18 Burst results for "Us Department Of Agriculture"

From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

The Book Review

11:16 min | 8 months ago

From the Archive: Michael Lewis and Tana French

"Michael thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. So you've covered very exciting topics before. Wall Street is exciting. Sports is exciting. The Department of Agriculture is not generally considered exciting. How did you decide to to turn to this? So it wouldn't have been exciting before trump. I think trump electrified all the material. So what happened. Several things at once happened. I just finished a book about Danny. Common name is diversity to Israeli psychologist who Study the way people Miss Miss Value. Risk price risk and one of their insights. Was that if you take a catastrophic risks. I mean it's like a one in a million chance of happening and and make it a one in ten thousand still very remote increase the likelihood one hundred times people don't feel it and I had this sense. When trump was elected in the way he was approaching governing that he was he was doing that across a big portfolio of risks that. I thought that the one way to think of the federal government is a manager of giant portfolio of risks many of them catastrophic and that people weren't feeling it exactly. I was doing on this in about how to write about it when he made Rick Perry the Secretary of Energy of Course Rick. Perry had said that he thought the Department of you should be eliminated when he was on stage in a debate but he couldn't remember even the name of the place and once he collided with it he realised. Oh maybe it shouldn't be eliminated because the departmental has nuclear weapons in inside of it and I thought well maybe this is the this is the way maybe actually kind of want follow it follow ric currency what it means for. Rick Perry to be running this place and then somewhere in all this. I learned that the Obama Administration partly because they're required to by law partly because Obama was a responsible person had essentially Had BEEN AT WORK. For a year to create these briefings for the whoever was gonNA roll into the federal government and run it and there was a there have been thousand thousand people across across the government who had spent the better part of a year creating these briefing books thinking about how to present the government to someone who didn't know anything about it and these briefings were supposed to happen the day after the election. I mean they're gonNa roll and that's what happened. When Obama rolled in to replace Bush and the trump people hadn't shown up at all so then I had a hook but now I do too in the hook was I'm GonNa go get the briefings. Briefings and trump people never bothered to get and kind of learn about this portfolio of risk and try to get a sense of what we should be worried about why that was the start and then you ended up covering not just the Department of Energy but also the Department of Commerce and the Department of Agriculture. You know I had a selection problem that reminded me a bit of the selection problem. I had with the big short and the big short there was a pool of kind of fifteen Wall Street guys who had seen the crisis coming or thought they'd seen it coming and made a fortune betting on the collapse of either Wall Street or the housing market and I wandered around a long time on a casting. Search figure out which ones were the best to tell the story through. Who are the other contenders? There were a lot of them. I mean they were. They were hundreds of them but they were fifteen of them and and all were willing to let me write about him. It was just who could kind of teach the reader the most important things what was the best way to dramatize this. And in this case I had actually fifteen cabinet level positions fifteen departments to choose from and I had a narrow down. I couldn't do the federal government. I wasn't gonNA keep the reader for more than a couple of hundred pages. I knew right away it was going to be three or four and I thought I had some criteria I thought one. It's gotta be something that I suspect. Most readers have no idea what it does and I just. I would just market test this. I'd be at a dinner party and say they might tell me what the Department of Commerce does and nobody had any idea that half the budget went to weather collecting weather data. You know or in the department energy most people didn't like Rick. Perry as opposed to the Treasury Department of the State Department of people have some vague idea. What does it? I wanted to be out of the public eye because I thought among other things I think. The risks are greater when public not watching the trump administration and finally. I thought they started to be very important so the Department of Education. I mean it's nothing's not important in the federal government but some of it's more important than than others so i. I spent time in most of the departments. I mean are talked to people from most departments and eliminated things along the way and then figured these are the three I wanted to do. Having said that I mourn not having written about the State Department and more not having read about the Department of the Interior. I think you could drop a writer into any one of these places and he would come away with a really. There's a wonderful stories to tell I mean. The Department of Education Is One. That's been written about a lot because of that. The high profile of the appointee to a lesser extent repairing sort of when he came in there was a flurry of attention and then kind of died away. So what is Rick Perry doing at the Department of Energy and what the Department of Energy supposed to be doing? It's a really good question what he is doing what. I dipped out of this story. I mean the last time I interviewed someone at the department injuries. Maybe six months ago and what I'm told. Is he set himself up as a kind of