27 Burst results for "Urban Institute"

Advocates, lawmakers push hospitals to help more with bills

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Advocates, lawmakers push hospitals to help more with bills

"Swamped with medical bills the hospital that treated you may be able to help and some advocates say they need to do more to ensure patients know that roughly one in seven U. S. residents with a credit record has medical debt in collections according to the nonprofit urban institute hospitals have ways to keep more people from joining those ranks those can include income based discounts payment plans help funding health insurance or waving a bill and writing it off as charity care people frequently missed notices in their bills about assistance or have trouble plowing through the paperwork to qualify that's according to Beijing counselors Jared Walker who runs a nonprofit dollar for that helps people with medical debt posted at tictoc video that shows how to search for financial assistance on hospital websites it's such a popular topic it's been viewed more than twenty million times I'm Julie Walker

Nonprofit Urban Institute Hosp Jared Walker Beijing Julie Walker
How much money do you need to be happy?

This Morning With Gordon Deal

04:06 min | 1 year ago

How much money do you need to be happy?

"Time and time again. Research has shown that not on Lee You need a finite amount of money to be happy, but that prioritizing things like friendships, hobbies and family may actually lead to long term. Well being. Reporter Brian Walsh, it Milly has a look at some of the studies. Briana, What are we learning? Well, I think that what everybody knows is that Americans are pressed for time right now. And the pressure that you don't have enough time to complete. What you want to do is leading to a lot of unhappiness. So that was kind of the overall scene that I found from the article and the really most important muscle. That I learned from the study published in 2018 in nature, human behavior that sounds that the ideal salary for life satisfaction is $105,000 a year. Not for an individual or a family it would run for it would be $210,000 a year, but basically it found that if you make less than that, you struggled to pay for loans. You struggle the paper based that kind of life necessities. And if you make more than that, You are often working harder and spending less time at home, Speaking with Freon Walsh control contributor at Millie, and she's written a piece entitled Here's Exactly How to Spend your Money if you Want to be happier. About the value of time and there also, I think positive, people said they were kind of more happy when they were focused on hobbies and friendships. Yes, exactly so that people who they this is a study that just studied 1000 recent college graduates and some of these recent college graduate chose careers. That were more intrinsically motivated, meaning that they would spend a little bit of their week working. But they had a lot more free time. And then some of the recent college graduates chose careers that were extra sickly motivated, so they were making a lot of money on, you know, hypothetically saving money, but it's something that the people that shows the careers that were left high pressure and left high stress often. On prioritize things like friendship. Andre Spending time on Hobby is a lot more, and that generally leads to more kind of long term feelings of satisfaction and happiness about the impact of just to a little bit of savings. Yeah, that was really interesting. You know, Atsu beginning of the pandemic, we found that a lot of Americans did not have that three months of emergency. Fabian's only 23% of Americans. There's a lot of talk about how you know Americans or not. I'm not really been able to say then that leads to a lot of Anxiety, especially the bigness of pandemic when everything shut down. But in 2017 researchers with the Urban Institute on the families that had even a little of $250 saved Avoided. Ah lot of things like being evicted, missing belt payments, applying for payday loans that have long term really negative financial consequences. So this idea that you have to have the reruns of emergency savings is great. The reality is that most people don't have that much money on. Moreover, you might not even really need that much money in order to kind of feel a sense of safety on kind of happiness in your daily life and finish up with that study about how giving away money makes us feel good. Yeah. I mean, I think that's pretty obvious. You know, if you walk that somebody you know who's asking for a dollar on the street, you feel a little bit better if you give away that dollar, as opposed to just kind of ignoring it. Um, well, if you have a friend who's going through something really rough, buying them a coffee feels really good. So these researchers 2017 at the University of Dork gave 50 people $100 and told them to give it away over the course of four weeks. Um, excuse me. Half of them are instructed to keep the money on. Half of them were instructed Tonto give it away, and the people who gave it away reported much higher levels of satisfaction and happiness. S so the lesson is that you don't need to be like a philanthropist like just basis and feel good giving away money. You could give away that pocket change or whatever. And it really does kind of lead to similar feelings of doing something kind for

Freon Walsh Brian Walsh Milly Briana Atsu LEE Andre Fabian Urban Institute University Of Dork
Democrats’ relief bill would expand earned income tax credit

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Democrats’ relief bill would expand earned income tax credit

"Democrats big relief bill continues to make its slow but steady way through the house. It's going to pass friday. Maybe saturday there is a bunch of stuff in it. A proposed boost. The minimum wage. Told you about that yesterday. Also some tax policy changes geared to low income workers. Marketplace's kimberly adams has that one. This version of the relief. Bill would boost the earned income tax credit which reduces the tax bill or increases the refund for many low income workers mostly for those who live with kids. This bill would expand that to include more childless workers. Elaine mog as a principal research associate at the urban institute and a types of industries that people are in that would benefit the most from this policy. Change are those industries that have been most hard hit during the recent recession food service and nations. The credit typically has bipartisan support. Mog says some of those affected by the change could see their benefit. Triple from a max of about five hundred dollars to fifteen hundred sam. Washington is with the center on budget and policy priorities. The earned income tax credit expansion would benefit we estimate seventeen million people overall And doubt include the five point eight million child that's workers the changes would also include more older workers by removing the age of sixty five. The bill only seeks to change the rules for this year. Meaning the credit would show up on next year's returns. Eric york is an economist at the tax foundation. But oftentimes if something gets its foot in the door of the tax code. It doesn't go away. It gets extended it gets debated and eventually becomes more of a permanent policy. This round of covid relief legislation also includes an expansion of the child tax credit which some economists say could lift millions of children out of

Kimberly Adams Elaine Mog Urban Institute MOG Center On Budget And Policy Pr Bill Eric York SAM Washington Tax Foundation
Millions to receive relief payment via debit card

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Millions to receive relief payment via debit card

"I have needs. It has to be its consumption. And that's the thing want debit cards can also be cheaper than checks for people who don't have bank accounts cashing a cheque cost them money. But with a card says shantelle boyens with the urban institute there is a network of. Atm's where you have the car you can access your funds without any feeds but people can only make one withdrawal for free from an out of network atm after that. It costs two dollars boy in says the income people are more likely to pay those fees. They may be located in areas where they don't have as good of access to in network. Atm's the cards also come with terms of service. An ira rheingold. Executive director of the national association of consumer advocates says some of them put card users at a disadvantage. You consumer if you have a complaint you cannot go to court. You cannot be part of a collective action. A class action members of congress sent a letter to the treasury this week asking it to remove those clauses and reduce any fees. I'm justin ho for marketplace lawmakers tucked a provision banning surprise medical bills into this latest relief. Package those are the unexpected charges from out of network healthcare providers that can add up to tens of thousands of dollars. One thing. that's not yet. Clear is how this might affect insurance premiums marketplace's nancy marshall genzer explains. It's a nasty shock without realizing it. You retreated by a healthcare provider. Who was out of network surprise. You're stuck with a huge bill. Jen taylor with the consumer advocacy group families. Usa says some of the biggest unexpected medical bills. Come from air ambulances where people were getting a fifty thousand dollar bill and they were unconscious and put into an ambulance and had no say in the matter. Once this surprise medical bill legislation goes into effect in

Shantelle Boyens Ira Rheingold National Association Of Consum Urban Institute Justin Ho Nancy Marshall Treasury Jen Taylor Congress USA
"urban institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"urban institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Want to hear what you've been going through. Send us a note about your economic journey through the pandemic at marketplace dot or g'kar. On Wall Street today. Not so thrilled with McConnell. Blocking those bigger relief payments will have the details when we do the numbers. We've been spending a lot of time on this latest covert relief package because it's going to affect many different parts of this economy like public transit. There's $14 billion in aid for US transit agencies in the legislation. Ridership is down pretty drastically in many places. Since the start of the pandemic. The empty A in New York and Bart system in San Francisco will get a healthy share of the new funds. But the money will also go to transportation agencies throughout the country. And as marketplaces and the Euler reports, many are worried. This is just a band aid. The 14 billion is less than half of what the industry was lobbying for. But first we just need to stop the bleeding been freed is with the think tank transit centerpieces with people across the country still working from home and some afraid of catching covert on the bus. This relief will stop the bleeding for a few months. You know, the best estimates indicate that there will be Budget crunch for transit agencies going into 2021 probably lasting through 2022. So this won't be the last aid package they need, he says. This money will allow transportation agencies to avoid doomsday scenarios of thousands of layoffs and drastic service cuts you in a free market. The Urban Institute says Those cuts would have affected many of the essential workers who continue to use public transit to get to their jobs. People who work in grocery stores. People work.

