily drink measured methane levels in ancient air samples. Those must be good and found that scientists have been vastly underestimating. The amount of methane humans are emitting into the atmosphere via fossil fuels in a paper published in nature the researchers indicate that reducing fossil-fuel use is a key target in curbing climate change. So let's bail out as well. Companies won't wait. Methane is the second largest anthropogenic contribute to global warming that is originating from human activity after carbon dioxide but compared to combine dioxide. Methane has relatively short shelf-life. You know this you've heard this here before. Now you're hearing it again. If we stopped emitting all carbon dioxide today high carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere was still persists for longtime says one of the researchers method is important because we made changes to our current methane emissions. It's going to reflect more quickly. He says scientists are able to accurately quantify the total amount of methane emitted to the atmosphere each year. But it's difficult to break down this total into its individual components which portions originate from fossil sources. Which are biological. I know you've asked yourself that over and over again. How much methane is released naturally? How much is released by human activity? Well these researchers turned to the past way drilling and collecting ice cores from Greenland. I know it sounds like a summertime. Treat but it's not the ice core samples. Act like time capsules that contain air bubbles small quantities of ancient air trapped inside by measuring the carbon fourteen isotopes from more than two hundred year old air. Researchers found that almost all the methane admitted to the atmosphere was biological in nature until about eighteen. Seventy that's when the fossil component began to rise rapidly to climb the timing. You won't be surprised to learn coincides with a sharp increase in the use of fossil fuels. The levels of natural released naturally released fossil methane or about ten times lower than previous research reported given the total fossil emissions measured in the atmosphere today. These researchers deduce That the manmade fossil component is higher than expected twenty to forty percent higher so anthropogenic methane emissions make up a larger proportion of total reducing emissions human activities like fossil fuel extraction and use love a greater impact on curbing. Goma warming than scientists previously thought. You bad scientists you. Tropical forests are taking up less carbon dioxide from the air reducing their ability to act as carbon sinks and bringing closer the prospect of accelerating climate breakdown. That was almost breaking down myself. There no more. Thanks a car. The Amazon could turn instead into a source of carbon in the atmosphere instead of an absorb of a gas as soon as the next decade owing to the damage caused by loggers longest and farming interests and the impacts of the climate crisis. New Research has found according to the Guardian if that happens. Climate breakdown is likely to become much more severe in its impacts. The world will have to cut down much faster on carbon producing activities to counteract the loss of the Sankt. Hey was happened to the sink. We've come found. The one of the most worrying impacts of climate change is already begun says a professor of the School of Geography at Leeds University a senior author of the Research. This is decades ahead of even the most pessimistic climate models. You know I understand why the models are pessimistic. They don't eat enough for the last three decades. The amount of carbon absorbed by the world's intact tropical forests has fallen according to the study from nearly one hundred scientific institutions. I don't believe it if it's not if it's less than two hundred scientific. They're now taking up a third less carbon than they did. In the nineteen ninety s owing to the impact of higher temperatures droughts and deforestation the downward trend is likely to continue as force come under increasing threat from climate change and exploitation the typical tropical forest. According to this research may become carbon source by the twenty sixties at this year's UN climate talks to be all in Glasgow in November. If if you can get the Glasgow November. Many countries are expected to come forward with plans to reach net zero emissions by Mid Century. But some rich company Countries and many companies plan to reduce their emissions by offsetting often by preserving replanning or growing new forest. This research shows that relying on tropical forests is unlikely to be enough to offset large scale emissions. But you know maybe nature is providing the answer in the form of this virus cause emissions are going down while we're all sitting at home maybe. The virus is the answer no. The movement of sea. Ice Between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase the century. Who Knew? I didn't know that I see. I was moving between our two countries. This raises the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like micro-plastics and oil according to new research from Colorado University Boulder the study in American Geophysical Union Earth's future predicts that by mid century the average time it takes to travel from one region to another will decrease by more than half the amount of sea ice exchanged between Arctic countries like US Norway Canada and Russia more than tripled speaking of ice during the exceptionally warm Arctic summer of two thousand Nineteen Greenland Lost. Six hundred billion tons of ice enough to raise global sea levels by two-point two millimeters in two months the Jews are wailed on the opposite pole and Arctic agenda to lose mass in the emergency embodiment and the Antarctic peninsula but saw some relief in the form of increased snowfall in Queen Maud land in eastern part of the continent so the Poles give and take these new findings and others by glaciologist at UC Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab of the subject of paper published in Geophysical Research Letters. When you this past summer had been particularly warm in greenland melting every corner the ice sheet but the numbers are enormous says the lead author of UC Irvine Isabella Conan in Antarctica. The mass loss in the West proceeds unabated which is very bad news for sea level rise. She said but we also observe a mass gain in the Atlantic sector of East Antarctica. Which helps mitigate the enormous increase in mass loss? We've seen over the last two decades in other parts of the continent you. Who's not doing well? With all the Monarch Butterfly the yearly count of Monarchs overwintering in Mexico released this week shows a decrease of fifty three percent in last year's count. Well below the threshold at which government scientists predict the migration of the butterflies? Could collapse. Tom Could collapse good. Scientists estimate that six hectares. I don't think Americans know enough about hectares. Do It's about fifteen acres actually is the extinction threshold for the migratory butterflies survival in North America. The latest count by World Wildlife Fund. Mexico found overwintering monarchs occupying just two point three hectares or seven acres. It's about half of what it should be to for them to survive. You see in hectares. I don't know if the butterflies use hector's scientists were expecting the county down slightly. This level of decrease is heartbreaking said a senior scientists at the center for Biological Diversity. Monarchs UNITE US. The more protections are clearly needed for these migratory wonders and their habitat said the scientist few years ago. Six to be. Exact conservationists led by the center for Biological Diversity in the Center for food safety petition the US Fish and Wildlife Service to protect better fly under the endangered species act. The decision will be issued in December of this year. Yes stuff move slow. This latest population decreases attributable the poor weather conditions during the spring and fall migrations. Monarchs have lost an estimated one hundred sixty five million acres of breeding habitat in the US. Do to herbicide-spraying and development develop the her. You know what I mean. Monarch caterpillars only eat milk. Would only milk would that's Dylan Thomas. Classic from but the plant has been devastated by increased herbicides sprang in conjunction with corn and soybean crops that have been genetically engineered to tolerate direct herbicide-spraying in addition to hold fend glyphosate. Roundup's monarchs by our other herbicides and by Neo nicotinoid insecticides that are toxic young caterpillars and decrease the health of adult butterflies. So it's not just the bees and an ironic bit of news at this point in time. The heartland institute is undergoing its second leadership change in less than a year. The group which rejects climate science according to Science magazine. Why bet they don't even subscribe? The group is ousting. It's president Frank Lizzie. After being buffeted by financial turbulence led a significant layoffs corn to two sources close to Hartland. He's being kicked out. One source said Huffpost reported earlier this year. The former staffers blameless for blowing through the group's budget these assertions came as the heartland institute hired a nineteen year old German woman to publicly reject climate science. That was an attempt to establish her as an asset as an anti Greta. Thunberg figure and to raise money. The heartland spokesman did not respond to comment. James Taylor director of Harlan's Center for climate and environmental policies. Supposedly a candidate. He has been passed over twice. Before briefly left. Hartland open a small pro fracking. Think-tank then later returned Hartland last June. The then president former Congressman Tim. Heels camp abruptly parted ways with the group. He was a three term Republican congressman from Kansas. Go figure and a former chairman of the House Tea Party caucus lessee former member of the Wisconsin State Senate and assembly in an ally of former governor Scott Walker oversell a tumultuous period for Heartland Institute. The chicago-based group recently laid off about half of its employees. He's he. It has received millions of dollars in funding from the energy industry over the years. A lot of from coke. We are coke. No we aren't anymore. Many of those contributions have dried up as major players in the oil and gas industry. Like Exxon Mobil backed away from denying climate change other funders such as Murray Energy have gone bankrupt. Murray what happened to you? You look bankrupt. Apparently there's no money anymore in climate change denial news of the warm copyrighted feature this broadcast and now ladies and gentlemen views of the Olympic Movement produced by Jim. Resolve the third this week. We address the question. Kind of movement be moved by some forecasts. According to Asia Times Tokyo may end up spending some twenty six billion dollars on the Olympics and Paralympics endorphins. Roughly seven billion. It was originally estimated the end that would cost the International Olympic Committee has ruled out staging the Tokyo Olympics. Behind closed doors because insiders say that would be anathema to the philosophy of a movement that seeks to bring people across the globe together in celebration sport. Cornelia Guard in Tokyo. Organizing Committee continued to maintain Tokyo Organizing Committee and the printed in maintaining public and private. The Games we'll go ahead and July and IOC executive board meeting takes place this coming Tuesday. It's understood a postponement is not on the agenda. The Olympic boxing qualifying tournament in London's become latest event to be cancelled because of growing concerns relating to the welfare of athletes as well as volunteers. Some sports including horse racing and snooker are continuing behind closed. Doors such an approach has already been rejected by the IOC they have the IOC accepted. It will need to relax qualification standards. So athletes who are on the borderline can be selected even if they're unable to compete in the coming months because of the pandemic nearly sixty percent of athletes have qualified but with qualifying events for climbing. Boxing fencing judo having been cancelled or postponed. Many athletes are being left in the lurch. Minute you hold the Olympics in the Lurch Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Obey says he wants the Olympics represent a world victory over corona virus. His fellow citizens are less optimistic. Sixty nine percent saying they didn't think Tokyo would be able to host the Games as and now this weekend. Us Olympic leaders are facing a growing rebellion inside their ranks about holding the Games a board member of the US Olympic and Paralympic Committee countered leadership by criticizing the track and field. Chief added to the call for postponement because the mushrooming crisis. Us Track and field CEO. Max Siegel tenant sent a two page note to his counterpart at the Olympic Committee. Sarah her sean. Asking the federation to advocate for delay. That came only a few hours after. Us swimming's CEO sent a similar letter and the sport that accounted for. Sixty five of America's one hundred twenty one medals in the last Summer Games on record urging SEGEL's words the. Us Olympic Committee has a leader within the Olympic movement to use the voice and speak up for the athletes in a blog. Post on Friday. Steve Meister a board member of the Olympic Committee in the US leveled much more criticism toward the IOC. It has not shown the leadership we Olympia desire out of those. Who are in charge wrote while he was careful to emphasize those were his thoughts. Not of the. Us Olympic Committee the Federation's Norway and Brazil also went public with requests to postpone. How do you move the Olympics? It's a movement and more than ever. We all need why every day talk from nowhere to run at. I'm Harry Shearer and this show sharing with you at this moment because neither of us has anything better to do right piece from the Washington Post over the weekend. Us intelligence agencies were issuing ominous classified warnings in January and February about the global danger posed by the corona virus at the same time the president trump and lawmakers played down the threat and failed to take action that might have slowed the spread of the pathogen. That's according to. Us officials familiar with spy agency reporting. Take that as you will. The intelligence reports didn't predict when the virus might land on you assures or recommend particular steps that public health officials should take. That of course was suggested by a separate operation a tabletop exercise at Johns Hopkins last October. That rehearsed what federal and state officials might need to do in case of a pandemic medical instruments right. The intelligence reports did track the spread of the virus in China and later in other countries and warned. The Chinese officials appeared to be minimizing the severity of the outbreak. That right taken together. The reports and warnings painted early picture. That who could have known about a picture of a virus that showed the characteristics of a globe encircling pandemic despite that constant flow of reporting trump continued publicly and privately to play down the threat the virus pose to Americans lawmakers to did not grapple with the virus in earnest until this month has officials scrambled to keep citizens in their homes and hospitals braced for a surge in patients. Hey surges a good? We've learned that intelligence agency have been warning on this since January said A. Us official had access to the Intel reporting was sent to members of Congress and their staffs as well as to officials in the administration and of course spoke on condition of anonymity. Let's get the disease or something. Worse Corona virus cases rose as president trump said. They were under control at least seven times the last two months. He said the number of corona virus cases in the US were falling or contained even as they rose. Well you know up and down there kind of simple you really can confide. Donald trump may not have been expecting this but a lot of other people in the government were. They just couldn't get him to do anything about this official said the system was blinking. Red Unquote reminiscent some. Might think of a briefing given to President Bush on August Sixth of two thousand one about Al Qaeda preparing attacks on the United States. Red Lights blinking hair on fire. The President spokesperson responded to this article. By saying it's more disgusting despicable and disgraceful for cowardly unnamed sources to attempt to rewrite history. It's a clear threat to this great country unquote the warnings from US Intel agencies increased in volume. How do you do it? Volume toward the end of January and our into early February said officials familiar with the reports by then a majority of Intel reporting included in daily briefing papers and digests from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the CIA was about Kovic Nineteen said officials who have read the reports you know. The surgeon warnings coincided with a move by Senator Richard Burr head of the Senate Intelligence Committee to sell dozens of stocks issued. A statement defending hisself. But he's going to be investigated by the Senate Ethics Committee which is preparing to have some teeth installed for the occasion at the State Department. Personnel had been nervously tracking early reports about the virus. One official noted was discussed in a meeting in the third week of January around the time. The cable traffic showed you as diplomats in Wuhan were being brought home on chartered planes. A sign that the public health risk was significant. A colleague at the White House mentioned how concerned he was about the transmissibility of the virus in January. Those obviously a lot of chatter the official said inside the White House. Trump's advisors struggle to get him to take the virus seriously according to multiple officials with knowledge of meetings among those advisors and with the president the health and Human Services Secretary couldn't get through to trump to speak with him about the virus until January eighteenth according to senior administration officials when he reached trump by phone the president interjected ask about vaping and when flavored vaping products would be back on the market according to senior administration official vaping. Ladies and Gentlemen on January Twenty Seventh White House aides huddled within Acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney trying to get senior officials to pay more attention to the virus. According to people briefed on the meeting the White House Domestic Policy Council Joe Grogan argue that the administration needed to take the virus seriously or it could cost the president his reelection and the dealing with the virus was likely to dominate life. In the United States for many months Mulvaney then began convening more regular meetings in early briefings however officials said President. Trump was dismissive because he didn't believe the virus it spread widely through the US by early February Grogan and others worried. There weren't enough tests to determine the rate of infection other officials including the president's Deputy National Security Adviser Matt Pottenger began calling for a more forceful response but trump resisted and continue to assure Americans. Core Corona virus would never run rampant as in other countries. I think it's GonNa work out fine. He said on February nineteenth. I think when we get into April in the warmer weather that has a very negative impact on that and that type of virus. The Corona virus is very much control in the US. He tweeted five days later. Stock Marcus starting to look very good to me unquote earlier that month. A senior official at the Department of Health and Human Services Robert Cadillac Assistant Secretary for preparedness and Response delivered a starkly different message to the Senate. Intel Committee joined by officials from the CIA. They told me members of the virus posed a serious threat no specific recommendations. He said to get ahead of the virus and blended defects. Americans would need to take effect. Sorry actions could disrupt their daily lives. Said the official quote. It was very alarming unquote trump's insistence on the contrary to rest in his relationship with China's president jean-jacques pain trump believed president. Gee was providing him with reliable information about how the virus was sprinting in China despite the Intel reports that Chinese officials were not being candid. Some of trump's advisor told him Beijing was not providing accurate numbers rather than press China to be more forthcoming trump publicly praised China's response China's been working very hard to contain the virus. He tweeted January. Twenty four th. The United States greatly appreciates their efforts and transparency. It will all work out. Well Unquote. Some of trump's advisors encouraged him to be tougher on China over its decision not to allow teams from the Centers for Disease Control into the country. President said in one February meeting. If he's struck a tougher tone with China. The Chinese will be less willing to give Americans information about how they were tackling. The outbreak as the disease spread beyond China. You aspire agencies track outbreaks in Iran South Korea Taiwan Italy and elsewhere in Europe volume of reporting spiked is the first cases of infection confirmed in the United States trump continue to insist the risk to Americans with small quote. I think the virus is going to be. It's going to be fine. He said February tenth quote. We have a very small number of people in the country right now. With said four days later it's like around twelve. Many of them are getting better. Summer fully recovered already. So we're in very good shape unquote. President eventually changed his tone after being shown statistical models about the spread of the virus from other countries and hearing directly from the White House core corona risk task. Force coordinator Debra burks as well as from chief executive last week rattled by a plunge in the stock market said people familiar with trump's conversations. And of course now this week. He's been having press conference well since he can't have rallies he's been having press conferences. You'll get on TV one way or the other press conferences with other officials most recently Ben Carson but almost every day Anthony Fauci. Us senior official with experience in the world of epidemics as well as vice president. Mike Pence the forementioned Deborah burkes and other officials and the president has been caught saying things that turned out not to be true like Google's website which was going to be up the ability of Americans to get tested if they need to. I'd I'm advised that the president is holding one of those conferences right now. Let's go to the network so we'll see incredible match my feeling that the FAO Chino Tony as other scientific feelings. But we'll see next question that you nasty. Excuse me. You're very nasty and your paper is your one of us. Go AHEAD MR president. You May in fact thing nasty question do I know but it really is. I think a lot of people may be wondering about this interesting because when you mentioned a lot of people I know a lot of people and that very impressed with what we and I mean all these extremely talented people up here are complicating especially the ones who are not but go ahead. You you've said many times sir in this at this podium that nobody could have seen something like this coming yet. There was a report on your desk when you came into office warning about a possible pandemic simulation that John Hopkins last October of a serious pandemic. So okay right again. Very nasty question. He didn't even finish asking but just the first part was so nasty. If you I'll tell you what I had in case you haven't been paying attention to the last couple of years which knowing your reporting is so very very possible and maybe you forgot who knows. We'll see but I had democrats and their friends right here in this room pushing one hoax after another. Somehow I'm supposed to see these reports and something at Johns Hopkins and I mean. I'm sure they're doing terrific work. Very incredible people down. But I'm supposed to stop keeping very close watch of the coverage of the hoaxes. Then I get criticized from the other side right while Sarah Scott exactly. Trish quiet quiet. Excuse me excuse me when you did. Did you even get the test? I don't think so. Let's get him out. Before HE INFECTS. Aristo is very dangerous and I want to be fair so. Let me finish answering his question. We don't WanNa fake charge about this too right. So people do reports tests and simulations all over the place and they're great people maybe the best maybe not but the people you see up here doing an incredible job even while they're standing up here you'd think that doing nothing for an hour an hour and a half each day but nothing comes further than the truth. Believe me if you think or other people think that all of these folks didn't know about those tests. Those warnings I would just say that's very insulting to these two so talented. They could be back in their offices. They're up here dining. I hope I can see behind but I'll I'll watch the replay so when the Chinese went public and we all know that took too long even though they're friends of mine. I'm sure president cheese. Great Man I'm sure he doesn't mind me calling it. The Chinese viruses biggest things on his plate like why they didn't go public with his sooner. I mean that's when I learned about it but he's learned a lot. I've learned a lot. I can tell you this if something like this happens again during my administration like God forbid another pandemic or this time Irish type of deal now. We know all of us up here and the rest. We know what to do and won't take a phone call from me or stream of texts from whoever my acting chief of staff happens to be to get it all up and running again quicker than anyone has ever seen even including this time so. I don't know if that was a Chinese report or a Chinese simulation it was. Maybe it wasn't but the important thing is that we'll see what happens. Thank you yes. You hear the unfair one. Thank you Mr President. You the other unfair one behind you. Thank you Mr President Sir. Do you think it's right to be constantly criticizing at ask criticizing us that these pressures while there's a national emergency going on? That's a nice question. I've never heard that one before. And when you say constant criticism. I have to say I know what you're talking about even though I may not because nobody gets more constant criticism than me and a lot of it from the very same people who've been kicked out of the issue. Mr President in our checks gives me. She gives me many people. Ask Me why I put up with it and I say I don't know all I do good things and then when whether it's the this hoax Adad hoax or like in this case a total nine hoax which we couldn't own soon even sooner. Thanks to the Chinese I get the same people just trying to get partisan advantage out of trying to trying to head down your favorite president not yours. I know but maybe soon even you I have to go negotiate a new deal about my hotels. I mean my kids run them but in a way still mind the hotels and also in a very real sense. My kids so mike is going to take over after a brief pause. Thank you thank you everybody I see okay and now. The apologies of the week is so sorry. Ucla officials. Hey that's my alma mater. They roll back the decision this week. About cancelling traditional graduation ceremonies after students expressed anger and circulated petitions. Online University said Wednesday. They would replace. In-person commencement with virtual ceremonies in an effort to curb the spread the virus there attractively decision. Thursday saying they would work with students to restart the conversation according to a press release from UCLA UCLA Chancellor Gene Block. We should have known the IMPACT. That decision would make especially during this time. We should've listened. I blocked wrote for this. He added I apologize. An email sent up by a landlord telling tenants who work in the restaurant industry to find alternate ways to pay rent if they're out of work due to the Corps Rona virus or face. Aggressive removal love on twitter. The landlord has apologized. Scorning Newsweek at twitter user Newsweek. A twitter user posted the screen shot from her friends. Instagram story writing the Indianapolis based landlords the emailed attendance it targeted tenants. That may work in the service. Industry who've been struggling as restaurants closed or force only takeout services during the virus quote most of our tenant pools not the restaurant industry. If you are now is the time to use your savings to pay your rent. I the message says Tap Rainy Day Fund. Because it's raining if you're out of savings need to tap your 401k unquote. Email then goes on to list alternative methods of gathering the funds. If you don't have retirement funds you need to borrow money from your parents and relatives of you. Don't have parents or relatives. You need to sell your car. You should pay your rent before you pay your car payment. Your utilities are cellphone even food. It's better to go to a food bank and to be homeless unquote. The last in the screen shot says the landlord's actions for the good of all tenants and they will remove nonpaying tenants can't let a few non paying tenants bring down. The whole ship emailed Newsweek. The landlord sent out a message of remorse quote. I realize I'm into significant mistaken. Offended my tenants in the community. The message I sent was completely insensitive on my part so I sent an apology to my tenants within a few hours and apologize for my ignorance insensitivity and callousness. I also tendered my resignation to my partners from day to day operations. I'm disappointed in myself and I let down people. I care about it pains me to offend those in the restaurant industry because I was a server for many years to pay my way through school and those years were some of the best of my life. I wish health com for our towns and for all of our community in these tough times. Yeah Com. That's what he's peddling true story. I was in recording studio. Wants a song that had the word. Pant load in the lyrics sort of as a placeholder for the real lyric is going to be. And I checked with the Soros Dot COM to get a less unsavory filling in for pat load and the response Theusaradio DOT COM had was. Did you mean landlord Youtuber Nikki? Demar apologized after being slammed and accused of being racist over a corona virus. Tick dog video. The twenty four year old had filmed herself getting her nails done while wearing a mask with the tune. It's corona time playing in the background. Social media users called the influence her well. She's an influence her a racist due to the fact that the lady doing her nails appeared to be Asian Demar insisted in her latest clip. I would have done that video regardless of who is doing my nails. I see everyone equally so I truly didn't see the problem until someone texted me unquote. One person told her. She looked privileged that he's in poor lady work while she was out getting her nails done others insists she couldn't have gone out in public in the first place. Dhamar pointed out this was filmed a week ago. Then I was informed. She's not the backlash was going on. Then I was informed about xenophobia. I don't know if I'm pronouncing that right. Sorry if I'm not. I understand how it looked that way and I'm not making this video to be like I did nothing wrong. Insisting she's a grown woman unquote. She's an influence her. Dhamar finish the clip by saying I can't be so thoughtless impulsive in dumb when doing something for humor. I'll apologize for my mistake but I'm not racist and I know who I am and it is what it is before getting emotional and turning off the camera. The original video has been deleted that is grown ass gay plus size model. Michael Macauley is addressing racist social media posts of his the resurfaced on twitter just as he was being profiled an Abercrombie and Fitch his new ad campaign about inclusiveness. That's rotten timing queer. T- where'd you got dot Com ran an interview with MacAulay last weekend? During which he touted the importance of diverse representation shortly after the interview was published a number of racists social media posts written by began recirculating on social media in one of the posts he blasted members of black lives matter calling them a group of extremists and other he bemoaned the activist group for blocking the streets and making him late for a meeting in another. He took aim at Jada. Pinkett Smith for her stance on Oscar. So #oscarssowhite then complained grammy's don't enough nominate enough white artists then he took to twitter unquote. No sorry quote quote first unquote later. I want to address the comments that were recently brought to light from several years ago. They were not intended to be hurtful. I realized how insensitive they are and I'm sorry for the harm. They caused thank you. He showed the post on instagram but deactivated the comments that allure. Craig fugate former head of FEMA. President Obama. Apologize for storming off the set an uttering a profanity during a segment on. Msnbc few can't utter a profanity ON MSNBC. Where in a tweet posted shortly after his appearance fugate apologize to Anchor Katie tour and the MSNBC audience at the point? I'm not helping time to step back. He wrote never was good at the talking heads in any way. This is too critical of time to let emotions get in the way my apologies to you and your audience unquote fugate had gotten into a disagreement with fellow panelist. Andy Slavic also a former Obama administration health officials. Fugate had argued virus needs to be dealt with immediately on the state and local level Slavic head called for more federal involvement slab. It had said we need a great partnership between the Federal State Governments. Fugate pulled out his earpiece and stormed off the set. Saying I don't have time to listen to be s people. Slavic also apologized. So it's a tie. China has exonerated a doctor who is officially reprimanded for warning about the corona virus outbreak and later died of the disease. You heard about him. This is a startling admission of error by the ruling Communist Party which like Our current government generally boats no challenges to its authority. The party's top. Disciplinary Body said the police force in Wuhan had revoked. It's admonishment of Dr Lee. When that had included a threat of arrest it also says a solemn apology had been issued to lease family and the two police officers identified only by their surnames had been issued disciplinary punishments for the original handling of the matter Communist Party officials police specifically in December reprimanded eight doctors including Lee for warning friends on social media about the Emerging Threat Toronto Raptors Chris. Vouchers apologized through social media channels for disregarding the self isolation edict from the team and the NBA after taking a test for the virus voucher was spotted shopping at a downtown Toronto Shop Lobe laws after he'd been tested for the virus following the teams return from western Western road trip. Few days ago I broke our team mandated self quarantine. He said. I want to apologize to the city of Toronto fans in the Raptors Organization while I have tested negative it was never my intention to endanger our community at recognize mistake and have remained self quarantine since. Let's stay safe. Toronto UNQUOTE VANESSA. Hudgens took to Instagram. This week to clarify comments she made during an instagram live clip. Day earlier that went viral many viewers that accused the actress and singer. Oh okay then of not taking the pandemic seriously enough during the latest video hudgens looking directly at the camera response to shutdown orders that some have said could last as long as July or August Yeah till July sounds like a bunch of Bs. She said about potential quarantine tour thirty eight million followers. I'm sorry but like it's a virus. I get I respect it but at the same time. I'm like even if everybody gets it like yeah. People are going to die which is terrible but like inevitable like unquote. She then seemed to backtrack a bit adding. I don't know maybe I shouldn't be doing this right now. She'd been busy on instagram. Recently posting everything from makeup and hair looks to calling her followers to donate to cause such as feeding America. Let's help each other out rather than freaking the F. Out K. K. She posted three days ago but it was the comments from the instagram live clip. That immediately caught fire with followers and other social media users quick. Call her out for not being sensitive enough to global crisis journalist and influence her Yashar Ali was among the most high profile who posted the clip and challenged her. What a horrible heartless message free to share with the younger people who look at you up to you. He said I think that's on them on. Tuesday hudgens blame people for twisting her words saying quote. I realized that some of my comments are being taken out of context. It's a crazy time. It's a crazy crazy time and I'm at home and I'm in lockdown and I hope that's what you guys are doing to in full quarantine and staying safe and sane. I don't take this situation lightly by any means stay inside. Y'All she followed with a formal apology. Reads Hey guys. I'm so sorry for the of offended anyone in everyone who has seen the clip from my instagram. Yesterday I realized my words were insensitive and not at all appropriate for the situation our country in the world right now. There's been a huge wakeup call about the significance. My words have now more than ever on sending safe wishes to everyone. Just stay safe and healthy during this crazy time unquote which only preuss that was written by her lawyers because they don't say like nearly as often as she did the apologies the week. Ladies and gentlemen a copyrighted feature this broadcast I love just a final note since we're being told the Army Corps of Engineers is going to be doing a lot of work connected with the virus thing. Yummy carbon engineer has got a plan to clean up a fifty year old oil spill in Alaska. They built did the Corp Engineers Steel pipeline to carry fuel over six hundred miles from hanes fairbanks in the nineteen fifties operating for over a decade over that time there were numerous spills including a rupture pump station Broccoli. Thirty three thousand gallons of oil released will McDonnell. The course technical head of the project. It's about eight hundred barrels of fuel programs to clean up environmental damage like that didn't exist on this bill. That changed they army dug up the soil around the League and then burn the fuel. Basically the extent of the cleanup at the time said Mangano. Now well the contaminated areas on the Bank of a river. The chilcott a food source for two towns in Alaska and spawning grounds for all five species of Pacific Salmon. The core focused in on the spill site in two thousand twelve and found gasoline diesel and benzene in the near Boyce nearby soil and groundwater surface water samples showed contamination levels warranted cleanup contaminates profound up to fourteen feet deep and soil still causing risk to human health. According to Alaska's environmental officer the core came with a range of cleanup options most vigorous sorry in most rigorous billick excavate. Seventeen thousand tons of contaminated soil treated with a process called land farming to neutralize contamination. Then the pudding clean soil. They won't excavate all with talented soil because that would mean digging up a portion of highway if the plan moves forward the. Us Army Corps of Engineers is bound and monitor soil and water at the site in perpetuity. Until everybody forgets about no until no contaminants are detected. Well let them drive the model of the United States Army Corps of Engineers and Ladies and gentlemen. That's going to conclude this week's edition of the show back back in your room next week. Same time on the radio whenever you want it on your audience divisive choice. The email address for this program chance to get cars. I talked t shirts the audio music playlist of what you hear here. All at Harry share DOT COM and on twitter at the Harish Lucia come see from century of progress. Productions originates services of WW NO NEW ORLEANS. Flagship Station of the change is easy. Radio knepper so long and don't touch your face

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Ep #338: Executive Athletes with Ken Lubin

