18 Burst results for "Uri Berliner"

"uri berliner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:38 min | 5 months ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Considered I'm Ari Shapiro Now a story that is one of our favorites It first aired in 2018 It's a tale about a stuffed toy monkey barely four inches tall made by the German toy maker stiff It belonged to a young Jewish boy at the time Hitler was rising to power The monkey would take a journey that spans decades and continents A journey that includes tragedy and a remarkable discovery Its owner was gert Berliner He's the father of NPR's uri Berliner who picks up the story from here 15 years ago a museum archivist from Berlin came to my dad's apartment in New York He asked for a favor Did he have something Anything from when my dad was a kid growing up in Berlin When he was here he said you know we have exhibits and at the exhibits what people really want is something personal Do you have anything And I don't know Then I realized what I had I had a little monkey He showed me the monkey and I said that is an amazing amazing object That's Aubrey pomerantz the archivist from the Jewish museum Berlin The toy monkey is pretty beat up Its fur is frayed One of its hands is completely missing And I remember him looking at me and saying you'd like to have it for the museum wouldn't you And I said to him geared its such a personal object It's an object which has so much meaning and is filled with emotion for you I'd never ask for you to give it to the museum He said do you know what I'll think about it And he did think about it It wouldn't be easy to give up the monkey The most intimate object from his childhood He kept it close for more than 60.

Ari Shapiro gert Berliner uri Berliner Berlin Aubrey pomerantz Hitler NPR New York
"uri berliner" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:33 min | 8 months ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Tested. Houston's response to Covid 19 is produced in partnership with ST Luke's Health visit. Houston public media dot org slash tested for more Funding for here and now comes from the listeners of W. B U R Boston and Math works. Creators of Matt Lab and Samuel Link software for technical computing and model based design. Math works accelerating the pace of discovery and engineering and science. Learn more at math works dot com and Angie Angie's list is now Angie committed to helping homeowners find the right pros for home improvement projects. Homeowners can read reviews the upfront pricing for hundreds of projects. And book appointments at angie dot com. This is here and now it's tough to buy a house right now because demand way outstrip supply and it's especially tight for people looking for their starter home. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Matt Perkins installs and repairs garage doors in and around Reno, Nevada. He's plenty busy homes there are sprouting up like desert wildflowers. Many of the buyers their Silicon Valley tech workers snapping up million dollar plus homes. Some of these people are just on the garage doors alone. They're spending 10 15 $20,000 a piece For these garage lords, custom garage doors.

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The journalist on Undergo power. His New Yorker piece is titled The Other Afghan Women. This is all things considered from NPR news. It is tough to buy a house. Right now The country is nearly four million homes short of demand, and it's especially tight in that corner of the market that once launched the American Dream. The starter home NPR's Uri Berliner reports Matt Perkins installs and repairs garage doors in and around Reno, Nevada. He's plenty busy homes there are sprouting up like desert wildflowers. Many of the buyers their Silicon Valley tech workers snapping up million dollar plus homes. Some of these people are just on the garage doors alone. They're spending 10 15 $20,000 a piece For these garage doors, custom garage doors made with cedar and polished copper. Organs isn't complaining about that. He thinks it's fine when people get rich, But the way things are going there, he's got no chance of owning a home. We build all these fancy fancy homes and low income apartments. There's absolutely nothing Nothing in between home values in Reno have gone up 27% In the past year, Perkins and his wife are renters. She stopped working as a pastry chef in the pandemic. They have a six year old daughter and another child on the way. I asked him what he aspires to, and he says nothing extravagant. I would like to have a space with a yard that I could call my own like 900, square feet. Simple cabinets, simple countertops. We shag carpeting. I don't care. I just want four walls and a roof that I can afford that home Perkins is describing is just about vanishing in America. In 2020, the number of starter homes built was less than 1/5 of the yearly average of the early eighties. It's a huge problem if you think about the fact that home equity accounts for the bulk of wealth The overwhelming majority of Americans that Sam Cater, chief economist at Freddie Mac, the government backed mortgage company. Traditionally, Americans started building that wealth by purchasing a no frills first home. Freddie Mac defines a starter home as 1400 square feet or less Others define it differently. But on the matter of why they're so scarce, there's a good deal of agreement. The high price of building materials, labor costs are up zoning regulations, restrict construction and a big one, Cater says It's really the value of the land that matters the most. When it comes to home prices. Now America is a huge country with lots of open space. So why should land be so expensive? Well, it's not so plentiful in the places where the jobs are and what people want to live. You know, many people are trying to crowd in the same Cities that are the most productive in the most affluent and offer the most opportunities. But high on affordable home prices prevent many Americans from doing so When land is expensive, it becomes harder for builders to turn a profit on entry level homes. Greg you Gal D does build them in suburban Connecticut. But, he says it's increasingly tough and more and more builders can no longer do it. You can often squeezed by, he says, by saying, no to extras like upgraded cabinets and countertops. And carpet pads. Place like that sounds fine to Matt Perkins back in Reno when he looks around, though he sees no sign of economizing home buyers seem to be Obsessed with this idea of luxury amenities and home builders are completely willing to give them that the numbers back him up less than 6% of the houses built in Nevada last year, where entry level homes Bergen says he'd gladly pass on the bay windows and stainless steel appliances for small house a bit of green in the backyard.

Matt Perkins Uri Berliner Sam Cater 2020 Freddie Mac America Nevada Perkins 1400 square feet 900, square feet Cater 27% Greg last year Reno Connecticut NPR less than 6% Reno, Nevada Silicon Valley
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:06 min | 8 months ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"The journalist on Undergo Paul. His New Yorker piece is titled The Other Afghan Women. This is all things considered from NPR news. It is tough to buy a house. Right now The country is nearly four million homes short of demand, and it's especially tight in that corner of the market that once launched the American Dream. The starter home, NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Matt Perkins installs and repairs garage doors in and around Reno, Nevada. Okay, He's plenty busy homes there are sprouting up like desert wildflowers. Many of the buyers their Silicon Valley tech workers snapping up million dollar plus homes. Some of these people art just on the garage doors alone. Spending 10 15 $20,000 apiece for these garage doors, custom garage doors made with cedar and polished copper. Organs isn't complaining about that. He thinks it's fine when people get rich, But the way things are going there, he's got no chance of owning a home. We build all these fancy fancy homes and Louisville apartments. There's absolutely nothing Nothing in between home values in Reno have gone up 27% In the past year, Perkins and his wife are renters. She stopped working as a pastry chef in the pandemic. They have a six year old daughter and another child on the way. I asked him what he aspires to, and he says nothing extravagant. I would like to have a space with a yard that I could call my own like 900, square feet. Simple cabinets, simple countertops. We shag carpeting. I don't care. I just want four walls and a roof that I can afford that home Perkins is describing is just about vanishing in America. In 2020, the number of starter homes built was less than 1/5 of the yearly average of the early eighties. It's a huge problem if you think about the fact that home equity accounts for the bulk of wealth The overwhelming majority of Americans that Sam Cater, chief economist at Freddie Mac, the government backed mortgage company. Traditionally, Americans started building that wealth by purchasing a no frills first home. Freddie Mac defines a starter home as 1400 square feet or less Others define it differently. But on the matter of why they're so scarce, there's a good deal of agreement. The high price of building materials, labor costs are up zoning regulations, restrict construction and a big one, Cater says It's really the value of the land that matters the most. When it comes to home prices. Now America is a huge country with lots of open space. So why should land be so expensive? Well, it's not so plentiful in the places where the jobs are and where people want to live. You know, many people are trying to crowd in the same cities that are the most productive in the most affluent and offer the most opportunities. But high on affordable home prices prevent many Americans from doing so. When land is expensive, it becomes harder for builders to turn a profit on entry level homes. Greg you Gal D does build them in suburban Connecticut. But, he says it's increasingly tough and more and more builders can no longer do it. You can often squeezed by, he says, by saying, no to extras like upgraded cabinets and countertops. And carpet pads. Place like that sounds fine to Matt Perkins back in Reno when he looks around, though he sees no sign of economizing Homebuyers seemed to be Obsessed with this idea of luxury amenities and home builders are completely willing to give them that the numbers back him up less than 6% of the houses built in Nevada last year, where entry level homes Bergen says he'd gladly pass on the bay windows and stainless steel appliances for small house the bit of green in the backyard.

