35 Burst results for "Us Marines"

Army Awards $50M Contract for New SOF Sniper Rifle

Frontlines of Freedom

01:40 min | 1 d ago

Army Awards $50M Contract for New SOF Sniper Rifle

"Looks like we might be getting some new sniper rifles in the U. S military. The U. S Army just awarded a $50 million contract Tow bear firearms manufacturing arm snipers with the multi caliber sniper rifle preferred by special Operation forces. A five year contract will buy 2800 MK 22 multi role Adaptive Design or M. Brad sniper rifles that can be chambered for 338, Norman Magnum or 300 Norm remain them or the 7.6 by 51 NATO ammunition. The award comes two years after U. S Special Operations Command Award. The contract to Bear for the Do em Red Sniper the system. The new rifle were placed the M one or seven separate fel also made by barrack in the M 2010 enhance sniper rifle systems. The M red will. Well, Army snipers to shoot out the 1500 M with the barrel trembled for 15000.338. That's 300 M further than the M 2010 enhance sniper rifle, which is chamber for the 300 Winchester Magnum. The MK 22 is part of the Army's Precision Sniper Rifle program, which also includes the Leopold and Stevens mark five ht scope in a sniper accessory kit. Now. The Marine Corps has also chosen the M wrapped for his advance Sniper rifle program. The M Rad is set to replace the Marines. Current Mark 13 months seven Sniper rifle, which is chambered for the 300 Winchester Magnum. Along with all the other bolt action sniper rifles in the sea service.

U. S Army Norman Magnum U. Precision Sniper Rifle Nato Barrack Army Leopold Stevens Marine Corps Marines
Hundreds March in Chicago, Protesting Police Shooting of Adam Toledo

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

Hundreds March in Chicago, Protesting Police Shooting of Adam Toledo

"In oakland california. Multiple fires were set. Numerous windows were shattered and several cars were damaged during protests against police. Brutality last night authorities say bottles and other objects were thrown at police. Protesters were also out in chicago. Where a thirteen year. Old boy was gunned down by. Police john kenton zara. The president of the city's police union says the officer had a split second to react. After chasing adam to lehto down a dark alley while speaking to fox sean hannity kenton zara also mentioned the boys gang affiliation. I've seen this many many times. Where parents are just at wit's ends with kids who are being led astray and they know what to do with them especially at that age. Where they're so impressionable. The officer who also serves in the marine corps has been placed on administrative. Leave

John Kenton Zara Lehto Fox Sean Hannity Oakland Kenton Zara California Chicago Adam Marine Corps
Coast Guard Searching for at Least 12 People After Ship Capsized off Louisiana Coast

KIRO Nights

00:25 sec | 4 d ago

Coast Guard Searching for at Least 12 People After Ship Capsized off Louisiana Coast

"For 12 people missing after their seek or marine ship capsized off the coast of Louisiana. Captain Will, Watson says Search teams are focused. We engaged, the Coast Guard engages in a search and rescue effort. We're hopeful. You can't do this work. If you're not optimistic if you're not hopeful when you do it One body has been recovered. Six people have been rescued. President Biden says he can't

Captain Will Louisiana Watson Coast Guard President Biden
Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:29 min | 5 d ago

Japan to start releasing Fukushima water into sea in 2 years

"Japan's government decided on tuesday to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked fukushima nuclear plant into the pacific ocean in two years. An option fiercely opposed by local fishermen and residence the decision long speculated but delayed for years due to safety concerns and protests. Came at a meeting of cabinet ministers who endorse the ocean. Release as the best option. The accumulating water has been stored in tanks the fukushima plant since two thousand eleven when a massive earthquake and tsunami damaged reactors and the cooling water became contaminated and began leaking. The plant's operator. Tokyo electric power company said it. Storage capacity will be full late next year. The prime minister said the ocean release was the most realistic option and the disposing. The water is unavoidable for the decommissioning of the fukushima plant which is expected to take decades some scientists say the long term impact on marine life from low dose exposure to such large volumes of water is unknown onto the basic plan adopted by the ministers. Tepco will start releasing the water in about two years after building a facility under the regulatory authorities safety requirements. It said the disposal of the water cannot be postponed further as it's necessary to improve the environment surrounding the plant. So residents can live there safely.

Pacific Ocean Japan Cabinet Tsunami Earthquake Tokyo Tepco
Wet Notes - 4-9-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:46 min | Last week

Wet Notes - 4-9-21

"This is wet notes here scuba shock radio for april ninth two thousand and twenty one first up today. I'd like to give you an update on new netflix. Documentary see spiracy. You might recall that. I introduced you to this film in a previous segment of wet notes. Well it did premiere on netflix's advertised. And i had a chance to watch. She spiracy a couple of weeks ago. The film is eighty nine minutes long and it can be captivating and controversial. Like i said this is certainly raising a great deal controversy especially as it relates to sustainable seafood and fishing. There's a couple of organizations that they called out into spiracy earth island institute and the marine stewardship council actually marine stewardship council issued a response on their website within days of the premier and every day. I see something more coming out related to the controversy. But i encourage you to watch the film and then decide for yourself about what it is saying like. I said lots of controversy. That's spiracy on net flicks now. Here's something that. I found really interesting. I came across an article that talked about how scientists are using thin wales to map out what lies beneath the sea floor. Now according to to seismologists vaclav kina from the czech academy in prague and john nab elec of oregon state university in corvallis oregon the song of the fin. Whales are loud enough to penetrate the earth's crust and revealed deep structures. I guess they have a network of fifty four bottomed size meter seismometers that the tech sound waves traveling through the ground and they picked up the of whales as they were passing by. Now they have a one hundred and eighty nine decibels song and that song can last from two and a half to five hours as they did more analysis they were able to map the underlying rock structures. According to these guys this is just as effective as those air cannons that are polluting the ocean with all that noise how practical this is yet to be seen. But you've gotta admit it is interesting. Now here's an update on the lectured aluminum tanks situation. You might recall back at the end of february. I told you about luxembourg Decision to exit the aluminum tank business and that they were looking to sell their plants in the us and the uk more. Here's some good news. Metal impact out of elk grove village in illinois is acquiring the graham north carolina luxembourg cylinder plant metal impact is no stranger to scuba tank business. They've been around since nineteen fifty nine and in two thousand fourteen. They purchase worthington. Aluminum cylinders has been providing aluminum scuba tanks to excess scuba and see pearls for a number of years. We've got quite a few from excess scuba over the past couple of years and so we're pretty familiar with metal impacts. This is some good news for the. Us aluminum Scuba tank supply chain. There's absolutely no doubt that. The pandemic has had a dramatic impact on the scuba industry. But i guess it's not all bad news if you happen to be in the right place and it seems that hawaii is those right places especially for new diver certifications. There's a recent article in scuba diving magazine. Titled more hawaiians getting certified than before the pandemic turns out that even though the travel has been restricted to and from the islands more locals are turning to scuba aloha scuba on awad who had reported a one hundred and twenty percent increase in new diver certifications. In two thousand and twenty. They went from twenty seven in two thousand and nineteen to eighty three in two thousand and twenty spurred by whole families going for they're open water certification with some great diving. It certainly makes sense to mask up and dive in our aloha state. Last week i was trying to see if the ocean based climate solutions act of two thousand and twenty was being introduced in this session of congress. Well no update on that yet but i did come across something very interesting. There is a house select committee on the climate crisis now. This committee was created during the one hundred sixteenth congress. That was the last one so it hasn't been around long. But they did produce a climate action plan of two thousand twenty. And that's called the congressional action plan for a clean energy economy and a healthy resilient and just america committee is chaired by representative. Kathy castor from florida and the ranking chair is representative garrett graves from louisiana now. I watched their organizing meeting from march nineteenth. Let's say there's just a little bit of difference on the ideas of how to approach In the approaches in making the us carbon zero by two thousand fifty but as representative castor stated. It's time to turn recommendations into policy. Now i'll be tracking our actions and keep you updated here and finally you might recall. Last year the uss bonham rashard an eight hundred forty four foot long and fibia assault ship burned out of control for five days. Now that was in san diego california. But now senator. Marco rubio from florida is proposing that the ship be used to create an artificial reef down in florida little bit of background. The navy did some cost analysis On what it would take to restore the ship to operational status an estimated that that would be somewhere between two point. Five and three point five billion dollars but the cost to decommission and scrap the bonham rashard would be about thirty million dollars. Senator rubio didn't provide any details on where the ship might be sunk and be become an artificial reef but he did say that it could be done for less than thirty million dollars to scrap the ship. This word Happened it would be. We'll keep an eye on it and see where it goes. Fingers crossed that will have another artificial reef down in florida. Something that big to dive on. Well that's it for this installment of wet notes for april ninth. Two thousand and twenty

Marine Stewardship Council Act Netflix Vaclav Kina Czech Academy John Nab Earth Island Institute Graham North Carolina Luxembourg Scuba Diving Magazine Oregon State University Corvallis Prague Wales Worthington Oregon America Committee Bonham Rashard Kathy Castor
3.4-Magnitude Quake Rattles Suburban Los Angeles

KIRO Nights

00:14 sec | 2 weeks ago

3.4-Magnitude Quake Rattles Suburban Los Angeles

"Domestic bookings are 90% of pre pandemic levels. Four point earthquake hit just outside Los Angeles A little over an hour ago. There were also a couple smaller quakes this morning. KCBS TV S Leslie Marine

Earthquake Los Angeles Kcbs Leslie Marine
'The Trial of the Chicago 7' takes top prize at SAG Awards

the NewsWorthy

00:23 sec | 2 weeks ago

'The Trial of the Chicago 7' takes top prize at SAG Awards

"The movie the trial of the chicago. Seven took home the top prize. At last night's screen actors guild awards the courtroom drama one outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture separately actors of color won the top individual awards at sag for the first time. The late chadwick. Boseman was honored with the best actor award. While viola davis won the top actress prize. They're both awarded for their performances in the movie marines. Black bottom

Boseman Chicago Chadwick Viola Davis
Royal Navy jet crashes in Cornwall

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Royal Navy jet crashes in Cornwall

"Jet grounded after royal navy pilots survive. Crash in cornwall and this is from the times while it remains inappropriate to comment on the ongoing investigation. Further technical advice has enabled the chain of command make appropriate decisions on the continuing safety assessments of the wider fleet. What am i reading. Doesn't make any sense. Consequently the orient has resumed. Hawk won t one hundred update. Jeff oh it's an update. Thank you thank you liz. We'll have come out. There did say update at say update their. I skip that. I wasn't paying attention to that. So it's basically saying. After the fact the readiness is professional podcast. Costa we have in charge of this director. That's in my ear right now. Is trying to explain what i was just reading and just threw me completely by surprise. Anyway let me start with the The top where should have started here. The royal navy and raf have grounded forty four. Their hawk jets after one crashed in cornwall. Yesterday to pilots were forced to check from the royal navy aircraft moments before crashed into woodland navy. Sources said that the flying of the t. one variants of the jet had been temporarily paused. The cause of the crash was investigated. The grounded jets comprised eight used by the royal navy. Twenty two by the raf and fourteen by the red arrows Many of them they had in their inventory. They had to get rid of because they found out that captain anderson had actually piloted them but Anyway the minute ministry of defence said that the cause of the crash will be investigated. Safety is our paramount concern. The rif has decided to pause. Hawk t one operations as a precautionary measure. We will review the situation. As further information becomes available. The jet was on. Its way to take part in training exercise known as thursday war in which royal marines ships and aircraft. Carry out war games

Royal Navy Cornwall Woodland Navy LIZ Jeff Costa Captain Anderson Jets Ministry Of Defence
City of Everett pushes back on hate group

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:40 sec | 2 weeks ago

City of Everett pushes back on hate group

"It removed a banner showing a hate groups logo from a pedestrian bridge. Come was Eric Heights reports it was replaced with another sign promoting unity. The banner place without permission on March 23rd Red Reclaim America. With the Web address of the group Patriot front, Kathleen Baxter, with the city's Public Works department tells the Everett Herald it was removed from the bridge overlooking Marine View Drive in a couple of hours. Then, on Tuesday, the city put up a new banner from the same spot displaying the message. All are welcome and average. No place for hate stickers promoting group have appeared around the city in the past couple of years. The city says it's not known to Patriot Front has an active local chapter or of its trying to recruit members.