The Daily Grind Business Podcast

28:15 min | 1 year ago

Ep #338: Executive Athletes with Ken Lubin

"Hi, everybody. And welcome to the daily grind. I'm your host column Morgan and five days a week. I aim to motivate educate and inspire you to live the life of your dreams. I interview some of the most successful and inspiring people along with sharing insight of my own in order for you to not only be successful in what you're doing but prosper in business and life. The show was for grinders people don't just have dreams, but are willing to lay it all on the line and grind for what they want. Welcome everyone to the daily grind. Hey, grinders recently. I've started to rebuild my website using wicks see in the past a website for non person like myself was really a pain in the butt. I had to find someone to build the site. Relay what I wanted pay thousands of dollars only to have to go through months of editing, and eventually just putting up with what I had. I wanted to start with a blank slate and design my website the way I wanted it. That's why I chose wicks. I I was able to start building my site and publish it for free. I chose from over five hundred stunning templates to find the exact fuel and look that I was looking for I could change customize in add anything I wanted wherever I wanted. Now, I've only been working on the site for about an hour a day for the past two weeks. I'm not quite finished yet. But can't believe how quick and easy. It's been to use an how professional it looks. What would have taken me months to complete in the past? And thousands of dollars. I've completed only a few short hours myself, plus everything is automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile, which for me is super important for my business. What I've learned is that building a website doesn't have to cost thousands. It doesn't have to be a headache and can actually be really easy and enjoyable with wicks to get started using wicks today and get ten percent off go to wicks dot com forward slash podcast again. That is wicks w I x dot com forward slash podcast. Hey, everyone and welcome back to the show today on the daily grind. We sit down with Ken Lubin Ken Lubin helps people achieve their dreams and accompanies to reach their biggest goals he thrives by getting people out of their comfort zone. He's a death race winner, managing director and executive recruiter was Ziara partners. Founder of executive, athletes and the executive athletes podcast and US Olympic Committee. Career advisor today on the show Ken shares is amazing entrepreneurial germ with us along with a really powerful lesson. So as always everyone, be sure you have a pen. No, Pat out sit back and enjoy today's episode with Ken lupin. Will can Lubin welcome to the daily grind. How are you today? Good, colin. How are you? I excited to be part of the show. Of course, we're excited you here as well. Can't thanks for being here. And if you wouldn't mind, Ken, Sharon, a little bit more about who you are. And what it is that you do. So I am my day job. I'm actually an executive recruiter. I've been in the retained executive search world for the last seventeen years. I worked with a company called CR g partners, and I focused primarily in specialty landed especially finance all over the world senior level executives. So that's my day job. But I also have the side hustle that were chat about two. And I think there's a lot of combination of the two called executive athletes. Which actually was born and bred out of out of my search business. So we can go more into detail and then on the side executive athletes as well as passionate, endurance racer. I love adventure race in. I love getting out there doing cross fit and try and all different types of stuff. That's probably way too hard and takes up too much time. But it's too much fun. Not to do, no doubt. So you've always been you've always been into sports. Right. I have I have I grew up as a ski racer all through raced all through college got into bike racing and then just sort of morphed into doing longer endurance, events only doing two or three year. But it allows you to really have a goal and have something to chase after. And if you know, you get not shape that you're going to be screwed on your knee event. So just forces you to keep going. No dell. What do you think about, you know, growing up being an athlete skiing now and endurance race? Or how do you think that's up you kind of prepare for for life and business? What you're doing with the with your podcast? You know, I think it just it creates resiliency, right? It's just sort of always always be pushing all he's trying to get better. Always trying to learn. I'm forty six years old. And I still feel like I haven't learned anything yet. It's people like you're an expert in this or an expert in that like, I don't I don't feel that way. At all. I feel like I'm actually a beginner. And what can I learn from? You is really what I'm looking for look to learn from others and see what they're doing and learn from the mistakes they've made but the genius stuff they've done to. Yeah. You know, I love that. Because I think some of the top athletes they talk about how throughout their career. They've always taken with them, a beginner mindset, which to them has been super important because when you have a beginner mindset, it allows you to take leaps forward because you're not stuck in what you're doing. You're willing to listen to side help. And I think that's what you have to do. And all terms of, you know, being an entrepreneur Abuna professional being an athlete being a student. Right. It's always sort of. I have the module of always be learning. And I think that's the key to that's the key to success. What it was it? I Jim Rohn said I believe what he said, you know, you don't make you don't formal education does make a living. Yes. Extracurricular education makes you you know, welfare. Yeah. And that's the key. It's you know, it's it's always be learning. All always reading always trying to get better. Always trying new things of what works, and what doesn't work when did you get into self education yourself? You know, I really early on in my recruiting business. I always never thought. I was that good, right? And I was just all I didn't have the self confidence the self esteem in that business. And really just said, hey, you know, what am I going to do to get to that next level? And the funny thing is like, you know, you see the Tony Robins videos on TV, and you know, I didn't invest in the whole program. I went up Barnes and nobles and bought the disk that was twelve dollars, right? And doesn't just started from there and started listening to his stuff. And then you start listening to mentors that he had listened to and that type of stuff and just really going from there, and that it's morphed into, you know, all right? I don't wanna follow guys that are in social media space or follow people in the recruiting space or follow people in the athlete space. So it was really just grabbing control and saying, hey, you know, I'm sort of sick of where I'm at I need to learn to become better. And how can I become better? No. So you're in the recruiting business. What made you want to? Podcast. Like what what was that for you? Because I think each person has their sort of unique story on that like for you. What what drew you to podcasting so executive athletes, and I'll tell you the story of how that how that all began and how it ends up as a podcast now. So being in the executive recruiting business, I focus in like I said earlier in especially finance, and as you can imagine during the recession of oh, eight nine two thousand and ten not much was happening. But I said myself, and it's really when I started listening to like Seth Godin Gary vein, or Chuck those guys and if figured if I wanted to sort of build my own tribe, and I found wanted to connect with people that have the same I same wavelength. So I actually learned really learnt how to use linked to and extensively just really jumped into it. Yep. And built a built a few groups. They started a group called executive athletes that were chatting about that have about twenty thousand followers on. I have. Actually to other groups though, Boston banking and financial services professionals group. That's another eleven thousand and the specially lengthy group of another eight seven or eight thousand so I was utilizing social media to the extent that I could linked in Israeli a tool for a lot of times. It's for sales. It's reather people looking for jobs or people looking to hire. So it's a great. It was a great tool really to expand. This and expand this down the road. So -secutive athletes was sort of my passion, my passion project, then you know, I never had access to really top people to just learn from right because I always thought, athletes and executives and all those people are very driven and what they can pull off is just unbelievable. And you know, and it could be artists in executives. It could be programmers and executives right percents. My, you know, I'm an athlete, and I love to just try to get after it. So what early on us put on networking events in Boston. Boston and New York, then I really know. I had always wanted to get into the podcast in and the timing was right. And I had an opportunity to do it and found the right technology to pull it off. And it's been awesome. I've interviewed guys like you. I've interviewed some of the best traff. Elites in the world. Like Mark Allen. A lot of, you know, top ski racers because that was my background racers. But now it's really spinning off into entrepreneurs in the space or real executives that are out there. Just crushing it on the weekends. They're doing iron or double ironman. But really figuring out how they train how they train effectively. What are their diets? What makes them successful that type of stuff totally? So for you when you started to I mean, you started to listen to Seth he started to listen to Gary v and you started these linked in groups did you do. So with the intention of monetize ING it or is more. So you just for trying to connect with people. You know, I think the connections turn at the monetization. Right. Really what happens? I can't tell you. How many, you know, cool things I've been able to do how many leads is turned into my surge business that type of stuff because everyone always wants to talk about, you know, talk about side gigs. Right. They wanna talk about the athlete side or they wanna talk about what they're passionate about. And that's really that's where the whole thing started. From was here. Let's get people to talk about their passions. And how can we connect you hashing? And then, you know, now itself it's starting to get into the point where there's people want to sponsor if people want to you know. Pitch their product that's stuff. So we're not there yet. But we're not far away. No doubt. So here's the common thing that people. Here's a common excuse can. It's like I don't have enough time. Right. This is the comedy for everyone listening. He's trying to start a business trying to get to the next level for you. You have a job. You have a podcast of these linked in groups, you do iron man's, and I mean, you are a busy, man. How do you control your time? You know? I just I always have this thing in back of my head. No wasted steps. Right. When can I can I if I'm going I'm going to the bathroom in the laundries in there while let just which laundry yard. And all of a sudden laundries all done, right? Or you're in the cargo and somewhere, you can learn something on the radio or I don't watch professional sports. I don't watch football. I don't sit there and watch TV if I can go out on a Sunday and ride my bike for four hours. I'd rather do that than watch a football game. So it's a lot of that type of stuff. It's really I don't know if it's sacrifice. It's just swapping productive hours with non-productive hours. And how do you how do you get that internal fire and drive inside of you to do that? Because I think for a lot of people they they're sitting on the couch, and they may be sit in the country right now, listen to plug as they watch Netflix. They know that they should be getting outside. But they don't like where where does that internal fire? Come from. You know, it's it's always been there. I think it's always been for me to just try to become better. Right. Try to you know, how can I had Vance in sport or in my career or thinking outside the box. It's really that's what sort of. Excites me is the creativity behind it because business and being launched preneurs all about being creative. Yes. And that sort of what motivates me is it getting off the couch to go run of super long race. And this and that now that you know, runnings boring. It's boring shit. But if you are creative with it, and you're gonna go run in the woods with your dog. Or you're gonna go for run and stop every three minutes and do ups or five minutes or do something like that it just changes things up or go for a run or bike. I don't ride my bike with headphones in but going for long Durance run. You can listen to a book. Right. So you're getting you're getting both things you get knowledge. And you're getting your fitness. So and when people always ask me, how do you do it with young kids and everything else? I would just throw them in the baby jogger my wife. Never said. No, don't take the kids for two or three hours. Oh, Honey, I'm gonna give you. Take the kids for a run. Right. You know, she never said. No. So that was the other way I was able to pull that stuff off. No doubt. And it just having that just that mentality. I think that's probably where you get it from sports right is like sports correlate so much over into entrepreneurship because not all the time. Just like you said when you not all the time, you feel like running all the time you feel like getting on the bike not all the time. You feel like getting up and writing a blog is an entrepreneur doing a podcast, but those little things accumulated over time get you those results, and I think if you chunk it down a lot it's a lot easier. Right. It's going for if you know, you can go run for fifteen minutes. If anyone tells you that they're not tired. If they go run hard for fifteen minutes on a care for the best or worse than the world. It's you know, it's a hard workout. That's true. Do Burke's for two minutes. Go do Burgis for two minutes straights. See if you can actually doing for two minutes straight most people can't right? Yeah. So it's it's looking at it that way a write in a blog post. It's like all right. This is gonna take me. Eight minutes to do this blog post. It's you know. So it's less intimidating when you look at it that way, and it's like, I think a lot of people when they start off. They're like say, fitness wise, right to like I'm gonna go to the gym seven days a week for the next two months. No excuses. Like, really, you're not you're not gonna do that. You're setting yourself up for failure at the beginning of that. Whereas with you're saying like just figure out something that you can do consistently every day. And that's exactly all it is right. You said it's I met some one at a conference or talking about it. And you know, that's where the whole two minute thing came from. He's like you can always do something for two minutes. You can do two minutes worth of push ups. You can do two minutes worth of stuff when you're on a conference, call most people just don't sit on your on the conference call and surf the web stand up and do air squads or something like that. Right. It's little things like that really add up and by the end of the day, you've accomplished more than you ever thought possible toes. So how do you prepare yourself? The morning for the data. Come because you've got a whole bunch of stuff to do all these goals set out for yourself all these things that you're trying to accomplish. What do you do at the beginning of the day to set yourself up? So typically I like to get up early recently. I haven't been because we've been deriving its rates all over the place. I've spent. I like to get up early when the house is quiet. How how early is early? Like, we talk. I fuck it too early. Yeah. But the host is quiet, and I can do, you know? That's what I do. All my social media stuff is between say five fifteen and six fifteen gosh you and then I gotta get up stairs. I make all the kids lunches, you all that type of stuff. My wife like I'm fortunate because I've worked from home, my wife, I say he's got a real job. She's gonna to go to the office. So I can bang out. All that stuff. Pretty much be back down to my desk by seven o'clock, six forty five seven o'clock, and then just at that point social media, stuff's done. And really I can do my research what I need to do on my search business. I can follow up with emails early on because my business all over the place. It's you know, it could be four o'clock in the morning in someplace or it could be noontime in Europe. So I do that then and then most days at lunchtime. I'll go that's when I work out. I'll either go to the gym go to cross fit or go for a run or do something. You do something for about an hour. Come back in my day starts all over again. No, do you like doing some sort of Certa interrupt? You like doing social media? You know, I sorta do. Yeah. Can't you? I do. I enjoy it. I think it's just great ways to connect with people. Yeah. But it really allows you to see what people want right as well. You know, you can gauge what your audience wants based on their reactions. Yeah. And it's from me. I just look at it all as an education. Right. What works, and what doesn't work and what's going to work the next time or trill trying to figure out what's next. I think that's sort of you know, you're probably doing it right now. But what's next in the world of social media and continue to expand our voices in the marketplace. Totally. So what's next for you? I mean, that's a great segue for two thousand nineteen like, what's what's the one thing that you really want to accomplish and twenty nineteen? You know, just to continue to build my personal brand is really what it is. And you know to take that to take my podcast listens up number one number two continue to grow. My search business by continue to build my personal brand. That's my big focus for twenty nineteen to just, you know, continue to get my voice heard. And really just you know, have the self confidence that I'm an expert in the things that I do. And like I said earlier it's having that beginner mindsets aggressive, but also you have to realize that you've got twenty years experience doing this stuff and don't be ashamed of it either. That's a hard thing for me. It's just sort of always minimized. I've always minimized everything that I've done where now it's like, all right. Have the confidence go out there and make it happen? Totally. And I think you as like how forty five forty five. Yes. See I think you have a huge advantage even over young kid. I think a lot of like younger like the younger generation, I guess so to speak like. Think that, you know, forty five older, and if they get into like, I think it's the complete opposite. I think that you bring a new perspective to it. I think that's what Gary v preaches all the time. And I think it's a super like, I think it's amazing people your age doing it because we don't want to be honest. I don't want to listen to someone who's twenty four years old tell me about no life experience or how to start a business like they haven't been through enough. Right. Like, I feel like I connect more with people who have been through more. And I think there's there is a huge power in that. And really just understanding it. And I think what's crazy is there's sort of two schools of thought, and and I'm right in the middle of the jenex generation, right? All there is I grew up. Parents always said become doctor lawyer Indian chief, whatever you are, you know, go work there for twenty years or thirty years and get your gold watch at the end. Then there's the opposite side is all right. Let's embrace technology. Let's use that lets us. You know, what's out? Out there. And what's crazy is in the financial services business? I'm interviewing guys that are, you know, forty five forty eight and they think they're washed up and done. And they're like, I don't think he's interview me. Like, are you kidding me? Like, I'm forty six and my mindsets. Still like, I'm in my twenties. Right. Every day. I wake up excited like all. Right. What can we do different today? How can we do this? But there's a very closed mindset because I think gen-x is that gap between you know, are the baby boomers in the millennials and some go the baby boomer way and some go the millennial way, and where we're probably the only generation that didn't have technology that has technology now and still were at the ages where we're able to adopt it versus our parents age. You know, but we're not afraid to pick up the phone and make cold calls because we know how to communicate over the phone or one hundred percent of that type of stuff, right? It's it's a totally different mindset versus only using tax and only using known even use Email anymore. But you know, the combination of old school will meets new school. And I think that's where you're seeing a lot of the next generation exactly what you said that forty five that forty to fifty generation being like, hey, let's let's just make it happen. And it's pretty cool. I mean, totally I mean, even use the example of Warren Buffett. I mean, he always was wealthy. So to speak in terms of always did. Well, but I think it was fifty six I not mistaken like his net worth at age. Fifty six was a greater than all the years. Previous Kim bind like it took him that long in order to get to that point of becoming a billionaire. And I think a lot of people think they're done at that age. And that that's just when he was getting started. If you look at most successful entrepreneurs, you know, like really successful. They didn't start until their forties or fifties. Totally. I think everyone thinks today that you're going to start a dot com or fintech or whatever. And all of a sudden and three years, you're going to be a billionaire and believe me, it's happened. But it's probably happens. You know, twenty people. Yeah. Everyone thinks it's going to happen to them. Yeah. It's so true. I mean work towards it. But I think oftentimes it's like don't set unrealistic expectations for yourself because I think I don't know about you can when you do sit unrealistic expectations or you think so far ahead. It's almost very difficult to get started taking action right now because you're like you're thinking of a billion, but you haven't made seventy five thousand yet. Right. Right. And that's and that's the mindset, and you know, fortunately, or, unfortunately, that's what Silicon Valley selling. Yes. Or pharma here in Boston. Right. They're all selling. That they're selling the dream is really what it is. And you know, the only way to become successful. It's still work your ass off. I don't care what it's true. What you say? Or do all these guys are working twenty four seven. It's you know, it's crazy Zuckerberg was working twenty four seven. There were living on gallons a red ball else to keep them going. But that's that's what it takes to be successful. There's you know, very few people hit the hit the lottery, right or the private equity lottery. Yeah. Totally and a lot of those people who do hit that lottery. It ends because you you go through that money quick. Like you raise say fifty million dollars for a startup company. You put it into advert like that. You don't make any money that money will go fast. It's cr-. Oh, yeah. And what are you going to do next? Right. Because a lot of people do it so young that. And then they they don't want to say they're lucky they're sort of in the right place at the right time. And then they're like, what would you next right unless you're? Brilliant. Didn't know what you're doing totally. So for you, can I mean, this is a question that I love asking. But I wondering so you could go back in time and sit down with say the twenty year old version of yourself and not change anything. But maybe offer a piece of advice or piece of guidance. I'm wondering for you with that would be just trust yourself. Right. And trust your decisions, and though waffle back and forth. I think that's key. That's just a lot. Maybe that comes with becoming older and having more self confidence or self esteem. But it's all about if your gut sorta tells you it's right, then it's right? If you've got tells you it's wrong a lot of times, it's wrong and just trusted decisions. You make. Yeah. I couldn't agree more. I think oftentimes for most people, they know, what's right? Like, you know, the decision, and I think it's offset. I think most of the time they make decisions and I've done this. You know, it's wrong. But you do it anyways. And it's off it's. It's there's nothing. I don't think there's anything worse because like you that self. That's what self sabotages. It is. And it takes you out of the knees, and it's tough. And it's like, yeah. You're better off blowing up a deal because it's the right decision because it will come back for you down the road. Yeah. Totally right. It's, you know, oh, I'm going to do it this way or do it that way and you make what you make make an extra ten grand. But I'm a firm believer of karma that tightened grants going to cost you twenty grand down the road hundred percent hundred percent now Ken for people at their who wanted to reach out connect with you. Check out your show. Where's the best place? They can go. So you can follow me on linked in. I've got a number followers there. So it's just can Lubin on Lincoln, founder of the executive athletes podcast, managing director at g partner. So you can see that there. If you want to listen to my podcast, take a look at executive athletes dot com, I post everything on the blog. So that's easiest way to find it or on anchor dot FM as well. So those are going to be the best ways to reach out to me. You can either Email me, you know, probably best emails candidate executive athletes dot com. You know, feel free to reach out to me that way. So some I will share all those links all share the link. To follow Ken on lengthened. Make sure you follow him reach out connect and also visit executive athletes dot com. What I'll do can also when the episode goes live on executive athletes all here on the podcast to slip when we can get a feel for for the show. Get to know who you are and get some more listeners. Awesome. No. And thank you very much Colin for this. This is awesome. I had you on my podcast was a blast. So anyone who's listening like share do? I'll do all that good stuff on all the grams that are out there. So it's been it's been a pleasure. Some Campbell the way we're going in the show here is I'm going to give you the floor, and you have the opportunity today to share with our audience the thought of the day. So one thing or one thought that we can all go home with today. You know, just keep on truckin. I was telling you earlier today, you know, I've had a bunch of deals blow up that I thought we're going to happen. And it's like, oh, yeah. But you know, if you just keep looking forward and keep going down the road the road goes up and the road goes down. So just be patient and always doing so love it. And as you can see from this interview everyone sick. Successes driven by passion hunger. And today's dang patient. Everyone has to overcome obstacles, everyone has a story. Start building yours today. Today, we had the chance to speak with Ken Lubin, Ken. I want to thank you again so much for taking time out of your schedule. Coming on the show here with us today. There was awesome. Thanks, calling pleasures all mine. Everyone for not subscribe to the podcast, that's subscribe button. If you liked today's episode sheriff's your comments, we'd love to hear your feedback and also share this out with a friend until next time. Call them Morgan signing off and always remember to keep on grinding.

executive Ken Lubin Ken Lubin Boston colin Morgan Seth Godin executive recruiter US Olympic Committee Gary headache Founder CR g partners managing director Ken lupin Jim Rohn advisor
The Fosbury Flop

Everything Everywhere Daily

07:08 min | 2 months ago

The Fosbury Flop

"At the nineteen, Sixty, eight Olympics in Mexico City Dick. Fosbury won the gold medal in the men's high jump. He did it by jumping Olympic record two point, two four meters or seven feet four inches. What was remarkable about his accomplishment wasn't the Heidi jumped but how he did it get interest when a gold medal revolutionized the sport of high jumping. Learn more about the innovator of the Fosbury flop on this episode of everything everywhere daily. This episode is brought to you by curiosity stream. This podcast gives you a wide array of subjects and things to learn about every day. However, sometimes, you might want to go more in depth on a subject than what you might get on a daily podcast. Curiosity Stream has over two thousand, five hundred documentaries about a wide variety of subjects, including shows like the Olympic Games Amir to society. Prices start as low as two, ninety, nine per month or one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine per year one of the cheapest streaming services online. If you'll have to learn than start your subscription by visiting everything dash everywhere dot com slash curiosity stream, or click on the link in the show notes. High jumping is a very simple sport. There's a bar and you must jump over it without knocking the bar down. And that's pretty much it. For something. So simple it's surprising that there's been so much innovation over time there have been several styles and techniques used in the high jump the scissor jump the straddle, jump the western role. In the eastern cutoff. We're all different variations of how competitors managed to leap over the bar. Most of them were like a glorified leap or hurdle over the bar. If you go and watch a youtube video showing any of the previously mentioned techniques, it probably looks very different from how you may have seen people do the high jump today. That is because the way almost every single high jumper in the world jumps today was influenced by Dick Fosbury and the technique he developed the Fosbury. Flop. Dick Fosbury began high jumping and school in Medford Oregon as a sixteen year old. He began experimenting with new techniques to compete in the high jump because he was having difficulty with the current popular technique, the straddle jump. With this jump, you would have your body face down and kick your legs over the bar sequentially. Fosbury just couldn't do it. You couldn't even meet the qualifying level of five feet or one point. Five meters at high school track meets. You went back to the scissor jump which was considered outdated. Then at one meet, he had a breakthrough you lower the shoulders and lifted his hips and managed to get a personal best of six feet. Fosbury kept doing his unique style of high jump improving the technique get to figure out everything himself as he noted in an interview quote quite honestly, there was no model nothing similar to what I was doing. They really didn't have anything to help guide me only to encourage me. His early attempts described as an airborne seizure. The name Fosbury flop came from a local newspaper that ran a photo of him with the caption fosbury flops over bar, and in corresponding the writer said, he looked like a fish flopping in about. By his senior year, get changed the technique to going over the bar backwards head first and curling his feet over the bar. He was able to do this because this was also the same time that they switched the high jump landing area to foam rubber. The foam allowed him to land on his back prior to this. Almost all high jumpers landed on their feet as there was only a pile of sand in the landing area. It looked weird but it worked as a senior. He set the school record took second at the State Tournament and later won a national tournament in Houston. After graduation, he attended Oregon State University whereas coach tried to get him to jump like everyone else. The debate on how we should jump ended his sophomore year when he crushed the school record by jumping six feet, ten inches or two point, zero, eight meters, his technique had clearly proven itself and his coach agreed to go all in. They began by filming him jumping this way. So they could. Improve technique. Other people began taking notice to. In nineteen, Sixty, eight, he made the cover of track and Field News One, the NCWA championship and won the US Olympic trials all using his crazy jumping technique. Even, though he won the Olympic trials in Los Angeles, the US Olympic Committee wasn't sure that the results at sea level would be the same as the results at altitude in Mexico City. So they had a second trial in Lake Tahoe. We're five very qualified again. During the Olympics Berry cemented his reputation for doing things differently he skipped the opening ceremony. So he could go see the pyramids outside of Mexico City and slept in a van that night. At the Olympics, he coasted to a gold medal making every single jump up until he had the gold medal clenched and then tried for a world record which he didn't get. He had to settle for the Olympic. An American records Fosbury success was unique because it didn't come from enormous strength or speed. Witness Biman's incredible performance at the nineteen sixty eight Olympics which I went over back in episode thirty one. Fosbury found success because he dared to do something different and to break the sports established norms. After he won a gold medal, the crazy technique was no longer so crazy and everyone started doing it. Just, four years later at the nineteen seventy, two Olympics in Munich twenty, eight of the forty competitors were using the Fosbury flop nineteen seventy-six marked the last time anyone wanted Olympic medal using technique other than the Fosbury flop. Every single Olympic medalist in the high jump in forty six years has followed in the footsteps of Dick Fosbury. Special about going over backwards well as it turns out files. Berry degree in engineering, and while they were analyzing his technique in college, they figured out the secret. Every other style of jumping, required, putting your whole body over the bar at the same time. In physics terms, they had to put their center of mass above the bar. With the Fosbury Flop, you could go over the bar yet keep your center of mass below the bar as your body bends around the Bar, your center of mass shifts from the back to the front. But at no time, does it have to be above the bar in terms of the physics of jumping it's all about the center of mass. Fosbury won the NC Double A. Championship again in nineteen, sixty nine but never competed in high jump after that he set up an engineering company in Idaho. In nineteen seventy seven and attempted unsuccessfully to run for Congress in two thousand, fourteen today he is the county commissioner for Blaine County in Idaho. His name however lives on every time a high jumper anywhere in the world flops over a bar backwards. Executive producer of everything everywhere daily is James. Makhala? Special. Thanks to everyone who supports the show over on patron. Please remember to leave a review over on apple podcasts. Even a simple review can really help the show get discovered in the Sea of other podcasts that are out there.

Dick Fosbury gold medal Fosbury Olympics Mexico City US Olympic Committee Mexico Heidi youtube Lake Tahoe Oregon State University US Idaho Oregon Medford Los Angeles apple Executive producer
98 - Great Health on the Nutritarian Diet with Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Switch4Good

