19 Burst results for "Urbana Champagne"

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You know the government has to invest at the highest level in these things. So I think that there's been that leave we've not invested enough materials and there's been recognition at this at the top there had been steering the National Science Foundation, for example has. started some new materials initiatives. They've been some young, some private foundations like the Moore Foundation which have started investing in materials people, but we just need more I. Think at the end of the day materials are the basis of so much of what we do and again, just the fundamental nitty gritty had these materials combined part of it rather than the most exciting. I discovered a whole new material and field. It has to be supported. You have to support both sides of that. Right. In. which the what's the intellectual property patenting status You know suppose you come up with the new process. Of the new combination. Of those things patentable. Yeah Yeah, they are of course. Yes. Yes. So if you just sort of look at the sexual in a number of patents coming out of countries, is the US competitive in number of patents. At this I don't know what happened. Yeah, it'd be interesting. You know it's one out would that be can see rate? That that sort of includes what university is doing what the government is doing strategically in this area. A very difficult thing like you say because it's a long cycle. Investment and Long. Psych. Overturn problem right and so you can imagine countries like Japan really doing well in this area because they seemed to have longer horizons right? Pin Union does I mean that's crazy thing is that you can the European Union will invest a lot of money in in big centers materials for example, right? And and you know they, they have a huge centering graphene huge centers in in magnetics, for example, It requires a high level government investment that that other countries will make. In most students need to get into it. So you have to sort of make this field more sexy I. Guess Right in some eighties happily. Okay was. Wasn't about price twenty, sixteen or something in the material selena. was. It. was that. I. Don't know. When grappling won the Nobel Prize in housing I I. Think. That was something in twenty sixteen, I can quit remember that was all sorts thought crime cycle ten with the graphing Nobel Prize. twenty, sixteen, new girl I'm curious about that is a because those types of things help right do sort of showcase that. Of course, it Twenty Sixteen Nobel Prize was the cutlets vilest housing. This was for two policy materials. Interestingly, this was constantly so Duncan Haldane on. Of the other theoreticians and heated theoretical basis of blood apology but costs let's foulis worked on two dimensional superconductors. specially. Interesting. So it was a topic that I've worked on for my thesis project. Looking. At transitions in that two-dimensional superconductors make between superconducting and insulating states and they discovered that these transitions they make were Were due to could could be described by. The to policy. Basically, the go hard describe it anyway it's..

US Nobel Prize government National Science Foundation Moore Foundation Duncan Haldane European Union Pin Union Nobel Prize. Japan selena.
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I just want to. So this top logical materials they super conduct. that's absolutely s Haakon. Yes. So so They they superconducting it's doing that in room temperature. So that said, the top launch materials aren't what we call superconductors intrinsically necessarily not not all of them. They're. They're just conductors. Okay. Just get some sort of superconducting ring ride. It right said they didn't conducting ring around. Okay. Now, you can some of them are, do you happen to be superconductors superconductors need? The. Superconductors and a superconducting top logical system is useful for a difference of continent computing schemes. For examples. The whole nother area we're also looking at. A lot of coupling superconductors the top logical systems in my lab. But know that they're the conducting surfaces are just conducted their metallic conducting. Nothing in the differences that a metallic system. There's a there's A. Like I said the superconductor is A. Quantum Mechanical Ground State Your Energy gap to becoming a superconductor and you don't have these top logical system. That it's not a superconducting energy gap between the top lodge Leonard Gap for conducting line right right I. Don't know if there's any connection I just want to ask you. So you know this quality computing arena one of the things that that seems to be interesting is this member stor. Rates. So I I wondered if any applications that you have looked at for members in this arena. I've a particular looked at memories some. People are looking at these as as for neural networks and things I thought is not. Right. Yes. So they you know the the issue in artificial intelligence that almost all of it is driven by software today. And you know you're going to hit some kind of constraint on the software side. So so one one idea is to actually have hardware. So he does something that can memorize and compute at the same same location just like. just like a neuron in the brain. And so so I don't know there might be some applications he has. My my understanding of a member stir is this is that or or of these neural networks they're they're basically trying to be produced the behavior of neurons. Are things that that fire in short pulses right and that have had memories of each other right if one fires another fire for example, and they knew that the length duration of each other's firing and it was a very specific. Behavior of neurons, like I said the quick pulses that have relationships to each other. You can mimic with certain type types of devices, right. So if you create something that has a blip like that, that's that can be turned on and off in very specific way with the voltage in that can connect to another one of these devices than you can mimic neuron and members are basically can be used like this mimic neurons..