Eric Heights Kathleen Baxter Everett Herald Public Works Department America Patriot Front
Anchorage man sentenced for falsely marketing goods as made by an Alaska Native

Native America Calling

01:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Anchorage man sentenced for falsely marketing goods as made by an Alaska Native

"And anchorage man was sentenced to five years probation. After being found guilty of illegally marketing items he sold as being made by an alaskan native artists came. Nba trip crouse has more on march tenth. The us district judge also sentenced six-year-old lease krenek to pay two thousand five hundred dollars in restitution and surrender more than one hundred twenty five thousand dollars in retail products. According to a joint news. Release from the us. Fish and wildlife service and the indian arts and crafts board skunk was charged with a felony violation of the indian arts and crafts act. The law makes it illegal to fossil market products is native made. Skunk was also charged with a misdemeanor violation of the marine mammal protection. Act according to the release the charges stem from two thousand fifteen whence chronic owned the arctic treasures. Gift shop downtown anchorage. He sold a polar bear skull to an undercover agent of the us fish and wildlife service in violation of the marine mammal protection act in two thousand seventeen undercover agents. Visited skornik store again announced about carvings. Skirt told the agents that an alaskan native artists from point hope made them but the carvings were actually made by s- chronic during his probation chronic will be prohibited from working with animal products. In anchorage on trip

Krenek Indian Arts And Crafts Board Anchorage Us Fish And Wildlife Service Crouse NBA United States Skirt
Imperiled Freshwater Turtles Are Eating Plastics

60-Second Science

01:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Imperiled Freshwater Turtles Are Eating Plastics

"What happened is i started cutting open. These specimens that had been preserved sitting in the same collection for five or six years. And i just started took a dribble cut off. The shell opened up. You know looked at the stomach. Contents and i was shocked to find that in the ten animals that i looked at two of those animals had plastics in their stomach. Gregg polly's original plan was to compare the diets of western pond turtles. Native to the creeks of the uc davis meriem with those of redbeard sliders that have been introduced but that all changed when the herpetologist from the urban nature research center at the natural history museum of los angeles county began to look inside the sliders. And then suddenly. I thought oh man. There's a much bigger story here. Which is that. they're ingesting plastics. And we know almost nothing about plastic ingestion freshwater turtles we know. It's a huge issue marine turtles. But no one's looking at this and freshwater turtles. Plastic ingestion has been reported over and over again in each of the world's seven types of sea-turtles. But there is another three hundred and fifty two types of turtles and only five studies have ever concerned themselves with plastic ingestion in those species. That's despite the fact that more than half of all turtle species are considered threatened with extinction. Turtles are among the most imperilled groups of animals on earth freshwater turtles around the world are declining in. So you're not in a researchers aren't going out in euthanizing turtles and putting them into the museum collections on a regular basis. You know we do that for lots of other species but we're not people are going to be doing it fraternals because it's just not the right thing to do from a conservation perspective.

Gregg Polly Davis Meriem Urban Nature Research Center Natural History Museum Los Angeles County
'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

Environment: NPR

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

'Zombie' Urchins Are Wiping Out Kelp Forests

"California francisco. has a sea urchin problem. They've exploded in numbers off the northern california coast and these purple spiky urchins are wiping out crucial kelp forests so scientists are searching for ways to slow him down. Here's npr's laura summer diving. A kelp forest is a lot like walking through a real forest. The seaweed is thirty to sixty feet tall. It's very surreal. You're kind of coming around. And then you have this large canopy over you. That's kind of filtering light. At least that's how it used to be says. Meredith mcpherson a graduate student at uc santa cruz. She and her colleagues found that ninety. Five percent of kelp forests have disappeared in counties north of san francisco. Cal provides a key habitat for all kinds of marine life. We were expecting something like that. But it doesn't really make it any easier to digest in terms of the actual loss of the coastal ecosystem because of an ecological double whammy. I came marine heat. Wave known as the blob. Water temperatures rose far above normal then came a more direct attack. Purple sea urchins. Their veracious grazers. They devour kelp. Sometimes we see dozens of them. Crawling up the stem of the kelp and kind of taking it down from there. Normally urchins are kept in check by their main predator off northern california a giant starfish sea star scientists call them known as the sunflower see star. But they've been wiped out by sea star wasting disease. Scientists think that both the disease the blob of warm water were made worse by climate change even now with most of the kelp off northern california gone the urgency

Laura Summer Meredith Mcpherson Uc Santa Cruz Northern California NPR Francisco California CAL San Francisco
Inconsistencies in Vaccine Administration Remain As More Americans Get Vaccinated

5 Things

01:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Inconsistencies in Vaccine Administration Remain As More Americans Get Vaccinated

"Twenty eight point six percent of people in the us have received at least one covid nineteen shot and soon very soon almost all americans will be eligible for their doses but there are still inconsistencies between the states as white house correspondent marine. Groppy tells us it's still unclear why some states are acting faster than others so an increasing number of states are opening up vaccines to the general public which made me wonder why some states are doing that faster than others. I assumed that the states removing. I were those. That are farther along in the share of their residents vaccinated. But that's not necessarily the case Some are like alaska. Which was the first state to make. All adults eligible earlier this month but mississippi which was the second stay continues to rank near the bottom for for vaccination rates not just for all adults but also for senior citizens which is one of the most high priority populations because seniors are have a high risk of not just getting kobe but of serious implications if they do get it and the experts i talked. You said there are different reasons why some states are moving faster than other states. Some governors might be more confident in the increasing amount of vaccines that are coming. There are also demographic differences among states and some states may not be filling vaccination appointments as quickly as other states. That could be because it's harder to make an appointment or to get an appointment into state or it could also be that they're more vaccine hesitancy among their residents and if that that is happening then you wanna make sure to make as many people eligible as possible to get the vaccination numbers up. You don't want these vaccines sitting on the shelf. You don't want ex vaccine appointments going empty. Especially as corona virus cases Seemed to now be rising and also as variants continued to

Groppy White House Alaska Mississippi United States
Fire destroys Los Angeles County LGBTQ pride lifeguard tower

KZSC Programming

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Fire destroys Los Angeles County LGBTQ pride lifeguard tower

"Some kind of distressing news out of Southern California. But with a rebo ending, Um, the LGBT Q Pride, Lifeguard Tower, Uh, down on Long beach was, uh Burnt to the ground. This'll reporting from Rachel Trend of CNN. City of Long Beach, California is working to rebuild a symbol of LGBTQ inclusion after it was destroyed in a fire that officials believe was an act of hate. This happened overnight on Tuesday, March 23rd. Long Beach Fire Department says the city's pride lifeguard tower was fully engulfed in flames early Tuesday morning. The tower had been a symbol of strong support for the diversity within the ranks of the Long Beach Fire Department and the community since it was painted During Pride Month in 2020 by the Marine safety division of the Long Beach Fire Department, who run the lifeguards. Jeremy Rocha, lifeguard who helped paint the tower told CNN affiliates, KCBS quote. I was pretty emotional with what happened. I just couldn't really fathom the fact that it had burned. Lifeguard tire was painted in the rainbow colors on Don't worry that in 70 so over the years go Well, the department says the cause of fires under investigation Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia has little doubt this was an act of hate. And gosh, she is one of several city leaders that believe the fire was intentional. Councilwoman Cindy Allen wrote on Facebook quote. These towers are made from fiberglass and have no power or gay or gas capabilities. We haven't had a lifeguard station burned down since at least the 19

Long Beach Fire Department Rachel Trend CNN Marine Safety Division Of The Jeremy Rocha Long Beach Southern California Kcbs California Robert Garcia Cindy Allen Facebook
Ship 'partially refloated,' but still stuck in Suez Canal

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ship 'partially refloated,' but still stuck in Suez Canal

"Rescue workers have managed to make some progress in on blocking a massive ship stock in the Suez Canal L. services firm says engineers have partially refloated the colossal container vessel the ever given the continues to block traffic through the Suez Canal but hasn't provided further details about when the vessel would be fully set free satellite data from marine traffic dot com shows the ship's bulbous bow ones will be launched in the canals eastern bank has been rescued from the shore nearly a week ago the skyscraper sized ever given got stuck sideways in the crucial waterway creating a massive traffic jam and holding up nine billion dollars worth of goods each day I'm Charles through this month

Suez Canal Charles
Project Sealab 1 Report  Part 2

Scuba Shack Radio

07:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Project Sealab 1 Report Part 2

"Today wanna conclude my two part series on the project sea lab one summer report from june of nineteen sixty five to recap impart one. I chuck through the background. Information contained in the report c. Labs sea trials and the ultimate successful placement at one hundred ninety three feet off of argo island near bermuda. You might recall that. The four aqua dots anderson barth manning in thompson had just entered a habitat on july twentieth. Nineteen sixty four for their eleven day mission first off. They needed to make repairs on all the systems that were not operable. The initial report says that the subjects sounds like a clinical experiment which i guess it was slowed their pace in that fatigue coupled with shoulder joint discomfort was noted their appetites were good and digestion and elimination where normal also the report stated that their sensory perception remained unchanged and the joint discomfort eased with time. Now there are quite a few photographs in the report of the men in and around. See lab during the mission. Unfortunately the photos are not really that. Good copy i have well. What worked did they do. According to the report the subjects performed work tasks outside of c. lab investigating marine life cleaning debris on the ocean floor surrounding c. lab taking pictures of their operations in photos of the small one man. Submersible called star one which was sent into the area for evaluation. Also described are two significant incidents that occurred during the mission one of which was a serious nature. The other was related to nitrogen narcos and that hit to team members the nitrogen narcos incident actually happened when two of the aqua noughts entered the transformer room of the lab without dr mark six gear. It says that they immediately experienced coaches had to leave and then helium was pumped in to prevent further issues with nitrogen marcos's. The more serious incident happened when manning apparently struck his gas control yoke against a habit and it accidentally closed it as he was depleting gas supply. He knew that something was wrong and made a hasty return to see and lost consciousness as he entered. Fortunately anderson heard manning's tanks see lab and found him lifted him above the water applied resuscitation and with the assistance of barth and thompson. He was saved. He remained active with the crew for the remainder of the mission. The only issue was a severe hemorrhage to the whites of his eyes on wednesday july. Twenty ninth nineteen sixty four. The mission was terminated due to unfavourable weather predictions and at twenty three fifty six. That's eleven fifty six. Pm c. lab was lifted off the bottom and the arduous task of recovering. The men and a habitat began on august. Fourth deok were taken out of decompression c. Lab equipment was packed and stowed for shipment and on april fourth nineteen sixty four at eleven thirty. A m readme. Jk laden chief of naval research congratulated sess and officially terminated c. lab one. Some interesting things were noted for example in the first paragraph of the summary. Report it states. The men during the occupancy lab accentuated their personal idiosyncrasy during one period excessive use of foul language developed as well as an independent attitude with respect to the surface support guests. They didn't appreciate papa topside trying to control them now. I want to quickly cover some of the findings. No surprise was that handling of the habitat was difficult. Especially when there were waves they also found that nitrogen percentage decreased over time as it was being absorbed by the sea water and could use compressed air to make up the o. Two since nitrogen absorbed four times faster than oh two and the helium didn't dissipate. Another finding was that the hookah system failed to perform satisfactorily. Apparently the pumps were noisy. Overloaded easily report also outlines some findings on the men one interesting note was regarding the selection process. It said that there might have been too many potential leaders leading to an unwarranted degree of independence below. The conclusions stated that human subjects could live and work under pressure and one hundred ninety three feet and while all major systems work many were primitive. The report suggested that the divers could spend six hours outside each day also provision for adequate body heating while swimming around was a major problem even though the water temperature was sixty nine degrees fahrenheit the project. Sea lab summer report concludes with a series of recommendations and those recommendations include a better handling system a higher degree of independence from surface support assigning one man full-time to housekeeping they dry vehicle for transporting and a final recommendation that a c. lab task group of twenty five to thirty five people involved in future. Rnd in the man in the programs be put in place so that concludes part two of the c. lab one office of navel research report from nineteen sixty five. We know now that c. lab to went to a successful mission before the tragic events of c. Lab three but in one thousand nine hundred sixty four at the height of the space race. We were also exploring interspace

Argo Island Anderson Barth Manning Dr Mark Thompson Manning Fourth Deok Bermuda Chuck Marcos Barth Anderson Swimming Office Of Navel Research
Wet Notes - 3-28-21