1:07:08 hr | Last month

98 - Great Health on the Nutritarian Diet with Dr. Joel Fuhrman

"It's only two point four percent of Americans that are at a normal weight because they eat healthily, exercise? Radio. So remember so that when people say are normal person or a normal young doctor died of colon, it's not a normal young doctor. He's a conventional eating smoking or drinking or junk food eating fast food eating. He's he's not a healthy person because those aren't foods. Those are food addicted addicted people and just because they're like other Americans doesn't make them healthy. We're not designed to be living on from it. We'll hello out there everyone. We are so so pumped to welcome you to the switch for good podcast. I am Olympic silver medalist and switch for good nonprofit founder Doc- bausch. And I am Alexandra Paul a certified health coach in a long time actress years ago. My life was radically transformed when I made the switch for good away from eating animals animal based products. My athletic performance was greatly enhanced much to surprise actually by the power of plant based eating dropping all animal products from my life has finally aligned my values with my diet. And now I feel more balanced and more at peace with food and with my body. Alexandra and I started this podcast with you in mind. We are here to take you on a transformative journey to learn the power of eating plants and help you redevelop a healthy relationship with food and a more whole relationship with yourself. Each week we bring you doctors, Dietitians, psychologists, prominent athletes, and other interesting guests who have deep rich information and inspiration to share. We welcome you every week. Join US on the journey to switch for good. This is the future. Hello and welcome to the switch for good podcast Alexandra Paul and I'm here with my. Wonderful. I know soon I realized that I didn't look at look. Senator. Yes. I didn't bring my source today. My amazing wonderful co-host dot C. Bow just throw them off and say like, lame co host. Say Wonderful. Well you know what you work so hard with switch good foundation you've put out this amazing report called dairy does a body bad. But you also have this power plate for athletes which. Also, kind of sticks it in the eye of the USDA's plate, their food plate, their pyramids, whatever they're making and So tell us a little bit about this powerplant plate that switch for good has put together and his and you're giving away it's an awesome a fridge magnets magnetic not so good. So stay tuned because that's going tell you how you can get one yourself. Yes for sure. So thanks from entering the port right that just got released last Thursday and it's going to be going to all of the college and university athletic directors all of the professional sports teams, performance directors, oncologists, gastroenterologist gynecologist it has a big release plan, but we released it just. last Thursday which by the time, this airs will just you know Habil had been freeze for about a month Kinda to the tribe right to to to all of our peeps and we're going to be doing a rally coming up where people can ask the questions and and just kind of like a drip launch because there's there's There's so much in there and it's a it's really unprecedented I mean never before have this many physicians and Dietitians reviewed this much research on dairy we site three hundred and twenty two studies, but it was written in a way purposefully for just. US. Regular folks like you and me to be able to disseminate to us and we're able to read. It and truly understand what it's talking about, and then with this with the citations it is is a very high level and and you know certainly comes across to any researcher or PhD or scientists in these fields. As you know quite legitimate because of all of the studies that we go through and reference. So I read it this weekend and I know it's really readable. So fascinating about why just from the history of why we're so obsessed with dairy in this country sure how government and business have colluded to get us to in consume more dairy and it's just fascinating. So I recommend that everybody go to the switch for good website and download the report themselves even. Just reading the first five pages I promise you. Even if you've been Vegan for decades, you will learn so much about why this y our country as you know. So dairy prone, right right and the and the and all of the ill effects that it has on people not only from a chronic disease standpoint, but you know specifically with athletes. Because that's who they've been targeting. You know in these in these most recent years and you know my story in in terms of you know as an Olympic athlete leading into the Olympic Games a couple of years before the the games I I went basin and I just I found it so frustrating and so confusing as to why I couldn't find. Any information on what I might eat if I wasn't going to guzzle gallons of cow's milk at the nutritionists and Dietitians really didn't have any information they didn't know where to source it. They just were literally being fed the information from the dairy industry via because they are the title sponsor and so in this report shoe, we unfold and of the the links missing links behind those studies, how the controls are quite often, and all of the with chocolate milk studies are done on less than ten subjects. So this power play, we can just go quickly but this is basically the answer to the the frustration that I had as an athlete. The US Olympic Committee has an athlete's plate and You know it's just a bunch of dead things on it. You know it's it's Brown and white foods mostly lots of lots of lots of meat you know just dead animals and then and Then you know products from animals mostly, and there's a little tiny part where some vegetables. So our goal with with this was to help nutrition was actually a nutritionist in. Minneapolis. That asks us to make this because she said I use that USOC, plate for my animal food based clients but I need one because I'm getting more and more plant-based athletes and I need something to help guide. Them, can you make one with just plant based? Wow, of course, and so we had a couple of goals. One was obviously to really source out the rose in the Micros and the interesting part of that we're going to go in today with this incredible doctor that we have on who really pushes a neutra -Tarian, diet as an athlete recovering when I went plant based I. Quickly realized that the micronutrients were so much more important and that's the conversation I should be having with myself not where am I gonNA get my carbs, proteins and fats because they just automatically you just come in when you focused on the Micros. So we focused just for audience who doesn't macronutrients are protein carbs fat like you said, micronutrients are like vitamin D, Vitamin A., and all your antioxidants. Chemicals and all of the wonderful beautiful you know density that it is in plants and really are the key to unlock premium recovery repair as an athlete you need the the macro but the the microbes are when I started when I folks are focusing on the microbes when I started really noticing like repair just you know speeding up and I was you know kicking my teammates butts that were ten years my junior. It really is focusing on this. So the the other aspect, the plate that was important to us, is that it when you look at it, you hopefully your mouth starts watering. It's beautiful, very colorful, which is a really important to get those fighter nutrients. If you get a lot of color and variety and your diet which we've heard from guests on this show, then you know you're you're you're on your way yes. So, people are going to want this. If you do. If you go to switch for good dot org, there's pop ups almost every page download your free power plate. But if you want refrigerator magnet, which is what we're holding right here, which are pretty awesome. For you when you open the refrigerator reminds you what you should be looking for in there and if it's not there, go get it go to your farmer's market Then you know what just email me info at switch for good and I'll send you one no problem great and we'd love a review. Remember you for the podcast to yes. Awesome you while she slips. Yes. Did I do that? Yeah. Okay. So it's a trade folks if you WANNA. If you WANNA fridge magnet. I'll send it to you and then you do a quick little review for us. That's just for your Karma, dot. You'll handed out anyway but but if you really good Karma, just give us. All right. Let's is your car mckeever apparently. Let's introduce our guest today. He is extremely well known throughout the plant community plant based community but also around America because he's been on. So many shows like draws good morning America talking about how important it is to to eat a nutrient dense diet. He has also written seven New York Times bestsellers including the book eat to live eat eat for life just came out in this year in twenty twenty We're GONNA talk about this he's. Also incredibly generous with his time and knowledge so that he could because he's very very passionate about spreading the words you might have heard him speak at a local veg fest or on the many podcasts he's been on on all over the Internet the we're going to talk about his term, Neutra -Tarian, and how important it is to adopt a neutral -tarian diet and what's different about it from another other whole foods, plant based diets and also. Secret. He was a competitive figure skater with a couple of world champion medals to his name. So you can talk about him. Tutsi is also lots of world champion metals to your name to. But so Dr Joel firm in we'd like to talk to you about your past and your present. Thank you so much for being on the show. Here everybody Nice I see. So let's start off with your figure skating days because I watched a video of you and your sister. Competing in the World Championships in seventy six and you. Since you. Tell us how you got from a figure skater to Dr. You know when I was skating in late teenage years, my father was sickly and overweight and he was starting to meet health books. So what does reading them with him? I started to read a lot of the natural hygiene literature from Herbert Shelton in nineteen that he wrote nineteen fifties and sixties about the harmful effects of processed in the. So I started to change my diet actually as it was in my teenage years I watched my father lose weight get healthier too but I. started. Become passionate about that literature and when I left when I quit amateur skating who knows as you had to be an amateur or professional because he'd couldn't compete Olympics if you took any money things like that. So So I started. So when I turned pro and started teaching skating performing ice shows and I started to to my father's on Shane of shoe stores that was going to take over his shoe business in the chain of shoe stores in New York City. I realized that my real passion was nutrition and I'm in the idea of becoming a physician who specialized nutrition would be the pinnacle of a career that would really interest me the most. So I met my started dating my wife at that point and she was actually Going going to go to medical school. So so that point with that kind of extra motivation saying White Dabble in some courses. So I quit I quit my father's shoe is went back to the Postgraduate Pre Med courses Columbia, with my wife that we got married both went back to the postgraduate premed courses Columbia sway reach the college forces. At graduate from college, but it hadn't hit all the pre medical requirements. Figure Skater wasn't dumb trying to which he medical school at that point. So so then I went back and took all those courses and went to medical school with us at the age of twenty nine with a specific intent to become a physician specializing nutrition. Ed Shoe become plant-based when you were a skater what and what actually drove was an ethical or was it a purely health reason that you? gave up meat dairy. Knows purely health performance stamina I enjoyed killing animals I just WANNA. Eat Them. God. Back then I mean there wasn't any that I know of real scientific data on it improving performance, and this is fascinating because even you know my day which you know to Olympic in two thousand twelve. I kind of felt alone in in the journey those couple years before which is now like ten years ago. So how did you? Yeah, how'd you get the memo that this could be incredibly important for performance repair recovery and output? You know mostly because I also found to became I advised the US ski team in Eric. Sloppy Eric Sloppy was in four. Olympic Games. When I'm mentioning for the Games because for a downhill skier to be there for sixteen years to get older and still maintain at the top of his career, we're talking about prolongation of your leg ability by being becoming more youthful when I got is doing it back in the nineteen early nineteen seventies. It was because I noted that the major flow people's careers during his get sick they lose training they burn out and they know the words the point is, is that When you're at the top of your career is the screen being the top ten in the world being no way are being the top three is all about timing and your ability to be healthy and not get sick and keep training or retraining, and so if you're not, if you have to worry about catching a cold or being sick or losing training or or being. So in other words by eating rights and you're exploring planes and exposed to different infectious agents, and so the point is never getting sick see contracts. You can train continue to progress every single week without overtraining training but people had as their out of their training and their training and their under training. They're sick and thrown back again, and so I I felt that eating so hopefully, we would never get sick and may also have better stamina get to the top of the skating world get their the ability to perform with a lot of Stamford still be fast the end of the program fast and strong as you're getting exhausted is the whole key to being top. At the top level in the world especially, the Russians used to be incredibly strong at incredible speed and strength, and we're. Talking about you know tennis basketball, skiing skating. You know these types of boxing is type things that whereas we know that the NAS study showed that professional athletes weighing more than two hundred, fifty pounds by linebackers on football teams have the shortest life span of any profession in North America. So eating to get maximum sides at a level of size that isn't natural for our species is not something that's going to radically short your life. So we can improve our strength stamina our ability to do like perform for a body weight jump why in move fast from side to side as a tennis player, but we're not going to maximize our size to get that big to do so you have to over chronically overeat. And the I'm sorry. But I don't think that any kind of Diet Vegan or non meat-based is good to eat to get that to get unnaturally large like that. Yeah. Okay. So you basically you eric, you're eating really to boost your immunity. Sick 'cause the whole cycle that starts when you do. So how did you know that this? Did you know that this was a nutrient dense diet and how did you know that was going to boost your immunity and that and and how did you realize and not believe that you needed animal foods to be healthy? Not even just large just just healthy I mean how did you guys kick that out? Did you start? Diving into reading and. Yes. Read a lot of books and I you know at that point my life by I read most and Herbert Shelton. Natural? Hygiene. Movement. So he was he. Was An organization called the American Natural Hygiene Society the National Health Association back then that advocated mostly nap eating natural plant foods in large quantities big salad nuts, beans you know and and trying to reduce processed foods, natural products it bad. A lot of crazy things they also advocated but of course, the Diet was clear that these undiscovered fighter nutrients were absolutely essential for normal humans which are essentially evolved from primates. were similar genetically, it'll primate structure and without a good intake of green vegetables and nuts and other things like that. We couldn't maximally EXPEC maximum system where performance and the idea the concept was set into place back then. That getting sick was unnatural at developing obesity diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease strokes, cancer, and dementia were not the inevitable consequence of aging and they were not natural for species. I was learning back there even as a teenager that it's normal for an animal to live out its normal life expectancy without developing chronic disease that preventing it from performing as performing through up to its later years and evolved the neutral -tarian diets. To enable people to live to be a hundred years old, which is not a blues on a blue zone. The average person lives to be a not ninety this some centenarians but I want the average person to be a hundred. We're talking about to do much better than the blue zone can do but in doing so we enable people have their physical capacity and therefore mental capacity throughout their later life whereas person America maybe lips to. Be Eighty still has such deteriorated quality of life between seventy eighty years old that the last ten years living in suffering. So there's no super talk about moving to a hundred with the actually living to ninety eight or ninety nine having a great act of physical life and that's what I think these advancements modern attritional science make possible, and now we have we can actually look it also some of the deficiencies flaws in the Vegan Diet. And my experience over the last thirty years I'd cared for about a mentor lot of these People Physicians who were actually established the natural hygiene movement in the American Vegan Society from the early nineteen fifties and sixties who as they became elderly developed certain problems like dementia. Parkinson's due to fatty acid DHA HA deficiencies or B twelve efficiencies paw. So I could look back and see, okay what are these people missing doing the blood tests and actually with the ability to supplement conservatively in conjunction with a plant based Vegan Diet? That's very nutritional, rich and complete. We can enable people to have the best possibility to liver disease through rice and also to reverse disease if they have something wrong with him. So. You've been. You've been in reading about nutrition for a long time how you just mentioned that your philosophy you've has changed how has your food philosophy changed in terms of how we can get the optimal diet for longevity and good health and recovery. Well. Occurred to answer that question but I have no philosophy. Philosophy means that some kind of agenda you have that you're trying to promote and you trying to get the science to fit that agenda or philosophy I just go where the the overwhelming amount of evidence. In other words, I wanna just let evidence in science and clinical empirical evidence of working with thousands of people shape the direction right of the where we're going. So I have no predetermined agenda or desire to be plant based or anything. I was eight years ago I was even thinking a little bit of fish would be okay in the Diet. And the reason why am I modified that more in recent years is because of the pollution of the oceans, the dumping of so much plastic and garbage in the ocean that even the small fish like sardines and scallops in any any kind of muscles contaminate with micro plastic and you have people micro plastic in their body and I don't even recommend brown rice at this point because brown rice is contaminated with arsenic because of the way we're using chicken manure and also growing rice patties fields in prior years with used also kind of chemicals on them in rice. The call custom brown rice very effectively sucks arsenic of soils and concentrates it in the kernel of the rice. So use other grains like It a grown in better safer soils also not as arsenic attracting as brown rice, and so I'm so in other words yes. A lot of bit This is not a philosophical base or even ethically base. It's just based on what's getting people most performance in most ability to get well reversed disease. So and I have that acronym g bombs and I. MUST must've familiar with that acronym, G Bombs B. O. M. B. S. to. Illustrate and have people keep in the forefront of their mind the foods with the most powerful association with lower rates of cancer. It's just as with the foods that have the most scientific documentation that have been folks protection against cancer in promoting longevity and Greens, beans, onions, mushrooms, berries, and seeds, and we could throw a dart at any of those just to give an example. Mushrooms. Have the most powerful. Anti. angiogenesis effects and most powerful anti aroma tastes effects. In other words they block excess estrogen and black the production of fat storage hormones, and of course, they blocked a black. Sandals getting cells, replicating getting a blood supply that could cause cancer very powerful anticancer effects and a mentioning this compound called seen as an example because the cell receptors on our every cell in a body as earthy ending receptor that comes from mushrooms, our body is designed to accept certain fighter nutrients that are high and mushrooms. It's as if were designed. In advance with DNA stabilizing mechanisms that are based on much getting mushrooms as vital chemical. The same thing for with green cruciferous vegetables, the most powerful stimulator of the interrupt to transcription proteins, which prevent genetic defects being expressed like a GS P. One gene that causes breast cancer abridging with that preventing defects means breast and increasing. So repair DNA repair or the ITC's in Green cruciferous vegetables were designed to be taking these substances and without them we can't expect normalcy. So I'm saying that these substances are essential to develop a normal human immune system reaction, and in this climate of a novel infection that came into the world like Colin is a nutritional problem because it would never have the ability to damage. People are hurt people that have a excellent function immune system exposed to g bombs on a daily regular basis when we're eating the foods that body needs is designed to To to accept and utilized for. So function, we're taking the foods designed the human species. Then everybody becomes resistant to those diseases and we have multiple means of resistance BIOS still invade, replicate, evade capture mutates more dangerous forms, caught cytokine storm. All these things only can happen in people that are dangerously immunosuppressed because they've eating a standard diet without the nutrients and foods that humans actually need Newman's actually require I'm saying we require vegetables, and if you don't want green vegetables and you better live close to a hospital is going to be in there pretty soon. Can we get one super-quick rewind on the rice 'cause I'm if listeners are having the heart palpitations that I did 'cause I round rice how how about black rice red rice white rice is did they have this? Does that Husky bring in a the arsenic as as much as the brown rice husk like are there to just need to clip it on all the races? Will Way race, as you know, doesn't take in as much arsenic, but it is highly scenic junk-food shirt. No. The other is is there might be some wild rice grown wild environments for example that are raised that. Are you know hunt hunted and raised by? Indians in canoes that not down that don't have commercially race in commercially ray rice beds. But I think most of the on Rice's including wild rice or relatively high compared to other foods if they're commercially grown. and their commercially fertilized includes organically grown rice and I didn't do the studies on me rices consumer reports to the studies right after the arsenic levels. So you have to go back to consumer reports to get the data on the amount abortion can always have rice as they tested. So is it because of the chicken manure specifically or is an rice set tends to absorb this because wouldn't it be an argument that other vegetables would have the same issue? No they don't they, the vegetables don't take arsenic as much as rice does can even went as arsenic in the soil as arsenal soils but rice takes it up more avidly than other vegetables, other grains and vegetables do plus the fact that they grow rice of the old cotton fields, which used them a lot of toxic chemicals boy legal in other invading insects. To be do not put chemicals down and is still chemical residue in soils last fifty years. Cotton. We love cotton as vegans but it if it's not organic, it uses a lot of pesticides and chemicals unfortunately. can we just stop in the make one more park it at the g bombs I feel like most of our listeners and and and I have a good sense of the incredible nutrient density of everything on here except I'd love to hear more about onion. yummy timing. I eat a lot of 'em bit but it's because I like them. What is wonderful about them? They're so critical in what I'm saying right here is that I'm saying that these four foods to cooked foods would be mushrooms and beans because beans absolutely well cooked and much should be cooked and to raw foods. Onions Greens raw are the foods that have the most powerful effect to give you the healthiest micro Bayada, the bacteria in the gut. And to not only improve the microbiome to thicken the biofilm that adheres to the bill, I, Gus slowing glycemic effect of a moderate Klay scenic foods. We know that high glycemic foods like white potato, white white rice, white bread or things are dangerous. Learn not healthy especially for overweight people in the highly scenic food your scenic index or glycemic load of your diet is negative towards weight gain and cancer and things like that. What I'm saying right now. Is that when you eat a moderate sending food like? Corn Peas, oatmeal it lowers the Guy Cemig affect dramatically when you regularly green beans and onions and mushrooms because the thickening of the biofilm coach stabilize slows the transition of glucose in the bloodstream for moderate Lacina Food Saudi, make a tropical food. Low glycemic. You eat mushrooms and beans and greens the other meals. So explaining that but the point here about The point here about these foods like onions is that they contain an enzyme called Alleles. That's a L L I N. ASC Aglianese, and that's when you cut an onion. It makes your eyes burn with. So Phoenix Acid, right? Because you're forming a lot of other for generating compounds like MSN and another, and these studies onions it shows generally about a fifty five to eighty eight percent reduction. Of cancers of all type depending on the cancer type even from something like a Quarter Cup, right half a couple of today. So onions are some of the most powerful anti-cancer food. It's not just the bioflavonoids, Kirsten and fibers, and also the richly one the only rich sources of these sulphur compounds come from onions and the AGLIANESE enzyme forms these compounds when you cut her blend the onion. So if you took the onion whole, the leak of the scouting and you plopped it into your soup and cooked it first, and then you took it out with a tongue in blended the soup base, you would have not formed many of those compounds because utilize deactivated the aglianese before it had a chance to form them rather if you eat the onion or scallions law and your salad and shoe it really well, that's going to give you the most powerful anti cancer effects or if you take the league in the onion of the skeleton and blended it in the blender with a little bit of. Liquid in there. So at the blender becomes a chemical reaction which causes gas insulting gas in your standard forming all those compounds. 'cause they alginates is heat sensitive. You WanNa get deflected comments and then you can take that blender full stinky mixed and poured into the soup to cook because they heat won't destroy the beneficial compounds. It just would have inhibited their formation if you cook before you blended it or shoot it. But then when you eat your salad every day and you put the green cruciferous in there and the water, the Ruga by Baby Bok Choy or the cabbages whatever you're putting your salad. If you don't concentrate on shoeing and liquefying that in your mouth, showing up in those cells and crewing scallions true. In the onions, you're not GonNa get the philanthropy cancer benefits because most those anticancer nutrients are formed in the mouth as you're crushing the Cell Wall and Mixing the Digest, mixing the enzyme with the other substance that forms the most beneficial compounds we're talking about. The best way to use the cook food maintain the nutrients is to put it in a high powered blender. Cream into a puree and then put it into the venue could dump into coke it into the soup and that networks for also cauliflower and Broccoli and such. Those things. Yeah. If you're GONNA cook them. You're not gonna cut them small enough. You're not gonNA break open the cells of eating Broccoli and cauliflower in a mixed vegetable dish. Then we usually walk it in a dish for only cooking at three to seven minute three to six minutes we wanna Cook it like a day. So it's not wiping all those nutrients we wanna not cook until it's much. So it still has a little firmness to it. You know. So we're naturally walk the vegetable dish mixed with a Thai curry sauce or something we're not going to cope until solely will use Broccoli Lorettes Snow Pea pods water? Chestnuts. Boots and we're going to put into may collie flower dishes, but we're not gonNA overcook things to two. So we're. Trying to kill all the enzymes and don't forget though you gotTa if you had a little bit of that enzyme from the raw food, you eat say neal, it would help you convert some the cooked Broccoli into the took, make some of those it out of it. So that had also been eating some raw with every meal eat some cooked with because Roy Bennett you'd get the raw end benefit the coke foods to that happens in the digestive tract bombing. Yes I do. I do follow you because I've read quite a bit about what you've written in terms of your philosophy in terms of the neutral neutra, -Tarian Diet, and how to get the most. Out of the foods. That we eat not a philosophy. Did I say philosophy again Oh my God i apologize it's not. It's I. Know it's based in science and I we always want to have people on here talk about stuff that's based in science so. This is Alexandra and I have a question for you what devoting implant having common. The answer is forager project. Four project is getting out the vote. This family owned organic plant based. Food Company is using its packaging as a way to encourage customers to vote this November voting is so important and it makes you feel good to come like a plant based Diet does. I've actually voted in every election in my home state except for one since I turned eighteen that's a lot of elections thirty, nine I think and the reason I didn't vote that once I forgot to get my vote by mail ballot and time. So if you don't WanNa, go to the polls, make sure you get your absentee ballot. This cool. Undertaking by forger gives me just another reason to love this company. They already had me hook with their Vegan yogurts. They're nut milk, sour cream cafes and butters. And I really liked their organic gluten free cereals. So definitely try that. Forger is dedicated to making the world a better place and you can help them on this mission give forger try, and while you're at it, do your part to make this country better vote on November third. You mentioned Cova and how you felt that. People. WHO. People got covid. Tell me misspeaking here people who got sick from covert it was. The. They could have stayed healthy if they'd eaten. A healthy neutral -tarian diet. Yes that's what I'm saying. I'm saying that was seeing people get sick and we're seeing people die. And of course, it affects the most sickly and overweight people more readily hurts those people the worst their health is, and I'm saying there's no such thing as a healthy overweight person that all of the way people are unhealthy fat cells spew out ripe kinds inside Opini, Bristol reactive oxygen species, raise your estrogen levels, press, your immune system, keep you chronically inflamed the battery. He can't keep the flashlight turned donald time. If you want it to work, you have an emergency you have to keep the flashlights turned off. And on a neutral -Tarian Diet People's white blood cells dropped dirty low matter. Of fact, a lot of people see the two point five bledsoe county Newtonian Diet, and they go to the doctor you need a bone marrow biopsy because they see the normal range of white Lizzo Council between five and ten and I'm saying right now to make this clear is that that's not a normal range between five and ten. That's where most Americans lie. It's normal between like two point three and six is probably a better real normal range you know what I mean so that whole. Not, a neutral -tarian, diageo blood tests, even outside of the normal range because there's so much better than the average Americans I also saying that almost all Americans if there's no such thing as a healthy personal, American Diet because conventional authorities are saying seventy percent of Americans are overweight, which is not true. That's because they're using a twenty five BMI as demarcation between normal weight and overweight an all along that societies. Long individuals had BMI's below twenty three in an ideal be am is probably below twenty two for male below twenty one for a female when you use A. Bmi of twenty three as a demarcation line, then you get eighty nine percent of Americans are overweight not seventy percents. and. So we have a whole population of sickly overweight people and the people that eleven percent that are normal weight. The vast majority of those like eighty percent of those people are smokers, alcoholics, drug users, sick people, medical conditions, and autoimmune conditions called cancers, the Jeff Disorders. Normally, people are at a normal weight because they're sickly and living. So unhealthily, they can't because they're smoking. Only two point four percent of Americans that are at a normal weight because they eat healthily exercise radio. So remember. So when people say are normal person or a normal young doctor died of Kobe it's not a normal young doctor. He's a conventional eating smoking or drinking or junk food eating fast food eating or he's not a healthy person because those aren't foods those a food addicted addicted people and just because they're like other Americans doesn't make them healthy. We're not SUPPO- were not designed to be living on junk food and and you know. What I'm saying so I'm saying that yes, if a person was truly healthy, they would not be vulnerable to cove it. It's a nothing thing for we healthy immune system to fight off you hardly even feel you're sick. I have so many you know under the people who've been exposed with who've been healthy people the no, they even got it. You've actually said that you believe that we can beat the war on cancer completely just by dealing with our diet and everything you know that we've done is your standards are way higher Dr Furman Than, the American Medical Association etc and you. A lot of doctors won't ask a lot of their patients because they don't trust at their patients will be able to follow through. So they'll ask for less you are you're asking for. More more. So you you believe that we We could win the war on cancer. We could eliminate heart disease diabetes. Right Yes I. Define it more specifically. You know I'm not saying every cancer would never occur because. Obviously let's say eight unhealthy, the I sixty years, Uber Life, and then you switch to a healthy cancer anti cancer diet you risk of cancer goes down dramatically every year your cigarettes you can off cigarettes twenty years you risk of breast a lung cancer goes down by ninety percent but you really had never smoked for two zero. You know what I mean and and I don't think doctors should be the gatekeeper nutritional information I don't care doctors no nutrition. Because, it should be reading writing arithmetic nutritional science taught grade school because just think about how crazy this is like we want the people who go to the cardiologists to be told by the cardiologists to cut the salt out of their diet because they have heart disease will if it was good to cut the salt at the Diet was good to solve that a diet forty years before they had heart disease not now after they got heart disease so said. We don't tell a person to quit smoking after they go to their common knowledge in the lung. Oh. You better quit smoking I. You have lung cancer It has this has. So the real power to lower cancer rates has to be if the whole population adopted at all ages not just an elderly people adopted, but the point or the other point but since huge contribu-contributions of. Of what we eat in the first half of our life that's why the neutral -Tarian Diet can't be a moderate. It can't be a modern intervention. It has to be true nutritional excellence and I want people to go one hundred percent to nutritional. Excellent. So the body has the ability to reverse DNA defects and Menthylatim, becks, DNA breakages removed. So you really see dramatic effects and we have tons of examples of people that had recovered from early stage cancers even. And so. And even people who recovered from later stage cancer on what like for example, pump people who? You know I have a woman, for example Pam in my medical practice for years ago about seventeen years ago. What metastatic ovarian cancer that went went to Alumni Fluids of fluid. and. Now, this eighteen years later and she's in great host thriving know and she was only given six months to live there not many cases of people even going to chemo living that wrong after advanced metastatic ovarian cancer by Rossa people like Adam sure nutrition as a tremendous role. But I'm not saying it's going to cause a hundred percent wipe out all cancer I'm saying win the war on cancer probably reduces cancer rates by ninety percent but more than that. If we go back to the whole population, all ages eating healthily. For example, around the world from our historical records in tracking. One Fiftieth, the amount of breast cancer. Look. At data from the nineteen sixties, even we have some areas of the world that have one fifty, the amounts of breast cancer hands of America us. So those populations are filed and they moved to America, they've started adopting more more modern lifestyles and diets, styles they rate of cancer skyrocketed and This is not phenomenally genetic. It's predominantly the lifestyle diet people are eating but nevertheless. The breast cancer epidemic is not natural. We didn't see breast cancer thirty, thousand years ago we have mummified remains and we have we go back in history and we are new phenomenon in human history for this explosion of autoimmune disease in these type of autoimmune, any cancer related deaths, and it doesn't have to happen. Nutritional science gives us control of health destiny and a strong obviously advocate but people making neutra. -Tarian, which just means super healthy eating. Make It delicious making enjoyable it makes you gives you more pleasure. In life, it makes living like more fun and it's not you're not giving up tasted pleasure because I it will thinking they're thinking just shoot me right now I'd rather die than have to eleven carrot sticks in and let us the rest of my life. I'd rather die younger whatever enjoyment is what some people are thinking and that's their. That's their addictive self, the teas foods takeover, the brain, and they're completely irrational because they think that their diet takes better than our diet does the diets could kill tasting better. Addiction is you just get you can't think of changing that and you can't live without and you feel so bad if you try to stop it. But with the right information. People weren't join like just as much. The taste pleasure of food just as much great recipes without being addicted to those foods in having to have to have them. Taste ready do change in a very short period of time avocado a personal. For Him our content manager at switched for good. Her her mom is overweight has read eat to live and has found it just she just hasn't been able to stick to the regimen unfortunately, and and kind of really has not been able to follow through and me we know that it you know it's it's a multi layered approach when approaching someone who you know, she potentially probably has an addictive nature to junk food fast food unhealthy food How do you work with people who are just having such a hard time sticking? Obviously there's a psychological layer to this Yeah. What would you? What would you say to Christine? To help her. Some people need professional help. and. They need a lot of knowledge. You know I wrote the book the end of dieting to help people get over that addictive idea of food but but they have to abstain from their triggers for a long period of time. So those addictions lessons, some people can't dabble healthy eating right if they if they go into it ninety five percent, it doesn't work because when they go a little bit to those foods that suck them right back up into the reading behaviors again, they need to have some sustained supervision and we have counselors the give people supervision in. That worked for me and I also as you guys know, I have a retreat here in San Diego, where people come and stay here for a few months. I had this place developed and built because if people with food addiction, you couldn't follow a diet without some supervision and professional help, but it's not only the period of time of absence and professional help. It's also changing their attitude about life and having some training and has to go on some of these people because when you are when the more you're an addict, it makes you more self consumed in more angry were negative about life. It makes you more callous to other people think about the drug addicts or cocaine addict who can kill and steal do anything to get continue the cocaine habits. The same thing as food people, food lights they're angry about their their sooner angry people. But the point is they're looking for the approval of people. And when they're looking for the approved by the people, look at their their self esteem coming away and they're always. Being, fought and being the difficult situation can people aren't looking at them well or considering them well or thinking of thinking about them unfavourably, there's a lot of psychological baggage that goes award food addiction that we have to undo counseling and when people become mindful, they become more creative, become more grateful for the food they become more they. They're able to remote more and more care and love for other people they're able to appreciate the. Beauty of the world around them more, they become less competitive, less looking for other people's approval to get their eagles glorified and more satisfied with who they are as a person and their ability to like and care for others, and they become more kind to other people and and actually feel good about themselves, their ability to have goodwill for others and try to compete with them in best best them out. So I think that the there's some. Professional. Help that people can have to quit smoking or eat healthily people just need sometimes because their trajectory of what they developed in a is just to place them at too high of a burden and it's kept them in a prison. So to speak in the prisoners keeping them from really being the happy healthy emotionally happy person they have the right to they could have. You know I think what you're talking about in terms of really getting help with diet is is where it is. Now is where therapy was thirty years ago or twenty years ago people feel like they should do it on their own and they shouldn't ask for help and that if they do ask for help, it should just be from a book maybe but not from intense going away to your retreat for example, where people stay weeks or months seems to indulge it even though health is the most important thing that we can give to ourselves and to others really our own good health because we're better people like you said. You know when I do spend a lot of time writing and speaking about this issue. So because I know from my career less decades, a lot of people know learn about healthy eating and want to do it and they still fall back back and forth loose awake in back again, they don't stick with it healthy. So I spent the last the last two decades to figure this out and put together people to give these. That's my book. No my more recent books maybe take eat to live to a newly the end of dieting and east and. Each wife take a little higher level of. Dedication of what writing about to have people better at here to it's recognizing that some people just require have to see this other and as addiction and totally abstained from those addictive triggers for a while if they're gonNA succeeded this yeah that I think that's what exactly women a suggested Christine. For by her family, her friends ask to say we're going to remove all possibility. You're not eating these foods from your environment you the stay with this. Concrete cravings and really enjoy eating this. You've got to do it one hundred percent. We'll make sure you do that for the next six weeks I still going to have no unhealthy food around you WanNa keep you track through this perfect tastes change stop tro cravings will go down if you had a daughter who was a cocaine or heroin addict, I would white we keep our inner site and wouldn't let her out of our sight because the we just WanNa make sure you can get rid of a cocaine habit. This food is who is really serious it's killing people they can die in a short period of time addiction used to bait you know say all die ten years or Twenty years. Now, they could die a month now they get cold and they don't start eat healthy and get their weight off. Don't start to get down there. What we find is that even a person that's one hundred pounds overweight. If they start dropping weight like three pounds a week or two pounds of Kilogram A. League. Even a few leaks we see the inflammatory marker go down. We see their risk of their diabetes gets so much better. THEIR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE STARTS TO NORMALIZE THEIR IMMUNE SYSTEM MARCUS START to normalize. We see tremendous improvement in immune function when person starts to eat healthy and lose weight even before they've lost all their access weight just the fact that so I always say neutral terriers person us at an ideal weight eating a healthy diet or a person. That's overweight but moving towards an ideal diets extreme moving towards an ideal weight losing at least two pounds a week. If they're overweight not losing at least two pounds a week, they're not really on the program. And the process of continuing to lose two pounds a week is going to keep them in an immune protected state whereas they just stayed overweight, they would not be protected. Now are they. Are. They when you say they need to be losing weight. which is an indicator that they're getting healthier and eating healthier is that because you you believe that we need to eat just under our calorie burn for longevity and health, and so that's where you like to keep them or is it because the foods that are on this Newtonian Diet Whole plant based foods are lower calorie. All those things. You said either or it's both those things. We can eat I mean I. can you know you can eat? It's hard to eat more than four hundred calories with time if you're eating hot helpful occupy space in your stomach peppers and Cali flour and beans and salad vegetable soup, the fluid and. It makes you feel full it's hard to get so much. What I'm saying is that also when you beating my role vegetables and some of these foods at the cow is not all biologically accessible nuts and seeds by the way, some of those calories turn down the apostolic to make you satisfied. But all the calories that the fat passes through the toilet bowl is no absorbed beans. You Ratchet Down your appetite by two hundred calories in a cup of beads. But some of those calories mel out of more resistant starch that pass you go to the toilet bowl, they don't even come into. The bloodstream. So you're naturally caloric moderately courtly restricting by was agreeing with you eating all these high nutrient plans is makes it difficult to consume so many calories because they're so filling and because these nutrients also turned down the APP, the central nervous system, the fiber, the body forms Buta rate from the fiber and rate signals the stat hypotheticals to sell you eat less foods, the bulk chewing action all the activity it takes time it takes to absorb the speed of absorption. All these things naturally make you more comfortable eating less calories but nevertheless in the other thing you're saying is true to. that. The other thing that you said was true that as you eat excess calories, it speeds up your metabolic rates. So. If I was GONNA, eat two hundred calories over my metabolic rate a day. It's a hundred cats three, hundred, sixty, five, three, thousand, five, hundred calories a pound. So that's. An extra hundred calories a day but an extra ten pounds a year two, hundred calories a day next twenty pounds a year. No I'M NOT GONNA gain twenty pounds from the extra two hundred calories because as you take in excess calories, the body resume its metabolic rate to try to burn them off. So I only gained ten pounds the year, not twenty pounds. But you you speed up your metabolic rate, your aging faster and you speeding up the the bird, the loss of stem cells the loss of telomeres your body can raise metabolic rate by increasing its respiratory quotient and by raising its body temperature or by rubbing up the fire Reuter all biological systems that make you age faster see paying a pack with the devils when you understood your calories a little bit. I'm going go one hundred calories less than that. About needs. I'M NOT GONNA lose all that way because my body will slow down a bit get alot of the body temperature all be colder in the winter time I'll make the glimmers in my hands on girls skied and an extra maybe later on when which fired function may be able to lower in my respiratory quotient will be lower but that's the secret to the to aid to slow the aging process and you also said if you don't mind the Into that also term you said you believe. Also don't believe anything. Okay. You got call of everything. I'm trying to do the Best I. Can it at an in-depth review of all science looking at thousands of articles and seeing where the most evidence where the onerous evidence lines so people can make judgments based on a full degree of science like a lot of people in the field. We use some short-term binder controlled studies to come up with hypothesis. Advise people what to eat and I'm saying no, that's a hypothesis we've got to really feel good definitive. We're giving people good advice we have to make sure the learnt long-term epidemiologic studies therapy that have thousands of people looking at their health for decades that look at hard end points. Like death or heart attack or cancer, and see if they corroborate the short-term studies, they both are in agreement. If the all not an agreement, we can't come to any conclusion. So I'm trying to come to come to giving people advice based on whether was the most evidence and the studies agreement with each other to make the evidence behind degree of credence. Well it's cleared up. Why can stay lean because I eat at least three to five hundred more calories than I probably need every single day so It's interesting though it just want to comment on the fact that most of us want to we when we re books are there's articles about losing weight and be healthy. They're all talking about how to rev up your metabolism. But with Dr Firm and saying is that it's healthier to actually have. A slower metabolism because you you age less slowly I imagine that also goes with cancer will grow less slowly. That's right. There's no such thing as losing weight to relevant. It's the biggest scam. It's comic book information that people are trying to sell people rev up your metabolism eat more food did not get fat that's just nonsense. You know there's no, you can't. You're not gonNA get away with eating more not getting fat. You're still gonNA gain weight but the extra calories of what recipe metabolise. But you're still you're paying a price for the devil if anything if there was a magical pill that could rep metabolism see without kept putting calories in then there's plenty of those. I would talking. Only noxious or toxic substance then it's called a form of collage effects and logic effect comes from the toxic substance. If can't be can't do both can't be if I give you up till to you know to make you not hugh out making put you to sleep or to wake you up to make a urinate more urinate less. It's gotta be toxic because it has pharmacological effects. It's poisonous healthy things don't have those powerful pharmacologic effects. So what I'm saying is that exactly make this clear is we want to. Eat hopefully. So we get our nutrients that don't have to overeat to get them, and we want our metabolic rate to be a little slow. So we don't get too thin. We Wanna eat as little as possible and not get to want to have good musculature as we age good strengthened but so we don't want it but that's we want but we get healthy. We don't have to overeat getting good nutrients in. We're not have to when you're unhealthy to eat your become a coury consuming monster your. Fatigue all the time you have to keep calories coming in all the time to keep your energy up and you've forced to overeat. But because the quality of your diet is to well you eating a healthy diet, you feel great all the time and you could be touched with true hunger and you get the instinctual signals of when to eat when not to, and it becomes easy to eat the right amount of food and you more comfortable eating the right amounts of food and this becomes more instinctual eating. I let her go back to nutrient density I just have always had a pretty big appetite when I came out of my anorexia and Kinda catapulted into bulimia which was then obviously a lot of overeating The calories that I was taking in were probably mostly nutrient void and so although my stomach was filling up I never felt satiated. I've I've learned now on a very nutrient dense eating habit is still don't love to call anything diets but. When I eat more nutrient dense my brain is not telling my stomach, any more than I need more and when you eat void of nutrients, maybe your stomach starts to fill up but your brain still tells you that it's hungry because it needs to needs the nutrients and you conducted a study on hunger and the perception of hunger between eating a high nutrient diet, and then one that is less nutrient dense. What did you find? That study. Isn't it fascinating what proud of that study is used by researchers on hunger in Diet all over the world the people being that reference that studied in two, thousand, twelve I'm yes. It found that as people improve nutrient quality of their diets, they desired less calories of course. And instead of hunger being fatigue and stomach cramping and headaches it turned to become more of a now of flow and neck and upper chest sensation in here. So the perception of hunter changes and hunger was no longer as uncomfortable. It gave you a signal to eat, but you could go if somebody calls me up on the phone and say I'm coming home from work and I'm hungry when dinner they Called me up say Joel you want to play some tennis I'll say the tennis court I'll skip dinner later the it's not so uncomplicate just go go go with your place we'll do something now the point is and it goes away when you go start running start moving around anyway but so it's not so hunger in something that uncomfortable or painful it just gives you a signal it's time to eat. Hunger is not an emergency. Remember we. a lot of times that Can you talk about your pyramid just so people get a real idea you talked about g bombs but. Can you put the? Tell us what it looks like. So we could see what are the most nutrient dense foods, and which one should we get the most of in our diet and on up. Well Thank you for that and and I you mentioned earlier which one hundred per cent agreement with. Is that we have an unprecedented opportunity, human history today t the huge variety of different types of plants we can eat micro Greens. We can. You know we can eat fruit and berries in the wintertime we can get frozen wild blueberries we can get. Of, all types we have soy. And, variety is huge. So the Blues Jones had didn't have a huge variety in their diet. We can do better than a blue zone could have done. Now we can use modern science to pick the best habits of almost all the different Luzon's which all had one good thing they were doing, but there was nobody to put together all these best things from every blue zones over dietary portfolio, which is a neutral -tarian diet to try to put together all the lifespan anticancer tapped into dietary portfolio know so so absolutely that the That when we that the base of the pyramid is vegetables, we don't want to just eat one type of green vegetable. We WanNa have we don't have Kaelin strawberries and we want to have different green vegetables when both raw and cooked both cruciferous cruciferous artichokes asparagus and Broccoli and lettuces So but the fact that we can all this varieties huge and we can he colorful vegetables in arms things in squashes tip indifferent peas and Snow Pea pods and you know I'm interested in so much fault with with growing so much my own food out I. Moved to California I but when I was living in New Jersey, I had a garden I grew out of my own food I I had I made a greenhouse to and I tried to go with much as I could. I let hobby to gardening may get a thrill from eating something he grew yourself or picking it something you made yourself with good soil and so. But that's what you know. Regenerate organic. Our culture is all about and we do have a lot of farmers were very conscientious in just hopefully, the world moves in this direction when people start understanding that good food and good soil and putting planting and taking care of the earth in all this takes care of a body to allow the earth to continue to grow into prosper it's very different from the way the fast food you know killing the war world mentality driving the planet into extinction by killing animals and polluting in Clinton heating climate change in destroying the oceans destroying the earth soils just so that future generations can benefit from our planet. It's just a militant unreal on. Insane time because taking care of your own body has the same mentality and same long term projections in the idea of long-term intelligence means you do the right thing now aged down the road in the future. What do you fertilize? I'm your soil West. Wow, that's a great question I, use I have my own compost in which I put Red Winkler's worms and different types of worms in there, and of course, I don't just put coconut husks in with a little pete once but I put a lot of plant material the grass clippings leaves, but mostly I don't want us grasping some commercially areas. I'm usually using the pine needles from the truth wild forest you know putting there but the soil I purchased though has in it an earthworm casting and back one. Oh, I got in here instead of chicken manure animal manure. But I have some because they're they give the chemicals into the animals that are in the I I do have Guano in there, and I had jungle rainforest compost in there to and some prime soils and Burton soils. So I, really have some great soil. I've made to to plant my trees, the point, my vegetables in which makes makes it amazing because sometimes the rabbits elite something Britain and within like two weeks comes right back up and it's like sucrose incredibly fast crippled large amount of food. You don't eat that much space a huge amount of food. Yeah down. The elevated beds now put the wooden beds on top of cement blocks. So have the eight foot beds, bed sitting on top of cement blocks of the rabbits were up there need all the vegetables and also it keeps the soil, the high quality soil separately whatever was grown in this part of the country kind of any kind of You Know Talk Society that could be in the natural slow. Yeah. Yeah. I have a tower so they can't. Tower, we we have our condos, the worm condos no, no vegetable tower. The compost you rabbits or the raccoons they just it's it's a big base where the water stays and so they just you know it's just took plastics slippery. They can't even climb up. So you're kind of like don't even have to worry about that issue because it's A. Tough Conversation like you know through Jersey I had it brings fences. I had dig defense right down to the cement ground bath make sure no or or other animals, community vegetables and shipment woodchucks to come and destroy Oh. Yeah. Most definitely. I just WanNa just finish up on on your pyramid. So the vegetables are in the bottom and then tell tell us how you go up. And and because you add. Nuts and seeds some some folks feel nuts and seeds are not as crucial So can you tell us more about foods that you feel are so nutrient dense that are important for us to eat. Some g bombs and what cooling beans and fresh fruit and different types of vegetables. I don't think grains without essential but certain grain certainly a kmart healthy. I do think that dried soybeans that Annetta Monte are super healthy anticancer foods and should be included in the Diet and they're not as soulful in Simul more process. I want people to make an effort to include a meal soybean in there like a dry being there, and yet at the we give more credence to. long-term Epidemiologic Studies, and here's what they all show with an overwhelming amount of records. Those saying right now is that every study looked at the issue about nuts and seeds in the diet or out of the giants source of fat in Vegan populations in non vegan populations and every study with thousands of participants showed the same thing about thirty nine percent reduction of cardiovascular death and about a twenty percent reduction in all cause mortality including cancer deaths from including nuts and seeds your. Diet at least one ounce a day excluding nuts and seeds from your diet is a major risk factor of cardiac, Arrhythmia sudden cardiac death and increases the risk of cancer and you not absorbed phytochemicals in the foods you're eating. So the end in the seventh day adventist health study to which is one of the most important studies because it looked at people eating different amounts of animal products and showed more animal protein, mean more death and more plant protein made for longer. Life, that means paying some attention to protein on a plant based diet way eating etta mommy and you're eating Wa and Asparagus artichokes in beans that are high in protein and nuts that are high in protein not just having a macrobiotic diet based on rice fruitarian diet or It showed that paying attention to them. Rioting of these amino acid mix actually enhanced lifespan. But one thing that all studies showed conclusively I'm talking about literally scores of studies showing the same thing. That the exclusion of Nazis Diet increases the risk of risk of death and shortens lifespan. It's not a question even country it's not a controversy it's just you have radical components within the community but among those new nutritional scientists physicians I don't think there's any controversy, but the evidence shows that overwhelming, right? Thank you. Well, you've written over a dozen books including those seven New York Times bestseller. So folks if you want to learn more about the science that Dr Joel Firm and has put together and such great recommendations for how to live a disease free. Long Long Happy Life Than I. Really Recommend you go find his books. They can be fine found very easily because they're so popular and he has such a a strong fan base. So thank you. So Dr Ferment for being on the show, we really appreciate all the information that you've shared with us. My brother. Look for doing invested reports to you guys all you listeners. So, thank you so much for tuning in today if we helped you in any way, then click the subscribe button and let's keep hanging out together. We have so much more to share with you. And if you need more information on actually making the switch for good, please visit us at switch for good dot org for loads of Info, and you can subscribe to our mailing list with. All sorts of super bowl gifts. Discount codes to are very Fav- dairy free product and a lifetime of powerful health tips. So join us on the journey to switch for good. This is the future.