Matt Perkins Sam Cater 2020 1400 square feet America Freddie Mac Nevada Uri Berliner Perkins Cater last year 27% 900, square feet Silicon Valley Connecticut NPR Greg Undergo Paul Reno Louisville
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"Have long had a clear favor when it comes to tractors. John Deere is King in rural America. But farmers loyalty to the John Deere brand is fraying. MPR's Uri Berliner explains. Walter Schweitzer is a third generation Montana farmer. He never expected to get political in the middle of haying season. But there he was last summer on his John Deere tractor, hustling to cut and bail his head while the weather was still good. And then at the worst possible time, he says, his tractor kept shutting down. Randomly kind of did all the things that a farmer rancher does to try to troubleshoot the problems, But he couldn't do much because he didn't have access to the software that would help him diagnosis. What was wrong? Only a John Deere dealer could do that. Not an independent mechanic or Schweitzer himself. The guy who owns the tractor. It's not like I didn't know that this was an issue. It just became personal. You know when you're staring at a hay crop that needs to be in a bail. And your tractors not working. You get real nervous. Sweitzer wound up sending his tractor to the dealer, he says took about a month for the repair to get done his bill to replace the fuel sensor nearly $5000. Says a local independent mechanic would have charged only a small fraction of that. Quite so was fortunate. He had no backup tractor, so his crop didn't get ruined. But the experience made Schweitzer eager to fight for change. Equipment manufacturers are not supposed to hold you hostage. And that's what's happening here. These equipment manufacturers are holding me hostage to them, forcing me to use their dealerships to repair my equipment on their schedule on their time and at their rates. That's wrong. Today's generation of tractors have fancy touch screens and are packed with software and sensors that can help the farmer plant spray and harvest with great precision. That's one reason a new one can cost several $100,000 and his tech has become more important in farming. The standoff between tractor makers and farmers has intensified. Farmers say even simple repairs are off limits in 2018, the industry offered a compromise and made a promise. By this year, 2021 companies would sell farmers diagnostic tools that would let them fix their own equipment. But that's not happening, says Kevin O'Reilly of U. S. Pirg, a nonprofit research group. I myself called 12 different John Deere dealers in six different states asking to try to buy the software tools and diagnostics that you need to fix your tractor. And at 11 of the 12. I was told that I couldn't buy them. Sometimes I was told they didn't even exist. And then the 12 gave me an email address to reach out to which I never heard back from. John Deere declined to comment to other tractor makers, CNH industrial and add comb didn't respond to requests for interviews. The industry as a whole has fought.

Kevin O'Reilly 2018 Uri Berliner Walter Schweitzer John Deere Sweitzer America third generation 2021 Montana six different states nearly $5000 Today one reason last summer 12 different this year $100,000 Schweitzer U. S. Pirg
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"Farmers have long had a clear favor when it comes to tractors. John Deere is King in rural America, but farmers loyalty to the John Deere brand is fraying. NPR's Uri Berliner explains. Walter Schweitzer is a third generation Montana farmer. He never expected to get political in the middle of haying season. But there he was last summer on his John Deere tractor, hustling to cut and bail his head while the weather was still good, and then at the worst possible time, he says his tractor kept shutting down. Randomly kind of did all the things that a farmer rancher does to try to troubleshoot the problems, But he couldn't do much because he didn't have access to the software that would help him die. Diagnose. What was wrong on Leah John Deere dealer could do that. Not an independent mechanic or Schweitzer himself. The guy who owns the tractor. It's not like I didn't know that this was an issue. It just became personal. You know when you're staring at a hay crop that needs to be in a bail. And your tractors not working. You get real nervous. Sweitzer wound up sending his tractor to the dealer. He says it took about a month for the repair to get done His bill to replace the fuel sensor nearly $5000. Says a local independent mechanic would have charged only a small fraction of that. White, who was fortunate he had no backup tractor, so his crop didn't get ruined. But the experience made Schweitzer eager to fight for change. Equipment manufacturers are not supposed to hold you hostage. And that's what's happening here. These equipment manufacturers are holding me hostage to them, forcing me to use their dealerships to repair my equipment. On their schedule on their time and at their rates that's wrong. Today's generation of tractors have fancy touch screens and are packed with software and sensors that can help the farmer plant spray and harvest with great precision. That's one reason a new one can cost several $100,000 and his tech has become more important in farming. The standoff between tractor makers and farmers has intensified. Farmers say even simple repairs are off limits in 2018, the industry offered a compromise and made a promise. By this year, 2021 companies would sell farmers diagnostic tools that would let them fix their own equipment. But that's not happening, says Kevin O'Reilly of U. S. Pirg, a nonprofit research group. I myself called 12 different John Deere dealers in six different states asking to try to buy the software tools and diagnostics that you need to fix your tractor. And at 11 of the 12. I was told that I couldn't buy them. Sometimes I was told they didn't even exist. And then the 12th gave me an email address to reach out to which I never heard back from. John Deere declined to comment to other tractor makers, CNH industrial and add comb didn't respond to requests for interviews. Industry as a whole has fought against political efforts to force changes on manufacturers through what are called right to repair bills. Tom Brandt is a farmer and state senator who introduced Nebraska's right to repair bill full. Let's say You've got a couple $100,000 and you buy a bright, shiny new tractor. You only owned the hardware today that software is still controlled by the original equipment manufacturer. The rest is bill would change that it would unlock software and allow farmers and independent shops to make the same repairs as dealers. And industry group, the Association of Equipment Manufacturers tells NPR. He's kind of right to repair bills. They permit illegal tampering and create safety and environmental wrist. That's why states have rejected such bills in the past, but those right to repair bills they keep coming, Riley of U. S. PIRG says right to repair bills for Agriculture Have been introduced in 12 States. Farmers continue to speak out. We see more and more states introducing this legislation, and the movement continues forward as they realized that they just want to be able to fix their stuff. And that's not too much ask. But some farmers aren't waiting for bills to get past their hacking their own equipment to get around repair restrictions. Others they're going back in time. They're buying vintage tractors from the seventies and eighties that don't run on software or a Berliner NPR nous. This afternoon on all things considered. Musicians are eager to play in person again for their fans. But scheduling venues for bigger.