McConnell Urban Institute US San Francisco New York
"urban institute" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"urban institute" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Very good. We got plenty of time for more calls. But every week we've got to get some topics and Jeff and he comes prepared, and he does his homework and he sits and windows his way. Okay. So let's get to some of that, Jeff and also I want to remind you you can call. In fact, we've got a call off there that wants to address the timing of the market with covert. Can you time a market, Jeff? I don't think you would advise getting into that. Well, no, not to time. The market if you think that, But I did really of Ah, valid question That doesn't have an exact answer. The answer is that they're large states, California fifth largest economy in the world texts are New York, which I think is the 10th or 11th largest economy in the world, Illinois. New Jersey Those economy still have not opened up. I think once the election comes around, eyes over with and people like, um Ah, don't like uncertainty. We will have uncertainty. Maybe not on November 4th. But maybe November 11th. Maybe the 18th. We will have certainty sometime in the future. Um And people like that five. You know, timing the market for Cove it as soon as the markets are open. As soon as the election is resolved. I think the markets are going to open. I think those states are going to start to open up on the economy is going to be okay for a while, but we had some good questions there again. The AC unit Mortgage talking text line will keep it open. 799 11 34 14. 799 11 30. This is the article I was going to start with, because they're all of a sudden There are a number of articles that popped up. About the next big retirement threat, keeping your job past 50. And this is kind of where we started a discussion. Paul about retirement was that a lot of people are getting furloughed e think you included. Are some my son in that with Honeywell had was furloughed. Oh, yeah. Where he would have fired if he turned his computer, And it was that type of because they were working from home. Oh, wow. Yes. So they were monitoring whether you were taking your time off for now, But some of those now are are not being Fired back. This was a study. This is the fourth magazine article I thought was very interesting. A study from the Urban Institute tracked more than 20,000 adults over age 51 between 1992. And 2016. So it's a pretty extensive study 20,000 over 16 26 to 12 about 25 years. The findings revealed this is stunning over half Ah, full time Workers age 50 plus Experienced involuntary employer related job separation from their long term implore employer. More than half left their job leading to prolong unemployment or reduction of earnings of 50%, or more for at least two years. So it is Israel. Two thirds of individuals over age 50. Experienced involuntary job separation. At some point, employer related involuntary separations were largely consistent across geographic regions Industries. Education levels and demographics. So it took no prisoners that the good child more than half up to two thirds of people age 15 over experience some involuntary job separation. Financial consequences of losing. Losing your job later in life can be devastating..

Jeff New York Honeywell Urban Institute Israel Paul California Illinois
The Looming Eviction Crisis

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:41 min | 1 year ago

The Looming Eviction Crisis

"Kathy Seeker is fifty five. She lives in an apartment that she rents in Camden South Carolina with her husband before the coronavirus pandemic, Cathy was working multiple jobs. She ran the cafe at a bookstore and she also worked as a server at a restaurant, but the pandemic would shut down both of those workplaces and in March Kathy started a new job at an assisted living facility working with dementia patients she likes to work, but it only pays twelve dollars an hour and overtime pay is not available to her so when I took the new job for my career. It then sent our rent back. Months just months, I don't make enough money to support myself. My husband had a stroke at forty four years ago so he's not able to work. By August Kathy had fallen thousands of dollars behind on her rent and twelve dollars an hour. She just was not making enough money to both pay her full rent and cover her other bills like eletricity and car insurance and her husband's medications and my landlord was wonderful to so patient with us really was wonderful but. He has to make money you know and I had reconciled in my head like how I was going to get rid of our stuff how we're gonNA live in the car. And that was just going to be okay. Kennedy says there was some dark moments then when the stress from the possibility of being addicted was just overwhelming to be in that desperate situation. To be in that desperate situation and really feel like you've done everything you possibly can you know I'm a Frugal Person I home schooled my children for years I know how to. Pinch a good penny but I there was no panic. This is indicated for planet money. I'm Cardiff Garcia and I'm Stacey Smith Today on the show evictions millions possibly tens of millions of renters throughout the US could soon face a similar situation to the one that Kathy was facing the loss of jobs and income. So many of these renters has left the country with a possible evictions crisis and that crisis could have catastrophic consequences both for the renter's themselves and also for the whole economy. This message comes from NPR. Sponsor Microsoft the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat meet call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google Google has a variety of free tools and resources to help small businesses adapt from trainings to on-demand classes through grow with Google explore Google's free tools for small businesses at Google Dot, com slash small business. The rent for the apartment the Kathy Kirchner shares with her husband in Camden South Carolina is six, hundred, ninety, five dollars a month, and she cannot afford that on her wages from the assisted living facility where she now works it's really difficult. My paycheck today was five, hundred, ninety, five dollars and and that's for two weeks even before the covert pandemic roughly one out of every four renting households in the US. was already paying more than half of their monthly income in rent. So. Were already paying their rent paycheck to paycheck. But when the pandemic started the federal government along with state and local governments did respond they responded with policies to help avoid an immediate surge fictions for a lot of these renters congress and the president expanded unemployment benefits in the cares act passed in late March, which helped people who lost their jobs, keep paying their bills, things like rent plus a lot of state and local governments with these moratoriums in place that would stop landlords from a visiting tenants. The federal government added its own moratorium on fictions for a lot of housing complexes that it subsidizes but the expanded unemployment benefits expired at the end of July in the moratoriums on. In at least twenty, four of the states that had them had also expired by the end of July. Including the moratorium in Kathy's own State of South Carolina. The Federal Moratorium has also expired and all of these reasons why so many housing experts are now warning that innovations crisis could start soon and the people who are most vulnerable to innovations. Crisis are low income renters according to the Urban Institute. Low income renters are more likely to have held jobs that have been lost in the Cova pandemic especially jobs in food. Services and the retail sector. In fact, two of the jobs that Kathy Secrets your work before the pandemic in a restaurant and in a bookstore were in those two sectors. The new job she took at the assisted living facility did not pay her nearly enough to offset the income she lost, but the economy is still in rough shape. So finding the kind of works used to do is just still really hard this hard when you're willing to work three four jobs like I'm not afraid to work, but you can't find work. A lot of Americans can't find work right now and many are struggling to pay their rent according to the Census Bureau roughly one out of five renters could not pay their rent on time in July and August could be worse nearly one out of three renters said the either had no confidence only slight confidence that they could pay their August rent for months. Kathy says that she herself could only pay partial rent her landlord kept growing tab for her running. into thousands of dollars and I would ask him every couple of months to show us what where we work because I was trying to make payments I would I would keep making payments, but it would be like three hundred dollars for the month. Well, that's less than half of what I, what I them, even though I have a job that's a you know a decent job, but it was it was a challenge. You know it's very stressful to live under that. Environment, if innovations crisis does become a reality communities of color would also be disproportionately hurt partly because a much higher share of black and Latino. Households are renters instead of homeowners there about twice as likely as white households to rent, and before the pandemic, they were already much more likely to face eviction than white households. If there is any good news here, it's just evictions. Crisis is not actually started yet. The warning signs are flashing red but so far evictions. Are actually quite low in a lot of major cities that of course does not mean that everything is fine. Remember that the expanded unemployment benefits and the state moratoriums on fictions only just expired a few weeks ago and it could take a bit of time before the struggles that people are having in paying their rent translate into actual evictions and it also means of course that there is still time for federal state and local policymakers to act again and possibly avert. Meanwhile. In at least some parts of the country hundreds of rental systems, programs have been directing their money to help prevent evictions and a lot of them have received money from the federal government for this very purpose and one of those organizations ended up helping Kathy. In fact, it was actually her landlord who put her in touch with the local program from the United Way that Helps Fight Homelessness this program called New Day Kathy applied and got a grant from new day. She was approved to receive about four thousand dollars and that money cleared all the background Kathy owed her landlord a felt like I. Finally had a chance to get my head. Slightly above water so that I could breathe and it would give me that time that I needed. To get my life together again, and by the first of September, we'll be able to put the rest of my rent down like I'll be able to breathe. Of course, a new start does not mean everything will continue to be fine in the future Kathy's hopeful that as the economy recovers, she'll be able to find other jobs to supplement her income but that partly also depends on whether it becomes safe to work those jobs while there is still a pandemic, there is no certainty about this or about whether the economy will keep recovering. So in the meantime, Kathy has a message for policymakers. Anything can turn on a dime and there are people who are really hard working. who really don't want take charity but don't have a choice. And if it is something that can help people even. Anybody. I would absolutely begged them to consider to continue these programs. We need them people that want to make their rent they want. To, pay their bills. They don't. WanNa take charity they and they're working as hard as they can. You know, and then when you add in the stress of. VID. And going out. Even, if you don't have to work environment like, I do just to go out, it's it's so mentally exhausting. The the mental anguish of not being able to pay your bills is overwhelming. Overwhelming And I don't. I don't. Know How funding works but I do know that if there had not been this funding. I'd, be in my car.