Superconductors Leonard Gap
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You are you can. You can make something specific fear needs to fight combining materials. It's like the best. Team in some sense of materials applications would be combining the materials genome with three D. Printing. You make come up with something in the you just naked We're not there yet but it's it's exciting. It's exciting team I think. It's also you know in some areas generally humans have a prescriptive of experimenting. And oftentimes, you know if you have a designed space and you're searching that designed space to find something. Sometimes it tend to be inefficient because we bring lot biases into it. And so one direction artificial intelligence sister say let the machine experiment. And let guide the search of the design space to find something. and they want you know if there are things like that that you are you doing in material sciences. So. So what I mean ideas, you know, let's say you have a you have an objective function, you wanted material of these properties. and. A humans could go into the lab and they could experiment that good do different things using your intuition expedients at knowledge. Alternatively you can you know basically led the machine, run those experiments at loan from those experiments and we those experiments in some way. in in biological sciences. What example these types of things appeared do have more power. Part of that is because of the biases you know people drink the process. Yeah. I think again that would be Be. Incredibly. Incredibly useful if we could do the. And there's a lot in there is like I said, the materials genome part of materials genome project is trying to do things like this need people will make what we call back. Raider which means that they put you know they can put up to fifty or sixty materials in IDA inside a system, and then they can. They can your heat the materials that they they evaporating that they go onto another substrate and they can make up to sixty combinations, materials institute, for example. A So. You can have a machine make and people are doing are trying to help people, make machines, they they do this, they make predations where different combinations, the same materials in all the time that you can automatically test it for different things. I think that there is a space for this and it's probably interesting. The problem the problem is that as I mentioned there Suny, there's still too many variables. Useful all the time grew. Let's say you put sixty materials in there, and then you had you know you have sixty to the sixty combinations. Of Materials and then you've tested sixty, two six but what are you testing them for? Him for thermal properties, a test man for electric properties you tested there to see if they're top logical. There's there's lots of things that you this is a tool, but just one, I would say another tool that's been for example that been invented recently is, is it more analytic way of predicting for example, whether things are top logical or not? Right. This is a huge advances in the field is is that there's a way of actually looking at the. Crystalline structure of of known materials and then predicting them to have specific top logical properties, and this is something that I think that combined with the genome, project using an analytical calculation or understanding of the way materials are in their structures. And then categorizing them according to these have good thermal properties these electric. Combining. That with some machine learning materials genome, those combined have I think a lot of promise. could be very powerful. Yes..

materials institute D. Printing
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Because. We think about that. So thin right I mean you can think of taking the thinnest material that you could imagine hanging holding up it would just crinkle it would it would blow away couldn't hold it it would tear. Reasons to think that this couldn't exist and yet it was discovered that you could just lay this out flat on a little substrate and there be a Adam thin layer material that you could put contacts on studied that you could put lights on that. You can image all sorts of things and all sorts of new behaviors abuse. It is a transparent. Is, it is so clippers material like this was graphene. Carbon in a lattice structure That just one atom on a surface and graphene his many many amazing properties including being transparent. So it's it's very strong. Highly conductive electrically into also transparent. So very interesting for transparent material applications. But since discovery of graphing, there's been a discovery of many many many more types of materials that can be made just one atom thick and have also all sorts of unique properties, and so there's just been a boom in our ability to create understand, manipulate these Shirley to d materials. And some of these I I don't know that the technical basis for this ninety of. Top? Logical materials. Yeah. So so you sort of get some sort of superconductivity on the edges something like that yeah yeah. So. Talk. Logical materials are another thing that's just been studied that been discovered in the past ten years from the rare case for these were. Predicted theoretically before they discovered experimentally. An in predicted, just someone looked at the electronic structure of it and said, you know if you have this material, the electronic structure should be. Inverted in this way where instead of having just a standard insulating material, you should get an insulating material that on the inside but has ducting surfaces on the outside. which is really crazy when you think about it, right I mean what would make a material? How does even know where the edges are anything and that's what tells you that there's something really crazy quantum mechanical about this. So it's gone. And so so one of that of that is in transistors, right? acidly yeah. These these conducting surfaces tend to have very low power dissipation. End they can transfer spin they can transfer electronic a quantum mechanical properties, electrons called Spin rather than charge preferentially. So that is also uses less energy and can move things without heating. So they could be used for interconnection possibly, they keeps pretty for specialized type of transistors on off switches. Fruit for different types of conductors possibly. It neither idiots interesting. These are either those these. These quantum materials are the things that we do my lot that we do research on..

Adam Shirley
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"They tend to have a lot of different properties than he had been have magnetic properties or other. electrons form stripes or form other structures on their surface before they become superconducting. So all of these, there's been a lot of progress in understanding all of the different electronic behaviors of high temperature superconductors and I think that these are fundamental. This is fundamental progress toward designing something that has a higher transition temperature. So we're not there yet, but there's been a lot of progress in the fundamental understanding. So when you say high temperature superconductor conduct conductor. You mean severely hundred hundred Kelvin or something like that or yeah I think that see. So the the highest the highest temperature is A. something. Yeah something like one hundred thirty Kelvin hundred. Fifty Kelvin. Or something like that. Right up up liquid nitrogen temperatures. Rick. Great. So it's still cold, but it's As. Most many of the many of them had the early ones have transition with elements have transition temperatures. Four Kelvin or something so. Complex is pretty Balmy or one hundred. Fifty Kelvin is pretty balmy compared to that. But. Not Good enough for ninety sort of convince slap like like electricity, you know For. The city and things like that because. The used to think that it is coming right room temperature superconductivity is coming in which case you can actually I you gain something like thirty percent. In losses in transmission or if I remember correctly. So, it's a big deal in terms of electric city but that is that is not dare it's true but I would just like to add to that though I think one of the interesting things about fundamental sciences that you never know what what you're going to get instead. So you know I, I think if we could find more energy efficient ways to transmit electricity that would be hugely important for society and for our for our for our world on the other hand, things like magnetic resonance imaging MRI are is run on conventional superconductors. So in MRI has superconducting magnet inside which allows you to put nick a very, very large magnetic field for imaging without overheating wires. And these were perfectly well with conventional superconductors. Of course, would it be easier and cheaper to have it without a superconducting? Magnet inside or without without a helium cooling these are. Two Four Kelvin or something that helium cooled magnet would be easier but. Even with a helium cooled magnet these are impressive uses of superconductivity. I'm just want to activate. The other thing is that the most unless you've been following the quantum computing progress has been made in the past. Years but there's again in the past ten years just been tremendous progress in terms of nicking quantum computers they went from something like you know a couple of bits to hundreds of BITs, which is incredibly hard to do no. No, I don't think anyone many people were not sure that even get to this stage. But the IBM computer and the computer or all based on superconductors, and so even though we're not even we don't have. Power delivery houses with superconductors are first quantum computers may well be. With. Conventional. Superconductors. Y-. So so one of the night computers two dimensional quantum materials. Two dimensional meaning. It is just one one atom thick. Yes. So yes. So the materials that you're talking about here are. Are Atomic thin materials, and this is something that's really another these materials that have been discovered in the past ten years basically May ten fifteen years in these been probably one of the most exciting developments in. Materials Science is the discovery that something that's only one atom thick can.