Tom Brandt Kevin O'Reilly 2018 Uri Berliner Walter Schweitzer Riley John Deere Sweitzer America Association of Equipment Manuf Montana third generation 12 different 2021 Schweitzer six different states $100,000 last summer 12 States NPR
"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you if you've already given if you're the reason we're here if you haven't given or it's been a while since you last time you donate it. Keep thinking about us and give now if you can 8883769692 or simply go online at W. In my city, dead work. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Could Democrats and Republicans agree on a plan for infrastructure? President Biden asked Congress for trillions of dollars to rebuild roads and bridges, along with a lot of things like housing electric vehicle charging stations, home care. Even more. Senate Republicans have attacked that bill for covering Maura than traditional infrastructure, but have also offered a smaller version. Of the plan. Among those working with Republicans is a key Biden ally, Democratic Senator Chris Coons of Delaware. Senator Welcome back Good morning, Steve. Are Republicans serious about making an agreement with you? I think we'll find out today because there's been a syriza of back and forth negotiations and proposals today. Senators capital of West Virginia Wicker of Mississippi Are going to unveil their trillion dollar counter offer to the last go sheeting session they held with President Biden. I remain hopeful that we can come together around significant investments in hard infrastructure in Bridges and tunnels in airports and ports in revitalizing the things that help us move people and products and make our country more competitive. Remind you last month we actually passed a $35 billion water and wastewater infrastructure bill literally. Today the Public Works Committee is marking up and authorizing bills that I think will go through. Bipartisan basis, and this week we are debating and I think will finally pass $120 billion bill for making our country more competitive with manufacturing and innovation. Since Senator I'm on other fronts, Senator I'm listening, listening closely to what you're saying there and we'll just remind people the president asked for a couple billion dollars in infrastructure. You said. They're coming back with something that maybe more like a trillion, And you are optimistic. They're gonna be in agreement on what sounds to me like traditional infrastructure like roads and bridges. Do you think that's going to be the shape of this? Some of the other more creative parts? This bill will go out. Yes, Steve. I think we could do this in two parts. President Biden's American Jobs plan asks for 2.3 Trillion in investment in a very broad range. Of needed investments in our country. Republicans are negotiating around a trillion dollars over 80 years in more traditional heart infrastructure. We could pass that on a bipartisan basis. And then later passed much of the rest of the Biden proposals of the Democrats agenda with only Democrats through something called reconciliation and still accomplished most of President Biden agenda if not all of it. And I guess we should clarify that for people. There's certain provisions where, with just 51 votes, you could get some very large legislation through if it has to do with budgeting. You have a chance to do that one more time this year. We do. So let's talk about the financing for this because, of course, the president wants to finance some of his plans by raising some tax rates to raising the corporate tax rate, raising the individual tax rate for taxpayers over $14,000. If I'm not mistaken, Mitch McConnell has said. We're completely uninterested in that. Steve. That's right. The critical issue here isn't whether our country needs infrastructure investment isn't whether we all agree that we should do this. It's how to pay for it. Democrats would like to raise rates on big corporations and the wealthiest individuals. Republicans would like to impose more user fees like gas taxes, for example, that would hit average working people. President Biden said in his campaign and is holding firm to this line that he won't raise taxes on people making less than $400,000 a year. And that's a lot of what spend really critical to this back and forth is OK. How do we pay for it? Last year we we passed on a bipartisan basis. Or trillion dollars in pandemic relief and recovery. I think, in the end a lot of this infrastructure bill, will you some of the previously appropriated funds that went to states And some of it will just not be paid for if we want to get it done on a bipartisan basis because we so sharply disagree about who should be paying to help grow our economy and invest in our country. So you'd borrow money and use the money that was appropriated for other things are authorized for other things. That's how you would do this. That may be the way we come to an agreement on this. Democrats would prefer to close some of the huge tax loopholes that were opened by a bill passed under President Trump with Republican votes on Lee. Republicans would prefer to do this by raising things that would impose more costs on millions of average people, even as we're coming out of this pandemic. It's a simple disagreement, but that's largely why we haven't invested in new infrastructure. On a big scale in the whole decade, at least that I've been in the Senate, so coming to a compromise is the only way forward here, Senator Coons as you probably know very well. Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, was quoted the other day saying quote 100% of my focus is on stopping A socialist country quotes get taken out of context, so I actually went back and watched the video, Mitch McConnell said that do you believe the person who said that is nevertheless willing to let some members of his caucus come across to vote with you on a big infrastructure bill? Well, That was certainly a disheartening quote and one that made many Democrats say This is the same Mitch McConnell, who led the Senate when Barack Obama was president and blocked virtually everything. Four years we'll have to see President Biden continues to engage directly with senators and I think this week today and possibly over the next two weeks at the latest, we'll see whether it's Able to move anything with Republican support. If it's not I'm hopefully, Democratic caucus will support President Biden's agenda and moving forward. Which could mean going even more through reconciliation or even ending the filibuster. Yes, both of those may end up being on the table. If we can't get progress with Republicans, I remain hopeful. Today you'll see US vote. On things that move for this big on making are making our country more competitive with China. It's robust. It's bipartisan. It shows we can make partner Senator Chris Coons of Delaware. Thanks. Thank you. American farmers have long had a clear favor when it comes to tractors. John Deere is King in rural America, but farmers loyalty to the John Deere brand is frame, NPR's Uri Berliner explains. Walter Schweitzer is a third generation Montana farmer. He never expected to get political in the middle of haying season. But there he was last summer on his John Deere tractor, hustling to cut and bail his head while the weather was still good, and then at the worst possible time, he says his tractor kept shutting down..

Mitch McConnell Rachel Martin Steve Steve Inskeep Uri Berliner Barack Obama $120 billion Congress Walter Schweitzer Republican $35 billion 2.3 Trillion America Democrats President Republicans Last year 100% today Senate
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"J. F daughter work. It's a 45 on KCRW. Thistles Morning edition from NPR News. I'm Tanya mostly and I'm Rachel Martin. We know there are some Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated. So there's this idea out there to give them money to encourage him minutes supported by a number of economists and politicians. Essentially a government cash for shots program. But there are those who do say it could backfire. MPR's Uri Berliner has more Robert lightened worries that appeals from politicians and celebrities that implore people to get vaccinated. They won't be enough. So cash payout should be a plan B. Lighten, an economist affiliated with the Brookings Institution, says that could be what it takes to reach her immunity, because if we don't get to that we're not going to get our lives back. He's proposing that the federal government compensate everyone who gets vaccinated $1000. $200 for getting both shots and 800 after the country reaches herd immunity. We just have a lot of people in this country. We don't trust the government or they don't trust vaccines or whatever. I view the payment for a vaccine as the price we pay for having a divided country. Lytton and his wife are both 70, and they were brainstorming about how they'd ever get out of the house again. Your idea. It's straight out of economics, 101. People respond to incentives and incentives could be used not just for the sake of individuals but for the benefit of society as a whole, like insurance discounts for safe driving. Cash payouts for employees who quit smoking. This one would be pricey. So it $1000 a person round numbers. We're talking somewhere between 253 $100 million. That's billions with a B but Lytton says it would be a drop in the bucket compared to the economic harm if the pandemic persists. After like wrote about paying people to get vaccinated. The idea got backing from former Democratic presidential candidates John Delaney and Andrew Yang and from the prominent economist Greg. Thank you, but that's about it. There's no groundswell. No bill in Congress, it may not be ready for prime time until we actually see the take up right. To take up rate for vaccinations. Now, if government pay up, speed up to take up right and help us overcome the pandemic, it would be money well spent. But some say the idea overlooks a basic factor. Fear payment may indeed encouraged some people to get the vaccine. Cynthia Crider teaches marketing at Washington University's Olin Business School. But it may also deter some people from getting the vaccine because payments signals that the vaccine is risky. The worry is that some people will think the government wouldn't pay me to take these shots. Unless there's something dodgy about the vaccine, even though there's no evidence of that. There's a lot at stake in overcoming suspicions about the vaccines. Dr Anthony Fauci says vaccination levels should reach between 70 and 90%. Fully protect the population, But more than 30% of people say they want or probably won't take the shots right now. The math doesn't work. Maybe confidence will grow as more shots are given. But if not a month from them, we could be hearing a lot more about lightens plan be paying people to get vaccinated or a Berliner NPR news. Later.