Kathy Federal Government Kathy Seeker Kathy Kirchner Kathy Secrets South Carolina Google Microsoft Camden South Carolina NPR Cathy Census Bureau Urban Institute Camden Kennedy United States Cova Congress US.
Pandemic Economic Impact in Florida

Brian Mudd

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Pandemic Economic Impact in Florida

"Now, as we continue down the back half in 2020 we are receiving reports showing the true impact of the pandemic across the country, and when it comes to the economy, the news predictably brutal, right hued shop lost income loss loss of businesses. And also, of course loss of tax revenue to government. But there's also been another trend. As bad as the economic impact of the pandemic has been as that veneer is bad, as was predicted at the onset, for example, according to the Federal Reserve, as recently as June So in the final months of the second quarter bed was expecting the second quarter economy to contract by 53%. Now. The actual decline, which was 32.9% huge, No doubt it was record setting, but it was still nowhere near as cataclysmic as the projections right and it looks like we have something similar. Playing out in Florida as well. Give you 90 according to Yelp. There are 3000 small businesses which have been lost in South Florida during the pandemic. These businesses employed approximately 60,000 people, Significant impact. Oh, heck, yes. Big deal. It is bad as earlier projections not even close, given idea well and have projected the Southport a Metro to be the fourth most negatively impacted nationally and that kind of small businesses. Was actually About in line in line with the national average. To the news was better still statewide is reflected through the collection of tax revenues, according to a report from the Urban Institute, State and local finance Initiative. Borders tax revenue, the decline from March through May. It was less than the national average A nationally states reported a 29% decline in revenue here every year. For us to con was 26%. That's right, our states the kind With 3% better than what happened across the country. So Look, I think it was logical to think that Florida would have been won the hardest hit states. Given the reliance and tourism and entertainment, However, that's not playing out. So why I boiled it down to three different factors that are likely behind this first for his economic record performance heading into the pandemic, second snowbirds staying for the summer. And third unemployment benefits totaling more than the average income for those laid off on average in our state, So it's kind of like this with a record low 2.8% unemployment rate in Florida in February, going into this thing that gave us a lot of a backstop. We lose in the second quarter in the normal year, approximately 900,000 snowbirds Many of them stayed. Many of them are still here. And then you have the unemployment benefits for the average 40 in whatever point they successfully navigated. The Boche connect system. And got their unemployment benefits. The average Floridian laid off actually did receive more than they had while they were working before. So these are all economic tail winds that have led to a better than average performance performance in south border

Florida South Florida Federal Reserve Yelp Southport Urban Institute Finance Initiative
Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

The Young Turks

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

"Unless Congress takes action, millions of Americans are likely to be evicted from their homes. Berry soon, and this problem is more than just a crisis. This is a crisis that the American people are dealing with, but there's also a crisis when it comes to Congress and how utterly? Our lawmakers are when it comes to providing the economic relief that Americans desperately need so there have been numerous stories published about the number of Americans who are likely to be addicted, but these numbers keep ballooning so for instance last week, the Federal Moratorium on Evictions and also on federally backed mortgages expired, and so there are some states that have implemented their own addiction. Moratoriums but you have to keep in mind. Mind that some states have not done so and we still have tens of millions of Americans who are jobless who lost their healthcare coverage as a result of being laid off in the middle of this pandemic, and then you also have Republicans who refuse to extend the unemployment benefits that were provided under the cares act. That was the additional six hundred dollars a week. That Americans would receive if they filed for unemployment. Unfortunately it seems like there are some members of democratic leadership who were going along with the lies and deceptions that are being message to the American people. So before we get to that I want to share some statistics with you. The Urban Institute estimated. That provisions covered nearly thirty percent of the country's rental units and I'm talking about the Be Moratorium on evictions by one estimate. Some forty million. Americans, could be. During the public health crisis, and of course, this is the most unsurprising part about all of this minority. Groups are the most. Vulnerable when it comes to fiction, so people of Color, according to CNBC are especially vulnerable, while most while almost half of white tenants say they're highly confident. They can continue to pay their rent. Just twenty six percent about african-american tenants could say the same around half. Hispanic tenants said they have little to no confidence. They'll be able to stay in their homes. And if you look at data, state-by-state to see how states are impacted by this. You Look at Louisiana, for instance, fifty percent of ten say that they can no longer afford their rent. A fifty one percent who say that they can't afford their rent in Florida fifty eight percent, in Tennessee fifty nine percent in West Virginia and again Benjamin love for you to jump in the frustration. Here is the utter lack of leadership, not just in in the federal government with the trump administration, but also with Congress right what we're seeing here is just it's. It's shocking, but it's not surprising race. It's almost like the natural combination of how are leadership has been leading the direction. They've been going. They are really pushing the people as far as they possibly can I. Think you are Frankin Clippers stain on. Twitter, said that they're trying to find the very least that they could possibly do without causing a riot, but you know when these numbers start hitting the fan right when people actually are put out of their homes with nowhere to go, and then if they if they're lucky enough to get in a homeless shelter night, we do not have the capacity to house. All of these people in the homeless shelters across this country, but even in that scenario they would then be exposing their families to covid nineteen. This is not something that's but the fact that they're playing chicken and taking it. All the way to the wire is is disgusting. Absolutely, so you have the moratorium on fictions on one hand, and then you also have the issue of the unemployment benefits which are set to expire on the last day of July, and so of course, when you hear the rhetoric coming from the Senate Gop, and also from the White, house, there's this live that keeps getting repeated over and over again about how well these unemployment benefits are just too high, and as a result are refusing to go back to work. In fact, one of the Republican senators. Who was her pet? This nonsense was Ted Cruz over the weekend. Let's take a listen to what he had to say. And then I wanNA. Compare what he said to democratic. Leadership Listen. In terms of the unemployment benefits do you object to providing any kind or any amount of federal boosts unemployment at this point, because not everyone is choosing to be out of work. The policy that Nancy Pelosi Democrats are pushing adds an additional six hundred dollars a week of federal money to unemployment. We have unemployment system system. Down, to seventy percent. Problem is for sixty eight percent of people receiving it right now. They are being paid more on unemployment than they made in their job and I'll tell you. I've spoken to small business owners all over the state of Texas. We're trying to reopen and they're calling. Their waiters and waitresses are other busboys, and they won't come back, and of course they won't come back is the federal government is paying in some instances twice as much money to stay home, but APP may, and to a lesser amount. At look at what we ought to focus on instead of just shoveling trillions out the door, we ought to be passing a recovery bill. What's a recovery bill or coverage? Bill would be lifting the taxes and the regulations that are hammering small businesses so that people can go back to work. A recovery bill would suspend the tax which would give a pay raise to everyone in America. WHO's working? That actually gets people back to work.