Kelvin IBM Rick nick
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Right, and so so this is the sort of the second category of ceramics glosses compulsory. Clear I mean these metallic glasses are there metal alloys? Were you were you were you affect the structure of them? Right? If that makes sense that's is saying so it would be like taking gold or some compas it like that, and then adjusting the way that it that it cools. So that becomes a solid but not in the same crystal lattice that it would normally. Back, if that makes sense. So so it gives it different different properties than it would normally have. Different properties so but but. But. They they contacted city. Yes they they're Yeah Jeff but they they might be. So in some cases, they can be their shapes can be adjusted or they can have more strength or more tougher than other materials. So so these are some things that have. Been Been. Invented in the past in the past few years and they're still they're still coming up with with our with us. But but again, I think it gives a great example of how of how materials that. You might think are. You know people often think that there's a standard type of metal or there's a stereotype of glass and it turns out that by doing research on how to had a heat them in cool them rapidly slowly you can deform them in such ways that the. Different types of different than what they were with even improve properties right? Great. Blocks of difference new ceramics and glasses they fit into one class of materials or no? Let's see. Ceramics are. My knowledge of the other thing I guess ceramics are are different. are typically different types of materials I would say, right? I think I think the glass. You're there. They're similar to each other generally ceramic. We'll have a better defined crystal structure it neither I would imagine neither conduct electricity rate. Did the typical ones? Yes. Unless conducting glass. Sessions. Say that they can I mean. Okay. So so they conduct electricity it's just you know often you have things like. Ceramics which are generally insulating there are conducting ceramics, and in fact, one of the one of the most famous types of of high temperature superconductors which are perfect conductors of electrity are ceramic materials. Okay. Okay. So it's again we're. We're we're pushing between what we what we're are comfortable with entered everyday life, which are ceramic pottery and things like this. Sort of. Burden aging. So these terms that be used. To kind of categorize materials. Yeah. It may not work actually in a few years. Yeah. That's fine. I think maybe an important point to make that that there's a, there's a lot to be learned at the Cross section between different types of materials. Right between between ceramics and glasses and conductors, insulators There's there's usually. There's there's things at the edges that cross between them that are have new opportunities for applications and for understanding the science at these. And I'm sorry if some of these little league on things like ceramics and glasses because it's it's interesting. This is Mitch the materials to Cato study that you're you're basing this discussion office am..

Jeff Mitch Cato
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You might not have predicted. These are things that you still have to worry about. So the materials genome project like the other project in project is really a tool that helps you with your starting point. It helps you limit the variables to to to know to give you a better idea of of where a good starting point is that were new so that the fundamental research can begin from more and more effective than efficient place, right? Right. Yeah. It's sort of changed, right? Now we can maybe predict want to properties might be for combination and then go for manufacturing of that way. You know you'd never used to be like that. Be Manufacture something and then tested right now if you could actually hypothesize and then and then manufactured. So manufacturer not now is more of a motor for important game. Yeah. I mean me you caught manufacturer it is also if you think it's also fundamental research and just under under because it does require a lot of a lot of knowledge in testing and an understanding of the fundamentals of materials even just to combine them. So I think you know maybe there's a there's a misconception that you to make a new material if I wanted to make. You know steal or something. I just take some Iron Nelson, some some chrome or something in out cop steel that doesn't work that way. Right? You have to harden it. You have to melted at a certain temperature you have to if you not very very careful with materials in terms of exactly what temperature do you raise a new coup? Exactly how you combine things they can just shatter for example. So so there is even in the process of the so-called processing stage there's a lot of fundamental physics and material science and chemistry that goes into that. Yes, that's interesting. I was just about to say so so the process one would think is an engineering problem. I was just going to say that that can't be solved mechanistically. But that's not the case. You you..