Lytton Cynthia Crider NPR News KCRW Uri Berliner Rachel Martin Brookings Institution Dr Anthony Fauci Tanya J. F Congress John Delaney Olin Business School Greg Robert Andrew Yang Washington University
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Tanya mostly and I'm Rachel Martin. We know there are some Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated. So there's this idea out there to give them money to encourage him minutes supported by a number of economists and politicians. Essentially a government cash for shots program. But there are those who do say it could backfire. NPR's Uri Berliner has more Robert lighten worries that appeals from politicians and celebrities that implore people to get vaccinated. They won't be enough so cash payout should be a plan B. Lighten, an economist affiliated with the Brookings Institution, says that could be what it takes to reach herd immunity, because if we don't get to that we're not going to get our lives back. He's proposing that the federal government compensate everyone who gets vaccinated $1000. $200 for getting both shots and 800 after the country reaches herd immunity. We just have a lot of people in this country. We don't trust the government or they don't trust vaccines or whatever I view the payment. For a vaccine as the price we pay for having a divided country. Lytton and his wife are both 70. And they were brainstorming about how they'd ever get out of the house again. Their idea. It's straight out of economics, 101. People respond to incentives and incentives could be used not just for the sake of individuals but for the benefit of society as a whole, like insurance discounts for safe driving. Cash payouts for employees who quit smoking. This one would be pricey. So it $1000 a person round numbers. We're talking somewhere between 253 $100 million. That's billions with a B but Lytton says it would be a drop in the bucket compared to the economic harm if the pandemic persists. After Light wrote about paying people to get vaccinated. The idea got backing from former Democratic presidential candidates John Delaney and Andrew Yang and from the prominent economist Greg. Thank you, but that's about it. There's no groundswell. No bill in Congress, it may not be ready for prime time until we actually see the take up right. Take up rate for vaccinations. Now, if government pay up, speed up to take up right and help us overcome the pandemic, it would be money well spent. But some say the idea overlooks a basic factor. Fear payment may indeed encouraged some people to get the vaccine. Cynthia Crider teaches marketing at Washington University, these old and business school, But it may also deter some people from getting the vaccine because payments signals that the vaccine is risky. The worry is that some people will think the government wouldn't pay me to take these shots. Unless there's something dodgy about the vaccine, even though there's no evidence of that. There's a lot at stake in overcoming suspicions about the vaccines. Dr Anthony Fauci says vaccination levels should reach between 70 and 90%. Fully protect the population, But more than 30% of people say they want or probably won't take the shots right now. The math doesn't work. Maybe confidence will grow as more shots are given. But if not a month from them, we could be hearing a lot more about lightens plan be paying people to get vaccinated. Marie Berliner NPR news.

Lytton Cynthia Crider Rachel Martin Brookings Institution Marie Berliner Uri Berliner Tanya NPR Dr Anthony Fauci Congress Light John Delaney Greg Andrew Yang Robert Washington University
"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KCRW

"Gotta crash in the left lane. That's got you backed up to Valley Circle Boulevard and attend Easter Grant in L, A a stall cleared from the right lane. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb lived an inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation Group by the same name was targeted will. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie Gotta who represents the third district where the bombing occurred, helped draft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there. Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group. And, um, I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable in a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that A government bombed its home city, its own citizens. Um, there was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is also the neighborhood where Walter Well, it's junior was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace Yeah, yes. Yeah. And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to bring about to change. Is Philadelphia City Council member Jamie Got ta Pleasure to speak with you. Thank you. Thank you so much for focusing on this. Now let's dig into some new research about something many of us are guilty of using buzzwords and corporate gobbledygook. NPR's Uri Berliner has a look at why it just won't go away. You've heard these phrases before, maybe more than you ever wanted to. There's definitely some synergy here. That is a win. That's a win win. Let's get our ducks in a row. Here, guys. All right, Here's the 30,000 ft view. It's true that down, I'll be fit up. Can you put it back together? Look, And then there's the more grandiose language so common in Silicon Valley. We're making the world a better place to pack cells, algorithms for consensus protocols, and we're making the world a better place for software defined data centers. In better place to make the world a better place. What does that even mean? All this word salad everywhere. It got Eric Anna such thinking. Why do people use jargon? Anuses teaches that us sees Marshall School of business. Working with two colleagues from Columbia University. He set out to answer that question, along with another one. We also were interested in kind of are there certain types of people who may use jargon more than others. They looked at published studies and ransom experiments that tested when and why people use jargon. And what they concluded. Is that where you stand in the social hierarchy matters a lot. Using jargon is is one thing that people think will impress others. Their research found that people with less prestige in an organization are more likely to use those buzzwords like interns. New hires First year students What we show is that the lower says people are much more concerned about how they'll be evaluated by their audience. Molly Young has a lot of sympathy for people in that situation. She's the literary critic at New York magazine and wrote an essay about corporate speak earlier this year, she says, when interns use words like deep dive, they're just trying to fit in there. Using it Innocently. Young worked at startups for nearly 10 years and says she knows the dialect only too well. But I could only describe his fake words scam me words like bs. Words So words like orientate or guest, imminent or Omni Channel or core competency, she says. When that kind of language comes from the mouths of people with authority, like corporate executives It's not exactly innocent. She recalls One boss who gave long power point presentations in a windowless meeting room with no air vents. She would be sort of going on and on about delivery. Abel's that we needed to operationalize certain processes in order to optimize share ability, as those words blended together into what young cause a soup of meaninglessness. Fellow employees gamely pretended to listen. But none of our brains were actually in the room. And, she says the result was numbing and disorienting. For me. The experience of having an executive speak to a group of lower employees with those words really got at what is disturbing about it, which is that it can also be used to sort of intentionally confuse people. Young hasn't worked. It started for a while now, but that doesn't mean she's escaped business, John Going altogether. It spreads like kudzu. A phrase will kind of float into my head like a little rain cloud Look, level setting or criminal. Just have a little shutter. We're almost done here, and I can't let this one thing go. There's one piece of corporate speak that really gets on my nerves. Learnings with an S. Mentioned it at the end of my conversation with Molly Young. Her response literally a phrase from Borac. It's right there in the title of the first movie, Cultural Learnings of America. Ford Make benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan Worry Berliner NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Many lower income Angelenos were already struggling to pay rent. The coronavirus made it that much worse way. Want.