cheerleader ceremonial head of with the. Who isn't all that interested in the place? So you seem tweet a lot about it but we never got the briefings presumably. I know more about it than he does. Because I sat down with people had them walk me through the whole department. Maybe by now. He's accumulated some information. But what does it do? It's a vast science project what it is and part of the science project is tending to testing assembling nuclear weapons. That that's a big part of the budget. Another big part of the budget is cleaning up nuclear. Waste their sites in this country. And you wouldn't believe it. It's sort of like green type. Post-apocalyptic PLACES PAN for Washington. The Department of Defense three billion dollars a year trying to clean up the remains of the plutonium factories that that generated the atom bombs for World War. Two you ask the people in the department energy to give you an honest estimate how long it's GonNa take to to clean the place up hundred years one hundred billion dollars. I mean that's not trivial. And and what is at stake is there is a giant plume underground of of nuclear waste. That's slowly drifting towards the Columbia River which is not that far away said up on the Columbia River because they need the water to cool the it was there for a reason but if it leaches into the Columbia River. It's a catastrophe the for the Pacific northwest and it's managed in a very short term way. Things happen there. That are very alarming but does that predate trump or is it always been managed in a short term way although trump was the trigger for my story and trump is by far the most negligent manager of the federal government. We've had my lifetime Fisher probably forever. I never thought of his story. Just about trump. I thought of it. A story about the narrative we have created has poisoned or at Lea- screwed up the relationship between the society and government. That that this whole notion that the government is filled with lazy stupid. Bureaucrats who were kind of dead weight on society is a really dumb story. It's not true story. Department energy actually illustrates this. There is within the Department of Energy and his science project a seventy billion dollar loan portfolio and a few hundred million dollar venture capital fund. That is responsible for the entire. Solar power industry is responsible for Tesla. The first that were given to Tesla it is. It's it's the only place where dollars will be allocated to long term innovation. Industry doesn't do this if you she track back. Where the the innovations that led to the current American economy came from almost always it started with a government some government investment the Internet. The iphone wouldn't wouldn't exist without govern investment. When I think about the government I think of it as this. This exquisitely important exquisitely complicated machine that. We've let rust for decades telling ourselves a story that we need to basically just kick it every now and then it keep it from being too lazy and this guys come along and got sledgehammer. Trump has come along and he's getting this is getting you. He's going to do really mortal damage to it all right. So here's a short term thinking way of looking at this if you have things like nuclear cleanup. That are one hundred year. One hundred billion dollar projects is this potentially four year maybe eight year term of neglect. Kind of benign neglect. Because it's just GonNa it's all moving so slowly anyway or is he actively doing something in these departments. That is making it far worse. We have to worry. I think we have to worry a lot in. That's not me saying there's there are people who were kind of professional watchers of the federal government who are independent reps of the situation and then they're terrified for a few reasons. One is just the people who were in the federal government in the first year. The trump administration twenty percent of the top six thousand managers in the government civil service senior executive types left Biz. A hollowing out of the talent. And there's real talent there. These are not trivial. People people who were there in a lot of people federal government could be being paid a lot more money in the private sector and they've been drawn to some mission whether it's school nutrition or tending the nuclear arsenal or the weather service. They're there because they love the mission in because they know how important job is and we've mistreated those people for a long time. But now the level of mistreatment got very high and the dispersion of those people is a problem but then there are lots of things that are not so long term. I mean the trump budgets zeroed out both the loan program and the investments in the Department Energy Department of Agriculture Department. Agriculture has a three billion dollar research. Budget typically always overseen by a scientist and agricultural scientist. And if you talk to the woman who previously occupied the place Kathy Woteki a re a one a distinguished agricultural scientists who've been in government. Thirty years really knows what she's doing. She's all of his budget right. Now is one way or another being directed to research tied to climate. Change that we're to feed ourselves we're GONNA have to think differently. Be where how and where we grey sheep and cows and grow wheat and the climate change and have a big effect on the food supply trump appointed to this job right wing talk show radio host from Iowa who happened to support who knew who has no science background whatsoever named Sam Clovis now he has recently been removed from consideration. And there's nobody on his anybody in the job right now but the neglect of investment right now in the government will have consequences down the road. The bright spot is make it so bad and this is the point of the book. It make it so bad that people may wake up and we'll have a different narrative about our government.