cancer breast cancer US America Alexandra Paul Herbert Shelton USDA cocaine US Olympic Committee Christine New York Times Senator researcher heart disease
Bob Beamon, Former Olympian

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

13:28 min | 2 years ago

Bob Beamon, Former Olympian

"Carello everybody you're looking live at fans Ville a college football utopia. With a rivers flow with ice cold. Dr. Pepper mission where every day is Saturday in everyone's a fan, even babies and the seasons never change because the only season is college football season get a taste of fans Ville this fall during a college football game near you Dr Pepper, the official Drake, a fans Ville grab some today. This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy chef. You're going to be joined now by a man. I've known virtually my tire life. A man who fashioned one of the greatest moments in the annals of sports fifty years ago this week in Mexico City. When he broke the world long, jump record by twenty two inches jumping twenty nine feet two and a half inches two and a quarter inches shattering. The world Mark that was just over twenty seven feet. I'm speaking of course of one thousand nine sixty eight Olympic gold medalist. Bob Beamon Bob, thank you for joining us. Great to hear from you. And this is a special week for me. I know Bob, I can't believe. I mean fifty years. I was actually I was not quite yet alive, but I feel like I was alive because I grew up with stories of of what you chief in Mexico City. My father wrote a book about you a biography of you, which he titled the perfect jump. One of my favorite of my fathers thirty three titles and you guys had a very special relationship, and I feel like to some degree anyway, I was fortunate to inherit some of that partake us back to October eighteenth nineteen sixty eight. You had been the silver medallist year before at the Pan Am games in the long jump previously known as the broad jump in. You were certainly one of the favorites for the gold medal and you're competing against eager tear Ovanisian and Ralph Boston who'd won the golden sixty in the silver and sixty four. How confident to what degree did you think you could emerge with the championship in Mexico City? Whoa, Lee Pan Am games happened in nineteen sixty seven, and I think that that was probably. The greatest experience that I can have and being in the international arena, it was getting me ready for the big Olympic that that would be in nineteen sixty eight. So I I was learning one. It would take to stay on top or be in the mix of of getting that gold medal in the Olympic Games. Of course, I took second in the in the long jump and Winnipeg, but it was a great experience for me. I I it's kinda proved to help me down the road for sixty speaking with Bob Beamon who fifty years ago this week on October eighteenth nineteen sixty eight set the world long. Jump record shattered the world. Long. Jump record jumping twenty nine feet two and a half inches twenty two inches farther than any human had ever previously jumped. And in some ways, as many people have said since then, although there was there was some great competition. The eighties in the early nineties with Carl Lewis in Mike Powell who would eventually break your record in Tokyo at the world championships in nineteen Ninety-one. Jumping twenty nine feet four and a half inches. You still have the second longest jump of all time. I mean, did you do you ever try to put that into perspective? Bob, that here we are half a century later in only Mike Powell and only once in Tokyo. Is anybody ever. Farther? Well, I think this week I'm just really visualizing they. They're jump in terms of, you know, the fifty years that it has laugh at and in addition to that it, it's it's the Olympic record Meyer Olympic record, still stands. So I have, I've lost a world record, but I'm in. I was in Mexico City yesterday and they. They have the main Dame, the Olympic training center after me. So it just made me just feel so good that that the Olympic record still stands out two years when also that Mexico City or Mexico still has offered me my feets some fifty years ago, not Beeman still the Olympic record holder in the long jump at eight point, nine meters or twenty nine feet two and a half inches, and Bob bet sixty eight Olympic track and field team. We had a discussion about it on the show few weeks ago with the author of a new book about that remarkable moment in time in that remarkable team, you could certainly make a case that was the greatest team ever assembled in track would be hard to deny that the gold medal. Are you the gold medal for Lee Evans gold medal for Tommy Smith at two hundred meters gold medal for Jim Hines, one hundred meters, dick Fosbury in the high jump Bob Seger in in the pole, vault Al order in the discus. I mean we could go on and on the four by one hundred four by four hundred. I think did Randy mats and win the shock put too. Right. That's right pop. I mean, and then of course, you know what happened with Smith and Carlos in the black power salute after the two hundred meters. You yourself had a history going into these games of of standing up. To big, it's you were suspended when you were in college for refusing to to compete in a segregated event. Can you tell us about that? What happened was it was a movement to human rights. What were you know what the boycott would have dead. However, all the athletes blackout decided to go ahead on and compete in nineteen sixty eight Olympics. They. So I I wasn't going to my past the sixty eight games because you just really never knew if you get hurt or your interest with not goes towards making it a nineteen seventy two things. So I said, let me. Take advantage of of of what is going on now. So I decided I decided I'm gonna go no matter what. So what happened was that John and Tommy Smith. Made a protest with the black glove, and they got suspended. By every bud, the head of the International Olympic Committee it. So you know, that was pretty alarming and disturbing to have that happen to to one of our teeth. They to actually see these guys go through just nothing, but k, Bob wanna. You know, one of the interesting things about your story, of course, because this is the urine, which Brundage as the head of the International Olympic Committee. And previously the head of the US Olympic Committee enforced strict codes of amateurism meaning Olympic athletes couldn't monetize their successes in the games. They couldn't have get paid by sponsors. Even though of course, everybody behind the iron curtain was innocence of professional being paid to compete in their sports. You know that uneven playing field. So you had to go pro to make money after you broke the records, he, you didn't jump va. Very much in official competitions after the record. And you never again jumped twenty nine twenty eight or even twenty seven feet in competition. If you'd be able to dedicate yourself the way that athletes now can because they could be professionals and make a lot of money while they can continue to compete in events such as the Olympics and all the track and field events in Europe. How far do you think you could have stretched your record? I probably would've stretch my my competition. Here's I've probably be trying out for twenty twenty. Now. But, but I think if we really look at and and I know that you follow us, you know, through through the data that has. Has come up was that Adidas, Puma began its major fight of who what athlete was going to wear their shoes and how much they could get out of each of the athletes that would wear issue and went to go metal. It began the fight of how of marketing really started or athletes making money. So you were in the middle of all that you were wearing both their shoes? Absolutely. I war a war primer and the preliminaries and Adidas in the finals. So I wasn't. I couldn't. I couldn't make money, but they gave me. They gave me at least twenty twenty five fares shooting. As early for looking at it today. I think the young athletes today would be laughing, so hard. And what had happened with me, but it was truly the beginning of of what they saw that athletes could endorse shoes and products of each of those company. We're speaking with Bob beam in the nineteen sixty eight Olympic gold medalist in fifty years later, still the Olympic record holder in the long jump at twenty nine feet two and a half inches. That's eight point, nine meters on the metric scale. But before we let you go, it's just an honor to be speaking to you, particularly this week on the anniversary of one of the great feats ever in sports. When you think back about that moment in time in my father was always fascinated about about this moment. Always fascinated him in one of the things that interested him was your personal story, which is so rich and I, I. Would I would ask our listeners to go look into it more more than we have time for right now, but you you, you found this perfect moment and you were just a kid at the time. You were twenty two years old. This perfect moment. No one could have even imagined you jumping this far or anyone jumping this far, you kind of destroyed the event for a while. What is it like to achieve a certain kind of perfection at twenty two and and have that. At the center of your life for so long, very happy about it. You know, they've also included in the dictionary a turn. That they use called beaming with. So you know, every every moment with chick Yuli right now, I'm just really thankful that that people remember me fifty years ago. It's certainly been a a wonderful journey Bob Beamon. It's always a pleasure to speak to you, sir. Congratulations on all the celebrations of the anniversary of that spectacular feed in Mexico City. Fifty years ago this week still the Olympic record holder still to second longest long jump ever in competition official long jump ever in competition. Bob, Hope we get a chance to see you soon and speak to you again soon. Thank you for coming on the sporting life. It's my, it's my project. I'm Jeremy shop and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday. Morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Mexico City Bob Beamon Bob gold medal International Olympic Committe Bob Beamon ESPN official US Olympic Committee Tommy Smith Mike Powell Olympics football Tokyo Olympic Bob Seger Jeremy chef Pan Am Adidas Bob wan
S5E2: A Team of Their Own

The Thread with OZY

22:23 min | 1 year ago

S5E2: A Team of Their Own

"The threat is proud to be sponsored by IBM the world needs a technology company that applies smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise, not just for some, but for all, let's expect more from technology. Let's put smart to work. Visit IBM dot com slash smart. To learn more. The world on this next. It was the sports bra seen round the world right after this. She missed a short company lost that game. Who can forget, when brandy Chastain ripped off her jersey and waved it around her head and celebration after hitting the game winning goal in the nineteen ninety nine women's World Cup final against China. Male soccer players take off their shirts to celebrate goals all the time. But chess Danes exuberance became the talk of the nation. Some founded inappropriate others had more elaborate theories, I was amused at the time by the people saying, oh, Nike set that up as, like no, I don't think China would have agreed to that. And if Nike really set that up, I'm sure, brandy Chastain 's sports bra would have had a big white Swoosh on it. Eventually the controversy died down, and Chastain sports bra became synonymous with women's soccer, a symbol of triumph. But back in nineteen eighty-five almost fifteen years before Chastain ninety nine women's team won the World Cup the very first US women's national team. Well, they hadn't even bigger issue with their wardrobe. Let us play. Let us play. Welcome to the threat a podcast for we unravel the stories behind them, the most important lives and events in history. To learn more about the surprising connections between them. I'm Sean Brazzaville this season's threads started with the ninety nine hours, the US national team whose triumph in the nineteen ninety nine World Cup watched women's soccer into the stratosphere. I don't know if anything tops that moment in nine hundred ninety nine still Caitlyn Murray is a journalist and author of the national team. The inside story of the women who changed soccer for the players who were around who were kids at the time they all talk about remembering the nineteen ninety nine World Cup. They remember that changing the idea of soccer, and what they wanted to do when they grew up, but the Niners victory would not have been possible without another group of women, a team who also wore the team USA uniforms, even if they were a bit bag. He. There wasn't a whole lot of need for US women's national soccer team in the mid nineteen eighties. There was no women's World Cup and the sport was not in the Olympics. Yeah. There had been paper teams of the national team from nineteen eighty two to nineteen Eighty-four. These teams where the best players in the country were picked in third names were on a sheet of paper. And that was they didn't actually play any games all that changed in nineteen eighty-five that the national sports festival, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana and event of the US Olympic Committee. The sports festival is America's centerpiece of Amateur Athletic, and this summer. It comes in Louisiana, women's soccer was featured in this event for the first time and it was sort of a mini Olympics that they had on non-olympic years, where athletes from around the country would compete against each other. Organizers announced list of players for the women's national team after the tournament concluded for the players whose names were read on that list at took them by surprise. They didn't know anything about it after the, the sport. Festival happened, they pulled this together. And they basically said, you're not only a paper team, but we're also going to go to Italy in two weeks and we're going to go play in this Mundi Alito, which then was, you know a mini World Cup stays at Eunice was a member of that nineteen eighty-five national team. It definitely took us all by surprise, the immediacy of it had a chance to go home for a few days after the festival, and then we flew to New York. And we stayed out in Long Island and we trained for a week or so. And then we all hopped on a plane flew over to Italy, the hastily-assembled national team, had a shoestring budget. They were giving uniforms, commonly called kits but they were not women's soccer uniforms, journalists Caitlyn Murray. They didn't have names or any information that would make it seem like they were designed for the players who are about swear them, and the women who got these kids. They really didn't. Look like they were designed for the team at all. And they didn't fit very well. It was apparent they were men's kids, because they did not fit them at all. They were huge. They came around their ankles. So the night before the team wants Italy, they were up late with their trainers. They had, you know, threads needles and they were cutting and sewing their outfits to make sure they actually fit them. Properly, the players made at work Stacy knows again. I don't know if we look the part, like, I don't know, if people recognize that we were soccer club, but felt proud to step on it with your D mates and get on the plane and share with people that you are the US women's national team. The team arrived in Milan, Italy, then took a five hour. Bus ride to a small resort town near Venice or the soccer tournament was to take place. Emily Pickering harder was also a member of that first national team who is a beautiful beach town. The pasta was awesome. The food was great a mean. The whole thing was incredible. We're on a beach resort. It was vacation. Bruce Springsteen had just come out with his big album, born in the USA and everybody in Italy loved it. So when we walk out on the field, they usually play this song born in the USA, which we would kind of look at each other out on the field and just start laughing. It was the first time that women had represented the US in an official international soccer match and they were playing against other national teams. Like Italy England and Denmark with much more experience, Stacy knows it was definitely I opening just brilliant. High level soccer we had to fight for every moment, and every opportunity in a match and it was definitely harder than anyone could have every his abate of the Americans also dealt with more than the tough competition on the field. Just getting to the field was challenged before their match against England. Emily Pickering harder. Our bus scout lost. We were traveling. Driving in the bus for an hour and we barely got there in time for game time. I think we were flat going into it and boom, they scored boom, they scored boom, they scored the team lost to England and would go onto lose three games and draw one. The tournament journalists Caitlyn Murray. The US looked like they were playing in their first ever games. And that's how the results went the US did not look prepared for facing fatigue that they met at those turnament in Italy. But the US team did win over many of the local Italian fans who attended Stacy knows. We always thought they were booing us because they were going. In. So eventually, when we stopped to look at the fans and they want your autograph than they were cheering you, they were all saying USA for USA going to Italy was a formative experience for the young team. I felt like we had a strong presence and we made ourselves known and we learned a lot. It was invaluable. Then we, we kind of knew the landscape, we knew our competition. And we knew we had to do. For the moment. There was no prospect of going to a World Cup or to the Olympics. It was just the beginning of journey, this group of pioneers was just learning how to play together and overcome adversity. It was the start of a teen culture. That would endure countless challenges in the upcoming years and eventually conquer the world. If there was no glamour in US women's soccer in the nineteen eighties. There was also certainly no money again Caitlyn Murray, the players on the early national teams were not doing it to be famous or get rich or beyond TV because those things were even possibilities yet the players were getting ten dollars per diem when they played in the US they got fifteen dollars when they traveled abroad and the first national teams received little attention from either the public or the press, you know, we look at where the team today, the endorsement deals they get facilities that they make. That was not even I think a remote possibility in the players minds at the time it was purely for the love of the game purely to represent the country. The lack of compensation and resources only further motivated the players. Tim Nash is the author of it's not the glory that has covered the women's national team for decades. What really helped? The team develop and become what they are is the attitude that well we're not getting any money. So how do we go out and win? So they would do whatever they could get very creative. Take, for instance, midfielder, Michelle Akers one of the team's best players. She sometimes workout on Racquetball courts. She didn't need anybody to ask the ball to or shoot at when she had four walls around her. So she just going there and bash them off the wall and work on striking the ball work on receiving the ball, all at once the players were largely responsible for maintaining their own fitness during the long, periods of time in which there were no gains Stacey Innis. I had already graduated. So I needed to jump in any scrimmage game or any pickup game. I could find us the weight room a lot and just reading on my own. So it was a lot of just self discipline, basically the discipline extended into all parts of their lives. Including what jobs the players could take Caitlyn Murray and you have a player like Karen Jenin's. She was the best player on the team at the time. She also was working in a marketing job, and she had Sakib quitting her job. So she could keep playing soccer because she would go to her employer and say, hey, can I have a couple of weeks off to go to camp with the national team in train? And of course, employer was like, no, you can't just keep leaving your job to go play soccer. So she would quit the job that she had compete with the national team and then have to get a new job. And she did that multiple times. So the point where it was a running joke within the team like, oh, Karen, quote, another job today, and there were certainly no career to be had and playing soccer. So wasn't like you're paying dividends towards something. That's gonna materialize Lauren Greg was the assistant coach of the ninety-niners that we heard from an episode one she was also a player on the early. Women's national teams there wasn't no promise of anything more than what was right in front of the which was very little from the outside. But for those of us in it, it was everything Greg slept on the floor of someone else's apartment. So she didn't have to pay rent. It was very difficult to have, you know, fulltime job and train at the level you needed to, and then be able to up and leave for a couple of weeks at a time and people weren't, so forgiving as they are now because it's so popular now back, then it was like we were doing all this in this early on the team, only played about five to eight games a year when they traveled for turnament trip expenses were paid, but it was not exactly luxury travel that players teas today about wine to have, you know, like jet service. You know, not fly commercial, we're like, are you kidding me? Like back, then it was like from Rothe thirty back was mocking and twenty nine above was nonsmoking. And so obviously the entire plane was, you know, a smoking. Lane or you know so we just literally be like covering ourselves in blankets the team wrote on low flying propeller planes in China. They played on dirt fields in Sardinia, Tim Nash. We wrote on coal train through bog area faces were just black with Cole. The restroom was a hole in the floor at one hotel, they stayed in Haiti. They got one hour each day of running water and electricity. So they would be jumping in and out of shower trying to get. And once you couldn't do that is bathed in the pool, and I said it was pretty nasty by the time they left, but in such environments, the teen really had time to get to know one another. They did not complain about how they were treated they just worked harder again. Lauren, Greg, we never felt deprived and felt very lucky to have the opportunity and we grew tremendously from that in that foundation of training when no one's watching became sort of the foundation for the success. I think of the team over the next decade. The drive and the resilience of this group of women would shape a national team that has won gold medals in four Olympics and three World Cup championships in nineteen Ninety-one nineteen ninety nine and twenty fifteen. Here's how three national team players express what those early days meant to them back. And to me is some of the happiest days of my life still to this day cry at the national anthem because I was the best of the best of the best, you know, it was it's a cool feeling. There's also just a great sense of pride that knowing that we were one of the foundations in one of the building blocks. We're the start of the history of the women's national team. I'm proud to be on the eighty five it opened doors and yeah, I carry it. I carry it with a full heart. It was no accident that the nineteen eighty-five team players. Got the chance to be pioneers, women's soccer. They were part of a generation of women that played on the frontlines of history. Thanks to a controversial new law. That's up next. Ozzie Festus back. Join Ozzy in New York central park, July twentieth and twenty first or some, the biggest names in boldest thinkers from John legend and Trevor Noah to Stacey Abrams and Malcolm. Glad will will help make this year's Ozzy fest, the most memorable yet, go to Ozzy fest dot com. That's osy. Y. F E S, T dot com to get your tickets. Things really started to change for women's sports, nineteen seventy-two. That's when title nine a law banning sex discrimination in federally funded. Education programs was passed by congress and signed into law by president Richard Nixon Nixon signed the Bill in June. Twenty third nineteen seventy-two it did not get a lot of attention six days earlier. Something even more momentous happened in the news. We have a mystery story, Washington five people have been arrested and charged with breaking into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee and the night. But Democratic National Committee is located on the Watergate office building for the next two years. President Nixon, and the American public were distracted by the Watergate scandal, title, nine was slowly remaking the sports landscape. The law meant that young women everywhere. At least in theory had access to competitive sports sports programs for girls exploded in the decades that followed in nineteen seventy four for example, there are only about one hundred thousand girls across the country that were registered with the US youth soccer association. Now that number is in the millions. The women of those first national soccer teams were among the earliest beneficiaries of title, nine Karen, Blumenthal's, a journalist, and author of let me play the story of title nine the law that changed the future of girls in America, the women athletes of the nineteen seventies where sometimes called title nine babies. For girls born in the nineteen seventies, the opportunities were vastly different than for girls born before that, there were sports teams from an early age. And so there were soccer leagues and soccer teams I three year old girl just like there were for three zero boys. There were gymnastics opportunities for younger kids. There were volleyball teams elementary school, national team player, Emily Pickering harder, again as a girl growing up in the seventies sixties and seventies, I was involved in all kinds of sports and wanted to play the mall. And as soon as I was allowed to play little league baseball due to title. Nine I played little league baseball and so- title nine was big. And you for me I, I knew about it at a very early age. But it was still hard to be a female athlete in my high school. We did not have girls soccer three of us decided to try out for the boys team. Well they put an ops. Stickle in our way that we were required to Ron do sit ups do push ups and things like that. So if is it to say none of us being prepared for pass the test, so we didn't get to play on the boys team? Stacy knows has similar experience sophomore year of high school. We finally got a girl soccer team, there is a point where my family had considered moving, or I was maybe going to live with an aunt, and uncle just in order to play high school soccer even with title nine affect that took many colleges even longer to get with the program. Soccer analysts, Jen Cooper, we all know title, nine passed in nineteen seventy two but it's not like a light switch was flipped on. And Secondly, everybody's playing collegiate sports, you know, took a while for conferences to get organized schools to organized facilities, recruiting all that stuff. It's like slowly taking hold if US colleges wanted to offer scholarships to male athletes. They had to offer them to women now as well. Susan whereas historian and author of game set match Billie Jean King, and the revolution in women's sports. And then as more and more women are getting these athletic scholarships. It increases the talent pool. It increases the depth and skill of the teams that they're being recruited on. And then you really see that playing out over the next couple of decades. So you begin to see how these scholarships are so important in the training of our. Future heroes. And those heroes include the women who played on the first national soccer teams Caitlyn Murray, the national team was kind of built on title nine because so many of those players who won on to have long important careers with the national team were identified in college as college players. So you have to think if there's no title nine if none of these women are competing in college who is going to be on the national team. Some of these women found themselves repeatedly ground zero for changing sports world. Stacy Enos I consider myself a pioneer by all standards. I mean, I've definitely have done on a lot of I, you know, I've been on my first high school team, the colleges for NC double A team. And then also had the opportunity to be on the first US women's national team. The women on that first national team were true pioneers. But there was another earlier team that really. We moved things forward, one in an entirely different sport. A group of women who are not just pioneers. They were revolutionaries. They were members of the Yale women's crew team. They get on an unheeded bus. They drive thirty minutes to the who satanic. They compete, and they train in the wind and the rain in the snow. And then they had to wait on an unheeded bus while every last yield member of the men's rowing team would shower. I mean, we're at Yale University, we are incredibly bright, women. And if we were to say it's okay for us to be treated this way. What kind of message would that be for us to send out into the universe? And so the women decided to make a statement we needed to speak our truth. And, and we wanted our voice to be heard, and I can imagine that in other athletic departments athletic directors all of a sudden said, oh, my God. Did you hear what those those women at Yale did? And maybe they started to think could that happen here in the next episode of the thread, the story of the Yale nineteen a group of women who pave the way for the women's national soccer teams, and who's bold act of defiance since shockwaves through college campuses across the nation and changed what it meant to be a female athlete in America. Play. The threat is produced by Robert Koulas, Shannon Williamson and me, Sean Braswell, Evan Roberts, engineered our show. This episode features the song lettuce, play written and performed by teacup gin. You can hear more of their songs at teacup, Jin dot com to learn more about the thread, visit Ozzy dot com slash the threat. All one word and make sure to subscribe to the threat on apple podcasts. Follow us on iheartradio or listen wherever you get your podcast.

soccer US Caitlyn Murray Italy Stacy Enos Olympics Emily Pickering America Karen Jenin brandy Chastain IBM Nike China New York Democratic National Committee Lauren Greg Tim Nash Long Island US Olympic Committee
USA Shooting Partners with Hillsdale College: Gun Talk Radio | 10.13.19 C