Philadelphia Andhra police Philadelphia City Council Black Liberation Group NPR Molly Young Jamie Got Ari Shapiro Valley Circle Boulevard City Council Walter Well New York magazine Walter Wallace Silicon Valley America Mary Louise Kelly. Uri Berliner Borac
"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Pregnant women. Change comes in response to reports of racial bias in who gets tested for drugs and other substances like alcohol and then who gets reported to child welfare authorities. All the investors. Jasmine Khan has been covering this issue. She was the first to get this story. She joins us now to explain more chaos. Haitian first. Can you explain to us what is in this new health and hospitals policy and how it is different from the one that it replaces? Well, the biggest and most important changes that medical staff must get the written consent from the mother before a drug test. That wasn't the case before. The policy was always to get informed Consent, but the mother was not Handed any written information with an explanation of the test or her rights. Now she does need to sign off on a test, and she must be told that she has a right to decline it. Otherwise, the policy enshrines this philosophy that substance use must be treated as a medical issue, not a moral problem, and I'm actually paraphrasing the very first line of the policy. It also advises medical staff to screen all pregnant women on their possible substance used with the verbal questionnaire, and even then, it's meant to be only for the purposes of providing prenatal care and linking women to treatment if needed. And a toxicology test is on. Lee ordered when deemed medically necessary s O. What led to these changes he has did did helping hospitals actually acknowledge issues with bias here? No, They didn't acknowledge that. But the system chief Medical Officer Michelle Alan. Did say the changes come in response to a City council hearing last year, where mothers and their advocates described being tested on at times unknowingly without their consent. Um, those women also told stories of a positive test result, including for substances like marijuana, leading to invasive child welfare investigations, and in some cases, child removals. Alan, listen to that. And when she spoke to me about the policy change, she spoken some personal terms. Actually, she said, obstetrician gynecologist by training, and she's been working with pregnant women in the public hospital system for almost 40 years now, so she thinks that the changes in this policy will be more fair to patients. So health care providers they're required to report abuse and neglect does the policy actually address when they should be reporting positive results to child welfare officials? No, the hospital's policy does not. However, the city's administration for Children's Services has also just issued some new guidance. Just last week, it's written jointly with the Department of Health. It reminds providers that a positive drug test of a newborn does not warrant a call of neglect in and of itself. In a C S has been working on this issue. They acknowledge Ah, long legacy of racial disparities in the child welfare system and a need to really meaningfully address them. Um, you know this system just to remind you overwhelmingly investigates black and brown families. Black Children in particular are overrepresented. In every stage of the child welfare system from initial investigations to foster care, so a C s has been trying to really look at the entry points to the system and to address where there might be unwarranted or unnecessary calls of neglect and drug testing is one of those entry points. What is the approach help providers should take if they do have concerns about drug use and child safety at home. Isn't the administration for Children's services, the place to go for that kind of thing? Well, advocates say that we, you know, as a society have normalized, calling child welfare authorities for something like this for some families. Without fully realizing what it means. When you make that call, So you know, I described how women at that City Council hearing talked about it a punitive system and being subjected to invasive. Investigations. They have been subjected to very onerous programs, including drug treatment programs that are mandated to attend even well. After these mothers continually tested negative for the drugs, parents have reported losing employment over the need to attend these programs or go to family court. And again, you know, drug use is widespread across the population, regardless of race. But when we talk about how to help those people, it's the child welfare system called only or primarily, I should say for black and Latino mothers in this city and not for white mothers. Yes, is this new testing policy enough to reduce any of these unwarranted tests or or reporting of results? From public defenders and other advocates that I've talked to the answer is probably not, um, public defender from the Bronx defenders told me A drug test is not a parenting test. But these test results are routinely held up as an indictment of a woman's parenting, especially for women of color. W Nice, easy. Yasmeen Khan. Thanks, guys. Thank you so much. Now let's dig into some new research about something Many of us are guilty of using buzzwords and corporate gobbledygook. NPR's Uri Berliner has a look at why it just won't go away. You've heard these phrases before, maybe more than you ever wanted to. There's definitely some synergy here. That is a win. That's a win win. Let's get our ducks in a row. Here, guys. All right, Here's the 30,000 ft view. It's drill that down. I'll be fit up. Can you put it back together? Look, And then there's the more grandiose language so common in Silicon Valley. We're making the world a better place to pack cells, algorithms for consensus protocols, and we're making the world a better place through software defined data centers..

City Council Michelle Alan Jasmine Khan Medical Officer Department of Health Yasmeen Khan marijuana Silicon Valley Children's Services Lee NPR Uri Berliner
"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In New York. Like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios. Restaurants. You can walk to art galleries, even a film festival, Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is covert related. New Yorkers used to say maybe one of their one day now they've decided we don't have. Look you lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out. There are which says people are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management, and Until recently they were living in a one bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side with their dog buoy as the virus spiked in the spring there, anxiety about going outside mounted, so it was coming in and out of the building at least 4 to 5 times a day to walk him. It was getting really stressful. Miriam and Steve had been planning to move to the suburbs since January. The pandemic clinched it being an epicenter, the washing of the hands just the nerves of it all. It was pushing us out the door for sure. Out the door to Montclair in late April, their offer on a colonial with black shutters and a big front porch beat out for other biz. Miriam says they paid almost 20% above the asking price. You think that would have cost even more if they waited, And so on June 1st, they moved in and officially became suburbanites. Everything came to the moment we could let the dog out in the yard. Similar stories are playing out throughout the Greater New York area since March, Around 10,000 New York residents applied to change their address with the Postal Service and moved to Connecticut. That's according to Hearst, Connecticut media and in the suburbs north of the city and further upstate Here's real estate agent Monica Schwarber in the month of April, where we typically would get Navy 75 increase in a month. We had over 400 enquiries, ditching the city and buying a quiet place away from the crowds takes money. Only the relatively well off can do it. It's not really an option for a low wage workers who take the subway and worry about getting sick. But for those who have the option of moving, it's not just anxiety over the virus. Glenn Kalman is the CEO of the national real estate brokerage Redfin. He says remote work has offered a new kind of freedom covered has changed what people want. They want that house in the hills, nearly that's far away from everyone else. Work from home is also liberated them people leaving congested cities for the suburbs. It's the story of America and has been for many generations. There was a period about a decade ago, when big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles grew quite alive. That's unheard of William Fry is a demographer at the Brookings Institution since they invented the car. I don't think We saw a few years where cities as a group are growing faster than suburbs. All that got a lot of media attention, especially about millennials in Brooklyn, but the picture has shifted once again over the past few years, there was more movement to the suburbs. More movement to smaller size metropolitan areas. So does that mean that a superstar city like New York will wither away? Fry doesn't think so. He says. New York is resilient. Its appeal is timeless, and maybe members of Gen Z will flock there just like the Millennials did a decade ago. Worry. Berliner NPR news Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album, so I really need to say anything more than that. It's called first rows of spring, the first time that he saw everything had changed overnight. Love started. First rule of Willie Nelson joins us now from his famous ranch outside of Austin. Mr Nelson, Thanks so much for being with us about I've read that this is the song that kind of got this album started. Yeah, but he can.

New York Montclair New York City Miriam Cantor Susan Horowitz Willie Nelson Steve William Fry NPR New Jersey Uri Berliner BJ Liederman Glenn Kalman front porch Connecticut Gen Z Brookings Institution Manhattan Postal Service
"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But I mean, who's free? Eli Armel lives in California and is the vocalist for a metal band called Salto. He's thinking about July 4th a little differently this year. I mean, there is this black folks like me who are not three to just walk around in their own neighbourhood for fear that they might get. The police called on them. So I mean, I don't. I don't have much freedom. I feel like as everyone else does, Mr. Arnold says he's always felt like this. But this year that feeling has grown sharper and years passed. I used to go like hang out at a friend's party. I live down the street in Disneyland. So we've gone there and watch the fireworks before. But now I've realized that a lot of the friends that I used to hang out with don't think my life matters. So those aren't people I really want to hang out with anymore. I feel very isolated in that respect. I don't think I think differently about it. Perhaps it's even more accent it. There's more emphasis more impact on the meaning of July 4th on her lead to raises a professor emeritus at Arizona State University. Her father's family immigrated from Honduras and her mother's family was part of the great migration of African Americans in this country. And so there was always an idea of betterment of striving of improving. We knew where we came from. We had this wholeness and we celebrated. As family members. The fourth of July There were the barbecue, so I had all these good memories of what the fourth means, As I got older, Of course, I said, Well, maybe we Arm have not cashed in yet on this American dream his way says she started to think more critically about the holiday After she got to university, I was introduced to Langston Hughes in his famous signature poem I to Sing America. They tell me to go to the kitchen. That's where I eat. But I eat, but I am American. Frederick Douglas. What is the Fourth of July mean? To the Negro. All of these ideas. Thes metaphors are saying we are a part of the Fourth of July and we want Should be invested in that complete reality that complete acceptance and, she says, despite police brutality and decades of deeply rooted racism. She still feels her worth is an American. Today, the fourth of July his home I've traveled the world over and I always wanted to come back home, and so this is where we have to work to improve the situation. To be a part of this social movement. Apart of black lives matter apart of striving for racial unity. Honestly, I think I'm not thinking about July 4th differently just because of always had a thing about it differently. Joel Burrell is a second year medical student in Spokane, Washington. So much out of immigrants my parent from Ghana, West Africa, mostly black man. That's grown up in the United States. So because of that, July 4th has always kind of been a day of reflection for me, and I think a large segment of the US population has always grappled with the meaning of July 4th. Mr Pavel says he feels lucky to have grown up is the child of immigrants during these Pearson conversations these days about what the Fourth of July means to different people they feel gets giving me kind of that perspective to put myself in someone else's shoes to understand that the world isn't black or white, but there's so many different, diverse perspectives. Joel Bovell has plans to celebrate today and then To reflect thinking about what did July 4th mean 244 years ago for different types of people? What does it mean today for those different groups of people as well? So for people like an undocumented immigrant or mother of a black boy? What does freedom mean for them when people are literally trying to deport you or Kim, take away your son at any moment? Starting July 4th is the time to think about what independence means, but it has to be equal parts celebration of how far we've come, but also recognition of how far we stuff to go. But Eli Arnold The vocalist in California says that He's finding it hard to think about celebrating at all this year. I'm just going to let off some fireworks in the street and then go inside before someone calls the cops on me. I mean, sure, we're celebrating America's independence it, sire. What? 200 something birthday Cool. What else we got on the table, you know? We have 130,000 deaths from Corona virus. People are marching in the streets because of racial inequality. People think that my life mattering is a point of contention. So what are we celebrating Eli Arnold, Joel Burrell and unholy to raise Friends often start in New York, like BJ Liederman, who writes our theme music. People have been moving to the suburbs for decades. But now the Corona virus outbreak may have Haitian that movement, even in New York. That has a lot of people talking about the future of cities. NPR's Uri Berliner reports. Susan Horowitz has never seen anything like it. We're seeing 20 offers on houses. We're seeing things going 30% over the asking price. It's kind of insane. Horowitz is a veteran Realestate agent. And she's talking about the frantic, hyper competitive market in Montclair, New Jersey, a suburb about 12 miles from New York City. It is a blood sport. Montclair is the kind of suburb that even appeals to demanding New Yorkers. It has yoga studios restaurants, you can walk to art galleries, even a film festival. Horowitz says. It's always been popular. But now on a completely different scale, every last bit of it is Cove In related New Yorkers used to say, maybe we'll move there One day now. They've decided we don't have look e lose anymore. We don't have people coming out. A sort of test the market and see what's out there, Roo, it says. People are eager to buy like Miriam Cantor and Steve can a plume. They're expecting their first child in September. Miriam works in ad sales, Steve's and risk management. And.

