18 Burst results for "Ural Mountains"

"ural mountains" Discussed on Sword and Scale

Sword and Scale

05:00 min | Last week

"ural mountains" Discussed on Sword and Scale

"That was a common occurrence. At this high school, lockers had to be rented for cash. What a shit school, by the way. In order to avoid these fees, students commonly hid their shoes and other items around the gym in various places. It sounds like a totally stupid thing to do, but is it possible that Kendrick tried to retrieve his fallen shoes by entering the mat from the top? I have a lot of feelings because I think the main thing I had to focus on for a minute is whether or not the bell brothers were involved in Kendrick Johnson's death. And I feel like unequivocally, without exception, they had no involvement in his death. I think if you look at the evidence, there is no way that either of those two were involved. So now we're talking about possible murder by somebody else or we're talking about an accident. But this is one thing I think is really important for people to remember. And I just want to read this quote really quick. I read this while reading a book called dead mountain, which is about the past hikers who went missing in the Ural Mountains decades ago. And he says in that book, it's a quote from Sherlock Holmes. When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. The fictitious character of Sherlock Holmes probably set up much more poetically. But William of occam probably said it first. I'll spare you the Latin, but what he said essentially was plurality must never be posited without necessity. Which has been rephrased over and over again in popular culture. And referenced again and again on this program. It is futile to do with more what can be done with fewer. Or the simplest answer is usually the correct answer. A law of parsimony. Otherwise known as occam's razor. One final glaring argument made for the case of homicide is the width of Kendrick's shoulders versus the diameter of the mats opening at the top. Could he have fit inside the hole to reach down and become stuck? According to tabloids and Kendrick's family, the answer is no. Kendrick's reported shoulder width came to 19 inches. The mats opening was reportedly 14 inches. That doesn't make sense, does it? This is another piece of the widely spread misinformation puzzle. Kendrick's true shoulder width was actually 16 inches across. Basically is what we found out is during the second and third autopsy, which was done by doctor Anderson, who believes that Kendra Johnson was murdered, so we have somebody who's, I guess, quote unquote, on the side of the Johnson family. That believes murder. He is the one that told us it was 16 inches. And not only did he tell us it was 16 inches, he showed us an autopsy photo where he has a ruler across his shoulders that clearly shows 16 inches. So I don't know how people got 19 inches. It's written everywhere. I know I saw one time, 17 inches, but nobody's ever said 16 inches, but if you look at the ruler across KJ shoulders and you talk to doctor Anderson, who believes this was a murder he is saying that his shoulders are 16 inches. Now, doctor Anderson also says you can't fit into a 14 inch mat. If you have 16 inch shoulders, but he does say they are 16 and it's very clear if you look at the image that they are 16 inches. And so that's something that's been misreported on in the media probably thousands of times. This corrected misinformation doesn't necessarily prove that Kendrick could have fit inside the opening of the mat. But it does make it slightly more plausible. Ash and her team took it even a step further. She tracked down the exact same mat. The one Kendrick was found inside of, and bought it. Check out the YouTube video where she's getting it delivered. Ash and her team at the time of this recording are still conducting their experiments, but they've already come to some shocking realizations. You know, I just got the mat in yesterday and from what we've already been discovering, it's really kind of pushed this whole case into a whole new dimension for me of what is possible here. And one thing I'm not trying to prove whether or not Kendrick reached into the mat, how he was thinking that day is what I'm trying to prove is if it's possible to reach into that mat and fall to the bottom. That's all I'm trying to prove here. I'm not trying to prove his mindset. I'm not trying to prove why someone would ever do that because it does sound wildly insane. I'm trying to just prove if it's possible

Kendrick Kendrick Johnson occam Sherlock Holmes Ural Mountains Kendra Johnson Anderson William Ash Johnson YouTube
"ural mountains" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