Congress Federal Government Bill Berry Urban Institute Twitter Ted Cruz Louisiana Nancy Pelosi Covid Cnbc Frankin Clippers Senate Gop Florida America Texas West Virginia Benjamin
"urban institute" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Dot com there was a study by the urban institute finding that only about ten percent of those sixty five and older Erica have long term care insurance now Mike this is really hitting home for me I was talking to you before today show about some things going on with my family and and thankfully most members of my family do have long term care insurance now they will tell you that it's super expensive and I hate paying for every single month but the way health is gone in our family they feel it's a good investment in their future does everyone need a long term care policy though easy answer now okay no so but it should be a part of financial planning and not to I'm sure this will create some hate mail from the long term care insurance sales people other people make money off of it yes make money selling long term care insurance that my fundamental problem long term care insurance is that it's a good idea I understand why people want protection from the cost of long term care the problem with the insurance is first of all it's expensive and then second you're you're paying a monthly premium or maybe an annual printing I said billing doesn't matter but you're paying a premium for something that you literally hope you never ever have to use right nobody goes to you is I hope I get to the nursing home so I can cashier less long term care policy I've been paying for all these years so that's just I don't have a phone problem with just an hour then the other issue is long term care insurance companies have a well documented history of raising premiums and it becomes unaffordable later father so it it's a mess so for us it starts with first of all let's find out if you need any protection a lot of people that we sit down with Kristen with with the great financial plan I mean an actual written plan that shows you you know taxes and inflation and income and combined with a great investment planning how your money invested to accomplish your goals will we sit down with they're going to have enough of their own money where it doesn't make sense for them to insure in other words they could self insure they'll be enough to cover that if they actually need it and if they don't need it who cares now for individuals who would just feel more comfortable having insurance protection another instead of self insuring they feel better paying a premium I personally wouldn't pay it to long term care insurance I would buy a life insurance policy well that's for when you pass away when you pass away right so traditionally you're exactly right Kristen it is for when you pass away and I'm not gonna get too into the weeds here because that's for a personal conversation you know somebody comes in and asks about within walking through it but there are life insurance policies out there and again I'm not a big life insurance advocate you know typically work with people who are older and don't need it right traditional life insurance to your path house if you pass away or you know cover your spouse for income or get your kids to college when we are talking to those people but when somebody asked you a long term care and I say listen I would buy a life insurance policy you see him come look at me funny ago well here's why there are certain life insurance policies are certain life insurance companies you can work with where the death benefit that you get through the policy you can also apply to pay for expenses at long term care facilities universe in homes okay or even home health care or something like that and so the reason I prefer the life insurance policies is because I'm guaranteed a payout ratio yeah I'm still paying a premium for it right that hasn't changed but if I need to go to a nursing home I've got the coverage I use the death benefit to pay for a nursing home if I don't need to go to the nursing home life insurance is going to pay back my estate in most cases that I've done in a way more than I put into it when I ran the illustrations tax free the money back so if you look at it I look at that as well that's a guaranteed payout why would they do put money in the long term care when I might never get the money back or if I put into life insurance I've got coverage to pay for the expenses I'm concerned about and may still always get the money back tax free that just makes more sense always has a strong German it depends on the printer and all that yeah the details but anyway I've never never strong word Chris and I can't remember talking to anyone who said it yeah I'd rather have the long term care I'd rather pay a premium they'll miss may never get back to the people I talk to go I didn't think I needed life insurance but now that I've talked to you maybe that's maybe that's a good idea to cover it so anyway that's a my two cents if you want more information or if you never heard about that just gives call happy to explain it there are all sorts of different options out there that not every financial advisor talks about and mainly it's because they don't make money off of it sometimes frankly that is the deal how do you go to the long term care insurance guy well know that there are different options out there if that is a concern Mike is happy to give you more details about that.

Dot urban institute Mike Erica
"urban institute" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Dot com there was a study by the urban institute finding that only about ten percent of those sixty five and older Erica have long term care insurance now Mike this is really hitting home for me I was talking to you before today show about some things going on with my family and and thankfully most members of my family do have long term care insurance now they will tell you that it's super expensive and I hate paying for every single month but the way health is gone and our family they feel it's a good investment in their future does everyone need a long term care policy though easy answer now okay so but it should be a part of financial planning and not to I'm sure this will create some hate mail from the long term care insurance sales people other people make money off of it yes make money selling long term care insurance that my fundamental problem long term care insurance is that it's a good idea I understand why people want protection from the cost of long term care the problem with the insurance is personal to expensive and then second you're you're paying a monthly premium or maybe an annual printing high so billing doesn't matter but you're paying a premium for something that you literally hope you never ever have to use right nobody goes to you is I hope I get to the nursing home so I can cashier less long term care policy I've been paying for all these years so that's just I don't have a phone problem with just an hour then the other issue is long term care insurance companies have a well documented history of raising premiums and it becomes unaffordable later so it it's a mess so for us it starts with first of all let's find out if you need any protection a lot of people that we sit down with Kristen with with a great financial plan I mean actual written plan that shows you you know taxes and inflation and income and combined with a great investment plan how your money invested to accomplish your goals will we sit down with they're going to have enough of their own money where it doesn't make sense for them to insure in other words they could self insure they'll be enough to cover that if they actually need it and if they don't need it who cares now for individuals who would just feel more comfortable having insurance protection another instead of self insuring they feel better paying a premium I personally wouldn't pay it to long term care insurance I would buy a life insurance policy well that's for when you pass away when you pass away right so traditionally you're exactly right Kristen it is for when you pass away and I'm not gonna get too into the weeds here because that's for a personal conversation you know somebody comes in and asks about within walking through it but there are life insurance policies out there and again I'm not a big life insurance advocate you know typically work with people who are older and don't need it right traditional life insurance to impel house if you pass away or you know cover your spouse for income market your kids through college when we are talking to those people but when somebody asks you a long term care I say listen I would buy a life insurance policy you see him come look at me funny I go well here's why there are certain life insurance policies are certain life insurance companies you can work with where the death benefit that you get through the policy you can also apply to pay for expenses at long term care facilities you know hurting homes okay or even home health care or something like that and so the reason I prefer the life insurance policies is because I'm guaranteed a payout ratio yeah I'm still paying a premium for it right that hasn't changed but if I need to go to a nursing home I've got the coverage I'll use the death benefit to pay for a nursing home if I don't need to go to the nursing home life insurance is going to pay back my estate in most cases that I've done in a way more than I put into it when I ran the illustrations tax free the money back so if you look at it I look at that as well that's a guaranteed payout why would they do put money in the long term care when I might never get the money back or if I put into life insurance I've got coverage to pay for the expenses I'm concerned about and may still always get the money back tax free that just makes more sense always has a strong German it depends on the printer and all that yeah the details but anyway I've never never strong word Christian I can't remember talking to anyone who said it yeah I'd rather have the long term care I'd rather pay a premium they all met may never get back to the people I talk to go I didn't think I needed life insurance but now that I've talked to maybe that's maybe that's a good idea to cover it so anyway that's my two cents if you want more information or you never heard about that just gives call happy to explain it there are all sorts of different options out there that not every financial advisor talks about and mainly it's because they don't make money off of it sometimes frankly that is the deal how do you go to the long term care insurance guy well know that there are different options out there if that is a concern Mike is happy to give you more details about that.

Dot urban institute Mike Erica
"urban institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The corner you know the often referred to as do nothing downs ironically are doing a lot with regards to taxes right and here's here's a question for you because this this was an article that came out from actually more of a not left or right leaning kind of tax think tank but one that's kind of in the middle and they're projecting anywhere from what would take a forty percent vat tax a value added tax which is the this is a kind of just socket to one with another you know government gotcha tax hidden tax on the cost of goods and services and then an eight percent or fifty percent increase to the payroll tax going up from you know roughly fifteen percent to twenty three percent and they said in that along with maybe at a top wage earner federal tax free to seventy percent still would be difficult to out run these deficits and here's here's the irony this Medicare for all that Sanders is proposing and even getting push back from his own party is projected over the next ten years the cost sixty trillion dollars now to put that in perspective in doing research for this in my new book I learned that the the we as a country spend about fifty two trillion over a decade and this is of course before we if we didn't go into recession or a stock market crash were rising interest rates because obviously our our debt is only gonna become more more expensive here's here's here was just interesting factoid for you do you know what it takes to spend a trillion dollars so if you spent one dollar per second in a day it's been eighty six thousand four hundred dollars over the course of a year you'd spend little north of thirty one million thirty one and a half million a year nap that spending rate what do you think it would take a number of years to spend a trillion dollars over thirty two thousand years folks thirty two thousand years now Sanders was slightly off as the centers for Medicare Medicaid services estimates that over the next ten years spending by governments businesses individuals will collectively reach fifty two trillion under the status quo the problem is under this measurement hills his health care plan alone would cost fifty nine trillion almost sixty trillion dollars and that's not from some right wing source it's the projection of the liberal urban institute it in fact you've even heard reporters they have said the mathematical.