Susan Horowitz Mr. Arnold Joel Burrell California America New York Eli Armel Miriam Cantor United States Montclair Eli Arnold Steve Joel Bovell Arizona State University Corona Langston Hughes Disneyland professor Mr Pavel
"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Safe with having a little fun the travel industry is trying to adapt to those concerns in normal times hotels try to attract customers with star chefs or high end designs but amid the pandemic when seven out of ten hotel rooms in the U. S. are empty they know they have to give people what they want which includes a lot of myself here's NPR's uri Berliner the news from home lately isn't about craft cocktails response it's a partnership with Lysol that's right Helton is teaming up with the parent company of Lysol it's all about enhanced cleanliness so Cordell is Hilton's global head of brand development we know that through this pandemic that expectation of cleanliness has probably been elevated to the point now where it's cleanliness almost with a double exclamation point after it at Hilton and other hotels guests can expect disinfectant being applied liberally and visibly for the sake of cleanliness and for reassurance says Jim Coyle who consults with hotels on customer experiences when you get a guest he you'll see the staff members they will conspicuously white the guests he heart of your clothing and it's you when you arrive desk you're going to see hotels that wiping the desk cleaning forty even though there's nothing on it when you go to your room more efforts of reassurance Marriott international has identified twelve touch points for extra disinfectant ray Bennett is the company's head of global operations doorknobs thermostats door handles drawer handles things of that nature has Hogan rolls out its clean state campaign Cordell says guests will notice some familiar objects missing they will see that some of the items in the ring that could likely be fingerprinted by previous guests magazines notepads pens those items have been removed from the right and there's likely to be more here's an industry consultant Jim Coyle again the phone will probably be something that is seeing its last days because of okay in that most divisive object in the hotel room I think the the death of many bars probably finally here all of these steps have one purpose to assure travelers that hotels are safe released as safe as they possibly can be well corona viruses still with this an early test will be convincing business travelers like Liz Oppenheim who lives outside of Boston she's itching to get back on the road the longer I go without traveling the more I just don't feel like a person I I literally had dreams almost every night about traveling Oppenheimer street drug companies on clinical trials and normally spends three or four nights a week in hotels she enjoys it for one thing she racks up a whole lot of loyalty points I have all the statuses for now her travel is on pause and this Oppenheim imagine staying in hotels again there's one word she uses a lot anxious so there's something about slipping between the sheets are clean white Christiansen hotel that's just credibly relaxing especially worked at a really hard you know tense day at work and it's just so wonderful but I think I will be anxious I think I'll be anxious to as hotels spray and disinfect and purge their rooms of pens magazines and note pads they may eliminate germs but will they eliminate anxiety hotels are about to find out re Berliner NPR news in a typical summer more than fourteen million children and staff members had to camp but not this year and although many sleepaway camps are canceled the country's largest summer camp associations have jointly released a field guide to operating while reducing the spread of crown of ours on a common that's from our education team tells Elsa Chang of All Things Considered what kids might expect this summer so I know the question on a lot of parents minds this year is is camp actually going to happen this year my guess is most are canceled I would say many are canceled especially overnight camps and of course it depends on case numbers continuing to decline but I have seen reports of camps planning to open really across the country in Arizona Connecticut Colorado Montana Texas and even here in New York City which has been the epicenter of the pandemic the YMCA day camps are currently taking registrations wow that seems kind of surprising to me you know I think it's a testament to the need first of all for child care on the part of working parents as well as a break for children right so I reported recently that the pandemic stand home orders have really had a negative impact on some children's mental health and I talked to Tom Rosenberg the CEO of the American camp association which along with the why put out these guidelines and he says this hits home in his household with his son who's twelve years Tom my son is on his computer probably ten and a half hours a day yeah and and that's pretty typical you know and he said even though his son's relatively privileged every child in our country needs these kind of experiences this summer more than any summer more than ever I mean it's so true sin so now there's this new guidance for camps what does this field guides say so these two groups told me they really saw the need to expand on a what was a very limited flow chart that was finally officially released by the CDC last week and so in this eighty two page guide they say you know first of all your state has to be in with the trump administration calls phase two or phase three of re opening which means assisting the client essentially case is plenty of room in hospitals and so if that's okay then the guide emphasizes you know that you screen both staff and campers both before camp started during camp that you're you're screening by taking temperatures and having self reporting of common symptoms like sore throats there's a lot of information here back cleaning and disinfection routines and then they're very interestingly they put in this concept cohorts cohort what does that mean in this context so the idea here is he would keep groups of campers and staff together as small a group it's possible some state guidelines say you know no more than ten campers in a group and that is your cohort and you would make sure that this group is consistent and the groups are separated from each other for all the activities including meals and this is to limit the number of contacts across the campus it easy in case there's some exposure some positive test easier your trays and isolate people what any recommendations on specific activities at these camps so first of all staying outdoors as much as possible seems to be indicated and that's something we've heard from other public health guidelines that there's less transmission outdoors and secondly they talk about swimming which is a huge classic when it comes to summer camp at the guidance is you know this virus is not water borne so it shouldn't be a problem as long as you don't mix groups of children and do these best practices seem feasible you know I think I eat there are some encouraging signs for example YMCA has been operating I central childcare at eleven hundred sites and they have not had a transition yes all right that's NPR's on your countenance thanks Anya thanks also and on you was speaking there with Elsa Chang Yellowstone National Park re opened this past Monday well sort of there's been pressure to reopen national parks even as many states are still seeing a rise in covert nineteen cases we opening Yellowstone is especially complicated the park touches three states all with a different mix of travel restrictions and rates of coronavirus cases but as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from west Yellowstone Montana it's not clear if many visitors well actually show up billed as the oldest operating hotel in west Yellowstone the Madison is a short walk from the west entrance to Yellowstone National Park with its original pine log siding and thick wood beams this hotel sits on a street squeezed with camera stores intricate shops hawking old faithful T. shirts wooden grizzly bears carved by chain saws and paintings of the enormous Yellowstone falls normally these sidewalks beneath the old western facade would be humming with tourists but obviously nothing about what we're living through as normal Garrett ostler owns the Madison hotel it's really disheartening no one on the street there is no one here you can shoot the ball in any direction and not have to worry ostler is wearing a camo hunting hoodie and a red face mask with a bear claw on it he loves to regale visitors with old stories about Yellowstone and what he calls the healing power of this park and its natural wonders ostler once it reopened as quickly as possible there's people who have been hunkered down for eight weeks are we ready for some healing and normalcy in Yellowstone brings for now tourists can only enter on the Wyoming side for day use snow overnight stays are allowed yet and park entrances for Montana will remain closed for the foreseeable future of the four million annual visitors to Yellowstone almost three quarters of them typically pass through these Montana gateway towns at the Madison bookings for June or about fifteen percent of normal and reservations later in the summer are cratering ostler says he's put the steps in place to protect his guests from the virus but even he isn't sure how you regulate social distancing in one of the nation's most crowded national parks people really struggle with staying fifty feet away from the bison let alone six feet from each other we're social creatures Yellowstone's highways and boardwalk paths are infamously clogged with tourists crowds of amateur photographers and their tripods aimed at a bison or bear on the shoulder of the road and then there's old faithful on a warm summer day it's more crowded amusement park than pristine habitat I don't pretend to say that I can disperse every crowd in every picture you're gonna see a yells Donald St Paul's going to be people standing six feet apart Yellowstone park superintendent cam Charlize ushering through what's being called a sunrise opening right now it's bare bones and limited but soon some campgrounds and cabins might open up the trump administration appears to be leaving it up to individual park superintendents to make these decisions most big parks like the Great Smoky Mountains or the Grand Canyon are doing similar saw off three openings no one is putting economics over health but there's got to be is there a balance in there that we can strike where we can start to reopen safely get seventy economy rolling again not go so far so fast that we can't pull back if it doesn't work out Shelley has been pressured by gateway town businesses and Wyoming in particular to re open there are only a handful of known covert nineteen cases in nearby counties there but he says he's also getting pressure to not re open the resort areas near the park in Gallatin county Montana have been the corona virus hot spot and in Montana and Idaho technically all nonessential out of state travelers we're supposed to.