06:08 min | 5 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"Wow. I got chills when you were talking about, you know, some of the responses to things that are happening in our everyday life, and I think that chills are really just from this idea that as writers, we can always do something. And I think a vein also about translation really struck me, you know, I often thought of myself as a translator, even though I'm using English language, but really translating space and voice for a lot of indigenous speakers. My parents spoke Navajo at home and that was the rhythm and the musicality that I was raised with. And so it's so familiar to me, you know, although the comprehension is not quite there, like I might not have the literal translation, but I know the context. I know the emotion of the language. I know the musicality of the language. And I know the power of it. So, and as far as you and your history, I mean, I know you came to the U.S. from Ukraine shortly after Ukraine declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, which leads me to believe that those intergenerational effects of war are remembered somewhere on your body. Because you lived with relatives with parents who witnessed those tragedies, firsthand, and that's kind of similar to me in my experience with my parents were the first generation to experience boarding school and displacement from their homelands. And so I'm curious how the journey of place from the Ukraine to the United States and the connecting emotions tether you to place, especially through the use of language and how that shapes your writing. Well, you know, first, I want to go back to something you said about writing in English, but hearing all the Navajo cadences and the music because I very much feel this right alongside you. Even though I write in English, I grew up on Russian language poetry, you know, speaking Russian in the home, it being read. So when I write, I do feel like there is an element of very Slavic cadence in the way that I approach English language poetry, so there is a way in which multilingualism kind of sings through my work, you know, whether I intend it or not, I can't help it. It's an intergenerational song inadvertently so always. But in terms of specifically the immigrant experience and its connection to war, I think that I, you know, grew up in the residue of trauma with it hovering in the house, always hovering in the house. My great grandmother was a Holocaust survivor. I mean, as is my grandmother as was my grandfather, even though they would never name themselves that. They were children, they survived in evacuation in the Ural Mountains. South of Siberia. And so they would never consider themselves survivors. And also the war in the way that the Holocaust was perpetrated in the Soviet territories, is very different from the model of extermination in the west. And the concentration camps. It's not one that's very much studied in schools. In the United States, especially. And it's one that in Soviet history was often denied, right? There was no acceptance that Jews were targeted, and so when we emigrated here, it was a big change in the narrative and in what they could claim as their story. And so when I started to write this story and to understand this story, it was my way of trying to understand how to write about a trauma that I did not experience directly. How to write about this intergenerational trauma without appropriating it with clearly demarcating my distance from it. But at the same time, understanding the way that I have been imprinted by it as well. And when Putin invaded just to bring it full circle, my mother and grandmother were in complete complete disbelief. My mother said, I can not believe he would do this while there are still those alive who remember hiding in those same subway metro stations during World War II. That's what was so unbelievable is that there are still people alive who remember the trauma of World War II because this is such a national trauma, you know, according to the Soviet ideology that he is horrifically trying to bring back. So it was unbelievable to them that he would re traumatize a

Ukraine United States Navajo Soviet Union Ural Mountains Siberia Putin
"ural mountains" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Working to find a resolution to this case and will continue to do so without rest until we get Brittany safely home. Now, along with grinder's WNBA career, she's been playing for a long time in Russia. What is the Russian reaction to this trial? Yeah, she has been playing there since 2014, and so she's well known to basketball fans, a particularly her team EMMC and a Katherine Berg in the Ural Mountains has won the championship repeatedly with her on the squad. But the case isn't getting quite the same level of attention as in the U.S., at least not yet. And maybe for this reason, the Kremlin rejects the idea that griner is a hostage. They say this isn't even about politics or the U.S.. The Kremlin argues this is just really a run of the mill case involving a foreigner. In this case, the well-known American who allegedly tried to bring banned substances into Russia and is paying the penalty. At least that's the government line. And what happens next with this case? Well, the next hearing is July 7th. That's next Thursday, and it may take several rounds of hearings before grinder as defense gets to make its case, so it's going to take some time, meanwhile, keep in mind that acquittals here are notoriously hard to come by. Maybe in part for that reason. There's a lot of talk both in Washington and Moscow about a possible prisoner swap for griner. And I'm not least because the Biden administration just did one. You know, they traded for a marine Trevor Reed, who the U.S. said was also unjustly detained in a Russian prison. It reads now safely at home and grinder's family and supporters won't Biden basically to do the same thing again. When how, if that happens, there are all good questions with no satisfying answers for now. Okay, and pierce Charles maines in Moscow Charles, thanks so much.