Iron Nelson
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So if you think about it. Light, has a wavelength in the in the hundreds of nanometers rate hundreds times tend to minus nine. Whereas when we talk about nanometer, right that's one nanometer. So you can't image things that are that small with light because like too big. That makes sense. So in in the eighties, things like scanning tunneling microscopes, scanning electron microscopes, using things, electrons to bounce off materials and and recreate images that way. Davis new ways of looking at very small scales structures. And and determining the electronics these very small scale structures in the behavior, and once we could image these determine their electronics ix you know then we could start making things monitor also at correspondingly innovations in fabricating things that were very very small and so once these two things came together we realized, Hey, things at the small scale can be made it can be image and they act differently and so once we had all this access, there is a huge boom in trying to study things and. And see what new behaviors be created at these small scales, and then also you know taking something that was very small and putting a lot of them together to make a composite or larger materials including other materials to get some new behaviors entirely. So that was the idea behind the national nanotechnology initiative and that's not I. think that's not that lasted ten or twenty years or something I. Think it's not it basically ended already if it thought that that allowed us make huge progress in New Types of materials like carbon nanotubes, wires everything has Nanno in it as you can seek right so so so that was one of the other materials genome project is that the materials young project is so you know so you know what? The the Human Genome Project is break human genome project. The idea was to map every gene in the human body, right? And that's a huge project takes a lot of time a lot of effort. But the idea is that once you once you know all the combinations that are there, you can start pinpointing individual one to try to figure out which ones are useful. And that's the exact same thing that we do with materials The idea is if you can make database that contains every possible material combination and if you're smart database just like in the same way that we know what? We can start figuring out what you know what genes cars onto color or to certain illnesses of you can start figuring out what material combinations correspond to high conductivity too high thermal, excellent, thermal properties all these things we can create equivalent materials genome where we can start predicting new combinations of materials that give us the properties that we desire. So. So this high entropy rise multi principal aluminum, alloy complex, consonant allies. Composed of nearly EP mortar concentrations of five or more metals. That form extensive solid solutions. So so you could you could essentially create custom. Solutions of metals. Right right. And so that's the sort of metal material genome You know kind of go into that or how does it work? Well, a lot of the a lot of the McKay says, there's a couple of things here. One is so I would say that the both the. Technology. Side of it is that a lot of these alloys. Are..

Davis Nanno principal McKay
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Preface or Mason Switzerland focus on the electronic properties of small-scale materials, sex nano scaled wires, and economically thin membranes. Collusive is relevant to applications involving Nanna scale and quantum computing elements. She currently serves as director of the Illinois material. Switzer Science and Engineering Center IT Multidisciplinary Research and Education Center funded by the. National. Science. Foundation. Bookham Nadia. Thank you to be here. So you were part of comedy. On frontiers, of Matteo Science Research. Berry, looked at what has happened and. Every going I wasn't undergraduate school in India in mid eighties. My advice I remember distinctly telling me that Makita signs it's all action is going to be for the nasty years. Right even. Windhoek Graduate School in engineering is I sort of left together on time ago. So you have to keep me honest here as we go through this as some of some of my memories may come back with some not. and so the report says that more than materials, signs, bills, or knowledge from physics chemistry biology mathematics. Computer and data signs at engineering signed says to enable us to understand control expand the material world absolutely, and you say all is an could inquiry based fundamental science media research is strongly focused on discovering and producing reliable and economically viable materials from super-alloys to polymer composites that it used in a baffling products essential to today societies and economies. So this is not a topic you know typically think, but that's so so much that has been done lost fifty years or so in the materials and like you say, the interdisciplinary approach to it especially more recently computer science and data soins. Seem to have done pity interesting interesting things there. So I I thought, we can maybe go through some classes of materials to kind of set the said the conversation. So the first one is metals. And you say in part by White Spinning, Netflix suggested integrated computational materials, engineering ICM e approach to materials development, the national nanotechnology initiative and Materials Genome Initiative. Yes. metal issuing the plastic decade has achieved humorous advance. So could you describe briefly of for National and Technology Technology Initiative, and the materials genome initiative. Yes the National Nanotechnology Initiative. I believe this was from two thousand, one under Clinton or something that it started. This was this was an initiative to that's what it sends to focus on things at the very, very small scale. In in the eighties especially, and even in the nineties there had been huge developments in. Imaging things that were very small..

National Nanotechnology Initia Switzer Science and Engineerin National and Technology Techno Berry Matteo Science Research Windhoek Graduate School Mason Switzerland director India Illinois Makita Clinton Education Center White Spinning Netflix
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Concerns grow as campuses become the new Covid-19 hotspots

All In with Chris Hayes

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Concerns grow as campuses become the new Covid-19 hotspots

"Of the biggest sources of concern right now, our colleges and Universities University of Illinois urbana-champaign was heralded as one of the most comprehensive corona virus plans in the country which included testing more than forty thousand students. Twice a week researchers had anticipated seven hundred positive cases in the entire fall semester. But instead in just under two weeks of classes there have been more than seven hundred cases. University of Wisconsin in Madison. was forced to move all classes online and quarantine students after their outbreaks or passed a thousand cases in just a matter of days university North Carolina in Chapel. Hill. Went to all online instruction days after students return after nearly two hundred cases popped up almost immediately and the theme in all these cases that while universities might have plans to control the virus. And control things in dorms and in in faculty rooms and things like that. College students do a lot of socializing off campus.