Sanders liberal urban institute
"urban institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"From the urban institute so that technology the contradictions alert is really a starting point and it's how it's integrated and using and investigations that's really crucial for the department's success also in a place or maybe it's not a high crime area at all but there's just a large gathering of people like for example we remember the shooting in Las Vegas okay is there a possibility of that being set up in such a way where as knowledge he gets better at least even the people around there they'll know immediately where the shot is coming from and a kind of a least eliminates that kind of search for and you know kind of doing it the hard way that went into the next shot to see where that's coming from where they can increase the response to that yeah so in terms of like the accuracy of the technology they the the vendor themselves have a I believe it's like a twenty five metre radius around the around the ten point and that's just for a check of of being safe in their in their technology but we found that through interviews with officers and sergeants they typically will they'll find people DO passing a firearms during a private sale in their backyard and the final ten point on you know the back porch and they because it's a pain point that the vendor seeds at the officers can also see they can then go and follow up with that residents say Hey we've we believe there was a shooting occurring here we want to clarify what was happening and them and learn more about that and it can be very very accurate second party questions in terms of response time so we look at response differences of gunshot detection alerts compared to those traditional nine one one calls for service from community members and in each of the cities for shots fired which are just those types of nine one one calls working on Thursday I heard a gunshot I'm not exactly sure where it was we found that officers responded much faster compared to those events for gunshot detection alert roughly the thirty seconds to three minutes three and a half minutes faster and what was interesting about this was that it wasn't that officers were treating the types of alerts differently or the types of shooting notifications differently they weren't saying this is a gunshot detection alert I need to respond faster or this is actually a call for service I'm gonna take a little bit more cautiously the the increase in response time really came from the technology being able to notify the department of the shooting event faster than a committee member can notify department and we saw a large increases in the speed that the parties are notified and then therefore an officer can then be were assigned and begin their response and the last question is really involved with training and I know you'll say this obviously this is most effective when is thoroughly incorporated into training is that going on right now is that kind of the plant as this thing is released throughout the country that really there has to be that part of the the training in the implementation is just so important to really make it as effective as possible yeah absolutely and we found across each of the three departments that training was very light for this technology in most cases it was a very short you know less than twenty minute conversation with recruits about this is an additional tool that you can have it and use in your responses we learned that the training itself with implemented unevenly across the departments also across time so when I was first implemented indeed agencies you know years ago at that point there's a lot of excitement around it and because of that they had longer training that we need more data now that it's been out for a number of years and they're used to it as as an agency standard the trains are are much but they're they're not as intense or as as details we also found that there are very few trains for other stakeholders in the departments such as crime analyst who can use the data from the system from gunshot detection technology and to create crime reports or you know weekly or monthly reports identify hot spots of shootings or even in Milwaukee we saw that they were using that information to identify gang shootings and and retaliation against students and try to get ahead of the curve to prevent future shootings as a former retaliation so there's a lot of data behind the scene that's important it seems as well that can be used but if there is a crime analysts aren't aren't even familiar with the system or they're not using the data and if they don't learn about it your training and they can't do that in crazy types of reports well as you can hear the urban institute does some great work Daniel Lawrence thank you so much for being with us couple things before we go where do we find out more about gunshot detection technology and then secondly if we just want to get involved with the urban institute and see what they're doing every day where do we go shares of gunshot detection technology there's a few different vendors out there our valuation focused on shots spotter they're the the at a large veterans in the field on the on the urban institute we're looking in Washington DC and our website is urban dot org and we have and I say we had my my team that worked on the study we have a number of publications me out on this evaluation but there are a couple things out all already that.

urban institute
"urban institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Research associate from the urban institute so that technology the contradictions alert is really a starting point and it's how it's integrated and using and investigations that's really crucial for the departments with us also in a place or maybe it's not a high crime area at all but there's just a large gathering of people like for example we remember the shooting in Las Vegas okay is there a possibility of that being set up in such a way where as knowledge gets better at least even the people around there they'll know immediately where the shot is coming from and it kind of a least eliminates that kind of search for and you know kind of doing it the hard way you can't wait for the next shot to see where that's coming from where they can increase the response to that yeah so in terms of like the accuracy of the technology they the the vendor themselves have a I believe it's like a twenty five metre radius around the around the ten point and that's just for a stake of of I've been stationed there in their technology but we found that through interviews with officers and sergeants they typically will they'll find people do you know passing to firearms during a private sale in their backyard and apply the ten point on you know the back porch and they because it's a pain point that defender sees that the officers can also see they can then go and follow up with that presidents day a week we believe there was a shooting occurring here we want to clarify what was happening and them and learn more about that and it can be very very accurate second party questions in terms of response time so we look at response differences of gunshot detection alerts compared to those traditional nine one one calls for service from community members and in each of the cities for shots fired which are just those types of nine one one calls working over say I heard a gunshot I'm not exactly sure where it was we found that officers responded much faster compared to those events for gunshot detection alert roughly thirty seconds to three minutes about three and a half minutes faster and what was interesting about this was that it wasn't that officers were treating these types of alerts differently or these types of shooting notifications differently they weren't saying this is a gunshot detection alert I need to respond faster or this is actually a call for service I'm gonna take a little bit more cautiously the the increase in response time really came from the technology being able to notify the department of the shooting events faster than I can remember can notify department and we saw a large increases in the speed that the parties are notified and and therefore an officer can then be re assigned and begin their response incredible last question is really involved with training and I know you'll say this obviously this is most effective when is thoroughly incorporated into training is that going on right now is that kind of the planet is this thing is released throughout the country really there has to be that part of the the training in the implementation is just so important to really make it as effective as possible yeah absolutely and we found across each of the three departments that training was very light for this technology in most cases it was a very short you know less than twenty minute conversation with recruits about this is an additional tool that you can have it and use in your responses we learn that it training itself with implemented unevenly across the departments also across time so when I was first implemented indeed agencies you know years ago at that point there's a lot of excitement around it and because of that they had longer training that we need more data now that it's been out for a number of years and they're used to it as as an agency standard the trains are are much but they're they're not as intense or as as details we also found that there are very few trains for other stakeholders in the departments such as crime analyst who can use the data from the system from gunshot detection technology and to create crime reports or you know weekly or monthly reports identify hot spots of shootings or even in Milwaukee we saw that they were using that information to identify gang shootings and and retaliation against students and try to get ahead of the curve to prevent future shootings at the former retaliation there's a lot of data behind the scene that's important state agencies as well that can be used but if there is a crime analysts aren't aren't even familiar with the system or they're not using the data and if they don't learn about it your training and they can't do that and create these types of reports well as you can hear the urban institute does some great work Daniel Lawrence thank you so much for being with us couple things before we go where do we find out more about gunshot detection technology and then secondly if we just want to get involved with the urban institute and see what they're doing every day where do we go shares of gunshot detection technology there's a few different vendors out there our valuation focused on shots spotter they're the the that a large vendor and and the field on the on the urban institute we're looking in Washington DC and our website is urban dot org and we have and I say we had my my team that worked on the study we have a number of publications coming out on this evaluation but there are a couple things out all already.

Research associate urban institute
"urban institute" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on KOMO

"ProPublica and the urban institute Liz Weston is a certified financial planner and author with the website NerdWallet she joined ABC Cherie Preston to talk about this new data what's because this trend and how people can navigate through what she calls the most dangerous decade this really hit home because as a woman in her fifties I have a lot of friends who have lost jobs recently and it's a it's a real problem for those of a certain age isn't it yeah it absolutely is and the interesting thing was it was a friend who was in the situation that made me start thinking about the fact I've seen this a lot I've seen people at this age bracket lose their job and then if they do get another job it tends to be one that pays a heck of a lot less so I started digging around it turns out there were there was a study by pro publica with the urban institute that looked at a bunch of research showing that this happens all the time in fact they thought thought with people who have into their fifties with long term stable jobs more than half of them lose those jobs and most of them never recover financially A. R. P. just recently did a cover story on its little magazine that sends out about this too is an idea of ageism or is it just companies who are moving younger workers into the workforce which I guess would be that wouldn't well yeah it's all kinds of things going on on Thursday finitely age discrimination going on they'd have done studies showing when they send out resumes that are when it looks like the person is younger they get far more interviews than the if you make the person seem older I mean they've done actual blind sort of scientific studies about this and we all know once we get up there we noticed that there's all kinds of things said about age that would never be sad about ethnicity or sexual orientation or anything like that that seems to be still okay to say about age so it's it's definitely out there but the good news is there are things you can do to anticipate this so that you're not caught unawares and there are ways to make yourself less of a target so let's start about that one of the things that you mentioned in your article is you should get any kind of training that you can while you're still working it's super important to pay attention to the training opportunities right in your workplace there tend to be a lot of them and a lot of people just pass those on by the reality is you cannot close to retirement you may feel like it he really tired and you just want to you know get across that finish line but remember coasting means you're going down hill and everybody around you is going to notice it eventually so that's not something you want to communicate you want to be looking for opportunities to say I'm here I'm learning I'm adding skills I'm still engaged and that's another thing the A. R. P. found out in general older workers are much more engaged than younger workers but you need to communicate that make sure that's coming across clearly so when you have a situation where you're trying to learn more things you also have a situation where you're trying to meet more people it's really important to keep your your network's going because a lot of people just let those flight as well and kind of hang out with people their own age people they already know and they don't meet anybody new yeah exactly and think about it you know this happens with your friends as well as you get older they some get six a move away some die the same thing is happening in your workplace if you are not actively reaching out to make younger contacts and just to keep your network up because.