Federal Government Donald Trump Rick Perry Department Of Energy Department Energy Department O Department Of Agriculture Department Of Education Department Of Commerce State Department State Department Of People Department Of Defense Columbia River Barack Obama Treasury Department Danny Michael Obama Administration Department Of The Interior
"us department agriculture" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on WTVN

"At the USDA who willingly takes our teasing Adam give us some guidance yes during summer we've got a couple considerations that we need to take into account and mainly has to do with temperature especially temperature outside but the temperature of our meat so my two big items for everyone out there are time and temperature so whenever you're cooking any meat and poultry wanna make sure you get to it the internal temperature so a lot of people will use color or time as an indicator of done this but those are only really guide the only definitive measure of done it safety is the use an internal temperature so their mom so this is the big one so your whole cuts of red meat your steaks chops roasts and chops they're sick and a hundred forty five degrees the three men are asked all the ground meat hamburgers those or items eight hundred sixty degrees and then all poultry weathered grounder hole cut if at a hundred fifty five degrees and then on the time side of that during the summer when it's above ninety degrees here goes very rapid we always want to get all our leftover food in the refrigerator cooler route at a cook out within two hours but really during the summer it's within one hour so anytime it above ninety degrees out you wanna get that food in the court and one hour saluted the main main takeaways for this card just to temperatures that you referenced before achieve what for us yes so those temperatures once you reach those temperatures they instantaneously will destroy any of any potential bacteria that can cause illness in there so if you get that that faith temperature you've destroyed any bacteria so it'll help prevent a lot of illnesses in and actually it some people might think that they don't get sick or don't get good Warren Ellis or they've been doing it correctly for all this time they never got sick but it's actually very common issue within the United States and a hundred twenty eight thousand people are actually hospitalized each year from food borne illness so it is something that does occur and it's something that we can prevent speak with Adam gearing food safety experts at the US department agriculture so when you go to a cook outs.

USDA Adam Warren Ellis United States ninety degrees one hour eight hundred sixty degrees hundred fifty five degrees hundred forty five degrees two hours
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTRH

"Food safety expert at the USDA who willingly takes our teasing Adam give us some guidance yes during summer we've got a couple considerations that we need to take into account and mainly has to do with temperature especially temperature outside but the temperature ever meet so my two big items for everyone out there are time and temperature so whenever you're cooking any meat and poultry wanna make sure you get to a safe internal temperatures so a lot of people will use color work time as an indicator of done this but those are only really guide the only definitive measure of done it safety is the use an internal temperature self with her mom so this is the big one so your whole cuts of red meat your steaks chops roasts and shop they're sick and a hundred forty five degrees three minute rap all the ground meat hamburgers those or items eight hundred sixty degrees and then all poultry weathered grounder hole cut if at a hundred fifty five degrees and then on the time side of that especially during the summer when it's above ninety degrees here goes very rapid we always want to get all our leftover food in the refrigerator cooler route at a cook out within two hours but really during the summer it's within one hour so anytime it above ninety degrees out you wanna get that food in the court and a one hour saluted the main main takeaways for this card just to temperatures that you referenced before achieve what for us yes so those temperatures once you reach those temperatures they instantaneously will destroy any of any potential bacteria that can cause illness in there so if you get that that they've temperature you destroy any bacteria so it'll help prevent a lot of illnesses in and actually it some people might think that they don't get sick or don't get good worn only or they've been doing it correctly for all this time they never got sick but it's actually very common issue within the United States and a hundred twenty eight thousand people are actually hospitalized each year from food borne illness so it is something that does occur and it's something that we can prevent because I'm gearing food safety experts at the US department agriculture is that when you go to a cook outs.

USDA Adam United States ninety degrees one hour eight hundred sixty degrees hundred fifty five degrees hundred forty five degrees three minute two hours
"us department agriculture" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Safety expert at the USDA who willingly takes our teasing Adam give us some guidance yes during summer we've got a couple considerations that we need to take into account and mainly has to do with temperature especially temperature outside but the temperature ever meet so my two big items for everyone out there are time and temperature so whenever you're cooking any meat and poultry wanna make sure you get to it the internal temperature so a lot of people will use color what time is an indicator of done this but those are only really guide the only definitive measure of done it safety is the use an internal temperature so their mom so this is the big one so your whole cuts of red meat your steaks chops roasting chops they're sick and a hundred forty five degrees the three men are asked all the ground meat hamburgers those or items eight hundred sixty degrees and then all poultry whether it's grounder hole cut if at a hundred fifty five degrees and then on the time side of that especially during the summer when it's above ninety degrees here goes very rapid we always want to get all our leftover food in the refrigerator cooler were out at a cook out within two hours but really during the summer it's within one hour so anytime it above ninety degrees out you wanna get that food in the court and one hour saluted the main main takeaways are those the temperatures that you referenced before achieve what for us yes so those temperatures once you reach those temperatures they instantaneously will destroy any of any potential bacteria that can cause illness in there so if you get that that they've temperature you've destroyed any bacteria so it'll help prevent a lot of illnesses in and actually it some people might think that they don't get sick or don't get good Warren Ellis or they've been doing it correctly for all this time they never got sick but it's actually very common issue within the United States and a hundred twenty eight thousand people are actually hospitalized each year from food borne illness so it is something that does occur and it's something that we can prevent speak with Adam gearing food safety experts at the US department agriculture so when you go to a cook outs.