Scuba Shack Radio

06:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Wet Notes - 3-28-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shock radio for sunday march twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one first up today. I want to give you an update from reef or the reef environmental educational foundation. They have released their two thousand and twenty two field survey trips and it's pretty neat. They have eleven trips. Planned in two thousand and twenty two starting with saint vincent in february and that is being led by amy lee. For those of you who listen to the show. I had amy on the show last july. They also have a cuba trip in march followed by raja arm pot in april. May june will feature saint lucia and roett tan. july is. the red sea and hawaii is in august. The september two thousand and twenty two baht trip is already sold out grand. Cayman is october bon. Air's in november and the year closes out in december. In 'cause you might wanna take a look at the reef website for all the details availability and pricing. These trips. look pretty awesome last week ned. who's a dive master at. The shop passed on a new york times article about looking for climate solutions and this article was written by catrine einhorn. Essentially she reported that ocean bottom trawling for shrimp whiting. Cod and other fish emits as much carbon dioxide into the air as the entire globalization industry. Now this was based on a study published in the journal. Nature and it was pretty enlightening. About how trawling releases. Immense amounts of carbon from the ocean floor and that leads to more acidification of the water and that reduces the oceans capacity to absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide. You can check out the entire article on the new york times website look for climate solutions by katrina einhorn. There's another piece of good news. Out of molly s this month. The honolulu star advertiser reported that a trained response team was able to free young. Humpback whale from gear entangling. It's left pictorial flipper. They were able to free about fifty to one hundred feet of line from the flipper but not we're able to get the Entangled line out of its mouth. They are hoping that that will ultimately free itself. They haven't seen the whale since it was freed. Apparently it wasn't in great shape but at least now it has a chance. They recovered gears being analyzed to see if they can determine the origin now. The efforts were led by the hawaiian humpback whale national marine sanctuary in partnership with cardinal point captains k key koala project and ultimate whale-watch. Now i've had the opportunity to go out with ultimate whale-watch from lana. A couple of times was very happy to hear of their support. We carry a lot of aqualung equipment in our shop and like most businesses twenty twenty taught many of us a lot of lessons. Well i recently sent out a message that they are introducing. A new aqualung is a bit of a rebranding. They're using a new tagline beyond the expected in the message. They said the twenty twenty taught them to expect the unexpected time to seek out the unexpected. If you check out the aqua lung website they further state that they are for the ocean exploration for ocean understanding and for ocean conservation. The aqua lung site also has a really inspiring short two minute video to get you inspired. Stay tuned for more from akwa. Long as they go beyond the expected earlier in the week. I got an email from nicole. Russell dima vice president of operations and i e mail had a lot of different information but one of the items that stood out said las vegas is open for business that means they are in fact planning to hold the demon. Show two thousand twenty one in las vegas in person and not some very exciting news. There was a learn more link in the email that took you to the dive equipment and marketing association's website where they gave you a list of all the trade shows conventions and meetings scheduled in las vegas of over five thousand or more attendees in the next twelve months. Now that was an interesting list. F why the marijuana business daily or m j biz con two thousand twenty. One is expected to draw thirty thousand people. And it's just one month before dima for all you dive pros out there. Mark your calendar for demon show two thousand twenty one november sixteenth to nineteenth in las vegas. Nevada can't wait to get back to dima and finally earth day two thousand twenty one is less than a month away earth day is actually april twenty second however it looks like this year. They are promoting three days of climate action. It starts on april twentieth. There are three lead organizations working on this educational international or education international the hip hop caucus and earth uprising will will be organizing three separate parallel climate action summits on april twentieth and twenty first ahead of president biden's global leaders climate summit on april twenty. Second what a difference a year makes. What a different political climate additionally earth day dot org will be producing the second earth day live digital event on april twenty second. Check out the website on earth day dot. Org for more information. Well that wraps up wet notes for sunday march twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one here on scuba shack

Reef Environmental Educational Raja Arm Roett Tan Catrine Einhorn Katrina Einhorn The Honolulu Star Advertiser The New York Times Amy Lee Hawaiian Humpback Whale Nation Saint Vincent Saint Lucia The Red Sea Cayman Ocean Exploration For Ocean Un Las Vegas NED Akwa Cuba
How Does Cuttlefish Camouflage Work?

BrainStuff

02:02 min | Last month

How Does Cuttlefish Camouflage Work?

"Cuttlefish be cephalopods stunning ability to instantly change color and texture to blend into their surroundings. Have another newly discovered trick. Researchers have found that these squidgy creatures can freeze their camouflage palette and lock it in place for up to an hour without any energy consuming input from their main nervous system that superpower to hold their disguise for long periods to avoid being detected and thus to avoid being eaten it also helps them snatch their own prey as they can remain essentially invisible as they lie in wait. The finding published in the journal is science not only reveals yet. Another clever strategy of these ocean floor dwelling masters of disguise. It also lends further guidance for engineers hoping to borrow from the animals tricks to develop new technologies such as much that can spring into three dimensions and soft bodied robots. That could say wrap around a human leg to provide support as with many discoveries. Scientists stumbled upon this one nearly by accident. The researchers were working at the marine biological laboratory in whole massachusetts. They were trying to trace. How the cuddle. Fishes nervous system directs. Its skin to transform its three d texture within seconds to blend into the background of say Kelp or iraq when these sliced through one of the two main nerves that runs along the side of a cuttlefish expected. The animal would lose. Its camouflage on the corresponding side of that narrative but instead the three dimensional texture provided by nodes on the skin of the cuttlefish called pathway stayed intact we spoke with trevor ward hill co author of the study and a neuroscientist at the university of cambridge. He said it was really quite surprising. In fact when i saw it generally when you cut input to a muscle it just relaxes and that's the end of it. We thought we did something wrong. But repeat takes. The procedures showed. The phenomenon was no fluke. The animals by the way. We're not killed by the procedure and we're able to continue swimming and feeding in a tank at the nba l. facility. The teams finding is the first time this kind of lock or catch muscle as it's known has been detected in any cephalopod

Marine Biological Laboratory The Journal Trevor Ward Hill Massachusetts Iraq University Of Cambridge Swimming NBA
"us marines" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"us marines" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"This is daniel for gela. And you're listening to the ai. In business podcasts. We had some great episodes in the past from folks in the public sector. We talked to the head of digital of the country of france. We've talked to leaders in the united nations and the always cd and gotten some of their tapes on trends and perspectives. Away is relevant for them. Thinks that for me. I think really reflect on the business community in relevant for business folks thinking about strategy use cases as well. Today we interview the former ohio. Cto of the marine corps cyberspace operations group roman yet. Kaminsky joins us. This week roman was actually introduced to me through a leader in the department of homeland security. Who i met at the united nations event in geneva with up by email. Hey you got catch up with this fellow. Roman we had a lot in common had some great conversations about some topics and frankly his take on. The relevance of artificial intelligence in cybersecurity is one that i think all companies need to hear a in cybersex machine. Learning in particular is one of those not going away. Transits patently obvious that in spaces like cyber second fraud machine. Learning really is the name of the game. It is going to be the only path forward. All the vendors in this space are integrating more and more of these technologies to be able to be more robust and deal with the more nimble challenges out there in the world and there's hardly anybody who knows more about those challenges out there in the world in the united states department of defense so romans perspective on where machine learning fits in why and how it's relevant. I think it'll be useful for folks who have business on their mind to again. I really liked to pull in perspective from outside of business and draw the relevancy For some of you listeners. Who are tuned in if you also enjoy doing that if you like pulling in different trends and if you like being able to find transient your sector or sectors that you're interested in..

Roman united nations daniel gela united states ai Cto department of defense Kaminsky ohio geneva france marine corps fraud
"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

01:41 min | 11 months ago

"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"Sign Up, get free shit agok serving early, and also some other perks like free tickets to events and stuff about. Please feel free to support a bunch of people that also you might also get a out like my Patriot support a governor. Governor is. Governed Soon Royal Navy. He's chef Goddamn seal not he's American is British. Royal. Navy EMC's the is is awesome chef. We recently had a discussion about whether heating. Baked beans is the same cooking beans, and the educate may saying that you don't Cook Bike Baynes you reheat baked beans. You don't even eat them. You read a got quite animated. Got Trucks Nelson Dude. He support the PUCK. A longtime is one of my Patriot support us. Thank you very much. Golf left. You love to the family, but the rest of the navy can be a little bit. Apart from the members of the Royal. Navy listen to podcasts. They are awesome apart from another member of the Royal, Navy Simon Piles. He's also a patron supporter. If I'm not sure if he's still serving or not go in ended out of the Royal Navy like flipping duck out of the water. I don't I don't think he understands what he wants to do. is in woman. Woman is out never the less Simon piles is also one of my pay. Child support as Would not be corrected me to mention gove without mentioned incitement because you never know, someone might get a cobb on that one as you mentioned without you just don't know on these royal ladyboys. They're sensitive. SOS silent pilots is also an individual. He's also part of the force he's about batterings are safe and he's also fellow Welshman. Thank you Simon.

Soon Royal Navy Simon Piles Royal Navy Cook Bike Baynes cobb EMC Golf PUCK gove
"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

07:17 min | 11 months ago

"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"It really upset me that I realize it's the the obvious anonymity of people. And their input into how you think you're doing. You know back in the day. I didn't give a fuck about somebody in Philadelphia or or Taiwan commenting on something I did. It's like. They, said like some Guy Taiwan, said the debit fucking because it's on twitter at all, things are equal. You can kind of see how people can take things a little bit more personally than they should, so I just cut it off net and I say it's like we're. WEIRDO's go for company, and it just triggers everybody 'cause they're fucking Weirdos, you know. Yeah, I I have a rule. Where stumped responded negatively. It's actually. I, Rick I picked up the Joe Rogan I. Man It is hard, sometimes fucking hard. Check it anymore. I never checked my mentioned. Though the somebody talk to go, eat my long or whatever? Some of them cut me deep right. I did I remember to buy interview? level. Levinson. What is a? Soothing power registered officer. became a he space explorer. He's a is a cool guy. Loves. Someone isn't youtube someone on their Cut Me really deep. On there. eleven eleven is a great guy. But, but you man. He's sick. Of Me. Also right comment. I am. Let let finding time to let you know may a night this is. What made him I and goes online. Put some I'm put some negative comment, which is director of the person the? Single Person Right now. Politics a different when we talking about stuff like you I do. They. They just credit for tension. That's exact- grind with central I. Mean you look at some of the shit that happened over this lockdown, right? It started in Sam Smith. Had someone shoot a video of him crying like weeping openly? He did that for one reason attention. My man can't go gives efficient at the nightclub on TV or an MTV so he's got cry on fucking cels media, right? That's one thing then you got. The now is Colonel Tom Because. He was Captain Tom Minute the ninety nine year, old gentleman, who served in World War Two. You said you know what I'm GonNa. Do A fucking soup. I'M GONNA walk around my guarded. fucking ever to make money for the just fucking has some single social responsibility. Now if you look at these things, objectively, you will I'm really proud to be. Part British waste British might my kids British? I live here twelve years. I'm proud of that kind of stuff that Catherine Thompson. That's one of the things that makes England one of the best place in the world at. That intestinal fortitude I admire it right and then. Who, who's who's got more caught though in the real world, unfortunately proton doesn't it's this fucking Guy Sam? Smith and I don't know him from Adam currently. He's a good singer. I think he fought up the bond theme he did, but they might you that. Radio Ready radiohead had nailed it right? But a lot of times. The way people get clouded in this world. It just doesn't seem fair and I. We were talking about how this thing will change. How people live their lives from here on out? Hopefully we will seem people like Captain Tom over due to just WANNA. Get some attention by weeping openly UW and also. As a father we talked about this before I. Want my children obviously be socially responsible self self disciplined self determination, but at the same time I want them to be. Non Fragile you know. I want them to have a thorough ability a resilience that it took me a long time to acquire it. Served in the Marines to do it, but. I want them to not be affected so adversely by such. Not Serious Shit I mean. We're talking about Canton here to go fight the Nazis. That was his fucking tactic Harry a lot of these young people. They got sitting their house and watch. Fuck in reruns Laviolette. That's completely different should fuck up them saying so when I see people kind of you know I. Posted something the other day about that old movie with dude got the sunglasses and he takes him off. He sees one way puts them on, and it says something else. Roddy Roddy Roddy Piper movie anyway, and it's funny 'cause it's like you know. You know whether they're talking about you know. The idea of being locked down equals communism, and it's like we'll see if you have nothing to compare anything to everything's communism, everything's racist. You're taking anything personally, and that doesn't. That doesn't bode well for those people when they grow up, have to have responsibility and pressure. Put on them because if they're gonNA crack it some shit like that when you have real pressure like. Like, being a parent reading household. Try to make your way in the world end pressure will crack you and your brain in those people who rely on you will be fucked, so that's the whole point that I was trying to make with the whole Sam Smith Captain Tom. Thing but you know as I say there's always people who are. As as as high minded as you. I thought that comment was made like dunes amazing. They took it as think Shitty, and it's like it's not usually exclusive saying an nuances, not something. That's a thin acquiring on social media. Now. Astonished me about coming saw. What May. We is is pretty astonishing by the generation. We know fucking hot coil. From my experience. Just going through life man. Shit Shit fucks with NOI accounting, so it changes you. You do not stay on the same goals of the Post. You don't hold the same values and standards all the way through you may think s- came close to what they know, but not no drastic changes but you. Hugh not the same person. When as when you're younger? Cap In trouble right now. Generation when you consider that guy is lived through, I mean he is the mind right? He is the man he was when he was fighting the Nazis. He's the same Guy Right now when you can sit. That was the full excite Moon Landon. ASSASSINATE, all fucking mind strikes in the UK the fucking Korean War the Falklands conflict the Gulf War. facials, officejet, Iranian embassy siege. Woman Prime Minister. Margaret Thatcher nine and then considered technology. smartphones Internet all of this stuff. The same. He doesn't give a shit. The, exponential of speed, in which things kind of accelerated people that generation must be like whatever. And I. Think I I admire the fact that they don't get. To off their center. It seems like a lot of times..