Liz Weston Cherie Preston ABC
Warren's big healthcare plan relies on big assumptions

All Things Considered

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Warren's big healthcare plan relies on big assumptions

"Elizabeth Warren today answered some big questions about how she would implement Medicare for all if she's elected president rivals and reporters have been pressing worn for details on how she would find a government run health insurance program that covered every American well NPR's Daniel Kurtz lavine has been going through warns you plan and joins us now with the details he Danielle Ailsa all right let's start with the big question here how much does warn say this plan would cost in total fifty two trillion dollars yeah yeah over the over the span of ten years now I want to be clear that is total that is not all new funding and we will get to the details on that in a minute here now she is saying twenty point five trillion dollars over ten years again would be a new federal funding so new revenue the government asked to bring in to put some perspective around this by one estimate that would be a nearly fifty percent increase in federal revenues over the next year right you say wow and that's a lot of money and it gets at just a sweeping program this would be a total overhaul that said the whole time words been stressing that middle class families would pay less than they do now that overall the country would save on healthcare how could that possibly happen given that there's this huge price tag right so let's go back to that initial number that fifty two trillion that is an estimate from a think tank called the urban institute for how much money will be spent in the entire American health care system over the next ten years so employers consumers on private coverage by the federal government by state governments everybody under Warren's planned she thinks that cost would stay roughly the same while ensuring everybody so she says this is a bargain now some of the she says it's just money shifting around for instance employers are currently estimated to pay about nine trillion dollars over toward health care over the next ten years Warren's plan says they would pay nearly all of that instead of to private insurers and just to the government in the form of a tax now opponents already coming out against this Joe Biden for example saying this tax will just end up being passed on to middle class workers so this is going to be a point of contention I would bet and and even with that that still leaves what trillions more to fill in here right warns been confronted about this over and over this question will this raise middle class taxes how has she answered that so this plan says that there won't be any new taxes on middle class Americans rather she leans a lot on new taxes on people who have more than a billion dollars in well so even higher wealth taxes than she has proposed in the past in addition to that new taxes on large core rations now in fact she's touting that many middle class Americans will have more take home pay because they won't be handing that money over in terms in in the form of freemen right however that additional take home pay will now be taxable so some revenue will come from some middle class America so does the math actually work out the way Warren is claiming it works out okay so this is a detailed plan from a woman who is known for detailed plans sure so yeah the numbers add up but the assumptions underlying these numbers are the things that we are going to be picking apart that experts will be for the coming weeks for example this plan would pay doctors what Medicare currently pays doctors with a hospital's a little more than that now what's important here is that is far less than private insurers generally pay those places so there is a big question as to how doctors and hospitals would whether this plan there are also questions about other taxes now since she introduced the idea of a wealth tax there been big questions like how do you enforce that how do you assess a person's wealth accurately how easy would it be to evade now those are real questions that will continue and almost a preamp that she has said that tighter tax enforcement is gonna be a big part of how she wants to bring in more revenues one other thing here is just that this plan is very complex and involves potentially immigration reform it involves some cuts to defense spending so there are a lot of assumptions here a lot of moving parts and how long would warn allow for a transition into Medicare for all from what we have now that is a great question this would be a huge transition she has said her transition plan will be coming in the coming weeks but that transition is really where some of these tough choices some of the tough things could happen to get us to Medicare

Elizabeth Warren Medicare Ten Years Fifty Two Trillion Dollars Five Trillion Dollars Nine Trillion Dollars Billion Dollars Fifty Percent
"urban institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:00 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who fill out their census forms next year will not be asked whether their citizens the trump administration gave up on its attempts to insert a highly controversial citizenship question still W. N. Y. C.'s a room then ago Paul says the city is predicting a major undercount there's a phrase you regularly hear from people when it comes to the senses the damage is done meaning even though there won't be a citizenship question on the census form next year the whole thing is tainted so the question now is and whether there will be an undercount many experts are certain of that it's just how bad with the undercount be to answer that city officials are looking to the past Joe salvo is the city's chief demographer and he says the worst under count on record happened in nineteen ninety the undercounted the city was about a quarter of a million people over three percent of the population was missed in the census salvos has twenty twenty could be even worse five percent of the city's population is easily over four hundred thousand people given the political climate he says even five hundred dollars in is not out of the realm of possibility this is what the city's confronting it could mean that we have fewer congressional seats and it would result in less federal funding for public health crises schools yes cell training and emergency preparedness Peter Lobo works with salvo in the department of city planning the census bureau and the decennial census defines reality it tells us who we are but it's not just an undercount it's an undercount of some communities compounded bind over count of others people who are double counted tend to be white and people who missed tend to be black and Hispanic that's right the white population will very likely be over count especially he says those people who own multiple homes and get multiple census forms and actually fill out multiple forms the urban institute has run simulations of the twenty twenty census and it projects a white over count both locally and nationally but the over account will likely be dwarfed by the number of people who simply ignore the census these include immigrants who lost trust in the process but also African Americans who could experience D. no significant undercount of any major racial or ethnic group the other day I met dairy queens which house he's a sixty seven year old black man who lives in nearby Astoria their purpose with the senses maybe ten years ago I would have answered but now the way things over the administration and how they're oppressing people I want no part of their teaching little children he said to me something like the census is a big joke now and this seems like something you give ice ammunition if you really want to know the truth is really a bunch of crap in my opinion the system so if you came to what would you do I would close a door in their face the census bureau reaches households.

five hundred dollars sixty seven year three percent five percent ten years
"urban institute" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

05:57 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Migrate efforts. I think we're inching towards something that looks like Medicare for all do you not think that way? Well, it certainly, you know, if you look at the democratic race right now with California Senator. Kamala. Harris right coming out in Des Moines and saying, you know, I want to get rid of pride healthcare plans. I want Medicare for all. And then some of her aides were saying on Wednesday. More. She's interested other options like the public option are people being able to buy into Medicare fifty. She came out today and said she is for Medicare for all single payer. No private coverage. And of course know she signed on early Bernie Sanders twenty seventeen Medicare for all which would completely wipe out private healthcare in this country Selley pies. But Dr Ezekiel Emanuel says that Medicare for all wouldn't cost any more than the current level of healthcare spending that we're already doing well that just isn't correct. Because as the urban institute in center had pointed out across the Bernie Sanders Medicare for all plans. He never talked about what it would cost or how would be paid for. But they cost it out more liberal conservative. Thirty two trillion dollars over ten years. That's three point two trillion year. And they even included some reduction ended ministered costs and glut cost. But even if you've doubled all of the tax income tax, the personal income taxes and corporate tax. It wouldn't be enough. The paper that could be doubling in out of money America's spent on healthcare today from three point two, adding another three point two trillion dollars. My guess is Sally pies. President and chief executive officer of the Pacific research institute. Sal you, and I have been talking about this inch towards single payer Medicare for all for years now when you and I were talking about the bad at the democrat did it on the down low. They kind of said it privately. Now, they've now they just full-throatedly embrace Medicare for all. Well, and it's very interesting because I think there is a survey coming battle between the more old school, moderate Democrats, and it's very progressive liberal wing Kamala Harris born, the Senator Massachusetts, Kristen gillibrand Jerry's all these people are really pushing the head of the democratic leadership council, but the Perez said, no, he's gonna get all the Democrats on board with Medicare for all the American people need to know, I'm Canadian I grew up under a single payer. No private coverage allowed. We will have just like in Canada long. Wait. Where the average Canadian wait five months since being a primary care doctor getting treatment by a special care seniors will have their care ration big tax increases dog shortages. Sally parts is it not true that the man that conceived what eventually became the Canadian healthcare system later on regretted that he did not inject private sector competition. Well, one of the the ministers from the province of Quebec the kept on gay, right? He did say that. But the founder of the whole Canadian healthcare system with a very socialist cap Scott called Tommy Douglas who started this whole thing into scotch want. And he was made by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the country's public Broadcasting Corporation candidate the greatest Canadian. And of course, how can you say that when you have all of these people on waiting lists and people like quad kept gay saying, you know, this was not allowing a private option like the British did with the national health service. Ten percent of it care, but the waiting list in England, the shortage of one hundred thousand health professionals doctors, nurses, and healthcare providers. This will this has happened candidate, and it will happen in this country. So when you're telling in your in these plans Bernie Sanders plan, and what Harris, well, we'll cut costs a bit by paying doctors forty percent below what they're paid today w paid rates. By Medicare the best dot they're not that's going to retire early or see to your patients or end the best and the brightest kids are not gonna go into medicine when they think they're a civil servant working for the post office, a DMV Sally pirates. Isn't that already happening aren't a lot of people? Now, a turned off from the medical profession are having a lot of doctors already retired early because of ObamaCare own doctor retired early and he said a letter saying I can't cope with all of these electronic health benefit mandates from ObamaCare and all the regulations this happening a lot with dot particularly those have fifty and over. So we're developing shortage, even before just under ObamaCare, which I always felt that President Obama's Affordable Care Act was a stepping stone to single payer. Well, they said it out loud. Harry Reid said it in an interview with Las Vegas a newspaper. Howard Dean said it said it was a step towards the single payer, which is what they want. They knew they couldn't get it in one swoop. They said it wasn't covered the great deal. But they certainly said it, you know, it's a sign of the times. Sally, if you and I are referring to people like Howard Schultz who wants to embrace and improve ObamaCare as a moderate and people that want Medicare for all as radical. I remember a time when when ObamaCare with radical. Yes. Exactly. And how Howard Schultz who sounded Starbucks and he Michael Bloomberg. Or kind of you know, I don't know whether they're going to enter the race for president or not. But I think they're becoming a little bit nervous about this old Medicare from well, you know, we need to include on ObamaCare. What you do is. You know, added a public option which would be a government healthcare plan that would compete with private insurance and the exchange of well, Larry obvious, if there's a government healthcare plan competing with private insurance. They will price moa therefore that'll be slow crowd out private insurance in this country. It's a slower to get to Medicare for all solid pipes president and chief executive officer Pacific research institute has always Sally. Thank you very much for taking the time. Thanks, very we come back border security, Nancy Pelosi said there will be no money for a border wall in the legislation..