USDA Adam Warren Ellis United States ninety degrees one hour eight hundred sixty degrees hundred fifty five degrees hundred forty five degrees two hours
"us department agriculture" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on WWL

"Expert at the USDA who willingly takes our teasing Adam give us some guidance yes during summer we've got a couple considerations that we need to take into account and mainly has to do with temperature especially temperature outside but the temperature of our meat so my two big items for everyone out there are time and temperature so whenever you're cooking any meat and poultry wanna make sure you get to a safe internal temperatures so a lot of people will use color work time as an indicator of done this but those are only really guide the only definitive measure of done it safety is the use an internal temperature so with her mom so this is the big one so your whole cuts of red meat your steaks chops roast in shops are safe and a hundred forty five degrees the three men are asked all the ground meets hamburgers those or items or eight hundred sixty degrees and then all poultry whether it's grounder hole cut if at a hundred fifty five degrees and then on the time side of that during the summer when it's above ninety degrees back here goes very rapid we always want to get all our leftover food in the refrigerator or a cooler route at a cook out within two hours but really during the summer it's within one hour so anytime is above ninety degrees out you wanna get that food in the court in one hour so those are the main main takeaways for this are those the temperatures that you referenced before achieve what for us yes so those temperatures once you reach those temperatures they instantaneously will destroy any of any potential bacteria that can cause illness in there so if you get that that they've temperature you've destroyed any bacteria so it'll help prevent a lot of illnesses in and actually it some people might think that they don't get sick or don't get food borne illness or they've been doing it correctly for all this time they never got sick but it's actually very common issue within the United States in a hundred twenty eight thousand people are actually hospitalized each year from food borne illness so it is something that does occur and it's something that we can prevent speak with Adam gearing food safety experts at the US department agriculture is that when you go to a cook outs.

USDA Adam United States ninety degrees one hour eight hundred sixty degrees hundred fifty five degrees hundred forty five degrees two hours
"us department agriculture" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Expert at the USDA who willingly takes our teasing Adam give us some guidance yes during summer we've got a couple considerations that we need to take into account and mainly has to do with temperature specially temperature outside but the temperature ever meet so my two big items for everyone out there are time and temperature so whenever you're cooking any meat and poultry wanna make sure you get to it the internal temperature so a lot of people will use color work time as an indicator of done this but those are only really guide the only definitive measure of done it safety is the use an internal temperature so with her mom so this is the big one so your whole cuts of red meat your steak roast and shop there if in a hundred forty five degrees the three minute rest all the ground meat hamburgers those or items are eight hundred sixty degrees and then all poultry weathered grounder hole cut it at a hundred fifty five degrees and then on the time side of that especially during the summer when it's above ninety degrees here goes very rapid we always want to get all our leftover food in the refrigerator or a cooler were out at a cook out within two hours but really during the summer it's within one hour so anytime it above ninety degrees out you wanna get that food in the chorus and one hour saluted the main main takeaway what does the temperatures that you referenced before achieve what for us yes so those temperatures once you reach those temperatures they instantaneously will destroy any of any potential bacteria that can cause illness in there so if you get that that they've temperature you've destroyed any bacteria so it'll help prevent a lot of illnesses in and actually it some people might think that they don't get sick or don't get good Warren Ellis or they've been doing it correctly for all this time they never got sick but it's actually very common issue within the United States and a hundred twenty eight thousand people are actually hospitalized each year from food borne illness so it is something that does occur and it's something that we can prevent without I'm gearing food safety experts at the US department agriculture so when you go to a cook outs.

USDA Adam Warren Ellis United States ninety degrees one hour eight hundred sixty degrees hundred fifty five degrees hundred forty five degrees three minute two hours
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"You also America's trouble with tuna these days and tips for keeping your New Year's resolutions. All of that story in about twenty minutes. Who'd recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths these days, but the US foods system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse sloppy in all we do a pretty good job. That's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain. We have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line and awkward. Just did the math the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinarily that figure out how many affected foods. There are really is a tiny tiny percentage. All right. So would you say we like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year you have to soom there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example, that's on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls four of which were food related. So it really depends. But again, even four food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall items, because they're afraid of what happens down the line, if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is that with that calms higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is. Now, you have to think about all the expenses. Accompanies we need to put in in terms of better trained better paid workforce's things like radiation, quit meant state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one? That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled done by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do is when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two. Eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died and three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed foodborne illnesses air just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens or.