Sam Smith Captain Tom Taiwan Roddy Roddy Roddy Rick I Captain Tom Minute twitter Guy Sam Margaret Thatcher Philadelphia Colonel Tom Joe Rogan MTV Levinson Canton radiohead UW UK Catherine Thompson
"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"You have you starting got a real bad reaction to the respiratory isn't the symptoms they give you this antiviral in it lessons to a point where you don't have to go to hostile. That's the we should be thinking about like ninety nine point. Eight percent of the people don't have to hostile. That's Maine's. The other people who care home, so that's the, said we all the folks. Just getting wiped out swath of them just terrible. Yeah like I going. Is this kiss political point-scoring in outrage media but the? Thing is. We. It's a blessing really that when you go out when we talk mutual going on, we're talking about people on the street and say hello and. A lot of people, the same people that will be inside stuck in mental and social media right. Mental. It will be going Imagine imagine you. You would imagine you would want round right on your Social Media Ki- like profiled his is like. Yeah, but the. The Night Ninety five percent of his likes saw left Leslie. You know Like to Kobe tweet once. I. Think a lot of ways because people have now been forced to concentrate on their online avatars and their online in their mind shit because they're realizing put all the realizing that they're. They're probably better off in it is. My Kid calls irs in real life than being weird, super angry. Super triggered personnel social media because I I, I don't. I don't do my social media. Right I. I do some Shit on instagram. Not Funny I. Try not to offend, but twitter I just can't do it because I. don't care about some. Do not liking what I do. But it's funny because I. Don't do it right, so people go on twitter. You Know Tammi Alaska. Call me every name in the book and no replies and the kid even angrier. up and they tell you they can dig it. Do something horrible to your dog and your? Get even more fears I'm just imagining the job with the beard in his mom's basement. Break into keyboard. Because I won't. Sell and and you know. It's just like stuff like that just makes me Giggle, but you see a lot of people that you know. You can look in. There is actually the people that don't look in the is those people you know. Go back home in the. and. It's just really ferocious than. That energy could be better place I mean. I was a young kid with a horrible idea of how I was supposed to spend my time and I became a marine I realized I could channel energies. To something that was looked productive. You know and I think that's what people can learn from this whole fucking things like you can change your your. You could change your whole shit up in the time that you've been in quarantine or in lock that right I mean over can be three months maybe four months before she gets back to normal. You get some of those the people who are out of shape myself PUT MYSELF BACK INTO SHAPE I've been telling my sits in my pools Ed re day. I'm fucking shit up my wife, actually look at word as well as. And most people who are busy like I got a lot of shit to do all the time. With you myself twenty right now and I do Baba Out Punch out and you can change. Will they say a ten days? You could break? You can't break habit thirty days. You could start something that will last, and that's what I think I'm trying to do. You know I'm not saying I have been examined. Be followed, but a lot of people who? Want to change something about themselves could do it in this time. This time can make you can. You can learn a language you can. Study for the bar exam and become a lawyer is the world needs a lot more of those, or whatever you WANNA do? You can do it, and you lay off the fucking twitter, and it's probably GonNa do head a little bit good to. That's that's the challenge. Right is getting away from the social media, so we miss if I'm not I'm not preaching. I am I absent flows to me. Absent Floats. I. Take my puppy. I'm like known as excellent array tissue. talkable public delight right now. I try to stop my puppy on Instagram for real. The puffy thanks, very, if one of those things were so easy to catch that little dopamine hit, you know so it's. It's one of those things where you know. Some people goes unnoticed that that's what they're actually doing, but if you are aware of it like when I quit smoking I read this book by Alan. Carr chatty man our car, but Alan Carr the smoking. Do I and one of the first things they they get. You understand that you're addicted to a drug. You're addicted to nicotine your drug addict right so if you break it down to the simplest terms, No dilu- Shen straight no chaser and you can deal with a certain fact delay. That's what happens when you get a life or sudden lunch, twitter or facebook. You can actually realize that you could get that somewhere else in your life by maybe working out fallen in love being nice to an actual living thing that. Can Transcend, so I have hope, but you know I mean I. I get in trouble time on twitter, because I just disparage it all the time because I don't give a fuck about it and the people who would their life. They really offended that you don't give a fuck about their twitter and it's kind of. I. It's coming around on me a bunch of ways because I got up on twitter back in the day that I was of involved in trying to. figure out what was a about?.

twitter Alan Carr Maine irs Tammi Alaska Kobe Leslie nicotine Shen dopamine facebook
"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"us marines" Discussed on H-Hour: A Sniper's Podcast

"Shannon was founded in two thousand and nine. In the wake of death of Joe Wittig who was killed in Afghanistan with regiment. Heroes was founded with the aim of raising money for military charities doing this by organizing fundraising events. Or intuited around rugby on Via. And since starting in two thousand nine, they have raised in excess of one hundred ten thousand pounds such a small team who typically only hold two three events a year. That is a staggering amount of money. They have they hold an a half. Hot Rugby Tournaments Be June. Festivals Suffolk Club's. It sets etcetera. They had three events planned this year. which all dates being postponed because of the Cobra, nineteen situation, however, intent still have them go ahead. Those events are two supper clubs. One will be at the the tame had restaurant eleventh spa. The other Suffolk in London. At Home House, the third event is a beer and Jin Festival, which will also rugby much going on? Have Live music allowed all manner festivities on enjoyable. And wonderful guests attended. To heat up to date with when these events new dates will be, you need to keep an eye on rugby. The Social Media at rugby number four heroes at rugby heroes on social media twitter instagram on facebook skimmer follow. They've also got.

rugby Joe Wittig Suffolk Club Shannon Afghanistan Suffolk Home House Jin Festival twitter facebook London
"us marines" Discussed on First Person

First Person

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on First Person

"Any poorly? I think it put it in more of a context. You know the one thing that I you know that am a father that I look back on. I really look back on kind of with all is I think about my time in the Marines and I think about my friends in the Marines I served with the Afghans and others I served with and I think about the guys. I knew who at the time I knew this had families and kids and were going out on night raids or fighting and footage doing it as parents now as a parent myself. It boggles my mind that they were able to do that. And I understand now that they were functioning with a level of emotional complexity that frankly. I just wasn't having to deal with you. Know as a twenty four year old lieutenant or as twenty nine year. Old Captain And it really gives me a kind of a sense of all about what they were able to do but it is it part of the reason why you end up not redeploying. I think it is. I think it gave me a sense that it was time. Can't life has it? Seasons in this season was passing and there were other things I needed to attend to like my family and at the same time. You don't ever really leave the war in some respects. You're constantly kind of returning. What is that propulsion? I think you know I. I left the military started working as writer and started traveling to southern Turkey where I want up. You know covering a variety of subjects to include the civil war in Syria the Islamic state's spread onto our rock and politics in Turkey as I was writing about these subjects. Kind of what kept coming back to me was the American experience in these parts of the world and how they were also intertwined into everything that was going on. And so you know. It's not so much that I keep coming back to them as much as like it's not over you know what would starter there for us. At least in two thousand one. Two thousand three is still not over so I wanted to write about that and just try to show the connections between Faluji in two thousand four and the Islamic state in two thousand fifteen in the same city and how there is a narrative arc connects these things both But politically you know. But also there's an emotional arc in the wars. Have an emotional topography to them. And I very much wanted to map that emotional topography and show the contours of what it feels like to to go to war. You see that emotional topography on both sides at various points in the book I do. I believe it exists on both sides in I believe in these wars for me in the Americans. I know her of my generation of thought of them. They were generation defining and in the book. I sit down with a former member al-Qaeda and Iraq who fought on Lombard provinces places. I fought and I talked to him he would. He tells me you know the war's regeneration redefining to him you know. And then I sit across from a Syrian activist of who participated in the protests. In Two thousand eleven. Two Thousand Twelve and he says it tells me the same thing that the conflict in that those protests in the conflict that led from those protests were defining to him and the fact that we've all been defined by these conflicts in the region. I see as something that connects us. emotionally connects us and is a point from which we can begin to understand one another even as radically different as we may be. Syrian activist American Marine and a former member of al Qaeda and Iraq. You know I'm an optimist. I believe that with everything I I've seen. I believe that people have more in common than they have different and to acknowledge. Those commonalities is a way to have deeper understanding and more empathy for one another. Do you feel like you have greater moral clarity on the American role in Iraq. At this point I think you can look at the war politically and then you can look at the war personally and for me. There's always been you know two separate things you know. I know I joined the military on the neck and sometimes people ask me like you know. Do you regret the fact that you serve based on political developments on the ground based on fact of Islam estates swept back into parts of bar province And I don't regret it because the nature of my service. The reason I was there wasn't necessarily to implement a specific policy in my mind. The reason was that I was there was that I again. I want to have a job or whether I was good at my job. Outta my job mattered. I can look back at decisions. I made that I feel proud because because I was there and we were able to make this decision in our platoon wound up getting through a pretty tough situation in in a better state guys and they get hurt so for me when I think about that. Those aren't really political issues as much if he asked about the politics of the Iraq War. The politics were terrible and we never should have invaded. Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out by. I think inflating the two is for me. Doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you recommended and received a Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury in in the book and I don't want to give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way well originally actually the That chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with. It said they're very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and said listen. Elliott you know I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. Know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book if you figure out a way to talk about him and I took that on board and I knew that I had this summary of action to serve an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action With a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into or included in official awards documents you. That's what I wound up doing. But you know wards are complex. GonNa quit Ryan. Shane said you not the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Brad. My greatest failure. Which is he didn't get lawn. The out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards. It's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan. They don't wind up handing out those awards. So you're often being honored for in. Some respects is sort of the worst day of your life. Why are you go back to Philadelphia as a journalist? What brought you back. I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects because you know like like Mallory said of Everett's because it was there you know I wanted to go back I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself I was living in Istanbul. The time and a good friend of mine was the New York Times Istanbul slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know he would help me. Get down there I really I jumped at. The opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity on your experience thereby returning? I didn't feel as though it was some type of catharsis per se. You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know. The veteran returned to the old battlefield. Whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice paddies or the you know the World War. Two veterans walking across the beaches It wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to Volusia was sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me. The most was how how little things had changed. You mentioned in the book that you try to imagine fluid differently when you return not as a battlefield right but as a community of homes and businesses and Volusia is not defined by creation but by destruction when I return to fluid I mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed standing there and looking at the city. You know when you go to other cities let's say old cities like I Dunno Rome or an Istanbul. You know you have sometimes these layered cities where you can see how one group of people have built on what another belt would another belt and it's how you wonder what kind of these this layering in certain cities and those cities. I think we're kind of oftentimes defined by that layer in these very old cities When I was back influenza it was almost like viewing that process in reverse is you would walk around the city. You would see destruction on you talk about you know that building. That building was destroyed in two thousand fourteen by ISIS. This building was destroyed in two thousand five. By the Marines. You know as the city that was defined by the layers of destruction that had come there And that jumped out at me You know hopefully flu jewel rebuild this at this moment that was perceived it. It's an interesting juxtaposition between a moment in the middle of a quarrier and Berlin with a former colleague. Conrad and he points out that a hill in the city is actually not a hill at all man-made and it's covering up it's almost archaeological dig of all the destruction the tanks armored the bodies that were left at the end of World War Two but Berlin is now this breathing living modern peaceful city and villages still a battleground in a different way. Yeah I mean it's it's food is a work in progress like I. I hope in like twenty years. You know and it's the city of Moscow. Those mosques will be standing like beautifully restored and you know and it will be a vibrant city and I can take my children there and you know. Walk Around and point to places with them. I think like most veterans. I know they dream of being able to do that. In Iraq or Afghanistan is just. That's not where either country is at this moment. You know. They're still active wars going there. Which is one of the things I think. They kind of have made these war surreal. Is that you know the equivalent passage of time. Let's say I'd fought in waste city so way city. Nineteen sixty eight. It's two thousand. Nineteen fifteen years so you know it would be nineteen eighty three right now. You know Vietnam was very very different place in nineteen eighty three obviously than it was in nineteen sixty eight in that passage of time whereas you know Iraq is a different place but the war is still percolating. There and were were not. There's not an in game. It's still a work in progress. What do you think the legacy of flu is for us now? I think the legacy is to be determined. I don't know what is you. Don't think enough time has passed you. Do you feel you've let it go this point or is it still of you? It's always a part of me. You know sometimes people ask me Elliott in like. How did the war change you? And I've never known how to answer that question because the war made me. I mean I you know I have a good friend who I go running within the morning. And he's you know he still works in special operation has been deployed in the war zones. More than than anybody. I know He's going in and out since two thousand three and so at one point we were running and we were just talking about the war and then that idea how to change us how it made us and he looked at me at one point he said you know Elliot said the melancholy of it all is that we grew up there and I feel that way I grew up there so asking me how the war changed me. It's like asking someone. How did your parents change you? Your parents don't change you. They make you thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks for having me.