Universities University Of Ill University Of Wisconsin North Carolina In Chapel Madison.
"urbana champaign" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Right, Charlie, Thank you so much that we've talked a lot. About the re opening of schools across the nation, heads of colleges and universities weighing in with us and Jason. If there's a theme, I think it's safe to say it is one of complication. Story from our Business Week team That's really along these lines this time around. It's the University of Illinois. It's showing that there is no foolproof reopening plan. Joining us with more on this is Emma Court Healthcare reporter at Bloomberg News on the phone in New York City, along with Bloomberg, BusinessWeek editor Jill Weber on the phone from Massachusetts. Joe. I feel like Jason. I talk so much about education, the virus and how tough it is in terms of these re openings. Yeah, I mean, it's kind of a nightmare. And and we've seen how how bad it can be in schools that have had students come back and within days have hundreds of positive tests. What's significant about this story is the Illinois actually took a very proactive approach and said that it was basically just gonna have universal testing. Of everyone, and that you know that would help stave off disaster and yet is in his reporting revealed it didn't totally stave off disaster. In fact, they were basically in a similar place. Is everybody else? Within days. Emma, what did you learn while you were reporting the story? Yeah, and thank you so much for having me. I think What's really interesting about the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign is how much they really did to think through. I mean, they did pretty much all the things public health experts have been talking about right? They tested really widely. They're testing people twice a week. They're doing contact tracing. They're using technology to help with the contact tracing, providing people with exposure notifications that they've been In close contact with someone who is covered making positive. They modeling to show that all these different measures they're taking will work. They were fired mask, you know, pretty thorough plan they have here. And yet we saw last week of school sort of sounded the alarm and said, We're seeing cases rise and it's not following our modeling anymore. We new cases would emerge of people came back to campus. But they were in decline. And they're not declining. And if it continues, we could have you know, as many as 8000. No cases on campus this semester. And so the school has really been cracking down inside. They made the announcement and they changed a bunch of things, including testing on people in certain high risk settings, like fraternity houses more frequently three times a week. Instead of two. But what I thought was especially interesting about this is you know when you're working a pandemic with the science, it's not quite established that you are reckoning with these gray areas. Not just the science of how the virus spreads but also you know human behavior right all along about how people move around the world and we don't totally know who's going to react in these situations and You know, you can do your best to educate people, but a cz we've all learned. I think during the pandemic, this's an area that's moving really quickly and you've been keeping. It helped the news. When you're news reporters, hard right right well and that human behavior and sort of the human behavior and individuals sort of variability. Just times, however many students you have on an individual campus and factoring all that in and you know, we all know this intellectually. But then scientifically it plays out in a very different way. So if you're an administrator at another school, looking at what happened at this school, Emma What's the take away and what is something either to do or not to do based on this experience? Right? That's that's a really good question. I think one of the key things to highlight here is that this at this university, the university said the issue is not just a student party. They Soon Some students would party even though they were supposed to be going to parties and, you know, socializing without masks, right? But that what actually happened is that some students tested positive and did not actually and it wasn't very many people, but they're saying, you know, it was this in combination with the partying that really kind of drove the surgeon case, right? So I think you know, One logical thing is Don't assume everyone is going to isolate after it has positive and also kind of interrogating. Why don't people Eisley? Is there a good reason for it? You need to be doing confirmatory testing, so people feel really confident, but they are positive for 19 like. Maybe there are things in the university's stuffing this now about how to better support students. In isolation. So that's one thing I mean, thinking about. You know, why might someone not quarantine Is it because they don't understand exactly what test means. Is there something else or they just really kind of socially isolated and they need to have some kind of human contact, even if it's setting up video chat with friends like that. But then the other aspect of this and this kind of hits on this human behavior that question two is really looking at. What can what are students allows to do when they're on campus? I think this is a big Question that you're seeing playoff play out affect college campus of all around the country. Right now, You know the students. There are things that people are not allowed to do any more. Right? We've all learned this in our daily lives but on a college campus. You need to socialize and you're going to go crazy if you're in your room by yourself and taking, you know costs from your dorm room right over For every day of the week. We spoke with a really great expert at University of Chicago who says universities need to show student hope they can socialize safely, not just what they're not allowed to do, And I think that's going to be a really important, Seamus. We move forward with these reopening. Another one important team, Emma is is one. That is sort of the flip side of what you're talking about, Because if you can't keep students activated and engaged, they think in in rooms and Dorm rooms and when they're isolating, you know, the other thing is this risk of having them sent home when they're sick, which has often times lead, Teo, you know, burgeoning caseloads elsewhere. What happened in Illinois is case on that front. Right, you know, And that's that's a really good point. So I mean, the university here actually help people to isolate, you know, once at this point in the semester when they're on campus They say, you know, isolate immediately And then the contact tracers from the local public health district will contact you and you'll develop a plan where the isolated they also.

Emma University of Illinois Illinois Jason Emma Court Healthcare Bloomberg BusinessWeek University of Chicago Charlie New York City Joe Bloomberg News Massachusetts Jill Weber Urbana Champaign editor Teo Eisley administrator
"urbana champaign" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on KQED Radio

"His native California to El Salvador, where his parents were born. That's forum. The rebroadcast of Michael Krasny tonight at 10 o'clock. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish, and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. Across the country. Colleges are seeing alarming spikes in Corona virus cases that includes campuses in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Ames, Iowa, and Chico, California. And this week we're seeing how colleges are reacting. Some have ask students to shelter in place in their dorms. Others have sent students home just weeks after their arrival. NPR's listen Ad warning is on a road trip to see how colleges and their students are adapting to the pandemic. She joins us now from the quad at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Hi, Elissa. As I understand it earlier this week at the very Illinois campus, you're on. The chancellor announced a two week locked down because of rising cases. What's the current situation? There s O. We initially came here to see the renowned mass testing program on campus. So students and staff are tested twice a week here. They're running between 10,000 and 15,000 test today at time, That's 2% of all testing in the U. S. But this week, we're seeing evidence that testing alone. It's not enough cases here are higher than they expected. And that's not an uncommon story all over the country. Could you get the bigger national picture? So about more than 20% of four year colleges started the semester in person. Many are big public universities. We're talking about tens of thousands of students. And these three openings are ceding the spread of the virus. Iowa has emerged as a big hot spot that's driven by students at Iowa State in the University of Iowa. You know, this surge has put campus is in a bind, because if they send students home that's potentially spreading the virus further. But having students on campus is problematic to do schools know what's behind these high case numbers? I'm thinking example over some party crackdown that have been happening. Well at the University of Illinois at school, says some students were finding out their positive and they're not doing anything different. They're not isolating and in some cases, they're.