USA FDA Lottie Meyer America zloty Meyer China Mexico USDA Latin America Asia reporter professor Africa university of Georgia nine hundred sixty pounds twenty minutes
"us department agriculture" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Keeping your New Year's resolutions. All of that story in about twenty minutes. Food recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. These days butts, the US foods this system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse slots in. All we do a pretty good job. That's true. I you have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really line in office. You just did the math the number of people eating in this country. So extrordinary that figure out how many affected foods there are really is a tiny tiny percentage. Right. So would you say what like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year, you have to film their three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls four of which were food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article coop, apocalypse, it's really not the case today. Eight companies are very quick to recall there either because they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically. We're speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is that with that comes a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as additives. Now, you have to think about all the expenses accompanied put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like a radiation acquit man state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no? Your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled on by the FDA or we call Don by USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data quickly as we do. And when they do collected it's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventy and he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed analysis. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not. Stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like wisteria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that. But you have to keep in mind food automatically comes from other nature. Right weather. It's drop quotas. We put our salad I'll romaine or greedy. It's that ultimately go into your your sandwich into the animals that we consume. We don't grow food. We don't wait the animals in a bio them. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through and these animals, well, they poop and things and ultimately they gets into our food. And if you wanna play devil's advocate and say, well, let's just grow everything hydroponically as we see is happening, more and more with protests. That's not perfect to they're using water. And of course, there's the risk that a water surface will be contaminated and also the humans that work in those hydroponic. Slap. Well, you know, they might not wash their hands so carefully when they come back from the bathroom or they might have a cold and be sniffling. Really nothing is lab. Sterile perfect place. Lots. He's lachey Meyer at USA today. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

USA FDA Lottie Meyer zloty Meyer lachey Meyer China Mexico USDA America Asia Latin America professor reporter Africa university of Georgia nine hundred sixty pounds
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTRH

"These days and tips for keeping your New Year's resolutions. We'll have that story in about twenty minutes. Recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths days. Butts the US foods this system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse sloppy in all we do a pretty good job. That's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math, the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected foods there are really is a tiny tiny percentage. All right. So what did you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year. You have to assume they're three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which was food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall their items because they're afraid of what happens down the line, if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically speaking with law Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is that with that comes higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is. Now, you have to think about all the expenses that companies would need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point about reporting may not be your friend? Explain that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US. Whether it's recall done by the FDA or recalls, Don by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data is quickly as we do because when they do collected. It's too late in an example that most people will remember back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed foodborne elyssa. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens or the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like listeria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that. But you have to keep in mind food automatically comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's drop produce we put in our salad. I LA romaine or greedy. It's that ultimately go into your your sandwich are into the animals that we consume. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through in these animals. Well, they poop and things and ultimately that gets into our food. And if you wanna play devil's advocate and say, well, let's just grow everything hydroponically as we see is happening more and more with produce. That's not perfect to they're using water. And of course, there's a risk that a water source will be contaminated and also the humans that work in those hydroponic. Labs. Well, you know, they might not wash their hands so carefully when they come back from the bathroom or they might have a cold and be sniffling. So really nothing is lab..

USA Lottie Meyer FDA China Mexico USDA salmonella Asia Latin America reporter professor Don Africa university of Georgia listeria nine hundred sixty pounds
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTOK

"Trouble with tuna these days and tips for keeping your New Year's resolutions. We'll have that story in about twenty minutes. Food recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. These days bucks. The US foods system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse sloppy in all we do a pretty good job. That's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math the number of people eating in this country, so extraordinarily that figure out how many affected foods. There are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So would you say you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year. You have to see them there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which was food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there because they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically. We're speaking with slots, he Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that comes higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is. Now, you have to think about all the expenses that companies we need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one? That's right. We have a system here in the US weather. It's recall done by the FDA or recalls. Don by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia Deo collect this data as quickly as we do. And when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is another parts of the world people just kind of get used to it. One of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how viewed foodborne elyssa. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Very often. There are pathogens or the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like listeria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that. But you have to keep in mind food alternately comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's drop produce we put in our salad, LA romaine or greedy. It's that ultimately go into your your sandwich are into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through Indies animals. Well, they poop and things and ultimately that gets into our food. And if you wanna play devil's advocate and say, well, let's just grow everything hydroponically as we see is happening more and more with protest. That's not perfect to they're using water. And of course, there's a risk that a water source will be contaminated and also the humans that work in those hydroponic. Labs. Well, you know, they might not wash their hands so carefully when they come back from the bathroom or they might have a cold and be sniffling. So really nothing is lab. Sterile. Perfect slots, he's lots he Meyer at USA today. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