Iraq flu Istanbul Elliott Vietnam Volusia al-Qaeda Turkey Syria Faluji writer New York Times us. Berlin Elliot American Marine editor Shane
"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"That the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action With a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into or included in official awards documents you. That's what I wound up doing. But you know wards are complex. GonNa quit Ryan. Shane said you not the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Brad. My greatest failure. Which is he didn't get lawn. The out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards. It's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan. They don't wind up handing out those awards. So you're often being honored for in. Some respects is sort of the worst day of your life. Why are you go back to Philadelphia as a journalist? What brought you back. I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects because you know like like Mallory said of Everett's because it was there you know I wanted to go back I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself I was living in Istanbul. The time and a good friend of mine was the New York Times Istanbul slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know he would help me. Get down there I really I jumped at. The opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity on your experience thereby returning? I didn't feel as though it was some type of catharsis per se. You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know. The veteran returned to the old battlefield. Whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice paddies or the you know the World War. Two veterans walking across the beaches It wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to Volusia was sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me. The most was how how little things had changed. You mentioned in the book that you try to imagine fluid differently when you return not as a battlefield right but as a community of homes and businesses and Volusia is not defined by creation but by destruction when I return to fluid I mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed standing there and looking at the city. You know when you go to other cities let's say old cities like I Dunno Rome or an Istanbul. You know you have sometimes these layered cities where you can see how one group of people have built on what another belt would another belt and it's how you wonder what kind of these this layering in certain cities and those cities. I think we're kind of oftentimes defined by that layer in these very old cities When I was back influenza it was almost like viewing that process in reverse is you would walk around the city. You would see destruction on you talk about you know that building. That building was destroyed in two thousand fourteen by ISIS. This building was destroyed in two thousand five. By the Marines. You know as the city that was defined by the layers of destruction that had come there And that jumped out at me You know hopefully flu jewel rebuild this at this moment that was perceived it. It's an interesting juxtaposition between a moment in the middle of a quarrier and Berlin with a former colleague. Conrad and he points out that a hill in the city is actually not a hill at all man-made and it's covering up it's almost archaeological dig of all the destruction the tanks armored the bodies that were left at the end of World War Two but Berlin is now this breathing living modern peaceful city and villages still a battleground in a different way. Yeah I mean it's it's food is a work in progress like I. I hope in like twenty years. You know and it's the city of Moscow. Those mosques will be standing like beautifully restored and you know and it will be a vibrant city and I can take my children there and you know. Walk Around and point to places with them. I think like most veterans. I know they dream of being able to do that. In Iraq or Afghanistan is just. That's not where either country is at this moment. You know. They're still active wars going there. Which is one of the things I think. They kind of have made these war surreal. Is that you know the equivalent passage of time. Let's say I'd fought in waste city so way city. Nineteen sixty eight. It's two thousand. Nineteen fifteen years so you know it would be nineteen eighty three right now. You know Vietnam was very very different place in nineteen eighty three obviously than it was in nineteen sixty eight in that passage of time whereas you know Iraq is a different place but the war is still percolating. There and were were not. There's not an in game. It's still a work in progress. What do you think the legacy of flu is for us now? I think the legacy is to be determined. I don't know what is you. Don't think enough time has passed you. Do you feel you've let it go this point or is it still of you? It's always a part of me. You know sometimes people ask me Elliott in like. How did the war change you? And I've never known how to answer that question because the war made me. I mean I you know I have a good friend who I go running within the morning. And he's you know he still works in special operation has been deployed in the war zones. More than than anybody. I know He's going in and out since two thousand three and so at one point we were running and we were just talking about the war and then that idea how to change us how it made us and he looked at me at one point he said you know Elliot said the melancholy of it all is that we grew up there and I feel that way I grew up there so asking me how the war changed me. It's like asking someone. How did your parents change you? Your parents don't change you. They make you thank you so much for joining us today..

flu Istanbul Volusia Vietnam Iraq Berlin Shane Brad Ryan official New York Times Philadelphia Elliot Mallory Rome Moscow bureau chief Baghdad Conrad
"us marines" Discussed on First Person

First Person

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on First Person

"Why you're going in? What was the mission? The mission was to flu. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand and four in which You know you may or may not remember. It began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed and their bodies hung from the bridge influenza. An led to a sort of a board battle With the Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faluji itself became a no-go area for coalition forces. And what really wanted to happening was between that March November It became a real safe haven for members of kite on Iraq and people like Zarqa. We were operating out of flu. And so it became this sort of seeping wound In whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Iraq at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Falluja the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrived in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February. Two thousand five and so We also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going and clearing out flu which is what came to pass So you know. Our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote tactical mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there you know. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy it's doing right by the Marines who become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires people to go the extra distance in those situations. But you knew going. In at the casualty count could be enormous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in? I think that the number you gave him the book was that you are expected. Potentially to lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in. When my same company commander my platoon had been tasked within our company which is three platoons about forty marines. Each our platoon was tasked as with all the main effort. So we were going to be the lead platoon going in. And you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty breaks for the lead platoon usually very very high. And I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine. Decide who is the commander of the platoons in saying? Hey you two need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled. Because I don't expect you guys to be combat effective by the end of the first day combat effective basically means. Don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore see us so that's pretty sobering But on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer. You know I was seventeen years old when I decided I wanted to go into the marines. I worked very hard my senior year of high school to get in on an ROTC scholarship. I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry so you know about seven years of my life. I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives. They look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled. You know you you've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready for it and have to accept. It's one thing to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you where your comrades and you tell a story about how. What rainy nights remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ryan? Shane and Sergeant Lonny Wells. What happened? Well lonny wells Was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company and you know most marines. Who fought him food? You can tell you where they were. When they crossed highway. Ten highway ten was a six lane highway. The bisected the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so lonny wells went across highway. Ten in as they were crossing He was machine gun in the street shot through his moral artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the road. Ryan Shane at the time. Was that you know real strapping. I mean you know six foot two two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery Sergeant. Who'd enlisted the age of seventeen whole life? He wanted to be marine Solani shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie Grabbed him pull them in once? Pull them twice. And then the same machine gunshot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road In there was a very iconic set of photographs taken on sequence of Ryan running out into the road to lawn and About two years later I was in camp. Lejeune and Ryan. Shane was awarded a Bronze Star for valor. So metal for trying to get Lonnie that day and that day it was raining. Those the first day it had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bet about when it would finally rain racks at Hunter of rain. Once the whole summer we'd been there And so in Ryan is getting his award. He said two things you know that really stuck with me. The first was he some finding it really hard An old by tobacco by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps He wasn't able to serve anymore. Which was pretty heartbreaking for him mandate time. He's getting this award. You know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct. I mean been shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his awarding. Said you know I'm finding it really hard To accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what? I perceived to be my greatest failure which I wasn't actually able to get Lonnie out of the street that day And lonny wells wound bleeding to death the other thing that he said. I said you know I'm looking out and who's going to be award in front of me Marines. Who'd been there? He said you know a lot of people. Ask me about that day. But something one's really asked me about. Was you know who went and got me? You know at that point lonny wells and Ryan. She had been shot in the middle of the road and wound up. Happening was to younger. Marines have run out into that same street and pulled them both to safety. You know so. There's also when we talk about the stories that could told and war and valor. You know. There's a lot of stuff that is overlooked and Ryan made that point as well. You also lost the weapons artillery officer who controlled air strikes and artillery for your company. And He'd been playing chess with him not long before he was killed. Yep so that was a friend of mine. Dan Malcolm and we were lieutenants together and he was the guy who would call in artillery and Wanted Happiness on the first day of the battle Our platoon had wound up pretty far forwards and artillery started landing all around us And it was actually friendly artillery. We didn't know what we didn't know where it was coming from and There was a high in the highest building around us in Dan. My company commander had been up on that building earlier in the morning but the the volume of fire that was coming on that building and so bad they'd had to get off this rooftop and later on as these artillery impacts are hitting around our platoon. I mean so close. It's like a steal wave Hitting a beach break in. I started yelling at Dan. Like who's shooting at? Us and Dan ran up to the rooftops to try to figure out where the artillery rounds were coming from and he was able to call those artillery rounds off of us and then as he was running down off the roof a sniper shot him and the impact right under his armpit went through his heart killed them almost instantly. You carry a story like that. How do you go on after that? You know you you recognize. I think that you know we all knew we were signing up for You now I think about the things that people did for me and you try to live a life with meaning that honors the people who who dedicate a comeback and and have the longevity that you've had Guys like Dan and Lonny Wells and Ryan Shane. I mean you remember them and Doug Zan Beck I mean all these guys. You just remember them. I think that's the best thing if you do after a few years as an you moved over to special operations and you actually weren't commanded marines anymore but foreign soldiers and there's a story you tell about a fateful decision made in that context to you know most of my career. I actually I worked in special operations and worked as an advisor to foreign troops along with maybe a handful of Americans who are also advisors. I in so That context on my war buddies. You know weren't other Americans. They were by large Afghans Who I fought alongside and you know. We did all of the things that people do in wartime fought alongside one another blood alongside another and I think that's Pacific story is Two OF THE PLATOON COMMANDERS. In a unit. I advised named Mortaza and severe Were we were returning one day from mission. We were in southeastern Afghanistan and severe lived all the way up in the Northeast on the pike the famous Puncture Valley and he would hardly ever get home to see his family and he had a chance one night to get on an early helicopter flight out and so he basically wound up taking a shortcut To get him home and because we took that shortcut we wound up hitting an I. E. D. in which One of his best friends was killed. He had a child already. By then you. I did and so That firefight in that incident was one of the first ones. I had been in As a father I think when you have I've always felt I never really understood war until I had a child because I think you can't understand the scope of loss. People can experience in war. And Tell You yourself have a child and can imagine losing that child and how there's nothing in the world that can ever make that loss whole. Did it make you WANNA walk away from more at.