Gun Talk

43:54 min | 1 year ago

USA Shooting Partners with Hillsdale College: Gun Talk Radio | 10.13.19 C

"With maximum features and versatility find out more at CRIMSON TRACE DOT com. Welcome good Tom Gresham's where there's crimson trace now offers a line of tactical oriented products including open and close reflex sights battle sites and a robust line of rifles scopes purpose built has a great chance as Vincent Vincent Hancock and others who are in this mix right now right exactly Midi and basically it's our role really prepare athletes for world and Olympic competition so you are the United States world that a lot of people don't even know exist yes that's correct actually we have as we speak we have two of our teams arm of the Olympic style shooting the Olympics as a as far as getting the athletes ready you know getting them out so things are shaping up real well for the Olympic Games in Tokyo we have twenty quotas spots security at this moment and now we're going through Bob Gambardella he is the CEO of USA shooting. Bob Thank you for joining us good afternoon how are you I am great and in our world are para team is at the World Championships in Sydney Australia and received three more quotas for the Paralympic Games the governing body of International Olympic Sport and where one of the forty nine MGB's as they call it under the purview of the United States Olympic and Paralympic obviously one of the big stories coming up is Kim Rhody he's already won six medals at six different Olympic Games. What are the chances that she goes shooting Olympics come to mind of course but there's a whole lot more than that and join me right now to talk about that and so much more is by for in there is an I've called it before this Byzantine system of getting slots for the Olympics and our athletes have to go out and shoot in these World Cup matches around kind of the selection by name of our athletes for Tokyo so yeah it's sort of quite a process and then it takes a long time to get through all these selection are shotgun actually at the final World Cup final and we did rather well we have Kim coming home with three medals gold silver and bronze judge it does so I have to win the slots quota slots and then you the selection of the individual shooters the athletes who are going to be going okay well you can never count came out and you know you put her in this situation and she'll find a way to win so we're very confident you know if you want to join us if there's a gun you wanna tell me about that you bought are something that you've been taking out to the range or maybe the stories about him biting somebody to go shooting with you we do about this is being involved in Olympic sport all my life I've been involved would USA VOLLEYBALL USA Taekwondo I worked at the US Olympic Committee of those as well again eight six six talk gun in Israel Pleasure to talk you know there are a lot of different aspects to shooting and of course like minded organizations such as Hillsdale we were up there about two weeks ago we brought a thirteen of our contingent both athletes and staff and all right I just saw I don't know if you even want to talk about this but you saw this release it's very interesting? USA Shooting in Hillsdale College doing this new partnership what is that class well cup or whatever chase me wow in fact I love that it's shooting program at a university because to me got the self defense side of it we have the second side of it we've got that cool guns and gear stuff but why does it get I don't think doesn't get as much attention as it should is international really had a great time in terms of being able to get out on the range shoot with their their leadership their trustees and their donors and our team I guess first of all let's do this when somebody says really USA shooting what is that how do you explain it to them while we're basically a national which included Kim and Vinnie Hancock and others and we just had a great time I really mending together so we think it's as I say I think it's a marriage-made-in-heaven to to get the donations that they're looking for we see ourselves as being they're using and and you know hand in hand with them and I've I've seen a whole bunch of different things but I'm telling you this is something that is very exciting for us to create a partnership with a with a existence there they are they are moving very aggressively when we got to that range where they're currently at it was just incredible to see the the the different the infrastructure they have already put out in their current range and then what are the proposed in improvements so we think as a kind of a partner with them college H- for those who don't know has already has a shooting program to have of course I've not been there you've been there as described to me as world-class shooting facility already mm as we move down next couple years we think that we could bring World Cup competitions to hill especially I think in I foremost shotgun and they have a grand plan in terms of pistol and rifle centers also so I think within time as they continue wins and how do we didn't give those kids those young aspiring athletes you know more opportunities through junior Olympics you know so and so forth one of the things that worked I'm a bad thing has to do with guns goes bang or maybe even twain certainly if it goes clang you like shooting steel eight six six talk guns Olympics how would a youngster in could be even like preteen but certainly young teams start on that path well you know first and foremost their facilities in partnering with them just a great it's just a great infrastructure altogether and it has everything that we would need to be able to run a world of opportunities for kids nationwide excellent all right let's fast forward to the Tokyo Olympics obviously the Olympics get great television coverage the specialty sport shops in town and we work very closely with them and they have just a good group of of instructors I'm S- throughout an athlete's development and so in part we see working with Hillsdale a great mechanism to create a seamless pipeline warden warms my heart that whole thing so that is terrific. ESPN question here if you have a young shooter how to shoot a pistol was amazing you know these things we live for but anyway I think as I mentioned I think it's junior clubs and then how we then start to make connection young kids that they can get into the into the pipeline and little funny story I'll answer your question really quick but we had the NSF here in June and hundred thousand people coming through our doors visitors each year and so we're trying to now take that and tell a story and this is where ourselves and Hillsdale create that backdrop that's really going to be appealing to get it get it more TV time and Bob In the Group at the ISF have been looking at lots of changes AH FOR US here at the USA Shooting Center here in Colorado Springs we have a very robust junior club that is run by Chris Crab who's one of the very young shooter or even parents who said you know my son and my daughter really likes shooting and I wonder if there's a pathway I mean very idea of going to the in the US the coverage of the shooting sports which is actually people have no idea it is a very large part it's one of the major events we're cognizant of not only in shooting but I think in Olympic sport is we got to create you know was we say the pipeline is the lifeline so we have to have really robust program the track and field and and what happened in some at some point they cut off into other sports it's an amazing spectacle and I think that I know there are leadership in SF in addition to our youth program that we have here we believe it or not Tom We have of course we're on the Olympic training center rounds we have over the one of gentlemen bought Mitchell who used to be the CEO at USA shooting many years ago working towards that end trying to how we can as we continue to look towards the and obviously I know you know this but with television convert coverage comes awareness in with awareness you get more youngsters and we were under one tent several other countries and all of our three disciplines of shotgun rifle pistol with together as one team to me that was more one example down there we have about one hundred and five acres of land that we lease from Fort Carson Great Facility we had junior Olympics this summer the Second Amendment and I think we really have a lot of great stories that we can tell the hundred thousand people that come through our doors a year offers along with the Olympic pistol shooters it was a total clash of cultures but boy everybody had a good time they sure did it's great family and I you know I I use shotgun about a hundred and eighty people from the industry and they brought him over for Olympic experience in this great to see this little young kids teaching these guys are in the industry when the US military's elite units and law enforcement agencies across the globe demanded innovation and reliability Abra keep us posted on the developments of what's going on because it's an important story I love what we have some great shooters we have some great athletes and successes what happened for Tokyo but I think that there's a lot of good plans in the in the works for you know Paris and of course La In twenty twenty eight which is really Kinda the hallmark for us they didn't settle they chose six-hour when world champion professional shooters demanded precision accuracy they didn't settle they chose six hour so it's no surprise more and more civilian gun owners are refusing to settle for anything less they're choosing sigsauer firearms ammunition electro optics suppressors look you know in terms more of a twenty first century model so I know that working on that and we're looking forward to see what what would come up it may not entering the pipeline so once again go back to feeding this pipeline yes Yay it's it is it is incredible and I think that you know like take for instance just can't win that stuff well visit gun talk dot com slash win to enter the legal everywhere giveaway presented God i Tim Knee Triggers One Grand Prize winner receives more than seventy three hundred dollars in prizes including two handguns triggers holster Colt Crossbreed Holsters to Santa's proper timmy triggers and Walter Inter now through November first at gun talk dot com packages tactical gear optics and more the best part residents of all fifty states can enter prizes from accion optics slash win that's gun talk dot com slash win six years the US sportsman's we had some talk about what is the story that we can tell not only about the sport but you know precision safety you know so on and so forth but also then to Lyons has been fighting to protect hunting fishing and trapping for sportsmen from coast to coast today we are under constant attack from extremist animal rights groups who want to end your ability to hunt the in the in this country where all ready to go and Hillsdale is there with shoulder to shoulder terrific thank you so much appreciate Jerry in the Olympics but you wouldn't know that from the coverage here yeah I think and and that goes for some other sports also but you always see the swimming we always see the something like but it's it's incredible we take we take we took that to the that same concept of when we're at the Panama Panamerican Games in Lima Peru whether it's a local competition a day at the range or even the hon of a lifetime setting the standard in aftermarket triggers tim knee is now producing more than one hundred the US join us to protect our sporting heritage and our way of life outdoors to join or for more information on how you can help go to US sportsman dot org seventy models of triggers for Bolt Action Rifles shotguns a are rivals end semiautomatic rifles proudly made in the USA since nineteen forty seven six find your new trigger at Tim knee triggers dot com the US sportsman dot for more than seventy years. Timmy triggers has been enhancing the shooter's experience there's one of which is you know uniforms you know in terms like rifle shoot is we all have kind of each country has the same color and it's really a little bit more professionalized Bob Hi this is Ryan Gresh with gun talk have you ever heard about a gun giveaway but thought I live in a state where I guns and Training Sig Sauer never settle L. for herself and that's why she has issued more than fifteen thousand conceal carry permits in her county she says in Her County Portent winning the twenty medals that we one in Lima it was fantastic so we have a lot of great things going on yeah just Fab- is Bob thank you so much for sharing this uh I don't have a deputy sheriff to signed every senior Olympic junior Olympic Nationals everybody came together as one family it was heartwarming to see that you know we all share citizen in the county to protect them so it is a personal responsibility I love Fresno County Sheriff Mark Why you signed up and find out more you bet at USA shooting Dot Org all right now we are open lines what have you been shooting off state okay so that that was really the regulation so it went long story short it went before the second circuit and then Ah for more information people can just go to USA shooting Dot Org it's obviously yeah located in Colorado Springs I remember several years ago I was there when we put together the action pistol three and a half years jail okay well basically so basically it was limited to only people leaving New York City to go out and George what else do we need to know about this thanks for taking my call it's really difficult for people outside of New York City to understand personal protection is good 'cause I love it all right let's go to George he's from shooters in New York with some news New York state and New York City changed their law in the case of New York state in regulation in the case of New York City is pretty simple I don't think they'll treatment of basically the chief beliefs who said well we don't know what these people are GonNa do if they leave New York City with their handguns you won't let us know and come on back Okay Tom we will and grand this has been great to be able to spend some time with you but we're here we can do whatever we can do for the gun commutes Britt saying she doesn't have sheriff protect everybody so it's up to each person each person's personal responsibility to protect himself home and every single location then they they you shouldn't be allowed to to do that so back in two thousand and L. Change it but the problem was when the second circuit upheld New York city's rule they did so basically only own the written St the other so we must control them you took the words right out of my mouth you've got to remember half paranoid these people are I it's the all we don't know who these people are so we're going to clamp heavy restrictions upon them because we don't trust him in other words they are not us they are ars I know we're the only state that has that kind of situation so a New York City because of its size was able to change their laws come back on tell you about the twenty calories and why I like them and also one of the shortcomings that some kind of running into those eight six six talk but George I appreciate you keeping us up today with that this this case has the potential for being massively huge is that that's redundant Chile has the potential for reaching out further than just guns I guess it's kind of thing that isn't it it's a big deal this is the case it's going before the Supreme Court oral arguments to be heard on December two the thing is as I'm starting to read more about this it you can go to Scotus blog think dot com and other places this act wants us to this New York lawsuit case that I've been talking about is making its way back just go to the Supreme Court they're going to hear oral arguments on December two happened was people were carrying concealed and ignoring the restrictions when they got caught they couldn't get arrested they could just throw their license so near you just a little history back in two thousand and two that used to issue concealed carry permits to people in New York City and but with restrictions Oh that our regulations won't stand up to a court challenge therefore we're going to stop the prosecution of this man who he said well we're going to crack down so we're going to eliminate the concealed carry for everybody except rich people famous people people on them and the justification of that was we wanna go to arrange and because it was a premise permit you weren't allowed to so in two thousand and two say we'll give you apprentice permit but you can go to arrange within New York City so they tell people okay you can't go out of New York City well they couldn't go out actually we know that this will never withstand scrutiny in court and so we can't let this lawsuit go or in this case disband the ATF mindset about every other day it occurs to me the other days not so much highlighted regulations can understand it federal regulations they're not laws they were passed by Congress they're just regulations made by New York City they don't know exactly what you're doing with your guns and especially with your hand guns and where you are every single day every single mom we can't actually keep pursuing it because it looks like they're actually mounting a good defense and it could shutdown this regulation I am of the manufacturing guns and they said but we don't actually want the precedent because we basically we know that the law is bad and Kratz but they have the potential to send you to prison for decades a regulation that nobody voted on in this case. ATF said the precedent fact there was a case I think ATF just dropped a case against a guy and CNN actually reported on it it was really interesting states and cities do they restrict rights and then when it gets challenged goes right up to the edge and they want to change the law they back out Oh yeah no no no nothing to see here avoiding did or people who raps to the Pistol License Department of which like three or four thousand guys went to jail for that I say and that was well documented they went to jail the stuff that goes on here number one near estate has premise permit generally allows you to have a gun in your home you can't take it to the ranger any place like this New York City into New York state because it was a premise permit and as soon as you cross the city London you no longer had a a handgun license so you get to spend L. A. it's it's amazing thing that's been going on there those of us and you're right those of us who don't live there don't quite have a handle on and it's hard to imagine the corruption in what's going on talk about the shooting there's reloading and hunting and self defense you'd like to join us it's of course it's free here to pay six six talk gun forgot I was going to tell you about it's Kinda weird kind of weird sometimes I don't know where I'm going with this I eight six six talk one or two but maybe a dozen or more hugely oppressive gun control laws that are going to go through there with Nary a speed bump on everything we know what's going on here it is just that close and there's a ton of money you have to be right now being and I was actually enrichment during the march there during lobby day which we were able to forestall at least temporarily da here at my local range and Last Saturday I shot my first two gun match which was just a blast I mean I had such a good time and bartered with political commercials Oh yeah they're all over the place and you know the interestingly though an awfully have this November close in this upcoming election and if the DEMOC I'm starting to say this but look if the Democrats get control you're going to have not I was with us out of Northern Virginia One I'm glad you called because I wanted to talk about that situation in Virginia anyway so you have the floor Sir hey calm again to do all the things because this is as you say it's right now you have a slim majority Republicans if that flips we know the government will reality Click Click still it oh he is Cacolo basically said Virginia will be completely unrecognizable state if the Democrats take control so we'd better get out there and vote on November fifth and really make our voices heard because it's I mean we have a slim majority in both chambers I think one or two seat majority but very slim Republicans we'll be no stopping it Virginia and if you're in Virginia yet to vote if you have friends in Virginia you don't live there you need to call them or contact them you need to go face tax free talk she said come back later I said I'm listening to Tom Gresham's gun talk right down the perfume before she opened the door to my office looking Mike a Million Bucks I'm a native New Yorker I moved to Virginia back in twenty seventeen and I'll tell you it's been such a breath of fresh air I've been able to you know I've I've been participating in ID on their Virginia is on the verge is going to sound weird to people the Virginia on the verge of becoming New York or California and it is that in good group and they really are a model that other states state gun rights groups auto take a look at yeah thanks Tom I know Arizona the second second amendment rally coming up right around the corner in DC which I plan on definitely I already told my wife don't count on me for that Saturday 'cause I'll be in DC but it all right back with you eight six six talk gun people are calling in right now bad analogy but it's like listening to a reformed smoker because you can say I have been where it's horrible and you need to and by the way congratulations smart move on becoming a member of the Virginia Virginia Citizens Defense League be CDL that is such an effective. I we gotta get out there I know that's national but I think it's still you know it it it still might have an effect on the local politics in Virginia have to imagine so pillow the the new legislature takes but you know we we're in a fight of our lives and there was an article in The Washington Post on October tenth that at this is really about Liberty Matt it's it's about freedom you know you have when I listen to you it's a maybe aw I don't know I want to say something here I you're not overstating it in fact I don't think it's possible to overstate what's you know born and raised in New York I was a Democrat once I was deep into union representation and all this you know the big bad greedy corporations and Arizona well yeah this is a national fight man and if you believe in liberty to me this is more about liberty than it is about I mean that's obviously about firearms but it really does the you know the Constitution doesn't apply up there so it's like I it's it's though you have moved to a free part of the country isn't it I came in I know you're you know I try to look at it like I compete against myself but I can't afford from the bottom and I'm fine with that 'cause I'm just all too happy to be able to do this because New York Stan I got out but if you're not in there you don't understand how it is I mean that's kind of what I'm hearing your voice one well Tommy not wrong I was raised it has a sister league out there it's called the AC Dino Arizona Citizens Defense League and I subscribe to them also I actually pay for a membership even though I don't it it really does feel that way but I'll tell you we are we are in the fight of our lives here in Virginia so I'm a member of the E. CDL make any sense well congratulations WanNa thank you for letting me talk about Virginia yes Virginia is huge and if you are a when I realized is that this is America man it's the land of milk and honey you can get out there no one is tying you to a desk or to a poll you know the things the right way swore citizenship that's a different topic but you know and I realized I said Hey you do whatever you want in this country and then it's like the lightbulb went off and it it was just refreshing to me to be able to read you know to think for myself and two but being from New York folks are kind of indoctrinated to think that world is at your fingertips here and my parents came here in the sixties because they want their from South America but they wanted a better life they came legally didn't hop offense to get here shooter gun owner Hunter I'm I you know it used to be I would say vote for the person who is good on gun rights now you have to vote for the Republican I wish it were it that way but that's what it is because if the Democrats get control there it will become Virginia Birthplace of presidents we've come a California or New York style state eight six six talk gun way you kinda depend on on the state for things but I don't know yeah you're you're told if that's gone away and if you don't think about it critically that's what you and perhaps more than any other organization ducks unlimited is working to ensure that our confidence wetlands not only survive dried kills ammunition the power of performance your firearm and enjoy the industry's only guaranteed forever satisfaction policy to stay up to date with the latest and best deals from Braunau's techs B. R. N. Our wetlands this is Jeff with black hills ammunition shooters looking for ultimate performance in Toronto blackout. CBS named one of the best products of two thousand nineteen visit Brownell Dot Com for guns ammo reloading equipment or anything new need to customize two five five six two to three perhaps more than any other landscaping wetlands embody the light giving abundance of nature has to offer Brownell Dot com is your home for all things firearms looking for retro rifle how about the one eighty or troll rifles it also provides superior performance on white tails and monster hogs this round is a great all around terminal performer okay so yesterday morning I wake up at seventy degrees I'm going to I'm out there hunting yeah sure that's fine with the whole everybody knows and then you stop and think you actually look at it rationally and kind of start to challenge it and you a style Ruger number one I love twenty five caliber cartridges not allowed to recoil they really work well particularly with control expansion people in uniform they're not gonNA people they weren't raised like you and I were and I think when they see a firearm sometimes it may be about the Fort Worth shooting one thing comes to mind after living in Dallas for almost twenty five years younger police officers younger generations well beyond this time is out to band together but time is now to rescue there you go andy is in Arkansas line three Andy thank you for your patience glad that you waited and now you're on Guntalk outstanding thank you in thinking uses twenty five caliber cartridges in long range competition the bullet companies haven't really created high be seen him Yeah Burger has one bullets I just wish this the only negative right now it's not a big deal I wished we had higher BC bullets but because no one I'm I'm not sure about the performance of Burger Bullets on game just Kinda thought but I do love the quarter Boerse so you know I think you're probably on to something here that makes a lot of sets it's kind of like a lot for a lot of people if all they ever stop younger people they they are just they don't have dirt under their fingernails they weren't raised like we were and I can tell you that especially in a great cause of concern for them and so as concealed carry person that I am and I know you I think we need to be mindful of that when we're stopping traffic and in Fort Worth where this officer outside this woman's home shoots her through the window and kills her in her own home after yelling did re yard rain and farther ahead my yesterday I had the two fifty-seven Robert's day before I had the two fifty seven wetherby actually about God's is what they read in the newspapers here on the nightly news guns equal crime may come away with that idea and if you don't have any background you go through the academy which because the weather be the number one B is just heavier I didn't want to carry it up now those mounds got heavy and I like the little the one twenty two magnum you know I've had a twenty two room fires and I wanted a little bit more punch I the yards I'm shooting steal two inch targets with told your call screener boring regularity let me ask you a question why did you go with the the here's the other part imagine this she's inside he's outside yelling don't move hands up what do you think she actually heard if any we'll be pleased with a hundred and ten grain slowed this round performance wealth through tough barriers such as car doors and windshields making it a great choice for police. I think you're onto something here line for Dave is in Kansas Dave range report what's shooting comedy just picked up a Ruger precision thing inside her house probably if anything it was that was it without identifying himself as Andy Thank You Dallas from living there for a long time what you're saying is they don't really have any experience or a frame of reference of John's being used in a legal capacity so for them gun equals thread

United States Olympics Bob Gambardella Tokyo Kim Rhody Vincent Vincent Hancock USA US Olympic Committee Tom Gresham Brownell Dot Com International Olympic Sport ESPN CEO Virginia Hillsdale College ATF Taekwondo Sydney
Remarkable Journey / Conversation with Ginny Gilder

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

27:03 min | 2 years ago

Remarkable Journey / Conversation with Ginny Gilder

"Entrepreneurs business owners professionals who seek excellence bringing the business classroom to you. It's the business builders show. Here's Marty wolf. Wiz. Welcome to the business builders show with Marty wolf and a special welcome to my guest host Jay Kelley O e along with Kellyanne our executive producer DC Taylor. We will be your guys on this learning journey Jay Kelley, holy. And I want to enthusiastically share stories and information to inspire leaders, and we are all leaders at some point. So you can then inspire others. You can find out more about Jay Kelley holy at and Jay Kelley, holy dot CO. That's Jay Kelley, holy dot CO. And you can find Kelly on Twitter linked on Instagram and Facebook the business builders show is distributed by C, suite radio. You can find the business builders show and many other fine shows on C suite radio. That's at WWW dot c dash sweet radio dot com. Various podcast is a part of the C suite radio network for more top business podcast. It's visit c desk sweet radio dot com. Okay, kelly. Let's get going. Thanks marty. This is Kelly hallway guest host of the business builders show. And I am absolutely thrilled today to have as our guest, my friend, Ginny Gilder, hey, Jenny. Hey, kelly. Thanks for inviting me. It's so good to talk to you again. All right for people who don't know you. You're in Olympia n-, you're the owner or part owner of of sports team the Seattle storm, you're an author a Yale graduate. Did you ever imagine? You'd have the career path. You've had. Okay. So the answer that question is so simple. No. Thinking when you went off to Yale. What did you think you were going to be doing with your life? Well, remember when I started in college. I hadn't even learned how to row yet. I hadn't even become an athlete. So when I was thinking what I was thinking when I started college was how am I going to survive for years at an Ivy league institution with all these people who are much smarter than I am. And then life too stunned folded of a love it. I love it. Okay. So let's go back to Yale and cassette. Making the varsity rowing team is is so pivotal in your story, and you outline it and your course correction. Okay. Let's let's for people who are listening. All right. You're five seven. You've got asthma. Not exactly the assets for rowing tame Honey t-, overcome the odds. You know, I think I was a little too ignorant to realize how high the odds were when I was a freshman. My asthma wasn't really problematic by the time. I got into my sophomore year. I really started getting sick a lot. And I my approach was oh, I'll just ignore it. But luckily, there was a very skilled nurse who worked with all the athletes who said to me, you're either going to deal with this or you're not going to be rowing. So she made me grow up, and she helped an enormous amount. And got me on a medical protocol that really lasted through my entire career. But I think I'm just really really good at ignorance the world's impo when it's not what I wanna hear. I love that. Because you had a coach sort of looked at you and said, yeah. Five seven this is not happening. You're not you're not like team material. Exactly. And I just felt so hard for rowing. I loved it so much. It was so different from meeting. I've ever done. I was in transpired. And I just wanted to keep going, and I think that's a really important part of life that people might not really think about especially when you're younger is how important it is to do what you love, and I'm not saying to ignore reality. I mean at some point reality would have won over if I hadn't made an Olympic team. Right. But you really should listen to yourself because doing something that is boring or feels tedious life can be long enough that that can really suck. It gets completely completely dragged down. I want to go back. 'cause I mean, I'm thinking of some of the interviews. I've heard you talk about that. It's kind of nice that younger women younger women athletes in particularly today. Get to take things for granted. And God bless, you know, the men have been able to do that for years. But for those who don't know the story, can you talk about the Yale rowing team and the legendary naked protest. So this was I started rowing in one thousand nine hundred ninety five title nine had been passed a few years earlier. Most of the Ivy league schools had gone co Ed in the late sixties and hadn't really thought about athletics for the women students that they were admitting when I started rowing the elements crew had just really been made a varsity sport, I think a year and a half earlier. So we would practice at the boat house, which was lovely the. The problem was it was twelve miles away from campus. And there were no locker room facilities for the women. So that meant the men would get we'd all get off water at the same time late in the afternoon. And the men would go shower and the women would go sit on the bus, wet and cold. We would then drive back the twelve miles which took about twenty five minutes. There was only one dining hall open. So we all had to go directly to dinner. So the women were sitting in wet clothes for three hours after practice. And we had a couple of women who are training for the nine hundred seventy six Olympic team who are on our squad who realize this was not going to fly when we all got back on the water in early February of seventy six it was an Olympic year is the first time women were going to be allowed to row in the Olympics. Thanks to the Canadians who brought in. And Chris ours to as our captain, basically cooked up this. Let's say alert to the athletic department, which was aware of the lack of Cicilline as but she an an Warner who was the other woman training for the Olympics decided that we were going to do a protest. A naked protest in front of the head of women's athletics. Woman named Johnny Barnette to really emphasize the problem. So she wrote a manifesto and nine hundred nine women of the women's of the crew got together. One morning. I it was early March wrote title nine on our backs in Yale blue ink covered ourselves up with our very fancy team issue sweats cotton sweats of the era and marched it's women's office. And well there was a stringer from the New York Times photographer from the daily news. Joanie Barnette was extremely surprised and the story went out the first page of the second section in the New York Times the next day AP wire it went about as viral as you could in the pre internet days and the university was shamed. And ended up building addition to the boat house. Adulterated victory. Oh, it's like it still makes me so emotional. But you still think you made the comment about the internet. We all these years later, we still sometimes have to shame people to get them to make make an effect these changes. But I thank you and your team for doing that. Because like you've said other women now can take these, you know, obviously, the facilities at the boat house or the equivalent when they're athletes they can take it for granted. But it has heck wasn't the wasn't the case back in nineteen seventy six you've made to Olympic teams amazing, but focusing on nineteen Eighty-four moment talk about coming back from disappointment. Because you really did think your Olympic career was over because of the US not participating in that Olympic Games. So the first thing I should say is that I thought my Olympic career was over before. Began because I didn't make a nine thousand nine hundred eighty Olympic team. I mean, I it's not like I had ever been on a national team. I started China for national teams in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven nine hundred seventy seven nine hundred seventy eight nine hundred seventy nine I got cut every year. So it wasn't like I was a shoo-in for the games. So the first issue was was I going to keep training for something that wasn't going to happen. And again, I was just so driven. I was so determined when the US Olympic Committee announced that they were going to name Olympic teams for every sport. I was well that was enough for me. I was going to keep training, and I was lucky because several of my national champion teammates from my team. We're also training is one of five women which huge number who is training at. Yeah. So that really helped. And then once I made the team and hit the boycott kind of the true impact, the the truth is that for me in one thousand nine hundred eighty. Making the team was such an accomplishment. I wasn't it's not that I didn't want to compete. But that was I can't say it was a lifelong dream because I had started rowing bright five years earlier, but it was that impossible dream, and it meant so much to make the team once I incorporated that kind of into my state of being if you will in my new reality, I started to become a lot more aware of kind of the political implications of wanting to do something that the country was fundamentally against and it was quite uncomfortable. Because we had all worked so hard for this, and we really were sacrificial lambs. We had no choice over this. People had worked years to make the Olympic team. Man, I was lucky because I got to try out again. But there were many athletes nine thousand nine hundred was their one and only shot so I felt a little bit like a traitor for wanting to go and being a little being unhappy that we weren't getting to go. And I also felt that I loved being an American, and if this was the sacrifice I was going to have to make I wasn't ever going to go to war. I would have to buck up and do it and recognize that was this was part of part of the deal. Yeah. Wow. Wow. So nineteen four you you continued to train you made the team. But there was some disappointment. When that one, what's what's the, what's what's the, you know, we talk about people pursuing their passion and doing something that they're really have their heart their soul in. But what's the downside of doing that? You know? The downside. I guess is the lows are low. And you don't really know the problem with committing is you end up, really, caring. So it's not like, oh, I stubbed my toe. It'll it'll stop hurting in five minutes. If you don't accomplish whatever it is you have in your sights, and it's big and you've worked at it for a long time. It can feel pretty devastating when it doesn't happen. You know for me though. I'm kind of like, I am a no guts, no glory kind of person. Even today. A lot much further down my road. I would much rather. Go bigger. Go home. Laughing PS. I've I've seen the interview a cycling around what does it one hundred ten mile crazy cycle race? I'm like, of course, you're you know, all in on this stuff. So I think really you have to decide what kind of life you want, and you have to decide what kind of risk you're willing to take a lot of different kinds of risks. There's intellectual risk. There's physical risk. There's emotional risk. There's financial risk. And I think every person if they really kind of want to have some say in directing their future has to have an honest conversation with themselves about what they're appetite is. And as it turned out, I have a pretty big appetite actually not for financial risk but for motion and intellectual risk and to a certain extent relationship risk because I'm willing to team up with people to try to make big things happen. I love doing that. And to do the work to make relationships work. Learn a lot in that rowing shell don't you? In terms of you know, everything you're talking about my guest today. Our guest today on the business builders show is Ginny Gilder Ginny. Where can people find you? Well, usually in Seattle you can come to Seattle storm game. There's a good plug get your seasons. Tickets. Get us yell say you're on the business builders show find Jiting right now. We're just to championship for the third and second time since I've been one of the owners of the team. But yeah, I have Ginny Gilder dot com. You can always check out the storm website. I tend to run under the radar Kelly. I get to talk to you, which I love, but I'm not out there doing a lot in the public. I tend to do much much more in my own backyard. I raise a lot of Helen Seattle. There's no question. You gotta meet Ginny. You've got to get to get a Seattle store and game. Are you going to get on a bike? And you gotta be Seattle. I I love every every part of that. Let's just before we jump into talking about the Seattle storm because I really do want to talk about that. I just want to kind of go of keep our footing in almost a Yale and Olympics. How's your athletic experienced influenced you as a business leader? So everything good about me. I blame on sports, but I will tell you that it took decades for some of the lessons to to actually land. It's not like I finished got my Olympic medal and trumped into the into the executive office and knew exactly how to act in the world. I really didn't it took a while to figure things out. But first of all people give up way too soon. That's probably one of the biggest is don't ever give up like don't give up. That's it doesn't mean necessarily that. If you're trying to open the door that you won't end up going through the window, and your path might change some, and you might realize that one goal is not exactly realistic. But inevitably something else becomes possible. Because of your persistence because of your dedication to an idea or some dream. That's one of the big ones the other one for me, which it really started to learn it in college and through rowing, but it really happened. It took so long is the importance of relationship and the importance and I'm not talking most intimate. Although, of course, that's important. I'm talking about whatever endeavor. You set your sights on accomplishing whether it's in sports, whether it's in business, whether it's an art. Is being able to work with whoever is going to support you in accomplishing that goal and figuring out how to deal with the tough stuff because it's easy to get along with anybody when life is good. It's when the shit hits the fan that you need to be able to talk directly to someone interest spectral way figure out how to get things back on track. And for me, that's invaluable. I said probably the two biggest things that's phenomenal thing though. Is that like say, no one ever goes it alone. Think about your own career. You know, even if you said, well, I was rowing by myself in a single scull. You still had a nurse at some point who helped you with your health and the coach and all that other kind of stuff and people tend to forget that at times mardi you're being really quiet. They're in the background as usual. I know. I know you're madly taking notes, but I am as a matter of fact, this this is a magical discussion. In a former basketball player nowhere near the level. We're talking about but the whole idea of the Seattle storm in how you got there. You're a rower what does that have to do with basketball? Well, it's a sport. Okay. I got it. Okay. Good answer. You know? Gives the back story. It was two thousand seven I had started an investment business too. Which is a very male dominated field. I was traveling all over the country. I wasn't home a lot. And I was noticing that. I didn't have a lot of women in my life, and I really felt disconnected from my community. So that was going what was going on with me in my own head. The Seattle Sonics were Anna storm were sold by a local Seattle light to a guy clay Bennett in Oklahoma who planned to move the team, and I had a friend who I had been on the board of a school with who was an avid basketball fan, and I did go to storm games is a season ticket holder and I saw her a game. And I said are you planning on trying to do anything to keep the storm here? And she said, she, you know, she was she was thinking about it. And I told her then if you if you need any help, let me now and she called a couple of weeks later, and so that was my kind of back story there. But what I say about owning a sports team is it's the intersection always a store WNBA team sports business and the move for social Justice. So I live on that corner. I love that corner. And it was owning the storm was. Was going. I felt would provide me with an opportunity to connect. With more women Mike to cone or women. It's obviously a franchise focused on women gave me a chance to work in the business world, which I find fascinating. And then gave me a chance to continue that push for equity which started when I was a freshman at Yale. Yeah. Was this aging that third piece in terms of social Justice talk more about that? You know, I'm really all about access to opportunities. So the WNBA let's is I think it's maybe twenty two years old. Maybe it's starting it's twenty third season this coming year, and that is a blink of an eye in terms of major league sports franchises. It's the one. It is probably the most successful sports Franch sports league for women in the United States. And it is just still you look at the salary gap. You look at the interest. You look at how the media portrays and how much time the media spends on showing women's sports, and you see the inequity. This is a long road. So I want to do my part. I if you know growing is never going to be a professional sport for many reasons and probably all of them good. But women's basketball is actually an interesting sport to watch. And really tell me why women should not have the same opportunities to pursue things. They love and for pay. Tell me why. They can be big silence. I'm not going to be able to come up with an answer to that one. I'll I'll just take a shot, and it's just a general just call it. Our general culture exactly I asked a change in and you're leading it you're one of the leaders in. So I have a question of follow up on that is so how in addition to the relationships you just described with the with the basketball team. How else are you sharing the lessons that you've learned with other women or business people? What else are you doing how how else are you involved insuring the lessons you've learned? Well, I would say a couple of ways first of all just we are looking at all the ways we can expand. Our storm business expanded annex on our brand and extended, and we think a lot about how can we provide support for women who seek leadership opportunities? So we're thinking about is there a business opportune. Entity there. Second of all I personally I feel like the universe kicked my butt so hard for so many years. It took me into my mid fifties. And it's true. I'm sixty okay. I'm old. Really took me until like the last five years when I finally felt like, oh, I understand all the lessons. The universe was trying to get learn. So now, I'm working on. How do I put those lessons together in a way that is not just palatable, but interesting to people say age twenty five to forty so that maybe they can sidestep some of the mistakes I made in getting to the lessons, and I'm working with my daughter on this actually his twenty-six we've created a little seminar series. That's helping me put together. My thoughts for my next book. Br. I'm gonna say braver sold on I already venturing down that even the thoughts of the next book. I mean, I personally I can't wait for that one. Because I love that whole idea of you know, how can you show people? Hey, here's here's my moment. At at. I'm fifty three so fifty three sixty whatever age, and you know hair here, ladies, here's Harry, you can fast track some of the. The setbacks or the mindset or the other crap that might be holding us back, and I would say Kelly really what the big push at the book is is engage in self reflection. It's so tempting to let the external world and your pursuit of certain goals, take you over but developing your own awareness of the world and your awareness of your biases. And how you see what's going on? How you valuate problems in relationships is probably the most important thing, you can do to really gain some freedom to choose your, life course. So we're talking about your future book. But let's focus on what's already out there. Let's make sure that everybody knows that what's available now. Because you said before we came on live that it's a great story that connects to what we're talking about today. What is the give me the title of the book again? It's course correction of is that correct? That's right. Oh, gosh. What is the subtitle? Is author. Let's just stick. With course. Correct. Correct. It's in the show notes that bold linked to that. Really? Of course correction is a memoir that it's a coming of age story that starts with my quest to really starts with my fallen in love with Ryan the first time I saw rowing shell and takes me to age forty. And basically intertwines my athletic pursuits with my own search for like who am I? And what what how am I going to be in the world? So it's a lot about family and love as well. I won't do any spoilers here. But it goes pretty deep into what it's like to learn to row not from a real technical place. I'd like to think that it's a more literary book than a than a step-by-step book. But if you're for people who are interested in the history of women's rowing or sports, if they're interested in one person's very personal story of what it took to become an Olympian. They're just interested in human interest stories, right? Those are all reasons to read it, and as you pointed out earlier people give up too soon, and your I mean, your persistence or flat-out stubbornness. To not let those kind of hurdles, and I think that, you know, for people that were like, you know, what what is what is their inner strength. What is it that is going to keep them going when you're sitting on a bus freezing cold, and you know, have a twelve mile ride. You know, what are you going to do because you love it so much and your book is extorting extraordinary in all of that. Ginny. I am indebted as always for your insight, and it is always such a pleasure to chat with you. Promise. You'll come back and share with us this next book in project will even get your daughter on with you and have a wonderful thanksgiving. Thank you as well. Thank you so much for this opportunity, always loved connecting with you Kelly. Thanks, Jay Kelley ho for being our guest host on the business builders show. You can learn more about Kelly at Jay Kelley, holy dot CO. That's Jake Kelly. Holy H, E Y. Dot c. And of course, you can learn more about me Marty wolf in the business builders show at mardi Wolfram business solutions dot com. That's mardi wolf business solutions dot com. Remember if you can get all our shows and many other great shows at C dash sweet radio dot com. Bringing the business classroom to you. It's the business builders show with Martin wolf as a loyal fan of the C suite radio show. We've got an unbelievable offer for you listeners to the business builders show. Get fifty percent off a cease wheat network membership. The C suite network will help you become the most strategic person in the room, you'll have access to top notch benefits in networking all helping you get the most out of your position. Take advantage of this limited time offer today. Learn more about the sweet network membership at C dash sweet network dot com slash CSSR. Again. That's fifty percent off a C suite network membership at C dash sweet network dot com slash CSR.