USA Lottie Meyer FDA China Mexico USDA Asia Deo America salmonella Latin America Don reporter professor Indies Africa university of Georgia
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Days and tips for keeping your New Year's resolutions. We'll have that story in about twenty minutes. Recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths these days, but the US foods this system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse sloppy in all we do a pretty good job. That's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinarily that figure out how many affected foods. There are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So would you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year. You have to them there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recall four of which were food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there because they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it. More prophylactically speaking with slotting Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is that with that comes a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is now used to think about all the expenses companies we need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid work forces things like radiation quit, man. State of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one? That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled them by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed foodborne Ellis's. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens or the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like wisteria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that. But you have to keep in mind food comes from mother nature. Right. Whether it's dropped produce. We put in our salad. I'll romaine or ingredients that automatically go into your your sandwich are into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through and these animals, well, they poop and things and ultimately that gets into our food. And if you wanna play devil's advocate and say, well, let's just grow everything hydroponically as we see happening more and more with protests. That's not perfect to they're using water. And of course, there's a risk that a water source will be contaminated and also the humans that work in those hydroponic. Lab. Well, you know, they might not wash their hands so carefully when they come back from the bathroom or they might have a cold and be sniffling really nothing is lab sterile perfect. Slots, he's lachey Meyer at USA today. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

USA FDA Lottie Meyer lachey Meyer Meyer China Mexico USDA America Asia Latin America Ellis reporter professor Africa university of Georgia
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Days and tips for keeping your New Year's resolutions. We'll have that story in about twenty minutes. Recalls throughout last year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. These days butts, the US foods this system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of things like the country supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country, and the reporting tools that are in place as Lottie Meyer USA today reports there is no poop, apocalypse slots in. All we do a pretty good job. That's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math, the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected foods there are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So would you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data the African-American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year. You have to film there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday, the FDA issued five recalls for which were related so it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall their items because they're afraid of what happens down the line, if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically. We're speaking with sloppy Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that calms higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is. Now, you have to think about all the expenses that companies need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like a radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one? That's why we have a system here in the US weather. It's recall done by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died and three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed foodborne Ellis's. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens or the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like Steria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that. But you have to keep in mind food alternately comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's doi- produce we put in our salad. I LA romaine or agreements that ultimately go into your your sandwich are into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through Indies animals. Well, they poop and things and ultimately gets into our food. And if you wanna play devil's advocate and say, well, let's just grow everything hydroponically as we see is happening more and more with produce. That's not perfect to they're using water. And of course, there's a risk that a water source will be contaminated and also the humans that work in those hydroponic. Labs. Well, you know, they might not wash their hands so carefully when they come back from the bathroom or they might have a cold and be sniffling. So really, nothing is lab sterile perfect place. Lots and lots of Meyer at USA today. It's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

USA FDA Meyer Lottie Meyer USA Steria China Mexico USDA America Asia Latin America Ellis reporter professor Indies Africa
"us department agriculture" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. But the US food system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of the country's supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country and the reporting tools in place as lachey Meyer at USA today reports there is no quote poop apocalypse slot. He explained that's true. I you have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top the line. And also if you just did the math the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected food there are really is a tiny tiny percentage. All right. So would you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Then put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year you have to soom there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which were food related. So it really depends. But again, even poor food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse that's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there. I don't think they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it. More prophylactically speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that comes a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is now used to think about all the expenses. Accompanies we need to put in in terms of better. Trained better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to sanding in the checkout line chances are no your point too about reporting may not be your friend explained that one? That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is another parts of the world people just kind of get used to it. One of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties. Nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed about foodborne illnesses just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens. The suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like wisteria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware that you have to keep in mind. Ultimately comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's drop produce we put in our salad allowed romaine or ingredients that go into your your sandwich or into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio them. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through in these animals. Well, they poop and things. And ultimately that gets into our food. Breakfast information for you right money reporters Lottie Meyer at USA today. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Ask yourself if you built a van for your business, where would you start at the beginning, of course,.