Medicare Kamala Harris Bernie Sanders Medicare President and chief executive Bernie Sanders Howard Schultz Sally Pacific research institute Senator Sally pies Canadian Broadcasting Corporat Des Moines Dr Ezekiel Emanuel Sally parts urban institute California
"urban institute" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on WJR 760

"Total sales were down fourteen percent, the fifth straight quarter of falling sales. But high end housing is still strong says realtor noble black with Douglas element. I think the prices have been resetting, but the market in general is still a lot of people are still holding on to their original pricing. So you're seeing deals that are. Being done. But it's all a matter of value in order to say exactly where the value is. We're probably back to twenty thirteen pricing and a lot of ways. But the high end frankly is doing the best in New York City of any of the markets right now like spoke on CNBC housing market in Las Vegas. Well, sizzling in two thousand eighteen but has now slowed a bit thanks in large part to rising mortgage interest rates, according to local real estate brokers, but Vegas remains a very popular place to buy a home says realtor Bob Hamrick. He tells FOX five TV in Las Vegas. Most of his buyers are coming from California. There's so much that's working in the favor of of Las Vegas from a tax standpoint against California, certainly from a pricing standpoint. There's a lot of questions about what's happening with interest rates. What's happening in the overall market? But suffice it to say we're extremely bullish on Las Vegas agents. Tell the TV station that the best time to buy a home in Las Vegas will be in the first quarter of the year since sales always pick up soon after the Super Bowl. The mortgage market is not adequately meeting the lending needs of self employed. Households. So says a recent report from the urban institute. Researchers found that self employed people who account for nearly ten percent of US households were hit hardest by the housing crisis and have been slower to recover. The urban institute report says factors beyond income such as tougher mortgage availability or requirements of appendix Q are likely at play now in the mortgage application process. Appendix Q is used to determine monthly debt and income coming up in half an hour. Single family rentals are gaining market share.

Las Vegas self employed urban institute California Bob Hamrick CNBC Douglas US New York City FOX fourteen percent ten percent
"urban institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Total sales were down fourteen percent, the fifth straight quarter of falling sales. But high end housing is still strong says realtor noble black with Douglas element. I think the prices have been resetting, but the market in general is still a lot of people are still holding on to their original pricing. So you're seeing deals that are. Being done. But it's all matters value in toward to say exactly where the value is. We're probably back to twenty thirteen pricing and a lot of ways. But the high end frankly is doing the best in New York City of any of the markets right now like spoke on CNBC housing market, NAS Vegas. Well, sizzling in two thousand eighteen but has now slowed a bit thanks in large part to rising mortgage interest rates, according to local real estate brokers, but Vegas remains a very popular place to buy a home says realtor Bob Hamrick. He tells FOX five TV in Las Vegas that. Most of his buyers are coming from California. There's so much that's working in the favor of of Las Vegas from a tax standpoint against California, certainly from a pricing standpoint, there's a lot of questions about what's happening with interest rates. What's happening in the overall market? But suffice it to say we're extremely bullish on Las Vegas agents. Tell the TV station that the best time to buy a home in Las Vegas will be in the first quarter of the year since sales always pick up soon after the Super Bowl. The mortgage market is not adequately meeting the lending needs of self employed. Households. So says a recent report from the urban institute, researchers found that self employed people who account for nearly ten percent of US households were hit hardest by the housing crisis and have been slower to recover. The urban institute report says factors beyond income such as tougher mortgage availability or requirements of appendix Q are likely at play now in the mortgage application process. Appendix Q is used to determine monthly debt and income coming.

Las Vegas Bob Hamrick self employed urban institute California CNBC Douglas New York City US FOX fourteen percent ten percent
"urban institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Four percent. Total sales were down fourteen percent, the fifth straight quarter of falling sales. But high end housing is still strong says realtor noble black with Douglas element. I think the prices have been resetting, but the market in general is still a lot of people are still holding on to their original pricing. So you're seeing deals that are. Being done. But it's all a matter of value in a tour to say exactly where the value is. We're probably back to twenty thirteen pricing and a lot of ways. But the high end frankly is doing the best in New York City of any of the markets right now black spoke on CNBC thousand market Vegas. Well, sizzling in two thousand eighteen but has now slowed a bit thanks in large part to rising mortgage interest rates, according to local real estate brokers, but Vegas remains a very popular place to buy a home says realtor Bob Hamrick. He tells FOX five TV in Las Vegas. Most of his buyers are coming from California. There's so much that's working in the favor of of Las Vegas from a tax standpoint against California, certainly from a pricing standpoint. There's a lot of questions about what's happening with interest rates. What's happening in the overall market? But suffice it to say we're extremely bullish on Las Vegas agents. Tell the TV station that the best time to buy a home in Las Vegas will be in the first quarter of the year since sales always pick up soon after the Super Bowl. The mortgage market is not adequately meeting the lending needs of self employed. Households. So says a recent report from the urban institute, researchers found that self employed people who account for nearly ten percent of US households were hit hardest by the housing crisis and have been slower to recover. The urban institute report says factors beyond income such as tougher mortgage availability or requirements of appendix Q are likely at play now in the mortgage application process. Appendix Q is used to determine monthly debt and income coming up in half.

Las Vegas self employed Bob Hamrick urban institute California CNBC Douglas New York City US FOX fourteen percent Four percent ten percent
"urban institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Workers in their fifties. The career trajectory to retirement can start to look less like a straight track and more like the lift hill of a roller coaster just before series of scream inducing drops. Twists in roles are your finances ready for that ride. We're joined now by Kelli grant, consumer reporter at CNBC dot com. She's also a certified financial planner Kelly. What do you have? Well, usually you're thinking about your fifties is a time where you maybe got your peak career earnings. You've got the right time to make catch up contributions for your retirement, you might be juggling paying tuition for your kids. And you kind of looking at this almost is this is your straight shot through to retirement. But unfortunately, there's some data out there that shows that it's about half of older workers experience at least one involuntary job loss after age fifty and that obviously can have some pretty big repercussions for your finances, especially if you haven't been doing some financial planning earlier. In your life. Right. All right. So the the easy advice, obviously is be prepared for this. But it's easier said than done would explain that front. A lot of this stuff is easier said than done. But certainly, you know, it's worth thinking about this prospect for an involuntary jobless data, by the way from propublica and urban institute that they looked at a lot of the reports out there on who's getting involuntarily laid off and where their financial consequences for that. But the big thing, of course, is to try not to kick the can down the road if you can on things like saving for retirement or saving for a child's college education. If that is an important goal for you about the woman from Chattanooga. She was a good example. Right. Inter fifty she'd been at the same place twenty something years, and all she knew was I think she was insurance. Health insurance company, and she she said, this was the longest relationship she had had in her life than initially expected. She was going to retire there. And then she got laid off, and she was very quick to find a new job, which is unusual. There is a lot of age discrimination. Unfortunately for older workers she did manage to find a new job. But it entailed a twenty five thousand a year pay-cut and now six years later, she is almost back up to where she had she'd been earning before which is also rare, by the way, it's about one in ten workers who have who has that full financial recovery. But for her the only reason she goes back where she is is because she's launched her own business shortly after getting laid off and a lot of her income now comes from that not from the new job that she managed to land. It's impressive though. We're speaking with Kelli grant, consumer reporter at CNBC dot com. She's also a certified financial planner. She's got a piece about called this job challenge should scare. Older workers in its losing your job when you're in your fifties or perhaps later, all right? So explain kind of some of these points here about how to prepare for that possibility. Well, saving early as one of the big ones that planners recommend also kind of smart to think about, you know, this this possibility that you might end up out of the workforce earlier than expected so CB be doing smart things like if you had debt trying to work on pain that down sooner rather than later because being debt free in a job loss. Of course, means one less payment that has to go out the door, or maybe several fewer payments that have out the door. Thanks, kelli. Kelli.