Sergeant Ryan lonny wells Ryan Shane influenza Lonnie commander Dan Malcolm Iraq Marine Corps officer Zarqa Faluji Falluja Moore Lombard province Highway Tan Marine infantry Elliot Mortaza
"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it Bellawood. In the first World War Guadalcanal Andy Wajima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city in Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know. There's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And I want you to explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know why you're going in? What was the mission? The mission was to flu. There'd been a battle that spring in late March and April of two thousand and four in which You know you may or may not remember. It began when a number of blackwater contractors were killed and their bodies hung from the bridge influenza. An led to a sort of aborted battle With Marines in which the Marines pulled out of the city and Faluji itself became a no-go area for coalition forces. And what really wanted to happening was between that March November It became a real safe haven for members of kite on Iraq and people like Zarqa. We were operating out of flu. And so it became this sort of seeping wound In whatever the counterinsurgency effort was in Lombard province in western Iraq at that time so we always knew that we were going to have to go in and retake Falluja the whole time I was in Iraq we knew that I arrived in the country in June of two thousand four and I left in February. Two thousand five and so We also knew that we would probably go do it in November of that year because the presidential election was in the fall and we imagined that the election would happen and then then regardless of who won the next day we would wind up going and clearing out flu which is what came to pass So you know. Our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote tactical mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there you know. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy it's doing right by the Marines who become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires people to go the extra distance in those situations. But you knew going. In at the casualty count could be enormous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in? I think that the number you gave him the book was that you are expected. Potentially to lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in. When my same company commander my platoon had been tasked within our company which is three platoons about forty marines. Each our platoon was tasked as with all the main effort. So we were going to be the lead platoon going in. And you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty breaks for the lead platoon usually very very high. And I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine. Decide who is the commander of the platoons in saying? Hey you two need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled. Because I don't expect you guys to be combat effective by the end of the first day combat effective basically means. Don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore see us so that's pretty sobering But on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer. You know I was seventeen years old when I decided I wanted to go into the marines. I worked very hard my senior year of high school to get in on an ROTC scholarship. I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry so you know about seven years of my life. I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives. They look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled. You know you you've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready for it and have to accept. It's one thing to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you where your comrades and you tell a story about how. What rainy nights remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ryan? Shane and Sergeant Lonny Wells. What happened? Well lonny wells Was a squad leader in a friend of mine's company and you know most marines. Who fought him food? You can tell you where they were. When they crossed highway. Ten highway ten was a six lane highway. The bisected the city and wound up being kind of the main line of resistance so lonny wells went across highway. Ten in as they were crossing He was machine gun in the street shot through his moral artery and was bleeding to death in the middle of the road. Ryan Shane at the time. Was that you know real strapping. I mean you know six foot two two hundred ten pound Marine Gunnery Sergeant who enlisted the age of seventeen whole life. He wanted to be marine Solani get shot and he then ran out into the middle of the road to get Lonnie. grabbed him. Pull them in once. Pull them twice. And then the same machine gunshot Ryan through the Stomach Ryan fell down the road In there was a very iconic set of photographs taken on sequence of Ryan running out into the road to lawn and About two years later I was in camp. Lejeune and Ryan. Shane was awarded a Bronze Star for valor. So metal for trying to get Lonnie that day and that day it was raining. Those the first day it had rained influenza and our whole deployment before that we had had a bet about when it would finally rain racks at Hunter Rain. Once the whole summer we'd been there And so in Ryan is getting his award. He said two things you know that really stuck with me. The first was he some finding it really hard An old by tobacco by this point Ryan had to get he was being medically retired from the Marine Corps He wasn't able to serve anymore. Which was pretty heartbreaking for him mandate time. He's getting this award. You know he'd lost a lot of weight and had a number of surgeries to correct. I mean been shot through the stomach so he stood there when he was getting his awarding. Said you know I'm finding it really hard To accept the fact that my greatest achievement in the Marine Corps which is receiving the sprint star for valor comes out of what?.

Marine Corps Marines Sergeant Ryan influenza Iraq Ryan Shane commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc Commander Marine Gunnery Sergeant lonny wells assault Marine infantry Korea Dc Vietnam Chosin Reservoir Amtrak Andy Wajima
"us marines" Discussed on First Person

First Person

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on First Person

"It's been sixteen years since the United States went into Iraq nearly nine years since president. Barack Obama formerly ended. Us combat missions there and yet the impact of the decision to fight is still being felt today in the early years of the Iraq War. One battle particularly stands out for ferocity from early November through mid December two thousand four US Iraqi and British forces moved into the city of volusia fighting operation. Phantom fury a joined effort to fight the insurgency afford trained well led and ready the operation deliberate the people who've lose it and begin the reconstruction of the city and the restoration mobilized more than eighty. American soldiers died in that operation. The heavier weapons fire a barrel of the insurgents. They caught it. Suppressive Fire and marine has been injured and his colleagues need to administer first aid and get him out earlier that year. Four American contractors were killed in Florida. Their bodies were burned and dragged through the streets. Everyone who comes to Faluji he warned will meet this fate. Phantom Schori was an effort to retake the city from a safer rooftop. We filmed tank moving along the street. Ready to fire a round into each house where they might still be resistance. Elliot Ackerman is a marine veteran. Deserve five towards up Ghanistan the Rock and was awarded the Silver Star the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart. He led a battalion of soldiers for that month of two thousand four in his new book. Pleases Names on war. Revolution and returning Ackerman describes what it was like to be involved in that critical battle and how it felt to return years later not as a soldier but as a journalist. He's our guest this week. Elliot so they actually want to start at what feels to me the heart of the book. Which is Florida two thousand four and I wonder if you can take us back to November tenth and begin their well. On November tenth. I was serving as a marine rifle platoon. Commander in Volusia on the assault of the city hadn't yet begun begun for us on that day. And I think that is kind of in some respects the center of the book because that was one of the earliest and most intense combat experiences that I had had a lot of what else occurs in. The book is kind of orbiting around that central. Experience lead you join the military? To begin with. I joined for a variety of reasons. I grew up overseas grew up in the UK. And I think kind of always being a little bit of an outsider to America. Made me want to give something back and kind of perhaps give me a different perspective on what it means to be an American. I was someone who when I graduated from college. I wanted the job that I had whether I was good at my job or bad at that job to really matter onto feel like I was going to have an impact and have real responsibility in the corps offered me that on finally like I was the kid who never stopped playing with his Gi. Joes I guess. I always had an innate fascination in the military and I think the confluence of probably all three of those things. What led me into the Marine Corps and I joined a before nine eleven did ROTC and college to become an officer in the nine eleven. While I was at school and so the Marine Corps than you know went from being kind of a you know more abstract thing in terms of what I would be doing when I served to something. That was much more tangible as there was a war. Going on there's a an Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual Afri- Doug back he says. Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go to college. They joined the Marines to be a part of a legacy. That was true for you absolutely. I mean the Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture. And I listen. I think everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons. But one thing you do opt into when you join this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and flew jar. Remember three days before the battle. The Math Marine Expeditionary Force. Sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted? Marine Nov Iraq came and talked to all of the assault battalions. And you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go do is just like what the Marines did it. Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and he will Jima and the Second World War at the Chosin Reservoir and Korea and Waste City and Vietnam. This battle is going to become part of the Marine Corps legacy that's only one component of what that data net and what that experience but an organizational perspective. Certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps. Curate that Your Company. Commander told you two weeks into the battle that you're both the luckiest unluckiest to be going into that battle. So soon into your service. Why was that? I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences. I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. So I think what my company commander you know who when he said those words to me was all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five What he meant was that you know right out of the gate were. When I came into the Marine Corps my first experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would live up to that and that was why I was lucky in that by Keith P. perceive in some ways it was true with the rest of my time in the organization would be a let down compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words proved true and the duality behind. Those words also proved true in that experience. One that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret. I lost a lot of friends influenza and wanting bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines. And wait explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle Well yes so talking about the culture. November tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday. So as they say November tenth. Seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these and One of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington. Dc wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there and deployed halfway around the world going to battle. Is You You read the comments message. But the current comments message and the General Jonny Lee Jun. Who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday? And you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth. Two thousand four all loaded up In about a dozen with a call. Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning. Really almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into Fujita and Were we were handing out these little bits of birthday cake. And our company's executive officer came up on the radio and read the comments birthday message to all of us so it had sort of this. You know surreal quality. Are you afraid in those moments as you know? You're going into battle. Sure absolutely everybody's afraid. And what's the fear exactly fear fear manifesting sort of I think interesting and different ways forever? I think the largest is just the fear of the unknown For me I was always afraid in the moments before I would have to go do something and then when I was actually committed to the acted self identity. Feel afraid but you know it's the fear of what you imagine can happen to. You is the fear of leading down in the people. You're with who you care about deeply It's just that broader. Just fear of the unknown. Did you know.

Marine Corps Marines Iraq Elliot Ackerman Volusia Florida United States Commander Math Marine Expeditionary Forc assault Barack Obama Phantom Schori Los Angeles Times UK president Purple Heart Faluji ROTC America
"us marines" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"US marines arrive at the American embassy in Baghdad I'm Pam who sell fox news the state department says U. S. personnel are safe following efforts by militiamen backed by Iran to penetrate the compound in the Iraqi capital they scaled wall smashed windows and set fires this comes after US airstrikes on Sunday targeted and Iraqi Shia militia group reportedly responsible for rocket attacks on Friday that killed one American contractor the group that was hit Hezbollah has vowed to respond against the United States I did speak today was one US official who described the situation as tense that one source also telling fox news the president is being briefed continuously by his security team and will make the final call on whether or not to respond to the storming of the US embassy fox's trade gangs the US ambassador was not in Baghdad at the time of the attack the state department says he's on his way back as Democrats demand witness testimony that president trump's upcoming impeachment trial Senate Republican Susan Collins of Maine says she's open to calling witnesses that effort being spearheaded by Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer Schumer points to a New York times article out Sunday that claims White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security adviser John Bolton among others tried to convince the president to release aid to Ukraine Sox's David spawned a date for the trial hasn't been said house speaker Nancy Pelosi is still holding on to the articles of impeachment it's the final trading day of twenty nineteen and the Dow is currently down forty points but overall it's been a record breaking year warranty here all indices are off actually the worst performing as the Dow which is a twenty two percent for the S. and P. five hundred is on track for its best year since at least a two thousand thirteen that's boxes dear troubled in the market gains credited in part with the trade truce between the US and China America's listening.

David John Bolton chief of staff White House New York times Chuck Schumer Schumer Senate fox Iraqi Shia militia China America Nancy Pelosi US Ukraine Sox Mick Mulvaney Maine Susan Collins trump
"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Many over not only those first few weeks but over the course of my three year recovery and really my nine years of journey since then now thankful that a write this book for many reasons but one of those being too thoroughly and appropriately explain not only my appreciation for everyone that help keep me alive alive but how all the pieces and parts fell together perfectly. There's Domino's to for the most part a cumulus one piece and and You know give me back here seven days later all those prayers from your hometown. We're definitely answered. Oh they eight. They played a part for sure. And then you talk about all the surgeries. You went through in Afghanistan and then I think the one that really make a lot of readers. Emotional is when you're flying coming from launch tool back to the United States and there was a mom who was with her son on board. And you happen to be on there too and what happened. So the lady's name is Jennifer Miller and her son Ryan Craig was on a deployment to Afghanistan and unfortunately fortunately Was Shot in the head. You don't go to Germany to meet your loved ones and less the prognosis is not good. So imagine as a mother flying over having to to pull the plug on your own child. Ryan continued defy and pull through not only through but continue to survive and get better so they asked her. Hey you wanNA ride back on. Our metadata edited flight and myself and Ryan were the two most severely injured casualties on board during the flight. She heard me moaning as she listening at closer to your Lonzo saying mom and so she knew what she had to do so she sat in between us us and she would hold our hands. They were working on Ryan she would give me attention and vice versa but yet a story that that still almost two powerful for words. But I'm thankful that I could share that with people just 'cause we survive off. The battlefield writes. It's a long dark scary and painful journey at times and it's not just us going through its military families and and our loved ones. He stay by the bed and hold our hands. Ryan is not only agreed but his mom Jennifer. She's amazing and actually throughout this book writing process. I was able to track down Medevac crew and I was able to go back to launch on in Germany and speak to the staff there and tell them thank you most of whom were not there when we came through but they always receive the worst of the worst than the everything they can to keep. Keep US alive and it just so happened that after nine years well. Eight years at the time of being asked every year by a nonprofit group aid you WANNA go back. Visit launched on both had the time and agreed and myself my mom Ryan and Jennifer all all got to walk the halls of launch to the ICU. Or they saved. This is amazing to say the least. You have an amazing family and I encourage people to to pick up the book for that among many other reasons so it was really at Walter Reed. I'm guessing then you fully understood the extent of your injuries so not knowing what happened exactly. Yeah Waking Up to a long list of Injuries and things that had been altered during those five weeks that was unconscious. How many surgeries did you end up? Undergoing me and mom lost the battle of trying to keep him. If I guess I would say roughly forty and a lot lot of them had to do with the correct yes they show reconstruction and surgeries in reconstruction by my oral Mech. CILLIAN facial team. Now you're talking about Brian Dan about how at least that first into Walter Reed. You didn't feel like you were motionlessly overwhelmed at first but when you got home talk about how the stress of that ultimately affected you yes so coming home after being in that stable COM hospital environment meant to your neighborhoods field cameras are going off everywhere and also for people listening that are like why was he home so early on in his recovery at that time and early two thousand eleven. There was so many casualties. Unfortunately coming back that Walter we will so so forth. I remember at one point. They were putting patients in the hallway. So with that said people they knew that had a long road to recovery. That would have to come back to Walter Reed no matter what once they kind of stabilizes made sure that we're alive and well. They allowed us to go home with the understanding that I would do therapy at a local hospital home and every week or two my mom would drive me back up to you Walter Reed. Td Surgeries and so early spring of two thousand eleven. I just left the hospital and I was at home and one night. I was struggling to make a bowl of cereal. There was probably a half gallon jug of milk but it was so heavy. My face I couldn't feel at one because the nerve damage to the grenade blew must my teeth out and so all around just a struggle. He he had finally get the ball zero made and I'm sitting at the kitchen counter and It wasn't the struggle of making that bowl of cereal or I was in in pain or anything like that that made me break but the main component I think was I had tried to stay so strong and like thumbs up all day every day because the hardest part of my recovery was the burden of knowing that my parents were suffering through my recovery with me and I know their parents they love me. They reassure me every day that it was their honored to take care of me and and get you better. But it's still hard to know that your parents are really struggling. Really see me suffering every single second of every day that I was away and so In that moment with milk going all over my face I broke Anna. It was by far mallows. Poin I and I was crying and mom came into the kitchen. She rightfully so thought. I was in pain immediately. Give me a hug asking me. What's wrong and I just asked her? He's ever GonNa love me again and I. It was a very tough moment but one that I'm thankful for because I realized that It's okay to take your time with your unique struggle and to have those breakdown moments but I'm thankful that minutes later I realized anytime you're presented an opportunity. You really only have two options. I could have have chose which I'm thankful I did to get up and take that small step or in a way. I could have sat at that kitchen counter for for the rest of my life so chose to get up and take that step and I didn't know how long I was going to be recovering. I think a lot of people get so wrapped up in. I don't have a plan or I don't really know like where I'm going to live. And that's fine a lot of times. It's just just taking a small step forward and in good time putting the next one right after. And that's a big part of this book to you. Didn't WanNa want to just tell your story and the amazing people that have helped you along the way. It's what you learned along the way and your encouragement to other people going through trials of whatever kind so was short on time but I have to get this story in real quick talk about learning that you're going to officially receive the medal. What that day was like at the White House with President? Obama is interesting interesting L. A. Sophomore in college. I'd done my three years of recovery and the calls started coming very entity thousand thirteen. Same things quickly. Got Official as the investigation. Got To appoint high enough. Where not even the Marine Corps really knew if it what's going to happen but no matter what if it did or did not we had to prepare? And so you know I had amazing marines a at the time Kendra modes really not only a great marine but has become a great friend and she really sat me down and said Hey I know schools your priority on now you want to do good and keep good grades but if this happens school potentially could could become a burden and I don't want you to give that up for this kind of short term thing that we have to do so thought about it. I decided to wait and get the call which came in February.