USA FDA lachey Meyer zloty Meyer China Mexico USDA America Asia Latin America professor reporter Africa university of Georgia nine hundred sixty pounds Twenty minutes
"us department agriculture" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on 600 WREC

"May have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. But the US food system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of the country's supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country and the reporting tools in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no quote poop, apocalypse zloty. Explain that's true. You have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain, we have reporting tools in place that are really really Capitoline. And also if you just did the math the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinarily that figure out how many affected foods. There are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So would you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Then put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year you have to soom there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recall which was food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, which really not the case today's day and age companies are very quick to recall their items because they're afraid of what happens down the line, if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically speaking with loti Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day could our food safety system. Be better. Yeah. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that comes a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is now used to think about all the expenses. Accompanies we need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no your point too about reporting may not be your friend? Explain that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US. Whether it's recall done by the FDA or recalls on the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late. And an example that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed about food Ellis's air just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like wisteria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware that you have to keep in mind food, ultimately comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's drop produce we put in our salad. I LA romaine or ingredients that ultimately go into your your sandwiches into the animals that we consume and we don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. You have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through in these animals. Well, they poop and things. And ultimately that gets into our food. Breakfast information for you, right, reporters not Meyer at USA today. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Ask yourself if you built a van for your business, where would you start at the beginning, of course, with the people.

USA FDA Lottie Meyer loti Meyer China Mexico America Asia Latin America Ellis professor USDA reporter Africa university of Georgia nine hundred sixty pounds
"us department agriculture" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"May have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths, but the US food system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of the country's supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country and the reporting tools in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no coat. Poop, apocalypse sloppy. Explain. That's true. I you have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math a number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected foods there are really is a tiny tiny percentage. All right. So what did you say you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess. Sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year you have to soom there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which were food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article apocalypse, which really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there. I don't think they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it. More prophylactically speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that calms a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is. Now, you have to think about all the expenses that companies would need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like a radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no? Your point too about reporting may not be your friend. Explain that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US. Whether it's recalled done by the FDA or recall, Don by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those Latin America or Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late and an agreeable that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died at three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed food elyssa. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens the suspicion of pathogens and those are things like salmonella like. Another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like the area and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that you have to keep in mind food comes from mother nature. Right. Whether it's dropped produce. We put in our salad romaine or ingredients that ultimately go into your your sandwich are into the animals that we could still meant. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through Indies animals. Well, they poop and things. And ultimately that gets into our food. Breakfast information for your money reporters Lottie Meyer at USA today. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Ask yourself if you built a.

USA FDA Lottie Meyer Don zloty Meyer salmonella China Indies USDA America Mexico professor Latin America reporter Asia university of Georgia
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Welcome into Monday, December seventeen Gordon Deal with Rossa K who's filling in for Jennifer Kushinka. Some of our top stories and headlines congress at an impasse for now over border wall funding, former FBI director James Comey testifies again, before congress California says it will no longer pursue attacks on texting tumbler today set to band adult content after its app was dropped by Apple's app store when child-sex-abuse content appeared new movie about World War One hits theatres today. It's called the shall not grow old, doctored some grainy footage and added color and the hero school bus driver from Alabama that story in about twenty minutes. Food recalls throughout this past year may have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. But the US food system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of the country's supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country and the reporting tools in place as Lottie Meyer at USA today reports there is no quote poop, apocalypse sloppy. Explain. That's true. I you have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain. We have reporting tools in place that are really really Capitoline. And also if you just did the math the number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected foods are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So what did you say what you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year. You have to film there. Three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, you can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which was food related. So it really depends. But again, even for food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there. I don't because they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically. We're speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Yes. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is with that comes a higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did sort of everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is now used to think about all the expenses that companies would need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to ending in the checkout line chances are no? Your point about reporting may not be your friend explained that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled done by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do when they do collected. It's too late an agreeable that most people will remember, of course, was back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal, China, they really didn't take action there until six babies had died three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed about foodborne elyssa. They're just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case. We would not. Stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Very often. There are pathogens the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like wisteria another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like the area and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware of that you have to keep in mind. Ultimately comes from mother nature. Right. Whether it's dropped produce. We put in our salad. I LA romaine or ingredients that ultimately go into your your sandwich or into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through in these animals. Well, they poop and things. And ultimately that gets into our food. Breakfast information for you, right? Money reporters Latine Meyer at USA today. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Ask yourself if you built a van for your business, where would you start at the beginning, of course, with.