Kelli grant CNBC reporter urban institute Chattanooga six years
"urban institute" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Have in mind. Well, we have in mind, and one of my and my policies most closely resemble what we see in the UK in Norway and Finland Sweden. I. Oh, yes. The old Canard of Nordic socialism. How exactly did Sweden? Get to the supposed utopia that it is it experimented with democratic socialism. Kind of often on it had unrivalled growth when it was a fully capitalist country when the democratic socialists took over about four five decades ago. Growth slowed. When Sweden adopted a quiz is socialist model. It was the second slowest growing European economy. The idea here that Sweden built itself into a prosperous nation or Norway or Finland or any of the other countries built themselves into prosperous nations through socialism is just a total lie. As is the idea that they are in fact, socialist countries, they are still they still rank highly on the global economic freedom index, which one would think if the government controlled the means of production, which is a socialist state by definition. There would be no economic freedom yet the Nordic countries have economic freedom because they are still fundamentally capitalist nations. They just have a rather confiscatory tax policy. And this is exactly what Oko Cortes is talking about. She sang. Okay. I want us still sort of embrace of capitalist model because we need wealthy people to soak in order to pay for my nonsense. But I want you. To take a listen to what she says when she is asked directly. How are we going to pay for this notice that Anderson Cooper does not get into the left leaning study? I believe it was the urban institute. That came out several months ago and said look Bernie Sanders Medicare for all universal health care proposal, which oka- CO Cortes adopted. And I think doesn't believe goes far enough will cost three point two trillion dollars per year for the next decade thirty two to thirty four trillion dollars of government spending. By way of comparison. Total government spending is roughly four trillion dollars. So we would nearly need to double federal spending. Just for one plank of this, Neo socialist agenda. And notice how she answers the question. How in the name of all that is holy are. We gonna pay for that. How are you going to pay for all this?.

Sweden Oko Cortes Norway Finland oka- CO Cortes Bernie Sanders Anderson Cooper urban institute UK thirty four trillion dollars four trillion dollars two trillion dollars four five decades
"urban institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or wrap up of the day's news on all things considered and WNYC. Middle aged and worried about staying employed. Well, a new analysis of older American workers from propublica in the urban institute says working after fifty is in fact, more turbulent than many of us thought after age fifty about half of workers are separated involuntarily from their job either actually laid off the business closed or they were strongly encouraged to lease. They ended up unexpectedly. The work conditions deteriorate so much that the job is no longer viable for them. That's Richard Johnson and urban institute economist and scholar of the older labour force he worked on the analysis. Recently published with propublica last week, I chimed in and tweeted about the need for news organizations to hire people from all ages, not just younger workers. And it's no secret that getting and keeping a job at an older age can be a daunting task. Some of you told me that your field seemed to prize younger employees, the detriment of those with more experience. And we heard from many of our listeners who called us to say. Yes, that's what happened to me. This is Ron from Little Rock, Arkansas. Sarah from Jeffersonville Indiana name is Alexander. I'm calling from Dallas, Texas. Hello. This is Eric Philadelphia live is laid off longtime job that two and a half years ago. I only modest about a high paying job and have regular blended so far. What have been used up? So. Today..

urban institute Richard Johnson Eric Philadelphia Jeffersonville Little Rock Dallas Arkansas Ron Sarah Indiana Texas Alexander
"urban institute" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"urban institute" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Middle aged and worried about staying employed. Well, a new analysis of older American workers from propublica. And the urban institute says working after fifty is in fact, more turbulent than many of us thought after age fifty about half of workers are separated involuntarily from their job either actually laid off the business closed or they were strongly encouraged to leave. They ended up retiring unexpectedly the work conditions deteriorate so much that the job was no longer viable for them. That's Richard Johnson in urban institute economist and scholar of the older labour force he worked on the analysis. Recently published with propublica last week, I chimed in and tweeted about the need for news organizations to hire people from all ages, not just younger workers. And it's no secret that getting and keeping a job at an older age can be a daunting task. Some of you told me that your field seem to prize younger employees, the detriment of those with more experience. And we heard from many of our listeners who called us to say. Yes. That's what happened to me. This is Ron from literati Arkansas, this is Sarah from Jeffersonville Indiana Alexander. I'm calling from Dallas, Texas. Hello this Eric consulta. My was laid off they longtime job that two and a half years ago. I only modest gaping was not a high paying job, and I have two regular employment so far since then, and so what I have have been used up. So I'm just getting by day today at presence Isla forced out of job at and been there long. What it is the job that I want, and I was forced out are still searching for a similar job. Why keep myself occupied with Uber? My mother who's turning sixty this year has been a nurse over thirty years working well over twelve hour shifts at a time and suffering from chronic illness. My mother is now in fear of losing her job, which she so dearly loves and enjoys as well as the roof overhead seven and a half years ago. I haven't worked at. I asked Richard Johnson of the urban institute to take us through the data and explain what's actually legal when it comes to ageism in the workplace what we know is that h is criminal is illegal difficult to prove. And that's really the problem. In fact, in two thousand nine supreme court made it harder to prove because court said about ten years ago that you can only prove discrimination. If you can show that age is the only cause for you being laid off for you not being hired for your wages being cut, and that's that's really difficult bar to meet. And so, you know, it's just something that employers can always point to some other reason. Well, that's really not not why this person was laid off their other factors at play. And so we see that there are a lot of claims against discrimination and the EEOC the Employment Opportunity Commission part of hill government enforces. These agents cremation laws, you know, makes an effort, but it's just it's just really tough. So let's talk a little bit about how. What we're seeing today compares to pass workforce trends have older workers. I e workers over forty always had to be this worried about their job security, or is this something that we're seeing increasingly across the board..

propublica urban institute Richard Johnson Isla Eric consulta EEOC Dallas Jeffersonville Texas Indiana Employment Opportunity Commiss Ron Sarah Arkansas thirty years twelve hour ten years
 Urban Meyer met with Buckeyes players on day after suspension

24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 4 years ago

Urban Meyer met with Buckeyes players on day after suspension

"Slash it appears despite being suspended Ohio State. University coach urban, Meyer was allowed to meet with this team Myers, current suspension and previous paid leave restricted him from talking football with his staff and athletes during August with one exception. Not meeting the day after the suspension was announced, emails from the senior vice president for human. Resources show Meyer and athletic director gene Smith were allowed to meet with the players and coaches last Thursday The emails. First. Reported by Ohio state's campus, newspaper the lantern, outlined, details of Myers suspension he can't attend practices meetings. Or official events and kid conduct any business related to being head coach Myron Smith were suspended over their, handling of a, now fired assistant coach who was accused of domestic violence Meyer resumes some coaching duties Monday but can't, coach during the first three. Games he will be allowed to run practices after the team's first game

Meyer Yemen Myers Ohio State Charles De La Desma Human Rights Council Senior Vice President Charles De La Gene Smith Nonprofit Urban Institute Saudi Arabia Myron Smith Arab Emirates Football Julia Walker United States Rape Director
Trump Reaches Tentative Trade Deal With Mexico

Steve Cochran

00:26 sec | 4 years ago

Trump Reaches Tentative Trade Deal With Mexico

"Dot com the US and Mexico reached a tentative agreement to change parts, of NAFTA but Canada's so far has not agreed to any. Of this the deal announced by President Trump yesterday leaves open the question of. Whether Canada the third country in NAFTA would agree to any of. The changes their minister of cultural affairs will be in Washington today to continue. To go, she Asians Mexico and Canada have stood firm on the importance of maintaining the deals. Trilateral

Canada Nafta Mexico President Trump WGN Urban Institute United States Washington Forty Percent