Iowa University of Illinois California NPR Urbana Champaign Michael Krasny Audie Cornish University of Iowa El Salvador Illinois Sasha Pfeiffer Ames chancellor Tuscaloosa Chico Alabama Elissa
Red-winged Blackbirds Understand Yellow Warbler Alarms

60-Second Science

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Red-winged Blackbirds Understand Yellow Warbler Alarms

"Brown headed cow. Birds ARE OBLIGATE. Brood parasites that means. They lay their eggs in the Nestle. Other birds leaving all the hard work of incubating the eggs and feeding the chicks to somebody else. Luckily many of those other species have evolved. Some anti parasitic defenses yellow warblers for example produce a certain type of call to warn other warblers about nearby cowherds. Researchers call it. A seat call is working on the yellow warbler and whenever we were doing seat called playbacks to the yellow warblers the Red Wing. Blackbirds gap showing up. That was truly a discovery. You know sort of this momentum that allowed us to to explore this question even further ecologists Mark However from the University of Illinois at urbana-champaign who ran the study. The yellow warblers seat call is called a referential alarm call because only produced for a single threat. The Brown headed cupboard and in response to the seat gall the female yellow warbler incidents attacking or mobbing the cupboard. She sneaks back to her nest and sits on a tightly so as to prevent the cupboard from being able to lay a parasitic gag. Red Wing Blackbirds. Which sometimes nest near. Warblers do not produce referential alarm calls but it turns out that they can eavesdrop on the yellow warblers calls and they respond to the seat calls the same way they do. The sounds of cowardice themselves. The results were published the Journal. Communications biology so red winged blackbirds perferred nest near Yellow warblers since the warblers provide additional vigilance against Brown headed cowherds. But it's probably a two way street from the literature. We know that yellow orders do better when they nest near Red Wing blackbird territories and that makes sense because the red wings are really aggressive. If you walk in bed off full of Red Wings you actually get physically attacked by the redwings. So they are not intimidated by large editors and so Make sense out for them to nest near the the reading. The researchers say that this is the first known evidence of animals eavesdropping on anti parasitic referential. Alarm calls these birds yellow warblers reading black birds. You know they speak different languages. They understand their own. Communication signals and systems are and what we discovered. Here is basically a bilingual. A Red Wing. Blackbird that can understand the vocalisations systems and the communication systems of another species. Young birds learned their vocalisations much. Like young humans learn languages and future research however hopes to understand the weather. The birds rely on the same underlying neurobiology to understand the calls of other species as they do when they hear the sounds of their own species. And what that might mean for our own efforts to learn additional languages.

Red Wing Blackbirds Red Wing Brown Nestle Cowherds University Of Illinois Journal
"urbana champaign" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And the university of Illinois at Urbana Champaign are requiring their students were studying in Italy to leave that country oil is bringing students back from Rome by Wednesday those students will have to stay home for fourteen days for observation it's telling its students to return to the US to their home countries ordered travel elsewhere as soon as possible in Arlington Heights beauty way WTF vice president pence is calling all hands on deck to combat the virus in an update he says as of this afternoon there are forty three domestic cases most in California and Washington state and what about a potential cure it is remarkable to think that there may well be a vaccine going to clinical trials within the next six weeks the president meeting with pharmaceutical executives today they caution the vaccine could be at least a year away at least six people have now died even with the spread of the virus it was a positive day on Wall Street the Dow up nearly thirteen hundred points one driving factor investors expecting central bankers and G. seven finance ministers to coordinate a response that would mitigate some of the negative economic effects from the corona virus outbreak J. J. Kinahan is the chief market strategist with TD Ameritrade he says the wild ride might might not be over just yet volatility events usually don't die a quick death they usually hang around for a while so I wouldn't expect this to be you know sort of the which is that is they would say that in the worst of us I think this is still a story that's going to be played out the next few weeks on the market the Dow had its biggest ever point gain in a single session will have those closing numbers coming up Amy Klobuchar be booted ginger uniting behind Joe Biden's presidential bid just hours before voting begins on super Tuesday club which are formally suspended her campaign and endorsed by noon today a day after booted judge announced his exit both will appear tonight with Biden at a rally in Texas a Waukegan man wanted on a warrant for sex abuse charges was taken into custody today in Louisiana police say twenty six year old Mario collegians Galliano was found hiding in a chicken coop he faces to warrant stemming from December of last year one for aggravated criminal sex abuse and one for failing to appear in court on the charges and now WGN sports here is Kevin Palicki Campbell's of drop ten of eleven they came away with just one victory in February tonight to host a sensation Luka don should should the Mavericks they currently hold the seventh seed in the west pulls twenty games under five hundred they want exactly the internet the guard out with a quad injury Denzel Valentine to start in his place college hoops Illinois has its most conference wins since two thousand five today the universe the university announcing that head coach Brad Underwood has been given a three year contract extension on top of his original deal runs through twenty twenty.

university of Illinois
"urbana champaign" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on WGN Radio

"When she asked the agent to stop playing with them the agent replied it was just in fun I'm sorry house because shared her experience on Twitter and noted that you didn't consider what the agent said to be a real apology kisses federal security director in this little later reached out personally to apologize a cook county judge has reversed to say decision to revoke the license of Lincoln telling companies service rather investigation three years ago found more than eight hundred cases of vehicles being illegally towed over an eight month period the judge says the stake in the commerce commission failed to advise link in that it could lose its license over that practice the I CC as the right to try to appeal the judge's ruling Lincoln telling is been allowed to keep operating during the appeal hello high school graduates could soon pay more to attend the university of Illinois school administrators are recommending a tuition hike for in state freshman for the first time in six years instead freshmen will pay two hundred eighteen dollars more to attend the Urbana Champaign and Chicago campuses and nearly one hundred dollars more to attend the Springfield campus increases must still be approved by the board of trustees a baby in Florida is going viral for her laugh check out this is a six month old to mela she could not stop laughing from what your dad this father's Sandel Lewis up one of the things that he thinks that he says rather she thinks his hands are like a joke but there's more than one looking for guess Mike dancing a monster good.