NPR uri Berliner
"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With having a little fun the travel industry is trying to adapt to those concerns in normal times hotels try to attract customers with star chefs or high end designs but amid the pandemic when seven out of ten hotel rooms in the U. S. are empty they know they have to give people what they want which includes a lot of myself here's NPR's uri Berliner the news from home lately isn't about craft cocktails response it's a partnership with Lysol that's right hello miss teaming up with the parent company of Lysol it's all about enhanced cleanliness Phil Cordell is Hilton's global head of brand development we know that screw this pandemic that expectation of cleanliness has probably been elevated to the point now where it's cleanliness almost with a double exclamation point after it at Hilton and other hotels guests can expect disinfectant being applied liberally and visibly for the sake of cleanliness and for reassurance says Jim Coyle who consults with hotels on customer experiences when you get a guest she you'll see the staff members they will conspicuously white the guests he heart of you before the and it's you when you arrive desk you're going to see hotels that wiping the desk cleaning forty even though there's nothing on it when you go to your room more efforts of reassurance Marriott international has identified twelve touch points for extra disinfectant ray Bennett is the company's head of global operations doorknobs thermostats door handles drawer handles things of that nature has Hilton rolls out its clean state campaign Cordell says guests will notice some familiar objects missing they will see that some of the items in the room that could likely be fingerprinted by previous guests magazines notepads pens those items have been removed from the right and there's likely to be more here's industry consultant Jim Coyle again the phone will probably be something that is seeing its last days because of coke in that most divisive object in the hotel room I think the the death of many bars probably finally here all of these steps have one purpose to assure travelers that hotels are safe released as safe as they possibly can be while corona virus is still with us an early test will be convincing business travelers like Liz Oppenheim who lives outside of Boston she's itching to get back on the road the longer I go without traveling the more I just don't feel like a person I I literally had dreams almost every night about traveling Oppenheimer street drug companies on clinical trials normally spends three or four nights a week and hotels she enjoys it for one thing she racks up a lot of loyalty points I have all the statuses for now her travel is on pause and this Oppenheim imagine staying in hotels again there's one word she uses a lot anxious so there's something about slipping between the sheets are clean white Christiansen hotel that's just credibly relaxing especially work in a really hard you know tense day at work and it's just so wonderful but I think I will be anxious I think I'll be anxious to as hotel sprayed and disinfected and purge their rooms of pens magazines and note pads they may eliminate germs but will they eliminate anxiety hotels are about to find out re Berliner NPR news in a typical summer more than fourteen million children and staff members had to cap but not this year and although many sleepaway camps are canceled the country's largest summer camp associations have jointly released a field guide to operating while reducing the spread of crown of ours on your coming that's from our education team tells Elsa Chang of All Things Considered what kids might expect this summer so I know the question on a lot of parents minds this year is is camp actually going to happen this year my guess is most are canceled I would say many are canceled especially overnight camps and of course it depends on case numbers continuing to decline but I have seen reports of camps planning to open really across the country in Arizona Connecticut Colorado Montana Texas and even here in New York City which has been the epicenter of the pandemic the YMCA day camps are currently taking registrations wow that seems kind of surprising to me you know I think it's a testament to the need first of all for child care on the part of working parents as well as a break for children right so I reported recently that the pandemic stand home orders have really had a negative impact on some children's mental health and I talked to Tom Rosenberg the CEO of the American camp association which along with the why put out these guidelines and he says this is home in his household with his son who's twelve years time my son is on his computer probably ten and a half hours a day yeah and and that's pretty typical you know and he said even though his son's relatively privileged every child in our country needs these kinds of experiences this summer more than any summer more than ever I mean it's so true so so now there's this new guidance for camps what does this field guide say so these two groups told me they really saw the need to expand on a what was a very limited flow chart that was finally officially released by the CDC last week and so in this eighty two page guide they say you know first of all your state has to be in with the trump administration calls phase two or phase three of re opening which means assisting the client essentially case is plenty of room in hospitals and so if that's okay then the guide emphasizes you know that you screen both staff and campers both before camp starts and during camp that you're you're screening by taking temperatures and having self reporting of common symptoms like sore throats there's a lot of information here back cleaning and disinfection routines and then they're very interestingly they put in this concept of cohorts cohort what does that mean in this context so the idea here is he would keep groups of campers and staff together as small a group it's possible some state guidelines say you know no more than ten campers in a group and that is your cohort and you would make sure that this group is consistent and the groups are separated from each other for all the activities including meals and this is to limit the number of contacts across the campus it easy in case there's some exposure some positive test easier your trays and isolate people what any recommendations on specific activities at these camps so first of all staying outdoors as much as possible seems to be indicated and that's something we've heard from other public health guidelines that there's less transmission outdoors and secondly they talk about swimming which is a huge classic when it comes to summer camp at the guidance is you know this virus is not water borne so it shouldn't be a problem as long as you don't mix groups of children and do these best practices seem feasible you know I think I eat there are some encouraging signs for example YMCA has been operating I central childcare at eleven hundred sites and they have not had a transition yes right that's NPR's on your countenance thanks Anya thanks also and on you was speaking there with Elsa Chang Yellowstone National Park we opened this past Monday well sort of there's been pressure to reopen national parks even as many states are still seeing a rise in covert nineteen cases we opening Yellowstone is especially complicated the park touches three states all with a different mix of travel restrictions and rates of coronavirus cases but as NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from west Yellowstone Montana it's not clear if many visitors will actually show up billed as the oldest operating hotel in west Yellowstone the Madison is a short walk from the west entrance to Yellowstone National Park with its original pine log siding in thick wood beams this hotel sits on a street squeezed with camera stores intricate shops hawking old faithful T. shirts wooden grizzly bears carved by chain saws and paintings of the enormous Yellowstone falls normally these sidewalks beneath the old western facade would be humming with tourists but obviously nothing about what we're living through as normal Garrett ostler owns the Madison hotel it's really disheartening no one on the street there is no one here he can shoot the ball in any direction and not have to worry ostler is wearing a camo hunting hoodie and a red face mask with a bear claw on it he loves to regale visitors with old stories about Yellowstone and what he calls the healing power of this park and its natural wonders ostler once it reopened as quickly as possible there's people who've been hunkered down for eight weeks are we ready for some healing and normalcy in Yellowstone brings for now tourists can only enter on the Wyoming side for day use snow overnight stays are allowed yet and park entrances for Montana will remain closed for the foreseeable future of the four million annual visitors to Yellowstone almost three quarters of them typically pass through these Montana gateway towns at the Madison bookings for June or about fifteen percent of normal and reservations later in the summer are cratering ostler says he's put the steps in place to protect his guests from the virus but even he isn't sure how you regulate social distancing in one of the nation's most crowded national parks people really struggle with staying fifty feet away from the bison let alone six feet from each other and we're social creatures Yellowstone's highways and boardwalk paths are infamously clogged with tourists crowds of amateur photographers and their tripods aimed at a bison or bear on the shoulder of the road and then there's old faithful on a warm summer day it's more crowded amusement park than pristine habitat I don't pretend to say that I can disperse every crowd in every picture you're gonna see a yells Donald faithful going to be people standing six feet apart Yellowstone park superintendent cam Charlize ushering through what's being called a sunrise opening right now it's bare bones and limited but soon some campgrounds and cabins might open up the trump administration appears to be leaving it up to individual park superintendents to make these decisions most big barks like the Great Smoky Mountains or the grand canyon are doing similar soft re openings no one is putting economics over health but there's got to be is there a balance in there that we can strike where we can start to reopen safely get some of the economy rolling again not go so far so fast that we can't pull back if it doesn't work out Shelley has been pressured by gateway town businesses and Wyoming in particular to re open there are only a handful of known cobit nineteen cases in nearby counties there but he says he's also getting pressure to not re open the resort areas near the park in Gallatin county Montana have been the corona virus hot spot and in Montana and Idaho technically all nonessential out of state travelers we're supposed to self quarantine for fourteen days on arrival it's not really.