"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"A veteran of the US. Marine Corps who served this nation in Afghanistan he he is a recipient of the medal of honor and he's also the author of the new book. You are worth building a life worth fighting for Kyle. Thank you very much for being here. I appreciate appreciate it. Well I know from reading your book that you moved around quite a bit as a kid but Where do you consider home South Carolina's home? I need to take teeny though to just say. I was born in Mississippi. So shout out to I run in Mississippi but South Carolina's home and recently after graduating from school I have moved to Charlotte. Is there a history of military service in your family before you so. My Mom's dad was in the navy. Unfortunately he died when I was young wrong but other than him. Just me figuring out the life of service in the military. You know my own but it's been an amazing journey. One one of the things I read in your book was the the tension especially not too long after nine eleven of college or join the service really felt the calling and it was. It was a tough decision decision for your family and even went to college briefly Talk about how you wrestled with that decision. And ultimately you dispel. You had to join the service. Yes so I've always been scared of regret regret. A new college is always going to be there so while feeling this calling to join the military. I didn't want to you not do that. And Wake up one day and regret having missed that opportunity so I don't think anyone knows exactly what they're getting into with a life of service listen and really alive many unknowns but I'm thankful I made the decision I then obviously did it again and I wanted to do something that was of a greater purpose and bigger than myself or anyone individual. Why did did you pick the Marine Corps I faked a Marine Corps and to help my parents understand that I was trying to be respectful of them. I want to many differ cruisers all of the branches at the end of the day. I joined the Marine Corps. Because I wanted I'd always welcome. Welcome challenge growing out whether blowing bubbles with gum sitting in the recliner with my dad or on the football field in high school. Just it's always with myself always trying to get faster stronger better and so I thought about the Marine Corps. I wanted something that would push me to you and hopefully beyond those limits that I knew and with that do something that really made me look deep down on his side myself to make that next step or pushed through whatever's in my way say to say I I believe that the Marine Corps would do that and right from the start right. I mean parasol and you talk about it in the book of coming onto the island and once you're in the camp or something they blindfolded you so you didn't know how to get out and yeah driving up to the GAY head down between your legs so if a win you go crazy or try to run away. You don't know the one and only little wind easy road on and off the island to To escape through the swamps. I guess you could say what was your moment of being broken as they say what are you talking about it in the book talking about Boot Camp. Yeah Yeah. It was a simple foot drill movement but it was towards the end of boot camp. I had thankfully been a squad leader for most of the boot camp except for about the first week now like everyone. Yeah everyone breaks I I think and then also maybe punish isn't the right word but suffering even more if you're a squad leader because anytime tassone in your squad messes up. You share the punishment with them. I think just after ten eleven weeks of that you know if it was just me out there going through that over and over because I kept messing it up I think you would have been a different story but Even that simple foot drill movement. I miss that up as a squad leader at the very front of the squad and then the rest of my squad suffered for it and we all got battle step in so it wasn't just my mistake now and it was a a good lesson and as simple as it was it made me realize that even the smallest malls of things affects all of them reigns around you and so yeah I don't I broke kind of in that moment and I was just so now only really hot in the middle of Summer Pierce Island and getting eaten alive by bugs But just messing it up over and over just an frustrated type of way so it wasn't too long after. That was the summer of twenty ten. You get deployed to Afghanistan Great. And you're in the two nine says a second Marine Division and you go to Helmand province. What's your first impression of place? Before we even touchdown I vividly remember we. You were in the back of image fifty three marine helicopter supercell Ian and the back was open. I mean we were on the last leg day number ten of our journey from the state to our small patrol base. Outpost that we're going to be living in operating for that that deployment and so being in that environment. The back is open. You have a door gunner. I remember looking back and seeing the door gunner and looking at the back that helicopter copter and two things were so surreal. That as is still does end Phil Roe thinking about and talking about it but I remember looking out and seeing just patches and different shades of Brown and green and farmland. I remember thinking I am. I going to step on I. Yeah I di in that field or my going to bleed out and that now and it wasn't a scared though it was. Just wow after depend depend on how you will get it my entire life leading up this moment my year to year and a half of training before and so does Canada actually happening happening and we are really in Afghanistan and the second piece was the crew chief who agree achieve rods in the back of the helicopter. He's obviously part of the crew but he communicates with the pilots. Make sure everyone's buckled in and At this point point we had been going through bases. We hadn't touchdown really outside a friendly lines or any basis yet and so we didn't have ammunition Shen as I'm looking at the bag. I'm interrupted by this crew chief. Hanmi belts of Ammo for my saw at twenty years old. And Hey hey we're probably going to take contact. Before even touchdown I'm thinking like this is so surreal. But that really set the tone for the entire deployment is asked survived for four months out of our seven month deployment mint but for that four months. we were living primitively and the first two months or so we were there slept on the ground no showers for the entire deployment and every single day from sunup to sundown was a fight for survival and it was never a matter of Wonder if we're going to get shot at today. It was a matter of win and Every Sunday from sunup to sundown was was a fight. We'll talk about obviously the day that changed her life in a moment but even before that there's a gripping gripping incident where you come under fire and you actually get shot but somehow the bullet bounces off of you and you're basically left with only a bruise but Some of your your other teammates weren't so lucky. Yeah absolutely and and unfortunately but yet was our very first patrol and you are down leadership wise so we had been in country for four five days at this point but when you get there he send out your platoon gene sergeant and your most likely lieutenant a platoon commander they interact with the Marines. That have been there on the ground. Goal and patrols is get a feel for the area and then you work your way down so it was time for me to go on this patrol stepdaughter filling lines and roughly an hour after getting outside of of our patrol base. We came under our first attack and our first fire fire the deployment and I was laying at the end of a road At a dead end but looking through my scope trying to cover as much of the field in front of us which obviously be avenue approach with the enemy.

"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

Veterans Chronicles

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on Veterans Chronicles

"Was a twenty year gerald u._s. Marine assigned to guard the embassy in tehran iran in november of that year he became the youngest of the american hostages as the islamic revolution took hold old in iran four hundred forty four days until kevin and the other hostages were freed and kevin. Thanks very much for your time. Today we greatly appreciate it. Well the real pleasure sure to join you and your listeners and <hes> look forward to a good conversation while it's it's one. I've been looking forward to <hes> for quite a while now. Let's begin with just the beginning of your story in real quickly. Where were you born and raised <hes>. I'm a native of the milwaukee wisconsin area born there grew up in the suburb at the age of eighteen <hes> as the eldest of a five kids <hes> decided to leave after high school and joined the marine corps <hes> to travel and see the world and eventually <hes> the plan was to be able to take advantage of the g._i. Bill which ultimately and eventually i did why the marines well honestly <hes> i i do have a grandfather on my mom's mom side who was a <hes> who is while he's deceased now but a world war veteran and <hes> but other than that really did not have a military presence in in my life <hes> background if you will in our family too much and i had a buddy in highschool who had been recruited to join the marine corps and and he came up to me one day and said hey listen i'm going to be joining the marine corps and they've got this thing called the buddy program and i started thinking about it and looking being added and <hes> <hes> saw it as a way to get some help for college which i wanted to pursue. A ultimately was the first one in my family who ever went to college judge and nonetheless <hes> it was <hes> it was a big change from what people might have been expecting. I i didn't have a plan for post high school and so it seemed as good of choices any <hes> it was supposed to be at phnom which was not really <hes> something i thought much about though as a young paper boy oy of ages twelve to sixteen i would read about it every day on the front pages of the newspaper. I did have a cousin who joined the marine corps <hes> which <hes> played the only a small role in my decision but it was really as part of the buddy program those recruiters to a good job you know so when you enlist that means you go the basic training and basic training for the marines is a little different than it is <hes> any other service branches so how was paris island for you. Well actually <hes> greg. I ended up in <hes> san diego. <hes> those individuals who grow up in the states that <hes> through which the mississippi river either goes or <hes> borders <hes> get a choice to go either to paris island or to san diego and that's where my buddy was going so that's where i am i went and and what's interesting. Is that <hes> my cousin had up in paris island. <hes> i did eventually end up in north carolina for some training but <hes> san diego you know they call it hollywood and <hes> we just sat around in our hawaiian shirts and sunglasses every day as you can imagine so once you completed that <hes> how soon after that was it that you were sent to iran well i signed up for the marines guaranteed contracts go into accounting and indeed <hes>. I went onto some accounting school. <hes> working in the supply field went down to north carolina for my training. I was really fortunate graduated top in my class <hes> for that brief stint and chose to go to japan where i did serve for fifteen months <hes> <hes> i was so very fortunate to get promoted twice in fifteen month period so it was while i was okinawa that i learned about <hes> the marine security already guard program and apply went to a meeting it was in the base theater and as you can imagine they've got big posters of marines and dress blues uniform arms big glossy full-size almost a banners <hes> photos of marines in front of the taj mahal and the eiffel tower and the great wall of china. I and i thought wow this is kind of interesting. I went to the meeting went to work the next morning and asked him a gunnery sergeant. If he had any familiarity at all with the program he did not and nonetheless s. agreed to write a letter of recommendation for me came back to quantico virginia in <hes> mayor june of nineteen seventy-nine for our training as a marine security guard. We started our class with one hundred and seventy nine <hes> students it was the first class that had both male and female marines scenes in it for the m._s._g. Program nine weeks eleven weeks later. Whatever it was <hes> graduated only one hundred and twenty one of us out of the one hundred seventy nine completed the training <hes> successfully and i got my assignment to go to germany and i thought this is terrific. I'm going to be assigned in the middle of europe. We're up <hes> at the u._s. Embassy in germany and certainly i'm going to learn the language. I'm going to be driving one hundred fifty miles an hour on the autobahn and i'm going. It'd be able to go skiing in the alps every other weekend well. That was my vision. That was the plan. After i got my orders and i came back on leave just just before it was to head out. I got back to quantico to gather my belongings and hit overseas and the sergeant major called me into his office and informed me that there had been a mistake and and <hes> they had accidentally assigned to jewish marines <hes> to go to tehran iran and i was going to be taking his place now in the context of mid nineteen seventy-nine. It's really not that far that much of a stretch <hes> for me to say that the first words out of my mouth to the sergeant major were sir. Excuse me but where's tehran so in today's environment we all know where is on the world map in nineteen seventy nine early nineteen nineteen seventy-nine anyway not so much and so <hes> when i think back on it today the very idea that they might have assigned a jewish marine accidentally to go to the u._s. Embassy in <hes> in in tehran would have been just horrible for him. <hes> i'm not saying i'm glad that i was a stand in for for him but <hes> it would have been worse for him from a treatment perspective because there was one jewish hostage <hes> berry rosen who had just horrendous treatment eight -ment he wasn't the marine but one of the state department folks and he had just horrendous treatment including because of his faith now. I don't know if you were briefed or later but obviously the revolution was already ongoing by the summer of seventy nine in fact there had been a very brief hostage incident in february of that year. So what were you told to expect and what were your first impressions once you got there. Will you know as a young marine sergeant. I was very fortunate to have been promoted to the rank of e. Five sergeant fifteen months after after i left for boot camp <hes> i had all the responsibility of a sergeant e five in the marine corps but at age twenty having just turned age aged twenty i had very little capability or skills of being a leader and <hes> so <hes> i was excited about the opportunity attorney to go back overseas <hes> we didn't really we were not briefed on the environment in the countries in which we were going to be based <hes> that took place place on site once we got there <hes> and so when the other three guys and i got off the plane in the middle of the night in tehran mehrabad international airport and we were greeted by armed guards and a bunch of mola's running around <hes> as well as all the revolutionaries it was quite <hes> quite quite disconcerting to be sure the next day found myself of course <hes> going through briefings and training and i thought to things while what did i get myself itself into <hes> but secondarily i thought to myself wow i'm in the middle of something. I'm in the middle of country which is consequential sequential in that era in time and little. Did i know just how consequential events would become over the course of the next three months so in the three months leading up to november four th which will obviously get to in just a moment <hes>. How tense was it right outside the u._s. Embassy or or wherever you were posted they're on a regular basis or early on. I would not describe them as tense or intense. Even <hes> things were pretty relaxed. When we first arrived arrived during the day we would quite often <hes> be able to go out to the local <hes> shopping district the marines <hes> once a week we would get in our big van and and <hes> other than the guys on duty the rest of us would head up into the mountains north of the city and do our p._t._o. Physical training do are running and such <hes> we we had visitors over from the british embassy in the canadian embassy and the australian embassy. <hes> you know we would we would play cards. We drink beer. We'd we'd have have a good time. We'd play softball out on the big twenty twenty three acre sprawling compound comprised of the u._s. embassy in nineteen seventy nine. We would play football with one one another. <hes> i enjoyed the first two and a half three months. We were there <hes> two and a half months anyway and then that's when the shah of iran was given the go-ahead to come into the united states for his medical treatment of course the shah the former leader before the ayatollah khomeini took over <hes> the shah was in very real <hes> suffering from cancer and so the u._s. government president carter made the decision to admit him into the philadelphia cancer center and <hes> he he was there for cancer treatment for a few weeks until the u._s. Government ultimately decided that he should leave the country of the united states because within that added intervening time the u._s. Embassy was overrun. We were taken captive in the beginning of the hostage. Ordeal began so kevin. We've built right up to the day <hes>. Let's talk about november fourth nineteen seventy-nine what happened we've <hes> at the time become familiar with the protests in the streets the burning of the american flags chanting of the people <hes> tens of thousands literally tens of thousands of people on a daily basis <hes> surrounding this twenty three acre compound <hes> many buildings on it <hes> the big motor pool even the chancery building and the consulate were on the compound itself the ambassador's residence we marines actually we lived outside the back gate in an apartment building <hes> not on the compound so it was not not secure it was not <hes> protected in any way whatsoever <hes> the protests in the demonstration the death to america chanting the yankee he go home all of that <hes> the signs that said send the shah back to iran for <hes> for war crimes trials that they wanted to put him on <hes> they disdained president carter's support for the shaw and that became the ultimate motivation to come onto the compound and to capture the americans and hold us captive for four hundred forty four days though i think everybody involved would admit that neither we nor they expected that it would drag gone for fourteen and a half months marine security guards at that time in tehran we were only carrying twelve gauge shotguns and thirty eight caliber revolvers and a huge satchel of tear gas..