Jake Kelly Seattle Jay Kelley Yale Yale Marty wolf Ginny Gilder Ginny Ginny Gilder basketball Ivy league rowing United States US Olympic Committee New York Times Olympics Olympic team asthma Jay Kelley O Johnny Barnette Jay Kelley ho
Friday Four

Outside the Lines

24:44 min | 2 years ago

Friday Four

"If you're a smoker, you know, switching isn't easy. You've tried vapes. Andy six they just didn't deliver the satisfaction. You expected jewel is different. It's not an e cigarette. It's vapor product that actually satisfies plus Jewess simple to use. And there's no cigarette. Ash, no lingering odor as a smoker, you expect a certain nicotine experience right jewel delivers give jewelry. Try check. O J U L dot com slash sports. Switch and be satisfied. Yes. You can do both. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. Awesome. Fine. Officially entered the NFL's concussion protocol beyond. Dell's scheduled me of free-agent next off season. How can we get these women a bigger chunk of that? And get them. Paid USA gymnastics continued to flounder the new leadership struggled to change the culture, you know? Kerry. He's like a leaf we need more people than there has to be a complete overhaul of the higher organization. It's friday. So hopefully, you know, what you're about to get yourself into the Friday four on outside the lines on Kagan does Bryant has been clear eyed about what he wants to get into the winner as they've been all year are the saints Levy on Bella supposedly about to get back into it with the Steelers, we got the NCI authorized to dig into college basketball corruption in the US Olympic Committee. Finally, saying aside gymnastics needs to step back. We got Clinton Yates he's here rock in his Vance. And he's tired of the hollow Molder of men rhetoric. Don van Natta junior rock and the Jordan fours brings us a canine story from his home state of Florida and Jeremy shop rocking the latest new balanced drop off Twitter, but he's still bringing us a story from the grant that's not really let's go right to our big story. Two different strategies for NFL players trying to harness their power one star receivers seems to have played his cards perfectly while confusion swirls around one of the game's best running backs. Does Bryan Bryan Bryan Dez Bryant back in the league? Over to our forty getting to work with them. This is the greatest situation that Dez Bryant has ever been in is Korea Levy on Bill back in Pittsburgh at an LA fitness club. You tweet upside down this whole situation has been up side down. He must be by Tuesday, four pm Oreos ineligible to play for the remainder of the teason if he shows up now, none of this makes any damn sense. That's right, right. One gafa. Let's stick to this. This question of what's going on this sense wake with Levy on bell? Because even the four of us in talking beforehand. There's a lot of confusion over what he's done here. Whether it's going to help him whether it's Steelers have won this faceoff. Don, you're plugged into the NFL. What do you think it happened here? Well, let's put it this way right now. The Steelers have won they're holding all the cards. This Levy on bell gamble that. He has made really looks like a foolish one. He's already lost almost eight million dollars in salary. He's looking at possibly lose his entire. Contract value and the Steelers can hit him with the transition tag in the off season, and he'll be paid less money than he was was going to be paid this year, and there's all sorts of confusion about the agent now looking at the fine print of the collective bargaining agreement. A kid cramming fern exam, you're doing that. Now. Let's let's just the facts as we know them right now when it comes to letting bell if he does not report by Tuesday he cannot play in the NFL season. Let's get that easy one out of the way. And then it gets confusing. The Steelers can franchise tag him at QB level money, which is twenty five million people think we're not gonna do right or they can as you mentioned the transition tag Ambika dock him year of service on that transition tax. So he would make even much less money than he would have made playing on that franchise tag this year. More much more to be eliminated. Hopefully, going forward the question here is there any way wins. This the only way he wins this if he goes to for agency and somebody falls in love with him, which is not necessarily going to be the case, they'll give me this notion that there's some conspiracy. Cheetah drive down his market value by the media. He's not playing football. And for the Steelers the guys who are replacing him are as good as he is James is leading the conference in rushing yards. You can't tell me that debt doesn't play in to what happens with on bell here. So this is my issue with this from the beginning, not playing football is what drives down your market value. Forget about all this other stuff. So if goes to another team, they're just going to say, you already turned down thirty three million dollar guaranteed deal. And you're not even playing it. Look at these guys. Why would I want you? If I know that I can get somebody else perhaps for a better deal. If it turns out at this stage of the game that his representation really didn't know what the options were here for the Steelers after all that we been through this long national running back nightmare pets, not so painful that a dereliction of duty. It bet does not constitute some kind of malpractice. I mean, what would I mean? Let's let's give his representations benefit of the data. Say that bell has been the driving force behind this all the time. Then you just gotta say at this point like what were you thinking? And by the way, it's out the first time we've asked that question about what he's been thinking in this situation. Yeah. Because at this point now, you have to ask yourself how they could have won this at the forefront of it because in football as Clinton mention driving down your value is not playing on top of that you if you're not a quarterback, you could just gotta get really lucky about what happens the Steelers maybe being at this point in the year. And there's an injury to a running back or he's not performing in any specific way that they're desperate for so many things had to happen for even for Bill to win this in the first place and bell was talking about remember in the off season. He was saying well if I'm not gonna go out and play. This is good for me. I've got too much mileage on me. Okay. If I take a few weeks off, this is part of the strategy. So to get to Jeremy's point, what was his representation thinking at the eleventh hour to be looking up the fine print of the collective bargaining agreement and say, okay, what are options. This should have been done months. Ago and to be fair. I'm not saying that levian on bills argument, theoretically was not one that made sense. He felt it as part of that offense that was larger than most people on offense for running back share. He deserved more fun more power to you. It just didn't work. And that's what's fortunate in this scenario. It's not to say he doesn't deserve. It is that he was coming from a compromise position to begin with that got exploited by the Steelers always goes back to what we talked about deserve. What Gene Hackman says unforgiving, you know, when he's lying there on the floor. Clint Eastwood's about to shoot him. And he says I don't deserve to die. Like, this Eastwood says deserves got nothing to do with it didn't know that we would bring in. Let her say. Nobody. Exactly. Let's leave it there. Right. Our other big story of the week the FBI approving the NCAA looking into college basketball eruption. We had Jay Bilas the Commissioner of all things college about on outside the lines. This week asked him the question. What impact is this actually having among college coaches? I think it has ruffled their feathers. I think everybody has been on edge. Because this this entire industry has gone from this multibillion dollar business where the only concern was NCWA infractions, and how that impacted you whether you would get a show cause or be suspended something like that too. Now, they're criminal penalties that could eventually be attached to such things. So it's easy to see that. We've never really had changed much change in the NCAA. So we won't ever have change. Maybe the getting into this will change anything. What does this mean here much for me? I mean, I don't see anybody shaking in their boots in terms of what this over oversight committee, or whatever you wanna call it against the is going to do to meet the biggest deal that happened on any of this was the kid who got that internship for new balance where the shoe company step, and they'll say will give you money to do something, whatever it may be not go to college in my opinion, needs to happen is issue companies. In fact, to be more involved not less involved when it comes to the development of players because with the NCAA has. Been doing for years is shame in terms of the concept of amateurism. So what this is I think it's topical in a very certain way nominal in another way. But overall, I don't think this really advances the story that much the paradigm shifting, you know. And I mean, the one thing I'll say though, is that I think things are changing as we've seen with the federal prime that resulted in three convictions. The dirty laundry of so many in the industry being out there. Now, if they're going to continue to operate business as usual, they're going to have to do it more carefully that still one this really gonna put things in emails, not put things things you think that they would have already been aware of. It's like they never saw all the president's men or I mean, it's like they have no other thing is. Yeah. The point is Jim boeheim the Syracuse coach he said that after the federal trial conviction. She said not a lot is going to change here. And I think he's right. I mean, the NCW is proven time and again to be toothless. We'll see what they do with the oversight committee. But I'm not expecting any major. I'm going to be the one person who feels like when we look back twenty years from now, there will be changing this will be a key moment because even to your point Clinton about the new balance deal that's pretty eye opening that they're willing to do that. But the other side of the coin, and that is I don't think there's gonna be a lot of basketball players who are willing to sit out and watch their contemporaries on prime. Television and beat the talk of everyone in the sports world just for a little bit more money. I guess what I'm saying is that imagine a scenario in which you did not have to finagle your way around the today under the guise of amateurism, and you've got simply deal straight up with the shoe company that is legitimately in the best interest of developing its athletes for the purposes of money-making down the line. The NCAA is problem here, you gotta find your way around all these sanctions and all these rules that affectively for what for whom and for what if you can cut out the middle person in this case, the NCAA, you might actually develops. Got to leave it there. You gotta leave it there. Sorry to interrupt you. But I'm not that. Sorry. Coming up. Best soccer parent video you'll see this week. Plus, Jeremy brings us an important story from the shells of say, I just wanted to say that. Under and neck. Thank you. If you're a smoker, you know, switching isn't easy. You've tried vapes. Andy six they just didn't deliver the satisfaction you expected, but Joel is different. It's not an e cigarette it's vapor product that actually satisfies plus Jewess simple to use. And there's no cigarette. Ash, no lingering odor as a smoker, you expect a certain nicotine, experienced, right? Jill delivers give jewelry. Try check out. J U L dot com slash sports. Switch and be satisfied. Yes. You can't do both. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. Outside the lie as Bronte by. Geico. Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. I welcome back at his time now for under reported stories of the week Clinton. All right. So the USOC said this week that they are beginning the process to perhaps revoke the governing powers from the USA gymnastics association. What that means basically is this if you don't understand the relationship that USOC has its various bodies, it's basically like the NCAA to conferences. So they would take in what is that operation? And obviously after all of these things Larry Nassar happen and so on and so forth. Something had to be done. But this is in official move at the Olympic level, which affects a lot more than just the people that go to the Olympics USA g runs all sorts of programs from the youth level on down. It's an indication that they know that there's a problem. It's only happened once or two times before I believe team handball type. What have you? But this is an indication something with some teeth. Does that USOC is completely sort of out of the woods here? They knew about this NASA situation a year before he ever got arrested. But at least it is an indication that USA gymnastics has to pay for this in more ways than just money. Yeah. It's easy for folks. Think it's impacting the top level of a couple dozen Olympic level athletes. You're talking about hundreds of thousands of young that will be impacted by this under reported story of the week is the WNBA now the WNBA PA has opted out and they want to renegotiate with the NBA over the collective bargaining agreement. I think what's been interesting this week. Is that historically anytime? You've gotta that's offing out. You've got logistical parameters that they're discussing you're out in front to understand and tell to the people what you want whether it's more money, whether it's different class of service on airfare, which I think could be part of what they've been bay. Once we've kind of on radio. Silence on what exactly it is that WNBA players what? From this contract negotiation. I I'm told that we will start to understand pieces of what they want in very specific terms going forward. And I think that would help them because I think people right now are under the assumption. They just want more money, and if it is a league that's losing money. Well, how can they ask for more money? When some of the changes that they want probably have to do with flying economy and more marketing to better sell their league across the US. Don. My under reported story are the Florida voters overwhelmingly in a landslide decided to ban greyhound racing. And basically, this is the death knell for grace greyhound racing in the United States. There's a Levin Florida racetracks where greyhounds currently race by the end of twenty twenty. They will no longer be racing. That leaves only six tracks in five states that will have greyhound racing. It's long overdue. There have been there's been cocaine given to greyhound races in Florida. There's been hundreds of dogs that have died since these advocacy groups have actually monitored since twenty thirteen and even the even the people that were pro- greyhound racing were stunned that nearly seventy percent of the Florida voters decided greyhound racing. So it's a big move. The the entire industry is a disgrace for this to happen is is really kind of crazy was still around. Exactly. Yeah. Sure of my under report story, and it's been talked about a lot certainly in the New York media put. It is an interesting situation dynamic. You know, the Mets have hired a new general manager. He comes from the agency world who's one of the top baseball agents at CA and many of the clients. He represented are now the people he's going to be negotiating to sign with the Mets or eventually people who trade for. But among those Jacob degrom arguably the best pitcher in baseball, certainly one of the best pitchers in baseball, Noah, Syndergaard, another cornerstone of whatever the Mets wanna do and Brodie van wagon in new general manager was on their side two weeks ago. Now, he's on the other side, this is problematic for a lot of reasons. Just got worse is talking about problem. And and we're just gonna have to see how this all plays out. But it's a it's an interesting story in the baseball world, and you get to the Mets in which is always always. All right now, it's time for our Dylan nearly us off again you are leadoff hitter role must him. He's the South Carolina head football coach. He's been in the news for a lot of reasons. But let's hear what he had to say about election day. How do you approach and heavy approach voting with your guys in terms of leading up to today? And today, I think about it. Do y'all have any? Today's election day. I do now. Getting ready for Florida. This might have got an offered laugh in the media room because because it's kind of uncomfortable. But listen that age in terms of engaging your civic duty if you're going to claim to be a leader of men, if you're gonna walk into living roofs and tell people that you're going to teach them to be better individuals. You might want to teach them something about how to get to the ballot box not knowing what day it is. Sure. It might be a funny joke when you've got Florida coming up but come on. What are we talking about it? These are young kids eighteen to twenty two dead or sure about let them know. This is an opportunity that is fail to you exercise. If you so choose it also wasn't that funny joke. Right. That's what I. Surprising. So so my my villain. This week is the preeminent club team in the nation. That is now in ownership or possession of the World Cup trophy Perry. Censure men were the powerhouse club teams in the world. And certainly in France conceding this week that four several years at a minimum. It scouts were denoting not only players abilities, but they're racial composition background. And this is we've used the word problematic earlier on the show, this is really problematic. This is this is it's it's stunning because France's already had a soccer scandal involving racial profiling players at the national team level. It's now seat at the club team level where scouts talking about whether players were of African descent sub Saharan African north African Caribbean Caucasian. It's just. There's no reason for it. And speaking to the prevalence of racist attitudes in professional soccer at the highest level. Kevin prince boa Tang, the German gain player knocked the US out of the World Cup in two thousand ten had this to say about needing someone to speak up. Cappone key left millions of money or millions of advertisers nyc and everything he would've left everything to to have the right to talk. He's a hero. You know? He's like Mohammad-Ali he's going to be known forever. And you needed the Brown James you need to go to the states against their president. You know, you need these big people to make big actions because otherwise nothing will change what we know. It's going to be heard. My villain is Josie. Marino the Manchester United manager he's sort of a lovable villain like a world. Wrestling federation villain. He'll yeah. He's he's a he'll and fans just love giving it to him in a match last month against Chelsea his former team Stanford bridge Josie Maria went nuts Chelsea pay basically celebrated a late equaliser, and you could see how angry security had to keep him from going after this Chelsea assistant. He felt it was completely inappropriate and wrong and bad form. And then just the other night Wednesday night in a Champions League match, which event this you see marina with his hand by his ear trolling, everyone as Manchester United came back to win two one over Juventus. So you gotta love him. To be fair. I love this. A lot. I love it. Look. Good. Great. All right. My villain. I bring you a character. It comes from Wales. It is a video of a soccer parents under eight league here watched by the goalie. The goalie was not in the proper position and the goalie's father pushes him into position. This is great for me because this is a metaphor for parents physician into this off. Yes. But then follow up follow up here. There's a goal scored. Anyway. Okay. There's a goal scored. Anyway. This is obviously a metaphor for parenting in that when you intercede with your kids life in the short term they win. But in the long term, they end up loose out that it's true. Extrapolate. It's true. Teacher hoping mechanisms you gotta let them fail at that. At that first level here, you're not in the position you should fail. Right. They're not on the back end. Anyway, it's just a great video coming up shocking wins we got big-hearted gestures. And Jeremy pretend to know what an story as heroes our next, but you're going to push through you're gonna pretend. The technology truth brought to you. Truth teenagers can communicate entirely in emojis. How lies birthday party? It's a slice kitten sucker, bald pineapple truth. It's so easy to switch them. Save on car insurance at geiko dot com. What are you talking about paper clips shoulder? Shrug high five wizard hat what go fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Tonight on ESPN, the seventh annual armed forces classic honoring America's heroes. Arkansas takes on Texas at Fort Bliss military base in El Paso that seventy stern on ESPN and the app after PTI sportscenter at six PM picking the winners for the NFL's marquee matchups this weekend. Plus of set alerts for top-five football teams, and the story of the forgotten star in the Celtics jazz game not named kyri or Donovan sportscenter, six o'clock ESPN and the app. All right. It's time for heroes. And I'll stick to the basketball, and I'll jump off my hero is north Alabama because I ever game at the division one level the women's college basketball team at north Alabama went to Vanderbilt and defeated Vanderbilt. Now, we Commodore the mighty Commodores now. This chick yearly crazy to me. Because of all the sports that struggle with parody women's college basketball's right up at worse. If immense college basketball team, make the jump to division one and beat a team you'd be like, no big deal, but in women's college basketball for this team to step onto the bandies home court and win very impressive the job done. All right. Cli- hero is Washington Capitals fan. This was during the pens capitals game. Those of you know, the NHL no that that's a big rivalry. And they'd be fifty fifty raffle at Capital One arena. So the capital said before the game day, we're going to put up all of the money race for the raffle and give it to the victims of the squirrel hill tree of life massacre. But there's a foundation I was going to be put for that. One fan won the raffle instead of keeping the half of the money for himself. He said, I'm just going to put my contributions to to the rest of Ditoto end up being thirty eight thousand five hundred seventy dollars, Mark. Good for the capitals on that. And good for that fan terrible situation outside of Pittsburgh and a prison. By hero is Troy Aikman. The Dallas Cowboys hall of Famer legendary quarterback three times per bowl champion on the radio this week. He said something that Cowboys fans have been thinking for a very long time about the front office of the Dallas Cowboys. I'd say there has to be a complete overhaul of the entire organization. You just can't simply replace head coaches and say now it's going to be better. No, it's been shown that it's not better. And you have to address how everything is being done to shot directly, Jerry Jones. Jerry Jones loves Troy Aikman. This really hurts. Jerry Jones personally as well. As Stephen Jones and this resonates now will Jerry fire himself, general manager likely not. But this was very very strong words from the hall of fame, and my hero is Kelly Stafford the wife of the lions quarterback, Matthew don't call Matt Stafford and she got on. I guess it was Twitter was newest an Instagram. Oh, that's right. That's what it is. And and she called out fans who are complaining about the line. Yeah. About her husband's performance. I applaud standing up for Matthew. Stafford of that situation, we need more more of that kind of engagement. That'll do it for us. Thanks for watching. It works. My name is Lauren. I'm thirty three. I didn't want my identity to be the smoking nam my first experience with jewel. I do remember being like distance good. It's it's it's like a cigarette. But not I don't miss smoking. At all. Like, I can officially say it grosses me out jewel is the tobacco alternative that delivers nicotine satisfaction without cigarette. Asher lingering odor. Make the switch at J U, L dot com slash sports. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine business chemical.

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Congress Probes Big Tech; DOJ Investigates Olympic Groups

WSJ What's News

12:48 min | 1 year ago

Congress Probes Big Tech; DOJ Investigates Olympic Groups

"You're invited to travel the world and discover what it means to live. The intercontinental life with more than two hundred properties worldwide intercontinental hotels and resorts welcomes you to who I conned properties in global destinations including New York London and Shanghai discover more about these cities and the tails inspire with stories of the intercontinental continental life a collection of stories that will excite your curiosity and offer New Perspective on the world here more at intercontinental dot com forward slash life Congress expands its probe into big tech companies demanding emails and other records plus the US US Justice Department investigate sexual abuse in US Olympic organizations going into two thousand twenty. They're gonNA resolve this. I mean not only do you. WanNa make sure people are safe going to the Olympics but also it looks bad if the USOC is heading to the next Olympics with this cloud of uncertainty investigations over their head. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm angry for totally New York before we get to our stories on big tack heck and the Olympics here are some other top stories. We're following today. As we work struggles with lagging investor demand we report the Japan's Softbank is planning to buy at least seven hundred fifty million dollars worth of we work shares. The company is gearing up for its initial public offering. We work is hoping to raise at least three billion dollars at inside. Peo- putting its valuation between fifteen and twenty billion dollars that is far less than the forty seven billion private investors valued the company. It's last round of fundraising as we reported this morning we work has announced governance changes at the company and will listed shares on Nasdaq the Food and Drug Administration when is evaluating heartburn drug Zantac after learning of a probable carcinogen found at low levels in some versions of the drug officials are looking into whether the chemical no known as N. D. M. A. poses a risk to patients the. FDA says the levels of the chemical in preliminary test quote barely exceed amounts you might expect to find in common and foods the FDA says it will make its assessments available to the public as soon as possible. China has agreed to exempt purchases of US soybeans pork any other agricultural products from tariffs that have hit hard in the US Farm Belt The Wall Street Journal's Josh Zoom Brune explains. It's been devastating for the US farmers and it's not just the terrorists themselves you know. China controls a lot of the companies that do the importing of these products their government has a lot of control over these companies and they've essentially just shut off purchasing from the US and instead they've been buying their their food from Brazil and Europe and other places and this is just raw total havoc on soybean prices and other crop prices so it's been extremely hard and you look at the numbers you know the US just on soybeans used to export around twelve thirteen fourteen billion dollars a year and that market has almost entirely disappeared for American farmers and then gone almost entirely to farmers from other countries and so it's it's a good sign if these tariffs come off and people can start selling back into China again but you really need to see large scale purchases sustained for a very long period of time time before farmers would even be back to where they were before. This trade war had started. You know any idea that farmers are going to come out. Ahead is months and maybe years away way I mean this is just this is really the very first step of climbing out of a very deep hole for American farmers. China made the exemptions. After president trump delayed a new round round of tariff increases the US and China are expected to resume trade talks in Washington next month. The London Stock Exchange has rejected a thirty six point six billion dollar bid from the Hong Kong Exchange our Margo Patrick explains that the lse expressed fundamental concerns about the deal in a letter on Friday Eddie including calling into question Hong Kong status as a financial gateway to Asia that was interesting because Hong Kong has had that sort of unquestioned -sition an as the way to tap into Chinese markets for a very long time now and with this letter LLC is saying we doubt that Hong Kong may even NBA The the financial city that companies will use to raise capital in China in that Western investors will wanNA connect with so they really called into question whether Hong Kong Hong Exchange even had something to offer them meanwhile LLC says it is committed to buying financial information and Terminal Company reflective actress Felicity Huffman has been sentenced to fourteen days in prison after she admitted to paying a college counselor fifteen thousand dollars to boost her daughters sat score core. Huffman is the first parent to be sentenced in the widespread college admissions cheating scandal. She has also been sentenced to a year of supervised release two hundred fifty hours community service and a thirty thousand dollar fine. You're invited to travel the world and discover what it means to to live the intercontinental life with more than two hundred properties worldwide intercontinental hotels and resorts welcomes you to conic properties in global destinations including including New York London and Shanghai discover more about these cities and the tails inspire with stories of the intercontinental life a collection of stories that were excited site your curiosity and offer new perspectives on the world here more at intercontinental dot com forward slash life house lawmakers are seeking a range of documents from companies including facebook Google Amazon and Apple The Wall Street Journal's Brian Tracy says the House Judiciary Committee launched its probe which is one of several into big tech companies in June. It's notable that it's bipartisan that both Republicans and Democrats have signed onto onto these letters to Apple Amazon facebook and alphabet which owns Google. There's a lot of detail in these letters and it's more than we've previously known about about where authorities might look when they investigate these companies so for Amazon. There's questions about Amazon prime pricing about the fees that are charged to Amazon sailors with Apple. There's a number of questions about the APP store with Google. There's questions about dozens of its businesses from its Web browser to its mobile operating system to search and with facebook there are questions about its acquisition of companies like instagram and WHATSAPP and that's only a small summary of what Congress is asking you name it with these tech companies. Congress has asked a question about it in these letters and the most interesting thing about the questions that they have not only sought business records financial statements and things like that but also communications emails from some of the celebrity founders of the companies and and other communications about these issues. Tracy says clashes are expected over what documents get turned over to lawmakers makers the House investigation comes as tech companies are facing greater scrutiny in Washington. We also report that national security officials and tech leaders have I've been working to better protect. US elections facebook organized a meeting at its headquarters in Silicon Valley last week our DC the Rahman says the meeting laid bare the tensions on both sides for all intents and purposes intelligence and tack didn't work together at a two thousand sixteen and now there's this understanding that Russia was able to manipulate public discussion through facebook and twitter and Youtube and that there were no guardrails. Nobody knew how how to stop it but at the same time there there is this tension around how much tha companies can actually share with the government. Everyone wants to avoid to repeat of two thousand sixteen but it's not at the expense of just handing over user information in the tech companies have a business imperative right. They can't just do this because people will leave their platforms and get angry at them and they'll be continued regulation and you know new laws could impair their ability to do business but you know from the government side they they want more too on so there's this tension that emerges in this meeting and it shows that the relationship they're still working out the kinks and fourteen months before twenty twenty and you can read the full story about the meeting on our website wsj.com or on the W J APP. The US Justice Department is investigating sexual abuse within US Olympic organizations the following the case against former national gymnastics team Dr Larry Nassar currently serving ineffective life sentence for sexually assaulting women and girls. The Federal Inquiry Creek comes ahead of the two thousand twenty Olympics in Tokyo joining me now with more details is Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca O'Brien Rebecca. This seems like a widespread investigation allegation which groups have you found that are under investigation right now by the Justice Department so it is a wide ranging investigation and it's actually I think best thought of as multiple investigations that interconnect and the important bodies to think about here are the US Olympic Committee the Center for Safe Sport USA gymnastics and and USA Taekwondo and the FBI which is sort of a side issue but think of it as like a layer cake right this mitigation which is being led by multiple offices offices in the Justice Department along with irs criminal investigators is looking at bad actors who are coaches or doctors in the gym level of various Olympic Sports. It's across the United States and then secondarily. There's an investigation into potential cover ups and maybe financial and business wrongdoing by the national governing bodies are N. G. Bees like USA gymnastics or USA Taekwondo and the third level here. Is You limit committee to the big overarching organization Asian. They're looking you know as well their response to sexual abuse allegations another potential financial wrongdoings now how big of an impact did the Larry Nassar Sir case have on the current investigations. This was pretty blockbuster case shook up the world of gymnastics in the Olympics too large extent what I think I mean the Larry Nassar case it slowly began building came first surfaced right after the Rio Olympics more than three years ago now and what I find incredible is that what the Nassar case not only did it first of all you know hundreds of women came forward with allegations but it really also opened shed light on all these other cases like in USA taekwondo or there had been allegations and some mm cases convictions of coaches that had kind of been lost to history and these this repeated. There's a trend over decades of misconduct induct and sex-abuse in a number of different sports that no one really had paid close attention to on a grand scale so the national case really not only was had a tremendous impact on on gymnastics in the Olympic Committee but it also just opened the floodgates as it were now we are looking ahead to the twenty twenty games in Tokyo what under the implications for the US Olympic system as we have been talking about the Nassar case did cause a lot of damage to the institution yet national case did a lot of damage image to USA gymnastics but it also had some blowback on the US Olympic Committee because of executives there who were informed of it and didn't necessarily take steps that many people in the public thing you know they they didn't talk about it more publicly. They didn't take steps to advance the investigation and they leave with egging their face and what is important about these investigations. I the thing is that they show the continued legal pressure on the USOC. There's political pressure with also legal and potentially criminal pressure on some of the executives or former executives of these organizations and going into twenty twenty. They're going to want to resolve this. I mean not only do you. WanNa make sure people are safe going to the Olympics but also it looks bad if the USOC he is heading to the next Olympics with this cloud of uncertainty and investigations over their head and of course you know in nine years they're going to be hosting the Summer Olympics in Los Angeles so oh you know we'll see how they resolve this Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca O'Brien. Thank you so much thank you. We'd like to hear more from you on this story war reforms do you think are needed to the US Olympic system ahead of the twenty twenty games. Let us know by tweeting US at W. S. J. podcasts and that's what's news for this Friday Friday afternoon. I'm Anne Marie for totally for the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

US US Olympic Committee The Wall Street Journal US Justice Department Olympics China New York intercontinental dot Congress Larry Nassar USA Taekwondo Food and Drug Administration Brian Tracy Amazon Shanghai Washington Hong Kong facebook gymnastics
Men in Blazers 03/18/20: With Caitlin Murray