Twitter director Lincoln Urbana Champaign Chicago Florida Sandel Lewis Mike cook county university of Illinois school Springfield
"urbana champaign" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Thirty six on this one for those of you who are asking that I will more than likely have democratic response to the debates on the show tomorrow I can see that is yet so we'll have a response to round shoe from Detroit's winners and losers from a different political perspective that's what we do here want to hear what people have to say both sides and then we'll I will make make our decisions accordingly you don't forget all this week in the for example give me a chance to win a pair of tickets the Wisconsin state fair which starts tomorrow and the governor's Blue Ribbon livestock auction enjoy the same of the auction August seventh twenty nineteen in the case high H. Coliseum the Wisconsin state fair for the right caller who can identify our top four stores later this morning we have the scouts the state fair and the governor's Blue Ribbon livestock auction I've been there it is fun number twenty versus first livestock auction gets big money for a those animals and that's part of the fun of this fair now it's one of the reasons people go and you can win those tickets during the fourth time sponsor all right home and remodeling that's coming up at ten o'clock well ten away will start before at ten used to say was FOR biggest stories in walking stay in the world it could be that it could be something else as well but will give you those for in about a half hour all right we were talking about politics the start the hour gonna shift to college remember the big the scanner which still on going the lorry Lachlan's and and I and others who basically game the system she did the system significant amount of money to recruiters to get their kids in schools they weren't qualified for now why is that a bad thing one they're breaking the law to it takes kids and their parents were doing it the right way and picks them out of the mix for big schools like USC UCLA and others across this country that's why it's a bad thing well the latest story now is and its its first was discovered at the university of Illinois Urbana Urbana Champaign it has to do with some college students and they're pretty well off families who are playing a little legal track on the university's here's our works families in these are mainly families of the Chicago area would give up legal guardianship of their children to relatives or friends why is this important well what happens in the students were now free of their parents money and wealth can file for financial independence which basically opens the door to all kinds of free programs financial aid and other things that they wouldn't be able to access because of their relationship with their parents well the university discovered this they were getting calls from some pretty wealthy individuals in the Chicago area enquiring about these low income programs that they had no knowledge of the universe university did a little research and found that this was becoming a thing ance and their students were requesting these programs morning legal guardianship status though for the most part still supported by the parents this is similar to what happened in that other big college admissions scandal remember the individual there was a Rick singer he it was the largest and still is the largest college admissions scandal in US history in that case families rich families used all their money to gain advantages and and gain the system essentially why does this matter because it's the same situation you have wealthy people taking short cuts although this one is a little trickier because technically it's legal they are taking a legal loophole to gain access to these programs they they would never out the kids would never be able to gain access to four one four seven nine nine one six twenty second mortgage talking tax line if your parents who has kids approaching college or in college you work hard you you've save money you've gone through all the rigmarole of getting whatever you ever ever financial help you can get for your kid whether it's it's loans which is something a lot of kids do not gonna go to college or scholarships applying for scholarships which can be a tedious process on its own what do you think the parents like this who have the means to to gain access to programs they never really should have access to gaming the system so they're rich kids can get in the schools that maybe they're not even qualify for four one four seven nine nine one six twenty I can mortgage talking Texan I'll tell you what I think after the break right here WTMJ.

four one four seven nine nine
"urbana champaign" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Enough to live on in retirement? How much can I expect to receive learn the answers to these and many more questions at an informative workshop that will reveal innovative strategies for maximizing your social security benefits at retirement, planners of America? We specialize in retirement planning and social security, should be an important part of your retirement income social security is far more complicated than most people realize that decisions you make now can have a tremendous impact on the total amount of benefits, you stand to receive over your lifetime registered today for upcoming social security seminar on Tuesday, June eighteenth at home would suites by Hilton Irvine. John Wayne airport in Wednesday, June nineteenth at courtyard chairman, oats by going to RPO a dot com. Again to learn more about maximizing your social security benefit, please register at RPO a dot com. No, an ad from bundle home and auto with progressive, and save on your car insurance. Maybe we should add in the word money. So they know that they're saving money. This that in there. Okay. Hello. Just not me. Okay. Well, he's got enough buttons to push in their progressive cap eighty from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company Philips and other insurance. Discounts not available in all states or situations. Guys leinna. And we've all been waiting patiently for summer. It's finally here. So kick things off. Right. And heat up your summer dating strategy with the match. Ab match has created millions of love stories. They've been number one in first and second day. It's number one in marriages, and over one million babies made less the matchup gives you the chance to carefully review profiles versus just quickly flipping through them. You can now view photos in read more about the people you see to so download the match at for free today. To be a millionaire. Flashy, flunkies everywhere. The country. Yes. Stay wants to low in Champaign Urbana Champaign on a supersonic play. One surprised landing field. We are back. This is.