USA Lottie Meyer FDA Gordon Deal Alabama James Comey FBI Apple Jennifer Kushinka California zloty Meyer director China Mexico
"us department agriculture" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Have some American consumers nervous to put anything in their mouths. But the US food system is still among the safest in the world, especially considering the sophistication of the country's supply chains the sheer number of people eating in this country and the reporting tools in place as lachey Meyer at USA today reports there is no quote poop, apocalypse, he explained. That's true. I you have to think about it. We have a pretty sophisticated food supply chain we have reporting tools in place that are really really top of the line. And also if you just did the math a number of people eating in this country is so extraordinary that figure out how many affected foods. There are really is a tiny tiny percentage. So would you say you like nine hundred sixty pounds of food per year. The average American. Then put that in perspective with illnesses. I guess sure. Sure. According to the US department agriculture is the most recent data, the average American eats close to nine hundred sixty pounds a year, you have to film their three hundred million plus Americans how many recalls are there. Well, I can tell you for example that on Tuesday the FDA issued five recalls for which will suit related. So it really depends. But again, even four food recalls in one day, again, how many food items are produced in this country are imported in this country, and how many are actually affected by food recalls. What do you mean by images perception? Sure. Well, as you mentioned yourself, sometimes we hear headline after headline after headline we start to panic. And we think it might be as I said in my article poop, apocalypse, it's really not the case in today's day and age companies are very quick to recall there. I don't think they're afraid of what happens down the line if they don't they don't want to deal with bad PR related to people getting sick or even possibly dying. So they rather do it more prophylactically. We're speaking with zloty Meyer money reporter at USA today about her piece entitled feel like there's a food recall every day. Could our food safety system. Be better. Some of the experts talked about that there certainly is room for improvement. But the issue, of course, is that with that calms higher cost of food. He estimated that if we did everything humanly possible, your grocery Bill might be as much as three times as high as it is now used to think about all the expenses that companies we need to put in in terms of better trained, better paid workforce's things like radiation equipment state of the art factories. Are we willing really willing to foot the Bill when it comes to standing in the checkout line chances are no? Your point too about reporting may not be your friend explained that one. That's right. We have a system here in the US whether it's recalled done by the FDA or recalls done by the USDA that really is top notch. We have to compare that to other countries think about perhaps those in Latin America Africa parts of Asia. They don't collect this data as quickly as we do. And when they do collected it's too late. And an example that most people will remember back in two thousand eight with the tainted milk scandal in China. They really didn't take action there until six babies had died and three hundred thousand people had gotten sick. Imagine. What would happen in this country? It just it does not work like that. Another thing is in other parts of the world people just kind of get used to it one of the experts. I spoke to a professor at university of Georgia. He had grown up in Mexico during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. And he said, and I quote, it was like getting a cold you get one once a year. That's really how they viewed foodborne illnesses air just became a fact of life in this country. That's really not the case we would not. Stand for it. What are the typical problems when there are food recalls? Well, very often. There are pathogens the suspicion of pathogens, and those are things like salmonella like another issue might be undeclared allergens, particularly with things like dairy and tree nut. Some people have very very strong allergic reactions to that they need to be made aware that you have to keep in mind, ultimately comes from other nature. Right. Whether it's drop hold as we put in our salad. I LA romaine or ingredients that ultimately go into your your sandwich or into the animals that we consume it. We don't grow food. We don't raise the animals in a bio dome. So you have to keep in mind that there are birds flying overhead and feral pigs running through in these animals. Well, they poop and things. And ultimately, they gets into our food. Breakfast information for you, right? When he reporters Lottie Meyer at USA today. Twenty minutes now in front of the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

USA lachey Meyer FDA zloty Meyer salmonella China Mexico USDA America Asia Latin America reporter professor Africa university of Georgia nine hundred sixty pounds
"us department agriculture" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"us department agriculture" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Good whose comet whose kids go there in what is that leads to when it comes to feeding kids and taken care of in cleanliness and stuff like that um the new mrcb news ever youth service based is reported on data tank by the department of health under the freedom of information act the report highlighted some troublesome findings including one end at a brooklyn school where live roaches in nearly six hundred fresh mice droppings were discovered by health inspector good god brooklyn and another five second graders were sick and after eating cafeteria lunch health respective visit a school days later found thirty equipment at poor protection for half who was laid out uh and why case in queens 1500 flies were found at a middle school in ozone park dishes are 1500 1500 uh us department agriculture regulates require local health inspectors to inspect school cafeterias twice every year about fourteen 100 city school cafeterias were expected at least once with some cafeteria serving more than one school according to the capitol the report while local food inspectors look for evidence of rodents or insects unchecked equipment to make sure food is stored in probably temperatures will also review how to food is handled uh although the city while a school system bus about a million stood as just fitting health inspectors offside at any given time to visit schools without warning and examine the kitchen team fifteen so what are the chances of a what are the odds of uh your facility been expected herat nasr one million students but i want to know how many facilities are fifteen people responsible for checking random probably hundreds possibly thousands i wonder arm and while seeds uh in why city news service report comes around three months after the city started off a offering free meals to our students so like that's a very liberal idea free meals are all students still at like i said i'm not i don't wanna just say like incurs kerr's data at they lower taxes than they refuse a pavelski i wonder if is literally like there's been a money other places ranked or even what the taxes they have is just not where it would need to beat a true.

brooklyn herat kerr three months five second