Men In Blazers

39:15 min | 9 months ago

Men in Blazers 03/18/20: With Caitlin Murray

"This is Rebecca Lowe. Will Rebecca if you listen to sub optimal radio and you on this thing to men in. Blazers on the NBC. Sports Network this world. And if you're listening to this let's just say one thing we're alive just alive but we're back with a special because global sports is reeling with the corona virus. Us A well played as managed to conjure an additional crisis. All of its own making this whole story family depressing. It's Pau for pooling story part legal procedural thing. I can repeat I meet telling him bail and I want to relive this with someone who full as the case day in day out because if we were all holed up in our own apartments right now this will be a massive massive new story so to help understand it deeper. It's a true delight to welcome to the puck eight journalist and author of the book the National Team the inside story of the women chained soccer. They didn't change enough. Say Four additional chapters written. It's a magnificent book even though I blood there on the back. Welcome to the poll. It's Caitlyn Murray Hi Raj. How're you doing Caitlyn? I am so happy to speak to you. You are in Portland Oregon. An area of the country that was first hothead by the Carina virus. How are you holding Caitlin Mary? Well I haven't left my apartment in fifteen days. I was sick so I stayed home. Which is what you're supposed to do. And then as soon as I got better we were told not to go outside to practice social distancing. So that's what I have been doing. You know if anyone has recommendations for how to pass the time really reaching that point where I might need them. Yeah there's nowhere to go. Everything's closed stores bars. Restaurants even Powell's bookstore is closed. So I've nowhere to go. I've got all the time in the world's stock to you so thank you for breaking up the Monotony of my dad. Oh fifteen days in an opponent you living my dream life. We are going to relive together. Critical story we're going to talk about the. Us Women's fight for equality as it talk but Tendai. Mike Barbaro a new on Maggie Haberman behavior. There's no access to analyzing. Let's go back to the beginning. Us Soccer and the US. Women's Union arena protracted battle remind us simply of the state. The women say that. Us soccer has been discriminating against them for years. It's not just pay. Pay is a huge part of it and the number that we've seen recently floated around as sixty six million dollars. That's what the players are seeking back pay. Because they say that you. A soccer hasn't paid them fairly. But it's other things that's non financial things it's hotel accommodations plane surfaces. I mean this is a fight. You know we'll get into it but the groundwork has been laid for years for this fight so this is sort of the next step in the women demanding better treatment and really sort of pushing. Us Soccer which is what they have always had to do in US soccer saying that the players have a union negotiated the terms of pay. The women are contending that run lawfully compared to the US meant right but the US soccer saying that it's a women's Union's fault the negotiating those terms. And if they don't like it they should blame the Union and management. Us Soccer Yeah. I think that's one of I mean I'm not a lawyer but I mean that sounds pretty lar- logical for us soccer to say. Look you had an opportunity to negotiate with us. This is the contract you came up with. You seemed pretty happy with it. But what the women say and something that came up when I was working on my book where we talk a lot about the negotiations is that the players ask certain things that. Us rejected outright. So there was nowhere to go and negotiations for certain things and the women have said that. Yes we negotiate a CPA but it was the best we could get and another thing that they've said repeatedly is you cannot collectively bargain away. Your rights your civil rights as an individual so that's sort of where this lawsuit takes us is that they say they have a but that doesn't mean that they haven't been discriminated against the caramel down was triggered by CO filings early March. Us Silica through. Its attorneys the little fomc full of ensure filed a series of legal documents in Los Angeles federal among them a memorandum. Finally heinous member on them attempting to the players claim that US soccer's violated the equal pay act entitled seven of the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty fool to make it illegal for employers to discriminate against employees. Pay In this case on the basis of Jeddah I mean the content of some of. Us stock is argument which have now been red. High and wide shockingly offensive Kalem. We are talking Vanessa. Hutchins level stupidity can remind us of this movement of fully in dog. And that's what they say yeah so. Us akers legal strategy has been the same for months they. They have a lot of different arguments but one of them was. They were arguing that the women were not performing equal work to the men and that already sounds like we're on shaky ground. Sounds a little misogynistic but it was this most recent filing which came. I mean this is all happened so quickly I mean. Was it a week ago at this point this filing a week ago. It didn't just double down on this argument. It sort of took it to a new level. The language that used it said that the women are inherently inferior to men. Basically it said the women have less ability because ability is defined by physical attributes such as speed and strength in plain firm unseen requires a higher level of skill and they actually said in the filing. It says this is not a quote sexist stereotype. It's indisputable science and I don't know about you but when I hear someone say I'm not being sexist. But they're probably being sexist so they sorta knew they were right up on the edge of saint something really misogynistic and have crossed over into that zone but they still want ahead and did it anyway. Yeah I normally when I'm GONNA to say really offensive to so we'll always I don't mean to be offensive. You gotta warn people before you drop the bomb and yeah. That's what they did. They always comes out. My mouth the memorandum. The job of men's national team plans carries quite more responsibility than the job of a women's national team. Essentially this memorandum tried to claim. The women occupy inferior jobs in equivalent occupations for wage comparisons than those held by the mad. You in an obstacle the towing caitlyn the. Us Soccer tried to justify paying women less based on the same misogyny speak by twitter trolls. To Demean female athletes everyday. Us Soccer has good arguments. That they couldn't make I mean we just talked about the fact that you know the union negotiated for it. That's that's one argument that. Us Soccer can make they. Can you know try to argue that the US men's national even the US women's national team are separate entities? I think that's a little tough when they've tried so hard to you. Know Ram this motto downs down. Everyone's throat one nation. One team. I guess what they really meant was one nation two teams. But you know that's an argument they can make For Prize money is another thing but they chose the nuclear option. They chose scorched earth. They decided let's just say that women are inferior to men lots belittle into mean female athletes everywhere. They didn't really need to make this argument and yet they did I. I'm not sure who that was a good idea but here we are. The news breaks on a Monday while the US and the mets on the failed of winning the awfully named she believes by Wednesday. They came out for that warm-ups against Japan Nashville months ago wearing that training tops inside our acquaint brilliant protests both shade on US Sokha by removing their emblem and just highlighting the stars the wo- Cup Save One and it'll say through a veiled threat on sponsor Nike that they wouldn't always be represented by the state was brilliant. Yeah I think it was a really powerful image. When they did the pre-game lineup photo. It was every single player together with these sort of like very serious grave SCOWLS ON THEIR FACES. They were not smiling. They were sending a very clear message and it was funny after they did this. They were the the training shirts inside out so you could only see the outline of the crash in the four stars. I started to notice. All of the people like responding to my tweets or all of my notifications very quickly all became like a photo shopped version of that cress that outline and the stars so the fans immediately took that and started running with it. the US women's national team and one of their partners breaking tease. Put out a t shirt of that design. And I think that was their best Single Day of sales for that company breaking teas so it really sorta caught like wildfire and that was sort of the point where I mean sponsors had already started speaking out but it was the sort of thing we're like. This was snowballing and I think that's what prompted Carlos Cordeiro to then during that game released an apology. That quite frankly just wasn't enough yet. You mentioned Carla Cabrera. Us Soccer President suddenly in the fiery line. We're willing to Sui as not. Us Soccer Budo. Madison's a look none of us were talking about before we stood for president for when I think about him I think Carlos Barreto not really a good guy no not a soccer guy and I think people do think that he is someone who sort of entrenched in US soccer and when new Galati the former president of us soccer when he left because the US national team failed to qualify for the World Cup. Carlos Cordeiro was not sort of the establishment status quo guy. He sort of ran against the wishes of scenario gladdy. He didn't have a lot of support at first that he sort of had to get that after a couple rounds of voting in the US soccer presidential election but he he was a vice president. Who wasn't really out there doing anything like you said we didn't know who he was really he's a former. Goldman Sachs executive. He is not a soccer guy and he's made that very clear since he took over as president he's really deferred soccer decisions to other people. Any talked a lot about you know letting soccer people make soccer decisions it was sort of course correction because the former president of US Soccer Senio Galati was sort of unilaterally. Making a lot of decisions. Carlos Cordeiro wanted to change that. But I think what we've seen as us. Soccer has not changed enough in the time that Carlos Cordeiro became president and I think maybe he was deferring to the people who've been entrenched in US soccer for far too long. I will say I love the idea of Barrow as a look what we call remember not to get too inside the bubble but the key constituency who voted him in a fiercely contested election. Who Was it? It was the Athletes Council amazing. Why keep reminding myself about it? Was the group of current and former. Us Men's and women's internationals who are meant to represent the interest of the players in the first place. Who with a swing? Vote the kingmakers. The queenmakers Stu Holding Batman. Looking back at my notes and call US book. Negra with the council is lead spokespeople and they said that the telling Carlos Cabrera was candidate. We can unify behind one stroke by is that the athletes came in and supported an nfs Lee contested election with a wrong. Did they know what they were doing? Would they let down ultimately? What what. What happened inside their decision making process at the time? But how did it go so badly? All I think that Carlos Cordero during the campaign for the presidential election he said a lot of the right things I mean. He said things about the women deserving equal pay and how he was GonNa fix this problem and it was going to be addressed. I mean things that he said during his campaign are now being used in the lawsuit as part of the depositions for the women's national team because he essentially admitted that the women had not been treated equally in the court filings. I came out. There's a very interesting email from former. Us Soccer Presents Neo Galati. Who was really angry at what Carlos Cordeiro was saying during the campaign and he said it was responsible for Carlos Cordeiro to be out there saying that. Us Soccer was in treating the women equally. So I think in terms of what curro promised there was a reason why he got the support of the athletes. He just hasn't delivered on those promises. Unfortunately we get the news leaking in US soccer filing. It's undisputed that job. Men's national team player requests materially strengthen speed than the job of women's national team player. I want to break the responses down from the different constituencies in the football will. What was the response? First of all from the play. As having to win games on the failed I will say after the Japan. Gay Making Pino's words post game. They made me tear. We've sort of felt that those are some of the undercurrent feelings that they've had for a long time to to see that as the argument is as blatant misogyny and sexism as the argument against us. is really disappointing. But I just want to say it's all false to every girl out there to every boy out there who watches team. Who wants to be on this team or just months to live their dream out. You are less just because you are a girl. You are not better just because you're a boy we are all created. Equal should all have equal opportunity to go out and pursue our dreams and for us that means on the soccer field so everything that was in that deposition of what they said. The argument is just not true. Don't ever believe that. What did you hear from the players side? Well the very first thing I heard was the spokeswoman for the players Molly Levinson. She's sort of the person who is speaking on behalf of the players throughout these legal proceedings. Because usually the players aren't directly responding to all the back and forth that's going on and she had a great response She said that. Us Soccer's arguments belonged in the Paleolithic era. And it sounds as if it had been made by caveman so that was really funny. But I think Megara Pinot really sort of crystallize this whole discussion. This whole lawsuit. When she said that the players had felt for a long time that sexism was behind the way they were retreating being treated by us soccer and essentially this despite improved it. It's pretty interesting that. Us is defending itself against accusations that it was sexes and it defended itself in the most sexist way possible. That didn't move us. Sokha Will Meghan repeated. Had to say that it was hard but then the sponsors backlash kick. Did I mean the reputational damage for your visas? You're Volkswagen's you Coca Cola's you deloitte's it's impossible for the browns to defend and us. Soccer has to listen to that. Because threat sponsors invoking moral clauses would mean. Us Talk Elisa's millions of dollars in projected revenues. That was a game changer. Yeah I mean. As soon as money gets involved people starts pay attention and Coca Cola was first they came out and said it was quote unacceptable and offensive and then the other sponsors just started pouring in with their own statements. Deloitte said it was deeply offended B.'s and Budweiser both said that. Us Soccer's position doesn't align with values is not one that they share. The strongest one was Volkswagen. That came out and said it was disgusted by the positions that US soccer had taken and they are unacceptable and a number of sponsors vowed to reach out directly to us soccer and express their concern. Wouldn't you look at these brands? I think a lot of them are attaching themselves to us soccer because of the US. Women's national team no offense to the US men's national team. But why would anyone be concerned about attaching themselves to that team right now? I mean since two thousand eighteen. It's been sort of you know hard to be excited about the. Us Men's national team the players on the US women's national team represents something larger than sports. The they are sort of these figureheads in the symbols for female empowerment and you know progressive values in a changing landscape and sort of being able to push the status quo. That's what this team is about. It's in their DNA. They went on the field. They also went off the field with everything that they've taken on and I mean. Us soccer split out there sponsorships. We don't you know this is something that comes up in the lawsuit. We don't really know how much sponsorship money is directly attributed to the US women's team versus the US men's national team. But I would wager a guess that these are really interested in the US women's national team so for us soccer to take this position where it is in this ugly fight that is just devolving into something pretty unsavory. You have to be able to see. Why SPONSORS WOULD BE UPSET ABOUT THAT? Are you trying to tell me? Caitlyn the volkswagon arm flinging all this money a US soccer solely so they can get the image of justice are. That's driving a jet up because this is breaking news. They were speaking out. It was just the Brown speaking out then. The board started to speak out about what was going on. I up Cindy Paulo Code then vice president of US soccer quickly followed by MLS. Commissioner Don Garber WHO's also on? Us Focus Board of directors for quick to leap pin distance themselves. Completely from the Memorandum Gober said the memorandum. Defend saving quote unacceptable. I did not understand this movement. I've got to be honest. They will be on. Us Soccer's board. How how could they don't like a US? Soccer filing briefings on behalf of their board or no empowering them to fulfil a legal responsibility as members. Yeah I think that's sort of gets to a larger issue that this situation has shed a light on which is the weird governance structure of US soccer. That makes no sense I mean. Us soccer still run like a mom and pop organization? That is not because the board positions are paid zero dollars. They are volunteer positions Carlos Cordero President of. Us Soccer also paid zero dollars. It's a volunteer position. The board members have indicated that they didn't know that this was the legal strategy Carlos. Cordeiro has come out and said that he didn't have a chance to review this and it's easy to just think that these people are lying because they don't want to take responsibility but honestly. I'm not sure that they actually read any of this. I mean the filing where these very sexes arguments were buried in. It was twenty six hundred pages and these are all into your positions. I went to a board meeting a US. Soccer Board meeting in December. And I did not get the sense that these board members were involved in the day to day and were regularly you know kept in the loop on what. Us Soccer was doing. There's a larger question about the way. Us soccer is wrong and they really need to address that because the president of US position. He's essentially working fulltime. I mean Carlos Cordero who so involved and for it to be a job that's unpaid. Of course you have a guy who's a former Goldman Sachs executive because you have to be independently wealthy to do the job it. It's not attracting great candidates for his role so there's a whole issue as far as the way. Us Soccer is structured and run that sort of a side issue. But it's an issue that needs to be addressed twenty six hundred pages. The only book. I've read that as long as the first volume of Bruce. Arena's also biography mentioned the US women's Plans Union they off a spokesperson Molly. Levins and full disclosure. A name only personally. She was a classmate with my wife out Wellesley. Go Blue and a half to say she handled last week. It was light and tweeted base. My watching Kelly C. Burned down the coals and emerge unscathed from the fire. Us talker had in that moment. Just expose themselves publicly. Awfully Molly delivered a ruthless withering brewer side it was like watching a two-footed tackle from Juliet fly in. She said well it's gratifying. It's been such a deafening outcry. Thank you talk. As blatant misogyny the sexist culture and policies seen by call us guitar have been approved for years by the Board of directors at. Us Alka this institution must change. She was taking a small point and say no no no. It is so much bigger than even what we see the court. Filing this tip of the iceberg. Carlos Cordeiro resigned. That's good I asked. That's you know that's what people are calling for. But that doesn't really fix anything I mean. Us Soccer is so entrenched in this idea that well this is how we've always done things so this is how we're going to continue to do things and you know. I talk a lot in my book. Abou- US soccer really needing to be pushed to change things. And you know when I was working on my book. I sort of quickly realized that the story of the. Us Women's national team is not a story of just you know triumph on the field and games and that sort of thing. It was a story about being in boardrooms and biting with US soccer. You know there's a scene in my book. Were Julie Foudy. Mia Hamm are sitting at a table with Bob Council Julia the former president of US soccer. And they're telling him off to his face telling him that they're never going to play soccer ever again because of the way. Us soccer treats them so. This is a very long standing issue. I think it's entrenched in the way that the federation approaches things and the way the federation views things and the people at the Federation of been there for so long. I don't think there's been a lot of introspection about why are we doing the things the way we're doing them? They just sorta just keep plodding along. And by the way when you talk about that story with the Great Julie. Foudy a ham. They were fighting to get more than ten dollars. A day. Stipends but you play crappy defense against nephew as women stay on the field of bless the thing goes against shave and then this movement. Us socking you. This was the case off the field the US stock aboard with suddenly in the same position essentially as Thailand in the women's World Cup so lost Thursday night. Call us. Cadaver resigned saying my one and only mission has always been that they want the best for a federation. I mean to me is great. Achievement in my mind was secure my dream of having the game. I love soccer on the lips of every American. Even though you don't like the sport and he made it come true but for possibly the worst of reasons is this. Awful stories was absolutely everywhere. We're GONNA talk about the immediate ramifications but I'm going to ask how much of all of this was actually solely call us cadavers fault. Honestly I don't know any of it was really his fault because like I said. It's an unpaid volunteer position. I I do think that any suggestion that he didn't know the legal strategy or you know. That wasn't clear. I think that's false. I think everyone has known for months that. Us soccer one of the things they were going to argue that the women are not performing equal work to the men. And you know you look at the player depositions Carli. Lloyd was asked months ago about whether the women can compete against teenage boys whether the women could win in a game against the senior men's national team. This was the strategy. So I'm sure Carlos Cordeiro knew that I'm sure a lot of people at the federation knew that but in terms of this being Carlos Cordero's responsibility or his doing. I have strong doubts about. I mean there are people who are still at us soccer even though occurred Arrow's gone. He is resigned. There are people who still work in. Us Soccer House who devised the strategy. Or were on board with it I mean. Us Soccer has an in house. Legal Counsel Little Walkie who I think. Was You know supportive of this new about it? GREEN-LIGHTED IT. So there are a lot of people there who were responsible. I don't really know to what extent Carlos Cordeiro was directly responsible. I think he just said okay. That sounds good. I don't know he really knew the finer details of the argument when I used to live in. Dc One of my favorite restaurants called House of beef at through love the American tradition of naming buildings after the most basic thing that's related to the fact that we have a soccer house a whole house the whole building may down stock fills me with joy but US stockings by Lewis. Have it in the case of resignation? The vice president's steps up to finish off the job search rise up Cindy Paulo cone who've been reelected last month as you talk as vice president. She was the first in line to succeed. Cadaver right we should applaud cheesy. First woman. To say didn't seven year old organization as a player many of you have seen but she was a fine for eleven goal scoring warrior. Play posted seventy five zero and one hundred and fifty eight glory-filled. Us appearances three NC double A. Titles to Olympic gold medals and he will come as a nineteen ninety nine. But can you give us a sense of Cindy Paula? A soccer bureaucrat. Well that's a great question. I don't. I don't know if we know that. Much about Cindy parlow cone. The soccer bureaucrat. We know a lot about her as a player. She was the coach of the Portland Thorns for one year and then she stepped down. I think maybe there's more to that story. I think the thorns Kinda wanted to get a new coach. I mean she's she's been on the board from what I have heard. Carlos Cordeiro really wanted a female vice president. He really supported her candidacy and wanted her to be on the board but traditionally I actually don't think the VP AT UA. Soccer has done very much. There's a reason why none of us really knew anything about Carlos Cordeiro when he ran for election when I was working on my book. I folks other previous. Vp's and I clearly got the sense that they were not involved in any sort of decision making day to day really didn't know what was going on so I don't I don't know how much she's been involved in things and that's sort of interesting question is what sort of president is she going to be. This is not the position she signed up for. She signed up for something. That was very part time again. All so unpaid. She has a job as the director for North Carolina. Fcc Youth System. She has a kid like she's got other stuff going on in her life. This is not the job that she signed up for another look portfolio but let me ask the big question. Everyone is wondering right now. Paula Code in some way related to the BERHALTER family issue cousin marriages any connection to so I am not aware of it. Seek change traditions. Holter calling the shots there but yeah not not as far as I know so the battle between us talk and the US Women. It was expected to head to trial may fifth trial. I think speaking to both parties six seven months ago. Neither really wanted but things have just gone so rutted just so angry from both sides In the run-up Three January and February. The trial was becoming a real possibility. But how many sudden changes in? Us Soccer all the lightly project you at the teams. Paek with a lawsuit and well. I think that the pressure is now on. Us Soccer to get this dealt with news quickly as possible and settle and you know write a check and make this go away because the sense I got before all of this stuff happened was that US. Soccer was really anxious to try to sit down and figure out a settlement. I mean before all of this happened. Carlos Cordeiro issues issued this letter where he said that. Us Soccer had offered the women the same that the men are paid. He made this really public showing about how. Us Soccer's trying to sit down and get a deal done and just based on conversations. I've had with people on both sides. I did get the sense that. Us Soccer was anxious to sort of. Get this figure it out now at this point. Us Soccer is clearly reached diminishing returns. It's hurting the more than it's helping them to try to defend against this lawsuit they really have to get this settled and I think that in terms of the payout that the women can get that has probably gone up. I think they are much better position to get get leverage and now that Cindy parlow cone is in there. She is a former player on the. Us Women's national team. She has seen some of the terrible treatment and the double standards that have been applied to the women over the years. She has lived it so even though she was. I think recruited by Carlos Cordeiro to be on the board and she was sitting on the board. And you know she. She's been on the other side. I think there's going to be an element of empathy. That maybe wasn't there before. She has vowed in her public statements. That she's going to repair this relationship. She's going to get this figured out. The goal is to get a deal done and I would think it happens before it has to go to trial and we'll see what happens with the trial anyway with the current advisor stuff. Probably will we push back? That's GonNa give everyone even more time to figure out a way to settle without having to go to trial though Caitlyn Murray. Where are you now in terms of the assumption between? Everything's GonNa Change now. Oh we should brace ourselves. Let's be realistic. Is going to be more of the same well. Us Soccer has resisted. Change her so long that it's sort of easy to expect that there won't be very much change but I mean look. They are going to a new. Ceo At some point. Hopefully they can find someone to take the job They'RE GONNA have new people making decisions. I think that what Heather O'Reilly says right. Us soccer needs to go through a length the reorganization process. And I'm not sure how long that will take I'm not sure to the extent that everyone is on board with it. But that's clearly what needs to happen. If they think that you know just having depar- CONAN there is Gonna fix everything. It's not so I wouldn't say that I'm super optimistic. But it's still very early. We haven't really gotten a sense of what kind of president that Cindy Parlow. Cone is going to be beautiful. You all of this is rooted in the Federation's attitude. The women ought to be thankful for whatever they get. That's nothing goes all the way back to the eighty s and the nineteen ninety. Yeah I mean the women at some point. We're being paid ten dollars per day and the men's team was being paid twenty five. The women were taking a hotel shuttle vans to their games in the men. Have Luxury. Bus Liners so this is something that The women have sort of lived for years at this point and I think some people thought that when this law sue came out that it sort of came out of the blue that it was unexpected when in reality the. Us Women's national team has behind the scenes. Been having fights like this with us soccer for years. So it's just sort of in their DNA The former president of US soccer. Bob Kahn screwy told me that the players they had a fighting mentality they fall on the field and they carried that off the field they constantly hadn't so fights with the federation and I think that sort of instruction instructive and it's important context when we think about these things. It's not just about playing on artificial turf grass which is something that comes up in the lawsuit. It's not just about sixty six million dollars in back pay which has come up in this lawsuit. It's about years and years of double standards in treatment. Were you a soccer said. You're lucky that you get to play soccer. You should just be happy with what you've got. I mean the thing that familiar so sad in terms of all of this is the football in America. We've always joked kaylynn on this. Show that football America's sport the future but it has always been a culture that's believed itself to be more progressive more path. Finding more pioneering brief in terms of other sports in the US and also the women's Soccer Federation's around the world and all of this. It's given us all pause. Socal ask you in terms of wider change has to happen facilitate positive change to occur at. Uso. Yup I think if there were an easy answer maybe. Us Duet although. I'm not sure that's a guarantee but I think it's it's a complicated question. I personally think that there needs to be a rebuild because you are soccer started as this little mom and pop organization in Colorado Springs the. Us Women's national team sort of started by accident. It wasn't like anyone thought. Hey we need A. Us Women's national team the US was invited to play in the tournament and Italy. One thousand nine hundred eighty five so they just sorta whipped a team together. Found some leftover men's jerseys in a warehouse and sent them to go play in the game so I think that. Us Soccer hasn't really evolved with the Times. Everything has just sort of happened by happenstance. And just SORTA with it. But they've never really looked at like. How can we evolve with how much the game has grown? Us Soccer's a huge organization? They have hundreds of full-time and part-time staff across the country. But it's still sort of feels like the mom and pop organization that it was back in the eighties nineties when the US women's national team was having to constantly needle the federation and threatened to go on strike and Boycott Games. And do things like that. I mean at one point. The women's national team got the US Olympic Committee in August and reported us soccer to the USOC. So you sucker needs to sort of has some self reflection and evolve. Pass what it's been which I don't think they have done yet today in should be said. The R- is incredible joy. The women under the management of new head coach flag. Care on a scale up playing some of the best football icy and God bless you Kristen. Press and Lindsey Horon. God bless you will say Caitlyn Murray and by God I oversee I mean becky sour brewed. You are amazing. We will have a real football and W. S. L. Football to talk about again very soon but until you book the national team the inside story of women have changed soccer by Caitlyn. Murray at Caitlyn. I think a blurb on the back of that book with something like that definitive telling the dreams of the skills and enormous sacrifices that have been made to bring Paler success on the failed and the fight for Equality v Caitlyn. I've gotta say I'm so grateful to you for walking through this and I do look forward to raising point with in person when this is all Asia Z. Harouna rightous say how they stay. Strong Caitlyn Murray keep on trucking encourage. Thanks Rach thanks for having me.

US soccer Carlos Cordeiro president Times Caitlyn Murray Carlos Cordero US Olympic Committee US vice president National Team director Soccer Federation Goldman Sachs Carlos Cabrera Sports Network Cindy parlow cone Volkswagen Portland Rebecca Lowe
AP Headline News Mar 15 2019 16:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

03:46 min | 1 year ago

AP Headline News Mar 15 2019 16:00 (EDT)

"You deserve a current account. That isn't all take. That's why a on post. We're doing party for thirty. Just open an easy to use her into count. With us launch thirty euro, I will give you another thirty euro for free to open a current account like Gibbs pop into your local post office today or search on post current account. Terms and conditions apply. Offer ends March thirty first two thousand nineteen see smart account for details on post is authorized by the minister for finance to provide payment services, and is regulated by the central Bank of Ireland in the provision of such services. ABC radio news. I'm Joanna here in Christ's church. New Zealand all of the flags are flying at half-mast on our council are in voting's today, and until further notice merely on dolls L. She says there are no words to describe the revolution chief fields for what the gunman in Christ Church believes in has false, the voice of height, and the only way that communities can respond to the voice of height has to come together and love compassion, and kindness, at least forty nine people were killed at two mosques in Christ Church students went on strike around the world today to send a message about climate change among the speakers in Washington. Carlos Stephan, ignorance is bliss it is dead. Isn't crying against our future? Speakers in DC stood behind a banner that read we don't want to die. A Florida man Caesar say 'Ok charged with sending pipebombs two prominent critics of President Trump is expected to plead guilty next week in court in New York. Thousands of people have been urged to evacuate on eastern Nebraska rivers as the massive late winter storm moving through has pushed streams and rivers out of their banks. There's a clean up in Michigan as well. From a tornado last night. This is the assistant Genesee county. Fire cheat we have roof through completely off two or three different trailers. We've got trees twisted tops or rip trade off. There's heavy heavy damage a late winter storm system continues to move across the midwest. It will send rain and snow into Minnesota and Illinois today. Fifty one women are suing the US Olympic Committee. It's board members and a number of high ranking officials for failing to prevent their abuse at the hands of imprisoned sports, Dr Larry Nassar, the supreme court says it will try to resolve all the legal issue. About a citizenship question on the twenty twenty senses. The justices are expanding their April. Twenty third argument to include whether to ask about the citizenship question. This is AP radio news. Police in New York are responding to the New Zealand mosque shootings. Here's the AP's. Warren Levinson news of the mosque shooting in New Zealand, turn what would have been a joyous occasion. A ceremony to rename a street in queens for a Muslim center into a somber observance police Commissioner James O'Neill sent a message that has become depressingly common in New York patrols and counterterrorism operations. Have been stepped up and locations deemed sensitive to our Muslim community here in New York City. We stand with you not just today. But always O'neil says the NYPD has a longstanding relationship with police in New Zealand, and is offering assistance to authorities in Christ Church where a gunman identified as a white nationalist opened fire at Friday prayers. Warren Levinson, New York, December death of a firefighter in Worcester. Massachusetts has been ruled a homicide. Authorities determine the fire he was fighting in an apartment building had been deliberately set by a tenant that former tenant has been charged with second degree murder in Massachusetts. I'm Ed Donahue, AP radio news. I'm ready to take the next step arm ready for university. That will help me Vance in my education and career a university that will make me feel supported an connecting ready for ODU online. Click the set or go to online dot ode dot EDU today.