Champaign Urbana Champaign John Wayne Hilton Irvine chairman Philips America
"urbana champaign" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:38 min | 3 years ago

"urbana champaign" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Oh, wow. I've got five gallons on the floor. Stephanie. Just just just carpet up burn the house down. Now, I gotta ask the they had to replace the carpet, right? I don't know what. Hey, where did you hear about this story seem intimately involved with this? Thirty five forty years, man. Oh who who shares? This isn't an urban myth. No, I've I've seen. Oh my God. I got a job your you had a confessional. I have a confession. Yeah. Finally, somebody else a full one gallon cana- paint came off the side of the scaffolding around me earlier this week, and I wound up painted from my belt to my shoes. Aw. Okay. Man, right. Let me tell you pants. They're now modern art. Oh, yeah. I I'm I'm really curious about this story, man. This this this because for one thing what kind of dog is it I it would be hard for. It's like, yeah. I don't know, man. It's just you'd have to be a pretty good sized dog to to knock it over. But soon. Yeah, thanks for keeping us posted on the latest. I don't know what happened to him. I guess we lost. But anyway. I don't know how to recover from that Allen. But I liked it. You know, we love hearing for our listeners with these great horror stories. So anyway, let's let's let's dive into middle Europe. Yeah. Let's let's dive right in their way for me being covered in paint this week to now Allen's starting to reclaim his dignity. So no, but Alan you you told us about this metallic would off the air which sounds like a fan develop. There's so much cool stuff coming out. I mean, basically you can build a deck now out of recycled tires. Well. That's true. Yeah. That you can you can replace it with that nylon material. So yeah. Well, I'm gonna take you back to medieval Europe and talk about those great church spires. And that kind of stuff have you ever thought about how much those things have to weigh? Well, I'm sure there. Yeah. I'm sure they way stonework stuff remarkable about how tall that gets stoned. Really, isn't that strong? No. I mean, and mortar and all that. Yeah. So how did they build these beautiful spires with all of that weight and get that high? Yeah. Well, they didn't use all that weight. They put in all those great, arches and windows right to to relieve the way and to let light in it. Relieved so much the way they could build higher taller. Yeah. We'll that. Same idea is creeping into well pretty much everything. Okay. So, you know, we'll all the three D printing. Nanotechnology we got going on. Let's talk about Nanos scale little bitty tiny things. Yeah. Yeah. Remember, Al you're gonna have to talk to me like I'm a five year old because some of this. Sometimes you get way too high tech, don't no you're gonna like this one. Okay. Explain it one of the best things about wood grain. Absolutely. So when you're working with zebra, wood or walnut or maple? You really wanna bring out the way you want the grain dapa. Right. You want the grain to pop. Well, let's say if we were to take something like, oh, I don't know like nickel. Metal actually texture it and give it little pours. Like would. Oh. It reminds me of like with these cooking shows where they whip something and it adds air. So you're whipping the metal to lighten it up in a way to. Wow. That's an interesting cool. Let's take things like anything from a golf club to an airplane wing. Yeah. These are high performance items usually made that a substances like titanium of well, let's take a more common material like nickel. Let's give it this exact same ideals like an old medieval church. Let's put some pours in it. Let's give it a little space and let it retain its strength. Okay. And now you've got a very lightweight very strong, basically metallic substance that begins to act in look like would. So the question for me. I guess Allen is their way is a way to incorporate where maybe you would use a wood treatment like a stud or something else. And maybe you could replace it with a metal. Well, that's metals more expensive that you don't grow metal. Right. So I mean, well, this would be this would probably be a really high performance point of view. Let's say like. A of point where like you, and I have hung doors before. Right. All right. Well, those little pivot points commercial doors. Yeah. Those things take an amazing amount of beating. Sure about that be made. Okay. So select areas, let's let's take this. The new technologies that are giving us more and more strength and lighter and lighter weight. And let's replace a lot of these big heavy clunky things like high-performance hinges. Sure. Or in your power, tools, those little points that always grind down and fall off. How about let's make something a little stronger. Yeah. Amen, brother. I can't tell you. How many little bits I go through with my with my drill. Philips head thing. They're always getting stripped. And how many of those of you blown through? Yeah. Yeah. It'd be up give me one that made out of titanium that would never strip or something. Yeah. Well, there you go. That makes a lot of sense. And actually that is not quite as complicated as I thought I I mean, I can get my head around that Stephanie just put air, and they're separate the separate the molecule. Yeah. Get give them a little space. And you know, I'm going to give a mad props out here to the department of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics in engineering and the university of Illinois at urbana-champaign. Yeah. And Vikram despondent at the university of cambric all contributed to the study on how to do this. So I love the fact that the more high tech, we get the more we kind of easing back to nature. Well, it seems like that's the idea. Right. Yeah. I mean, you know, the more high tech we get the less pollution, hopefully will produce the more efficient more. Yeah. So I mean, I think that stuff all all ties together. So but Allan. Yeah. These when you're describing it it does seem like we're we're moving that direction. Anyway. Because like you say, there's we're already using composite materials. Like, there's like there's a lot of times with a wood trim on the exteriors, especially here in the south that the bottom Cill tends to rot. It's just you know. Well, they've always in the water whenever I replace those nowadays. I don't use. What I use the composite material? I wouldn't use it everywhere. Because you know, I still like would. But why not just you fix it once and you're done so.

Allen Stephanie middle Europe Europe Philips Alan Allan university of Illinois Vikram urbana-champaign university of cambric Thirty five forty years five gallons one gallon five year