NPR uri Berliner
More Lysol, No More Pens In Rooms, Hotels Adapt To Win Back Guests

Morning Edition

02:11 min | 2 years ago

More Lysol, No More Pens In Rooms, Hotels Adapt To Win Back Guests

"In normal times hotels try to attract customers with star chefs or high end design but these are not normal times seven out of ten hotel rooms in the U. S. are empty now and to survive hotels are adapting here's NPR's uri Berliner the news from Hilton lately isn't about craft cocktails response it's a partnership with Lysol that's right Hilton is teaming up with the parent company of Lysol it's all about enhanced cleanliness so Cordell was Hilton's global head of brand development we know that through this pandemic that expectation of cleanliness has probably been elevated to the point now where it's cleanliness almost with a double exclamation point after it at Hilton and other hotels guests can expect disinfectant being applied liberally and visibly for the sake of cleanliness and for reassurance says Jim Coyle who consults with hotels on customer experiences when you get a guest key you'll see the staff members they will conspicuously white the guest key in front of you before the and it's you when you arrive desk you're going to see hotels that wiping the desk cleaning forty even though there's nothing on it when you go to your room more efforts that reassurance Marriott international has identified twelve touch points for extra disinfectant ray Bennett is the company's head of global operations doorknobs thermostats door handles drawer handles things of that nature has Hilton rolls out its clean state campaign Cordell says guests will notice some familiar objects missing they will see that some of the items in the ring that could likely be fingerprinted by previous guests magazines notepads pens those items have been removed from the right and there's likely to be more here's industry consultant Jim Coyle again the phone will probably be something that is seeing its last days because of help in that most divisive object in the hotel room I think the the death of many bars probably finally here all of these steps have one purpose to assure travelers that hotels are safe release the safe as they possibly can be while corona virus is

NPR Hilton Cordell Global Head Jim Coyle Uri Berliner Marriott International Ray Bennett Consultant
"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the latest on whether president trump will invoke the defense production act to get meat packing plants running again he says it will he said earlier in the day it would solve any liability problems the companies might have which suggests maybe it would protect them from getting sued for endangering workers it's not clear like what level of safety it would require that all right and we should also mention Amazon is a financial sponsor of NPR we've been talking with NPR's food and agriculture correspondent Dan Charles business correspondent Alina Selyukh and senior business editor uri Berliner thanks to all three of you thank you give as the world fights to defeat the coronavirus a professional wrestler in Mexico has found a way to use his special skills in the battle and as NPR's Kerry con reports he's making a profit the wrestlers Noam daycare is equal that somewhere down the sovereign son he won't reveal his real name hello hello from a sample see what I'm almost at a nice thing for me a professional lucha lotus or wrestlers keep their identity secret he told me up until last month he was making a good living on the live chat leaving a circuit Mexico's version of freestyle wrestling four nights a week he would suit up in his green and gold lycra leggings and matching character mask for bouts in his hometown Torreon.

trump Amazon NPR Alina Selyukh uri Berliner Mexico Kerry con president Dan Charles business editor Noam Torreon
"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"uri berliner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Has admitted that he needed some more help on the ground game and I think you'll see that coming very quickly former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg has hired over AT paid staff in Virginia while both Sanders and Elizabeth Warren have focused on building networks of grassroots volunteers the candidates will need at least fifteen percent of the votes statewide or in congressional districts to pick up some other than his ninety nine delegates from PR news I'm Bente here in Richmond China is reporting one hundred twenty five new cases of the corona virus its lowest figure since the country began keeping statistics on the disease as a global infections rice and pears Emily fanning reports that Chinese officials are concerned about coronavirus cases being imported from other countries the epicenter of the Chinese outbreak of the new coronavirus said this week would close down the first of the sixteen treatment centers and built a tree coronavirus patients citing the decline in overall numbers of active cases but in Beijing one of China's most cosmopolitan cities controls over movement and business operations have intensified to prevent new infections from overseas Emily Feng in Beijing U. S. defense secretary mark esper says that U. S. troops can begin withdrawing from Afghanistan within days as NPR's David welna reports the US agreed to draw down some four thousand troops by mid July under a deal signed with the Taliban secretary Esther says under the terms of the agreement signed Saturday with the Taliban U. S. forces soon will start leaving Afghanistan and that drawdown would begin in the first ten days but you know my instruction to the commander was let's get moving let's say show our full faith and effort to do that the U. S. has agreed to remove all troops within fourteen months as per says he expects fighting will start tapering off joint chiefs chairman general mark Milley agrees but to think that it's gonna go to zero immediately that probably is not going to be the case the Taliban's as a week long truce is over and it's resuming attacks on Afghan forces David welna NPR news Washington this is NPR news he was a print court is refusing to overturn a federal ban on bump stocks which allow semi automatic rifles to fire like machine guns the ban was implemented in twenty nineteen in response to the Las Vegas mass shooting that killed fifty eight people two years earlier investigators say gunman Stephen paddock used bump stocks to fire more than eleven hundred rounds of ammunition in eleven minutes the legendary former CEO of General Electric Jack Welch has died at the age of eighty four NPR's uri Berliner has more well still G. E. into an industrial powerhouse the most valuable American company during the nineteen nineties he was brash and outspoken fortune magazine dubbed him the manager of the century in nineteen ninety nine he made big acquisitions and cut layers of bureaucracy telling division managers to quote six six close it or sell it which was also criticized for his management style gaining the nickname neutron Jack for slashing tens of thousands of jobs after retiring from G. E. in two thousand one he kept a high profile writing best selling books dispensing business.