New York City New Zealand Christ Church AP Warren Levinson New Zealand mosque Massachusetts Bank of Ireland ABC Ed Donahue US Olympic Committee Genesee county DC Carlos Stephan Nebraska Gibbs supreme court Michigan second degree murder Dr Larry Nassar
College Hoops Returns

Outside the Lines

24:51 min | 2 years ago

College Hoops Returns

"I think smoking always affected my daily life because I was a closet smoker. It really sort of controlled my entire day. My boss is the one that recommended jewel. So I decided to give it a try. You don't get any of the odor of smoking. There's no ash all over your car. I would say give it a try get the flavor and satisfaction of smoking without the mess of cigarette. Asher lingering odor. Switch to Joel check OJ dot com slash sports. If you don't smoke Vate don't start warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. The college basketball season tips off tonight. Fans. Need one in dunks to compete? Just you know, those fifty but the ball desserts on the credits like that. Magic Johnson his management style has not been patient wealth. Gotta do a better job people impossible that you ain't nobody has the raised eyebrow. These days when another allegation comes in involving a student athlete. How can I help somebody educate and learn and develop if I don't have the context of their life. What you see your perception of abbey sporting events. Get this. Welcome to outside the lines. I'm Kate Fagin after a turbulent offseason. College basketball returns to the court. And that's today's big story from studios Z since we last saw college hoops in action. A federal jury returned a verdict. Convicting three men connected in pay for play schemes the first of three trials with documents naming some of the game's biggest players and programs, including Kansas, Duke. Michigan state and Kentucky all teams hitting the court tonight. In addition, the NBA's G league announced one hundred and twenty five thousand dollar contract option for top level talent as an alternative to spending one season in college. Of course that option came too late for the nation's top three prospects, all of whom will wear the Duke jersey for the first time tonight. What remains to be seen is how much the drama around the game might actually change the game here to offer. His perspective is ESPN basketball analyst, Jay Williams who joins us from Indianapolis before tonight. State farm champions classic J. Let's start with Duke. What does this star studded freshman class mean for Duke? Well, on paper K is the best class at Duke or ever had. Now dukes has some pretty amazing classes. But when you land the number one and number two and number three prospect in the nation at all commit to the same team. That is unprecedented. We haven't seen that before and a one and done era. And also, it will be the most relevant Duke has ever been in the history of the game for that program. They are highlights twenty four seven three sixty five and it starts with a guy like Zion. Williamson who will be everywhere social media star you combine with the likes of RJ bear who might be the first pick in the draft a guy like Cam reddish, who's a silky smooth guard. Trae Jones who also is a point guard can lead his team in so many different ways. This team is everything they're gonna live up to be. But with hype comes a lot of hypothetical. So we'll see what they have in store. RJ? From a broader perspective. How do you see the off season the FBI investigations conviction actually impacting the business of college basketball? Well, I love that use the terminology the business of college basketball because it is a business for everybody else. But the players frankly, I'm pretty shocked. This stuff has been going on for such a long time in our game. And people have known about it. You hear stories going all the way back to some of the oldest coaches in the game. And the fact that these will be considered federal crimes just kind of leaves me not knowing what to say. When you hear terms like bribery being used? Well, that's bribery. I see bribery happening in business every single day. The reality is that you know, none of these coaches are being held to blame here. So we have certain players at this sit out we have other individuals who potentially even after the pills process might have to go to jail for federal crimes, but we're not seeing any coaches with the exception of Rick Pitino and that was his third strike on something that wasn't this. So this all kind of leaves me flabbergasted, and the reality is I I don't know if bans actually care about it. Now, we have to watch it every single day we talk about every single day. But I think man perspective unless they want to use it by saying, hey, your school's cheater or your coach teats, and then they move on because it benefits their own school. It seems like nobody really cares. Yeah. Why do you think that is that fans don't seem to care about the revealing of this underbelly? Now, I know we're not supposed to talk about politics when I'm going to tip toe into this area. Anyway, it kind of reminds me there's a there's a headline that came out today that said, you know, Trump is making voting great again. And it's almost why with today's midterm elections. We're seeing record-setting numbers for people coming out to vote because there was something so disruptive in that vertical. It woke everybody up. We're having something that disruptive in our vertical, but it's not opening everybody's eyes. So I don't even know if a major coach goes down if you know, Mark Emrick goes out, Mark Emmett goes down with something. I'm not saying that's going to say that's going to happen. But something like that happens to that the green will that be enough to shift people's thoughts about what's actually occurring. But the the the realistic matter of this whole thing is that fans when they come home, they want this to be their escape they want to be entertained. They wanna sit back and watch their team and enjoy their team, and that's it. So until something disruptive to that nature. Skate. We're not gonna have any moment. One thing that was attempting to disrupt was the G leagues offer of one hundred twenty five K for top prospects. We got about thirty seconds left. But I wanted your opinion on how you see the top high school talent responding to that G league offer. Well, look content is moving down. And what I mean? But we have contracts for NCWA conserve is for NBA. And now high school is the next thing you're seeing companies like overtime really take over in that market. If I'm a high school kid, if I can create my own brand and have one hundred or two hundred thousand Instagram followers. Why would I hold out? I mean, I would do to Darius Bazeley, right? What you get potentially a new balance deal for fourteen million dollars or overseas or more make money as soon as possible or just train and get ready for the NBA draft. All right. Thanks J. Shaved today. Thanks. Kate lobs it into Murray. He gets down the lane leans in riverside, layup. Remain. Oh, he is. He did sell to remember that. Resolution said about forty points, but the ball desserts gonna crowd. That was curry Irving in the seconds after the Celtics loss to the Denver, Nuggets frustrated after the nuggets Jamal Murray took a last second shot to attempt to reach fifty points, a shot that Irving believed was in poor form of us. Just one of the NBA's many storylines ten games into the season. We've got interim coaches and gangbusters scoring. And of course, there's always the Lakers. We are now joined by ESPN NBA analyst Ryan Hollins who happens to have spent a season with curry Irving wall with the Cleveland Cavaliers Ryan, what do you make of that end of game reaction, by Irving. I love it because career having is a guy who's so talented that it was tough at times to get him motivated for to play basketball because the game comes so easy to him. So that he was actually frustrated in irritated by something happened. This is absolute greatest thing to happen for the Boston Celtics in curry to see him motivated and loving to play basketball again, and really frustrated and keep in mind. Curry Irving is a guy himself who can go out is score a fifty points or forty points at the basketball game. So this is a guy who's not capable of doing what Jamal Murray had done in this situation. This is a guy very very capable of say come on young fellow act. Like you've been there before I know you're excited, but there's levels so this and there's rule so the game you got Murray putting up forty eight which is a huge number on par with the kind of big numbers that have been going up across the league for these first ten games. It's been eye-popping on pace for the highest scoring season since nineteen seventy seventy one with you. Watching these games. What do you think accounts for the jump? Well, the one thing that they've changed is obviously the perimeter rules. You can't put your hands on the defender, and there's been an emphasis to level things out in post why the post players had beginning so penalize that you can grab and hold guys in the post. And now, you restrict their emotion you essentially penalize guys for being big. But now in the post they're calling it just as tight as they are on the perimeter. I was joking last night with corden McGinty. I said coy the way you got to the free throw line, you'd average thirty points a game in today's NBA. So if you know how to create an advantage the NBA is turning into a true game of skill. And if you can shoot it you can drive it, and you are physical. You can have a fill Dan today's NBA I've never seen so many guys averaging eighteen in nineteen points a game. But it's great for entertainment. I love seeing the buckets in scoring. All right. So it's been a busy week in Cleveland for many reasons and one of them being that Larry drew he agreed to coach a Cavaliers for the rest of the. Now when you look at Cleveland place that you've been what do you see going on here? Well last season they stepped in and try to have somewhat of a youth movement through the playoffs and Tyron Lou tried to insert the young guys like the Jordan Clarkson, the nance's of the real into the system, and it just wasn't working. And you saw toward the end of the Cavaliers playoff run. Tyrod Lou made a push and said, I'm going with my veterans. These young guys are going to sit. I have to win the way that I know I'm going to win and they were very successful doing such and you see the battle again as the season started entire rule. Tyron Lou, I think they just agree to disagree and said I had to be the coach that I can be in. It's not forcing young guys into the lineup. So the Cavaliers are moving forward with this this youth movement, so to speak, and I think they started to do that Koby Altman and company last year. But now they're going go and Tyron Lou has chosen not to be a part of it. You seem JR Smith speaking out Kevin love could be on the chopping. Block korver. So all those veterans are essentially going to be out of Cleveland, and they're starting over all right here in L A, Ryan. So I gotta ask you in LA question. Of course. So Magic Johnson has said Luke Walton job as Lakers coach is safe. You're watching this team closely. What have you seen from Walton's coaching and should his job be safe? Well, the one thing is that Luke Walton is done a good job. But he has a lineup in a roster with the Los Angeles Lakers with a group of young guys who need more firm coaching. They need to be more held accountable. You're running a veteran system inch which worked in Golden State. But these young guys still need to learn a bit more in. This is a firm reason let me come back to LeBron James a Y LeBron James chose Los Angeles. Because you have a GM in the name of Magic Johnson who's willing to speak up who's willing to deliver those tough messages to Luke Walton of sorts so right now this they're meeting their speaking was nothing out of the ordinary nothing different. They. They are supporting Luke Walton, but this is necessarily a cause for concern. Because Luke Walton you gotta notice and you got to see that they are not producing and he is at the helm of the ship. All right. Thanks, ryan. Predate your time today. No problem anytime. All right coming up, huge news from one of the most important stories of the year. That's next. My name is Lauren. I'm thirty three. I didn't want my identity to be the smoking mom my first experience with jewel. I do remember being like this is good. It's it's it's like a cigarette. But not I don't miss smoking at all. Like, I can officially say it grosses me out jewel is the tobacco alternative that delivers nicotine satisfaction without cigarette. Asher lingering odor. Make the switch and J U L dot com slash sports. Warning. This product contains nicotine nicotine is an addictive chemical. I was told to be quiet, and I think that when somebody in high power is telling you to be quiet. You know when right when they realize you are abused. I think that that is a threat, and especially when their first concern should be to make sure I'm okay to get information for me to see if my other teammates were abused to see what else I knew to get to the bottom of it. He was say gymnastics just said, we're handling this. We got this like stop asking us questions. Don't talk about it because you're going to tip off the investigation. So I didn't want to jeopardize anything. Come to find out. They didn't report it right away. That was Allie. Raise men on January sixteenth from outside the lines talking about USA gymnastics role today. The US Olympic Committee has begun the process of revoking USA gymnastics status as the sports governing body. This move comes in the wake of the sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the sport with former national team trainer. Larry Nassar, serving forty two one hundred seventy five years in prison and also after USA gymnastics, many failed attempts to create a healthy and functioning organization here to help us understand the impact of this move is USA today investigative reporter Rachel accent. Rachel, why did the USOC reach this decision? I think this has been a longtime coming in their letter to the gymnastics community that they wrote that the new leadership that's been in place, his struggle to change the culture rebuild the leadership and serve the membership. Feel remember the USOC wrote to them in January and mandated a series of changes said you must do these things or we will come to this point, USA gymnastics. Continued to flounder and make some fairly questionable decisions even with new leadership. And so that's why we're here. Now, what are the next steps in terms of revoking this? What will we see happen next? So there'll be a process that plays out under the USOC's bylaws, the USOC will appoint a three person panel that it will designate from various councils, and that will be chaired by USOC board member they will have a hearing where the USA gymnastics, can you know, sort of present its arguments, and obviously the USOC we'll have made its case that panel will issue report with recommendation of with a recommendation of what should happen to the USOC board of directors USOC CEO, Sarah, Hersh Lynn can also issue a report to that board. And then based on those documents the board. We'll make a decision. That's final most notably the US's bylaws don't outline a timeline for this. So we certainly don't expect it to take forever. But there's nothing that says. It's going to happen tomorrow or next week or how that process plays out in terms of timing. It's easy to think of USA gymnastics as just our Olympic team. But obviously, there are thousands of athletes all around the country who fall under the umbrella of USA gymnastics, if this goes all the way through and USA gymnastics is has its revoked from the USOC committee. What does it mean for the sport? That's potentially huge ramifications. Certainly USA gymnastics could continue functioning as an organization just without that recognition. But part of what being the Olympic and gbi confers as a cafe in a credibility that draws people into that grassroots pipeline as you mentioned thousands of athletes. The USA gymnastics is one of the biggest end GB's with more than one hundred fifty thousand members. And so if that's not the entity I would expect that we would see people leaving the organization, you know, certainly in the interim while this process plays out the elite level the teams that are competing at worlds. And at the Olympics are going to be fine. USA gymnastics will continue sort of functioning as it has been in regards to them. But it's really the the grass roots that there are a lot of questions about how that could be affected. If it does lose its NGO status, if we're seeing some byles right now on the screen, and she along with so many other of our economy gymnasts were at the heart of making sure that so much of this. Show is brought to light what role can be stars play in ensuring. The next iteration of this organization is healthy. Well, I think part of what has gotten us here today has been the voices of survivors like Simone biles. You just head alley Razman on earlier who have really pushed for changed and said the organization is not there yet. They're not showing us that they get this cul culture needs to change. You know, Simone biles in a tweet lead to decisions that close the curly ranch and led to. Interim CEO Mary Bono, leaving the organization after five days last month. They have a powerful voice, and they know it, and it's certainly clear the USOC is listening or at thanks for your time today. Rachel. A new analysis done by outside the lines shows that student athletes are about three times more likely than other students to be accused of sexual misconduct or domestic violence at power five conference schools. This analysis comes in the aftermath of numerous scandals coming from high profile athletic departments in the last few years, including Baylor in Michigan state. In order to provide background and context on the findings. We are now joined by ESPN investigative reporter poll Levin, Paula what is the main takeaway from this analysis. Well, I think there's two things one is athletes are more likely to be accused in these types of cases than regular students. And although that's not terribly surprising. I think it's interesting to see just how much more likely they are to be named in these complaints. And then the question is will, you know, why is that why why are they being accused of these things more often? And I think a lot of people would say, well, this has to do with the culture among student athletes. There's a small percentage of people who say, well, they're being targeted. But I think the larger voice there is that there's something that needs to be done to address the behavior that these athletes are engaging in and the second takeaway from this study, I think is is looking at not just the numbers that we have. But that the numbers that we don't have and the number of schools that are suffering from a major lack of transparency and not providing these numbers to us, and, you know, leaving students, and parents and athletes and alumni in. Dark about how much of a problem. They really have yet. It's not the sexiest to ask how data is compiled. But I do think it's really interesting for outsiders to understand how this process works and some of the obstacles you face. So how was it compiled? Well, very slowly painstakingly over about eight months. I mean, Kate, I if you just go back to even just the previous conversation you had with Rachel about the gymnastics issue. I think when you look at entities that handle reports of sexual assault sexual misconduct. There is a real demand from the public to be more accountable and to provide these numbers and whether it's university governing body whatnot. And in our case. I mean, it took several months for us to get these schools to hand over the numbers. When I first asked for this information back in March, Kate, I think maybe four schools actually said, yeah, we'll give you this. We ended up getting to thirty two schools. But that was after I logged I think the other day six hundred emails hundreds of phone calls going back and forth. Saying, hey, this is an interest. That's of issue to the public that you really need to have a better accounting for how many complaints are being made against your student, athletes and even students in. Because for a lot of these schools, Kate, they couldn't even tell us. How many complaints have been made against students much less even the narrower subset of student athletes. Are you released this analysis on Friday? So there's been a bit of time for it to breathe what has the reaction been since? Then. I think there's been a lot of reaction from individual of fans or students from particular school saying, hey, you know, I was really disappointed to see how high the percentage was at my school. You know, can you address this? But honestly, what I saw more of people posting who either students or alumni at particular schools that didn't give us information saying, hey, you know, what's up here what we should have this. We should have this information. So and and I think it has someone advanced the conversation again saying look, we need to do something to address this. Because one thing we do point out in this in the story is that this hasn't changed over over several decades. This is still a problem and the numbers indicate that it it's still going on. All right. Thanks call. Appreciate your time. And you can read more about paula's investigation on ESPN dot com are coming up. What happens when you lower your guard in an Uber. That's next. -nology truth brought to you by cold. Truth teenagers can communicate entirely in emojis. How why birthday party pizza slice kitten sucker bulb pineapple truth? It's so easy to switch them. Save on car insurance at geiko dot com. What are you talking about paperclips shoulder? Shrug high five wizard hat what gogo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more. Tonight on ESPN. We tip off the college basketball season with the eighth annual state farm's champion classic four of the top teams in the nation number ten Michigan state and more on Kansas in the early game at seven and its fourth ranked Duke number two Kentucky will they're also available live on the ESPN app. You can watch anywhere. A cautionary tale emerging from the NHL as seven Ottawa Senators climbed into the back of an Uber last week and had the kind of candid conversation smack talking coaches assessing team effectiveness that athletes usually reserved for spaces far away from recording devices. Here's a quick sample of what went down in that Phoenix. Uber. What he wrote? Video action. Ever teach you anything just commentate happening. Here's a Simpson's heat. Here's the other thing too. We don't change anything over so lighting meeting like fiction. Three weeks side note on the kind of Uber passenger whose goals to get from point to point b without exchanging any words, in fact, when I see that a driver approaching has a stellar four point nine two rating, but is known for great conversation. I consider cancelling the right? I mean, I don't cancel it. But I consider it. So a lot of things to dig into here in the big questions swirling around the release of this video is whether or not it's a violation of privacy, many Uber's have amounted camera and in notification underneath obviously these passengers the Ottawa Senators said they were unaware they were being taped are. But what's also really fascinating about. This whole story was how it brought to light. What I assume is an age old practice athletes out on the town, speaking freely on recorded leaving rumors in their wake all across the city. I mean, don't we assume most of the New York Knicks and the nineties and the Yankees and the eighties got into cabs and chatted up the driver. Now here we have that exact scenario, but given the time in which we live instead of hearing. Third hand. I don't know. Like, all right. So Vinnie says Charles Oakley was in his caveat other day and Charles is fed up with how weak the Knicks are on the boards. Now, we have a four minute video that confirms everything everyone in Ottawa probably already thought about the team. But no players were willing to say on the record. I mean that is until they didn't know they were on the record that will do it for outside the lines today. NFL live is next. If you're a smoker, you know, switching isn't easy. You've tried vapes. And e six they just didn't deliver the satisfaction you expected but jewel is different. 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273: Tina Hay  What it takes to build a profitable content publishing business

My Quest for the Best with Bill Ringle

29:24 min | 3 months ago

273: Tina Hay What it takes to build a profitable content publishing business

"Hi. This is Tina author of Napkin Finance and you're listening to my quest for the best with Bill Rangel. Listen up small business founders, senior managers, and rising stars Bill Brindell here host of my quest for the best where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock your broke potential on each episode, bringing the inside stories from published and accomplished guests who want to share their knowledge and experiences. So you can be more successful in leading your people managing Your Business and navigating towards more growth than more impact in a changing and challenging landscape. Let's dive in enemy today Tina Hey, Tina's the founder and CEO Napkin finance a visual guide to money found in booksellers as well as on the web. A strong believer in financial literacy, Tina created a platform for users of all ages to learn finance in a simple and engaging way. She's also the author of the bestselling. Book Napkin Finance Build your wealth in thirty seconds or less from harpercollins. NAPKIN finance reaches over eighty million people in the US abroad but working with banks and financial institutions including JP Morgan, chase UBS and US bank among others as a social venture with a focus on financial empowerment. The company also provides content to nonprofits, schools, universities, and. Has worked with the White House Michelle Obama's better make room initiative as well as the US Olympic Committee before Napkin Finance Tina was the founder and CEO of Platinum Test Group Co founder and president of city tripping dot, com and the editor of city tripping Los Angeles she earned her undergrad degree from Ucla and an MBA from Harvard B. School teen is here to help us understand her journey and book Napkin Finance Welcome Tina Hi. Thank you for having me. It's great to have you on the show. Tell me when you were growing up who someone who influenced your inspired you that would be my dad. He has always been an inspiration to me both personally and professionally in the way that he's kind of managed his career and has been entrepreneurial but also very fair and ethical, and just a good human being overall and he's been really inspiring and his always inspired me in the way that I run my business and also live my life. Can you think of an example when you were little were even in school growing up when you made a decision that affected maybe where he went to school or what job you took? And you could trace it back to an example of your dad or some adage or wisdom that he shared with you. Yeah. You know I come from generally a very entrepreneurial kind of community and family, and so I think most of the decisions I've made have stemmed from that viewpoint and that kind of perspective that you can make your own opportunities. You can create your own ventures or businesses and create things yourself without having to do it for someone else I think they really important thing i. Learned. Though was that you know there are no shortcuts you really need to work hard and I think even now today when I see we work with a lot of younger people we work with you know we've worked with a number of creatives but also financial professionals and the one thing that I've noticed that's really consistent is how there is a very big difference between the people who really work hard and are proud of their work and put the time and energy into versus the people who expect. To move up quickly and don't really take time and effort to to deserve that kind of career advancement and so I think. Learning, about hard work and learning to look for opportunities in places, you may not expect were. Two important things that I learned growing up to remember the first time you sort of look back and realize, wow, I got there because of hard work and yet I mean, I think about it all the time I worked hard ever since I was in high school. I I started working. Started businesses when I was very young and of course, many of them didn't work out some. You would laugh at to this day if you heard what the idea was for instance. Yeah I'll give you a great example. was you know a long time ago? One of the first businesses I started was a patented away and this is before like everything became digital but a way that you. Staple and bind a paper at the same time. So you could actually use it within a copy machine or manually, but it was a new way of binding papers together, and this is because I worked in film and we would have all these scripts and there was a very manual process of. Putting, them together I mean, it's incredible. The number of hours that people would spend putting these binding these scripts together. This is totally irrelevant today because everything is read digitally. stapling and binding at the same time through a copy machine. So it really kind of. Made it much easier to kind of have this. Bound copy of the script instead of having a staple but in a way that would actually like really beautifully presented. So there you go. It's. Totally irrelevant today at the time was really interesting. I had a patent that was a you know that we put together for it. We had restarted production or manufacturing in China it was it was ridiculous I what pretty far it was a great learning experience and I, was young and so it was a lot of fun to kind of even just learn about the different. Ways or you need to think about to start a business it's amazing that you put together and what it really ills faces everyone listening who started a business or created a product can relate to the pain you're feeling by having to go through all this additional labor and effort for something that could be automated and you saw that and you ran with it. So you just not only identified but you want a lot of respect in the eyes of people who said you know what I get that I totally understand what you went through and how that product or company came about born of that difficulty you were encountering. Right right exactly. I think and again you know the one thing I will say is it's great to look for opportunities but I, feel like every idea has been taken and it's a lot of it is execution and persistence and timing you know. So ideas persistence are great but more than that. It's like it's really Makes a difference how much you commit yourself to it to finding a solution, but also finding a unique way of approaching it so true. So True Tina take us back to the moment when Napkin finance was born was a conversation with a friend, a doodle that you saw in a book that you've created or someone else created or reaction to a new story. What was the? Genesis. Yes. You know it was definitely accidentally inspiration was my own experiences and challenges learning about money and finance I was in business school at Harvard and came from a liberal arts background. I'd come in from working in film and in the startup world, and so for me, I've always been in visual learner I'm not a numbers person and I found finance to actually be very. Confusing and intimidating, and so I always used sketching and illustrations as personal tool. And after business who I went into finance for a bit and then started a company. That was focused on millennials and money and one aspect was education but it was really that that the content around money and finance that took off and people were really interested in and so it was almost an accident, but it's it was really interesting to see that there is such a demand for people easy to digest content around money and finance, and so that became our focus and it's been amazing to see the traction we've had ever since and how much people are really looking for in craving content that can help them make decisions in moments that matter or life decisions for themselves, their kids their families. It's a huge need to have something that not only explained mixed people feel. To have conversations and even ask intelligent questions. If you haven't had the opportunity to get your copy of not can finance or view of some of the illustrations. It's an set of educational illustrations to better understand, money and finance. It's out of charts and graphs. Now wait a second that doesn't do it justice. Think of this to me. It's like Matt groening Creator, the Simpsons and Warren Buffett the MIC is successful investor had mind meld inside your brain? And ideas to capture a key idea principal and then define it illustrated and show to begin to apply it on a single page. When I was in college, we were given a couple of courses the opportunity to bring in one sheet of notes to the final. So we had to synthesize twelve to fifteen chapters of physics chemistry, numerical computing page, and it was a lot of work, but it was so much fun. I love the challenge of it and obviously the more work you put in the easier the final was because into understanding, boil it down to something so. Clear and so accessible you really had to understand thoroughly is that kind of the approach that you take with creating each page each chapter of Napkin Finance. Yeah. So if y Cristeta because it's incredibly hard to make something especially a complex topic, really simple and. Easy to read and I, think people underestimate how much time that takes. So what's interesting is that we have a team of creatives but also team financial experts that has to come together to do that because the condon has to be accurate. And especially since we work with banks financial stitches, it also pasta pass by their compliance legal departments, and so there's a lot involved in making the content, really high end high level and accurate, and you know and also fun and engaging. So it takes a lot to get even one Napkin done incomplete it. What else is the name of Napkin Finance? What if I not covered that you? WanNa make sure that people understand about this not only as a book, but also as a community and as. Your mission. Yes. So I think what what the beauty of what we do is we don't sell any product so we're never trying to sell you a credit card or anything else are content is purely advocating for our readers in transparent and so I think that's the beauty for us and for our partners. So we we make sure that we maintain that education is our priority, and so that's really important I. Think most financial content comes from someone who has an agenda, and so it's really Important for anyone who's looking for resources in there are a lot of actually wonderful resources out there other than NAP could finance, but it's important to see what the source is, and if there is you know what what, what they're asking for. So oftentimes, it's really important to understand and of what your goals are and make sure that you're getting the best advice and it's in your interest and not you know to guide you into a product or service. So I think an integral part, of Napkin. Finance is the experience that it involves not just the technical theory but like you said to make it accessible in-includes, fun facts that makes the topics approachable and also cheeky humour that makes it memorable and I think it builds a relationship with the content and also with your brand for example, the mutual funds chapter ends with this original quote invest in diversified mutual fund to lower the risk of your investments invest in a gym membership to lower the risk of love handles care of nut can finance. Right yes a we it's interesting. We use humour because again, just making it more believable and you know a topic again like money and finance really turns people off of the humor has been just fun I mean we do a lot of it on our social media as well, which has been great. You know we have a lot of we call the one liners, and so we use those we kind of use them within our book we have them on the site, but we also have social media as well, and so that's been really fun a fun part of. Our messaging in our friend, it's a social mission as well as a business mission. So how do you see making money accessible at this point in time to be something that has a social mission because of were recording this now we're in the midst of the pandemic lockdown. Sure. We've also had black lives matter come to the fore and we're in the midst of a lot of confusion and misinformation. How important is it to your mission to make sure that this information accessible to noxious people who have the resources to get excellent education but also people who are struggling. To, get by and to have conversations about financial topics to make it more central and a successful in their lives. Yes. So a few things first of all of our content is free but what I would say is that now more than ever it's more, it's it's important to understand your finances in such a great time to kind of check in and have a maybe have a review of your financial plan and take action and so. I, think most people and I you know my my belief is that the smartest people we know don't know much about money and finance and defer to other people often times especially women to take their to really control their finances and make decisions. But what we've learned over the last four five months is that that's a dangerous thing to do. It's really really important to be on top of your finances. Knowledge is power to make decisions or understand how people who are managing your finances or maybe eib whether it's your CPA. Or financial adviser attorney anyone who's giving you advice. Everyone it's it's in your best interest to understand where your money is where it stands. You know what your opportunities are, where you can manage your credit and your debt and so on and again, make it relatable and simple, and then put it on autopilot because again financial education's really key, it should be working in the background. It's good to check in at some point, but it's important and critical because it's also tied to your wealth. Your wealth is tied tight your health, and so having your finance finances in order means you have better lifestyle you have less stress. You know it's it's so related to every aspect of your life whether it's working your. Family kids saving investing anything that you really how you live your everyday life planning vacations everything is related to finance it. So it's always important to be very aware of where you stand, educate and empower yourself to make better decisions and also bring on people and help that can make you that can help you with things that you don't understand. You know we always advise people to deferred of advisors and financial experts to make decisions. You know it's it's dangerous to kind of, do it yourself with a lot of financial areas in your life, and there are a lot of great qualified people who can make you help help make you make better decisions Tina. As people, you know friends, family colleagues, classmates. WHO PICKED UP NAPKIN finance they've come to you and told you some of the differences it's made in their lives. Can you share a story about someone you know who wasn't able to have certain conversations or review certain reports but now is able to and how it's made a difference yeah. So I can give you Have many examples but one interesting one is we work with a lot of women who work with people of all ages, and so we work often with women who've never understood where their money is coming in and out of how much they're spending their budgeting and so one of the interesting things has been empowering women and older woman as well. Over the age of, let's say you know not millennials, which is oftentimes our core or everyone's core demographic but older women who May, be going to divorce or are widowed or just want to be empowered about their own money. So week at a lot of it, you know a feedback from them where this is the first time that they've actually learned about budgeting or basic things like you know starting to invest their money or taxes and how again what's going on with their money and how they can make better decisions instead of deferring to someone else. So I can give you one example of gene. Who is a very affluent comes from a very affluent family has money has resources. She came to us at the age of I believe about fifty five or. Sixty and she had never budgeted her money. She didn't know how to budget. She didn't know what a budget was and so for the first time, we help to put together kind of a worksheet. She used some of our resources and for the first time in her life was able to understand her income and her expenses and to save money for things that you didn't even know that she could save money for, and this is someone who has had an his college educated who had a lot of opportunities in their life comes from opportunity but has found are content to be helpful even after this many years of different other people are having her spouse make her decisions. So, we we love hearing things like that. That's just one example we have other people who are. Making decisions around spending. Let's say another woman her name is sally who's about to take on student loan debt who came across our content, our Napkins and sweets like paying for college saving for college and was able to power herself in sign up for Fafsa and secure more funding for college and understood the impact impl- implications of taking student loan financing what that meant for the long term. If she couldn't pay it back, you know helping her understand how much she should take out how much she should save how much she should be able to kind of kate yearly and not end up in ten years from now with this kind of huge burden on her shoulder and so we love stories like that helping empower people when they're making the decisions instead of when it's too late. That's so important I'm sure every business leader listening to this now has opportunities to learn more about financial areas of their business whether it's the P. and L. Sheet or whether it's in their personal finances or taxes or investments, and I bet you that there are. Pages. Or chapters or topics with a napkin finance that can help you become more educated. So encourage you to take the time to dive in and find something that's relevant and useful in your work life or professionalize. Tina. What was the biggest challenge in writing the book? Was it getting started slogging through the middle or bringing it to completion? Lena the biggest challenge was, it's interesting. It was it wasn't necessarily the content or the the visuals they infographics. It was getting it all done very quickly. We had a very short window to complete the book, and so the team came together and we really kind of jammed through a few months of kind of night and day round the clock working and and to get the book done that was the biggest challenge was really just kind of the short window to get the book created in an up and running, but otherwise everything came together very beautifully. So in a matter of three months or six months we put the book together in less than six months, which is very, very short time for a you know the number of his and other kind of visual assets incorporated in the bug and the quizzes and so on. So there's a lot of content that we had to fit in and also make it visually appealing and funds. In just a very short window. Emphasize consistent. It wasn't like you could see the last three that got done in a short period of time. You just had to get out the door it is consistent throughout and that's really a tough thing to do. So Kudos to you and the team for that. Thank you so much. Did you have the vision from the beginning that you wanted to publish the book and also have it lead to a community? For the book, we were excited to have another way for people to engage with the content because it's been so. Fantasy kind of reach people in different. You know places in different places in their life making different types of decisions. So the book we never expected to have the impact that it has, but it's been amazing to see. You know it's been fun to see the different age groups to see the press around the great reviews but we always really we've always believed in the content. We feel like it really offer some amazing visual resources and really fun unique content with the humor built in that can engage people in a way that traditional financial education. Content can't one of the reasons I asked that question because as people write books in our our authors and thinking of putting together a book, not everyone has the idea of being able to distribute it online and use it in a lot of ways that you have with the licensing at what point did that idea come to you and how was that part of your negotiations with the publisher? Yeah. So actually all of the content in the book is unique. So it's a great question because it is very tricky how we have all we have. Content on our site with content for partners and we have content in the book and we also licensed content businesses. So we're very careful that all of it is very unique and very specific to that kind of platform where it lives. So the book content is different than what you will see on our website. Some of it overlaps some of the Evergreen content is difficult. You know if you're talking about budgeting to make it very unique in one way or another, but we try to make it all fresh depending on what form it's on but. Licensing is always a consideration were very careful. We create everything in house, but we're also very careful and we we really want everyone to have a different experience depending on whether they go to our website or they visit the buck. Dean are you ready for the Mike? Quest for the best lightning round? Yes. Let's get started. So early asked you a person who inspired you're growing up when you talk about your dad and his example when you're in your teens, what's a song that you found inspiring? I. Would in my teens I was obsessed with And I mean again, it was unless early inspiring but I just. You know the love their music, and it was just really fun to listen to I guess where the streets have no name. What's the most effective way that you find to get the word out about your mission with Napkin finance each week over the last six months. So I think social media is the most powerful plots warm to get out of engagement and to reach many people as you know, as we can because most people that's where they live people live on social media. So it's been a great way for us to engage with our readers and also get feedback. Has Been Twitter Instagram pinterest with what have you found works best for you. Yeah. Mainly, instagram in the last six months what would you say is the best hundred dollar purchase you've made I would say the last six months I've bought. Several books that have been really inspiring to me. So I would say that's probably been the most the best investment has been buying actual physical books one or two titles on them as a book by Maya Angelou to my daughter another book I read by Wayne Dyer bleep it's called making the shift I'm reading letters to. A poet with love. I try to kind of expand out of the business world for I. think that's great at night. I. Make sure that once I. Turn off the computer. I'm always looking for something to read that's fiction to take my mind off that area as well. What would you say is the most important habit routine or belief that you've stopped in the last year? That's Brought you the most pleasure personal satisfaction I would say I've stopped or I've made a more conscious effort not to go backwards or look in the past and I'm very kind of analytical and I look back and I kind of always assess like how I could have done things differently or better. But I think what I've learned especially in Cobra's life. So unpredictable. You just have to continue moving forward and since you've made that decision, what's it opened up for you more joy more free time or relaxation. I would say less more peace of mind more opportunity more excitement about ways that I can make an impact moving forward. It's great. The took more napkin finance and what would you say is one of the biggest misconceptions that people have about napkin finance I would say that it's it's aimed at younger people because it's more visual. And kind of sketching. But an illustration humor but interestingly, it's been resonated with people of all ages the what's really the most rewarding thing is hearing the people fight for themselves read it, and then buy a copy for a friend or a family member or child, and that's been the most exciting thing because with this book, we haven't had to force people everyone who's read. It has found some value ended now maybe. Someone may not care about cryptocurrency, but they will care oftentimes about something else investing or improving their credit. So there's something for everyone in the book in you know. So that's that's been exciting to see. The people are not only enjoying it themselves passing. Will Tina youthpass lungs so many great ideas today on my quest, the best I just want to thank you so much for talking about. First of all, your dad helped you understand that you make your own opportunities and hard work will take you places that just expecting doors to open won't an execution persistence timing pays off as an entrepreneur we all need to be reminded the value of that. WanNa. Thank you for helping us understand how you coordinated your team of creative financial experts to bring together this product and that it's different both online as well as the printed book and the humor is one of the techniques and ingredients used to make it. So relatable and fun for people to learn about a topic that's ordinarily dry and I love your mission about helping people understand such important part of our lives finances. And doing. So in a way that helps us grow and understand and look at things that we probably haven't been interested motivated to look at in a long time. So WanNA. Thank you so much. Tina for joining my quest for the best today. Thank you so much for having me a pleasure. Dina before we say goodbye for now where's a place that we could find out more but you and your work on line? Sherzer where www dot napkin dot com on social channels where at Napkin finance and the book Napkin Finance Build your wealth in thirty seconds or less available anywhere books are sold. But we're GONNA linked to all of the places that people could buy your book and Follow You and interact with you on social media in the show notes. So it's real easy people remember Napkin finance dot com, and when you go to this episode on my quest for the best, you'll get all the links to other topics that we talked about during the interview, as well as all the way to connect with you and stay current with what's going on at Napkin finance so. Tina, hey author of NAPKIN finance. Thank you once again for joining me on my quest for the best. Thank you so much. Really appreciate in. Five this is bill and I hope you've enjoyed this podcast interview on my question. The best be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcast, Google play stitcher or your favorite APP. So you never miss an episode full of stories, tips and insights for the Bishop's small business leader. Now, the quick request for you please go to apple podcast and itunes and give us a rating and review. My team and I really appreciate the feedback and we read every comment find out what you enjoy and what you want as we develop new content course materials and a few surprises that we have in store for you when you rate and review my quest for the best you other small business leaders find US subscribe to the podcast and joined the community. You can get the insiders enewsletter for small business leaders by. 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