marine corps tehran iran united states north carolina shah san diego quantico gerald u._s paris island kevin germany milwaukee british embassy europe wisconsin japan carter
"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Get hurt so for me when I think about that those aren't really political issues as much if you ask them about the politics of the record the politics for terrible and we never should have invaded Iraq in it was a mistake. I think that's been proven out but I think inflating the two is for me doesn't feel like a true way to talk about the wars you you are recommended and received Silver Star for your actions in Operation Phantom Fury and in the book and I don't WanNa give too much away for you but the very end of the book you narrate the commendation in a way that I found deeply moving. What led you to narrate it in that way? Well originally actually the <hes> that chapter wasn't in the book. I turned the book into my editor and he was pleased with it said they were very happy to publish the book looking forward to it and then he gave me a phone call and he said listen Elliott. I just feel like I would be remiss if I didn't bring this up with you. You know people will read your bio and they'll know about this award and you don't talk about it at all in the book and you probably have your reasons for doing that but I feel like again. I would be remiss if I didn't say I think it'd be a better book. If you figure out a way to talk about it and <hes> I took that onboard and I knew that I I had this summary of action to sort of an extended description of the events that led to that award and I felt that the best way to do that would be to annotate that summary of action <hes> with a lot of my personal reflections and the things that don't get into are included in official awards documents and that's what I wound up doing but you know awards are complex GonNa like what it Ryan. Shane said the greatest honor. I'm getting his also Bradtha my greatest failure which is he didn't get lawn the out of the street that day you know when they hand out those awards it's usually because you found yourself in a really bad situation when everything goes perfectly according to plan and they don't wind up handing out those awards so you're often you know being honored for what in some respects is sort of the worst day your life. Why are you go back to flu jazz journalist? What brought you back? I mean not to sound Glib but in some respects X. because you know like like mallory set of ever because it was there you know I wanted to go back. I've been thinking I'm thinking about that city. Every day for twelve years at that point so when the opportunity presented itself <hes> I was living in Istanbul the time in a good friend of mine was is the <hes> New York Times stumbled slash Baghdad bureau chief when he basically invited me to come into flu and you know and he would help me get down there. I really jumped at the opportunity had been looming so large my imagination since I left. Did you feel you had greater clarity already on your experience thereby returning. I didn't feel as though it was some type of Catharsis per. Se You know I mean I think we all know the image of you know the veteran returning to the old battlefield whether it's the guys who served in Vietnam walking through the rice patties or the you know the World War Two veterans walking across the beaches <hes> it wasn't that type of an experience because of the war there is an over so for me returning to fluids sort of like seeing an update as to where things stood and what struck me the most was how how little things changed you mentioned in the book thought you try to imagine flew to differently when you return not as a battlefield you right but as a community of homes and businesses and that villages not defined by creation the destruction when I returned to flu John mentioned as I mentioned so little had changed you know standing there and looking at the city you know when you go to other cities..

Ryan Shane Iraq flu editor Istanbul Elliott Bradtha New York Times Vietnam official bureau chief Baghdad John twelve years
"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"In and clearing out flu which is what came to pass us <hes> so our mission was to go in there to retake the city establish nominal Iraqi control over the city in order to deny it as a safe haven to the insurgents who are operating out of there so that was sort of the the Moore wrote Tactical Nicole Mission in other reason. If you ask why people are fighting there. I think it goes to kind of what you said before. It's being part of this legacy. It's doing right by the Marines who've become your friends by your your comrades. I mean that's what I think. Inspires aspires people to go the extra distance in those situations but you knew going in at the casualty count could be nervous. Yes and how does it feel carrying that knowledge walking in I think that the number you gave in the book because you are expected potentially lose seventy percent in fact the number was higher. There is a moment before we went in when my same company commander my platoon had been tasked with an our company which is three platoons about forty marines H.. R. Platoon was passed as with the call the main effort so we were going to be the lead platoon going in and you know if you've studied kind of urban combat and tactics the casualty rates for the Filippo Turner usually very very high and I remember my company commander just quietly pulling me aside and pulling a friend of mine decide who is the commander of Neo platoons in saying. Hey you to need to just have talked through the plan for how Elliot Elliot how your platoon is going to get back filled because I don't expect you guys to be combat-effective by the end of the first day combat effect of basically means. I don't expect enough of the lieutenant to be left that you'll be a you know a healthy fighting organization anymore soon that's pretty sobering <hes> but on at the same time I mean you know it's not like I woke up one day and found myself as Marine infantry officer you know I was seventeen years old. When I decided I wanted to go into the marines I worked very hard hard my senior year of Highschool to get in on R._O._T._C. Scholarship? I then spent five years in university working for a bachelor's degree in a master's degree all the while knowing I was going into the Marines and then when I became a lieutenant trained for a year before ever showing up to the infantry sorry so you know about seven years of my life I've been preparing for this and so in the moment arrives they look at you and say you know you might need to get back filled you. You've known that there's a chance at this might be where your career is heading and so I think you just feel ready afford to accept a it's to feel ready for it in anticipation but it's another thing to watch men fall in front of you or your comrades and you tell a story about how what rainy nights let's remind you of a moment on Highway Tan with Gunnery Sergeant Ranch chain and Sergeant Lonnie Wells what happened well Lonnie Wells. <hes> was a squad.

commander R. Platoon Sergeant Lonnie Wells Elliot Elliot flu Marine infantry Gunnery Sergeant Ranch Moore Filippo Turner Highway Tan Lonnie Wells. officer seventeen years seventy percent seven years five years one day
"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"us marines" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"There's a in Los Angeles Times story that you reference in the book the Unapologetic Warrior and in it the manual reference Doug's I back. He says Young Marines didn't enlist to get money to go go to college. They joined the Marines to be part of a legacy. Being that was true for you. Absolutely I mean you. The Marine Corps has a very strong organizational culture and I listen. I think thank everyone I know who joined the Marines. They join for a variety of reasons but one thing you do opt into when you join is this culture and part of that culture is a legacy so you know when we were going to fight and Faludji I remember three days before the battle. The <hes> Math Marine expeditionary for sergeant major who is basically the senior enlisted Marine Alva rat came and talked to all of the assault battalions and you know one of the things he told us was like what you are going to go. Do is just like what the Marines did Bellawood in the first World War Guadalcanal and Iwojima and the Second World War Chosin Reservoir and Korea and way city and Vietnam this battle is going to become part of the marine cores legacy. That's only one component opponent what that battle net and with that experience mad but from an organizational perspective certainly I think it's became part of the the legacy and obviously the battle history of the Marine Corps curate that your company commander told you two two weeks into the battle that you are both the luckiest and unluckiest to be going into that battle so soon into your service why was that I think it kind of gets at the duality of these experiences I kind of call them in the book the it but for me that it was combat in Iraq and Afghanistan so I think what my company commander who when he said those words to me was you know all thirty two years old and seemed infinitely old and wise because I was all twenty five <hes> what he meant was is that you know right out at the gate would when I came into the Marine Corps my experience was was participating in this battle and that nothing I ever did would <hes> live up to that and that was why I was unlucky in that Vike coppee perceived in somebody who truth the rest of my time in the Organization would be a letdown compared to this but I was lucky because I got to participate in that and I think those words prove true in the duality behind those words also proved true in that experience is one that I'm you know I'm very proud of but at the same time you know there's a lot of regret I lost a lot of friends influenza. I wanted to bring us back again to November tenth which is also the birthday of the Marines and explain what it feels like to be going into that kind of battle <hes> well yes so talking about the culture November. Tenth is the Marine Corps Birthday so as they say November tenth seventeen seventy five. That's when my Marine Corps came alive. You know you remember these things and <hes> one of the ceremonies marines do anywhere they are whether they're at the Pentagon or at the barracks at eighth and I in Washington D._C.. Wearing their dress uniforms or whether or not there in deployed halfway around the world going to a battle is you <hes> you read lead the cosmonauts message but the current cosmonauts message and the General Jonny Lee Jun who was the first comment to celebrate the birthday and you eat a piece of birthday cake and so we were sitting there November tenth two thousand four all loaded up both <hes> in about a dozen with a call Amtrak's which these armored personnel carriers early early in the morning really come almost the middle of the night getting ready to go right into flu Asia and <hes> you know where we were handing out these little bits of birthday..

Marine Corps Math Marine expeditionary Marine Alva Doug Los Angeles Times Bellawood commander Chosin Reservoir Jonny Lee Pentagon Washington assault Korea flu Asia Vietnam Iwojima Vike Iraq