EMMC Katherine Berg griner WNBA Ural Mountains Russia grinder U.S. basketball Biden administration Trevor Reed Moscow Washington Biden pierce Charles maines Charles
"ural mountains" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:36 min | 8 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"And bottom spreading apart, creating drag and during the aircraft. When wanted, both sets of flaperons can be deployed creating drag like air brakes, so that the air speed or glide angle can be altered. A fuselage like crew cabin was to be embedded inside the wing, the design included a tail cone protruding from the trailing edge, which would contain the remote sighting stations for the bombers, gunners, and a cluster of rear firing machine guns. In the midsection of the cabin there were folding banks for off duty crew on long missions, the aircraft's bomb load was to be carried in 6 bombays, three in each wing section, fitted with roll away doors, although the original design precluded the carrying of large bombs, such as the early atomic weapons. Production aircraft would have defensive armament of 20.5 inch machine guns, or 20 millimeter cannon, carried in 6 turrets along the air across center line four above and below the wings, and four in the tail cone. In June 1946 the ex B 35 made its first flight, a 45 minute trip to miura dry Lake without incident. The XP 35s engines and propellers were army air force property, and had not been tested for compatibility by either Pratt and Whitney, Hamilton's standard or by the army. Reports and correspondence tell of three or four flights, when power plant and propeller vibrations increased, and the very efficient contra rotating propellers began failing with frustrating frequency. In meetings no agency would accept responsibility. The army also refused to allow northrops proposed modification of the bombays to carry the standard Mark three atomic bomb, whilst at the same time declaring that they wouldn't buy the bomber, unless it could carry the a bomb. Problems with the propellers are Scott worse, until Jack Northrop himself grounded the XP 35s, until the government fixed their propulsion system. As a solution, some aircraft were fitted with single props, with a severe loss of performance. And then the army ordered Northrop to convert a pair of the aircraft to accommodate 8 Allison turbo jets. As a result, the airframe promptly flew to more than 40,000 feet and topped 520 miles an hour, 840 km/h, in flight tests. Verifying the XP 35 airframes aerodynamics, but at the price of range, by using the thirsty jet engines. A prompt version had a design range capable of reaching targets 4000 miles 6400 kilometers away, but the jet engine versions range was cut nearly in half. This disqualified it for the air force's top priority mission as a strategic bomber, which, at the time, meant striking at the USSR's industrial and military complexes in the Ural Mountains. The air force itself involved in a confusion of rank and job changes eventually canceled the XP 35 project whilst continuing to test the airframe as the jet powered XP 49. The second XB 35 converted to an XP 49 all jet airframe crashed after an air force test pilot pulled the outer wing panels off, at 4.8 G during stall tests. The first, completed all its stall and spin test satisfactorily, but was destroyed by a fire after the news gear collapsed during a high-speed taxi test with full fuel tanks, which then leaked. A third XP 35 was converted to jet power, with four engines mounted inside the wing and a pair of potted jets slung underneath. It was to be a long-range reconnaissance aircraft. After only a few months, without explanation, the air force canceled its order for 30, and the last of northrops big flying wings sat abandoned near the edge of the airfield for two years, before being finally ordered scrapped on the 1st of December 1953. In front of Northrop and his devoted workers the aircraft were broken up, jigs destroyed and blueprints thrown into a bomb fire. Their design of the flying wing had been Northrop's passion, and its failure to be selected as the next generation bomber platform, and the subsequent destruction of the prototypes and incomplete aircraft was a severe bloat to him. In 1952 he retired at the age of 57, and virtually ended his association with the company that bore his name. However, in 1979 he finally broke his decades along silence on the matter, alleging a conspiracy within government centered around the then air force secretary Stuart symington. With a mind that appeared as sharp as on the day he retired he recalled an interview between symington and himself, apparently Northrop was told he should merge his company with consolidated. After the lengthy diatribe on mister symington's part, Northrop asked what the alternatives were. He said, alternatives, you'll be God, I'm sorry if you don't. General mccarney also in attendance exclaimed oh mister secretary, you don't mean that the way it sounds and this to symington said you're damn right I do. Richard Miller, who in 1948 was the Northrop chairman.

miura dry Lake army Jack Northrop Northrop Allison turbo air force Pratt Whitney Ural Mountains Hamilton USSR Scott confusion
"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

"Have literally nothing to eat. The story of any famine is obviously going to begin with some kind of natural or environmental catastrophe. And so it was for Russia in 1921. This catastrophe was centered on the region around the Volga river, and the steps by the Ural Mountains, but it was not confined there entirely. There was a crop failure in 1920, followed by a particularly heavy frost over the winter that killed off a ton of seed. Into these inauspicious conditions would follow an extreme summer drought that turned fertile acres into a dust bowl. Dry thin topsoil was just blown away by the wind. So 1921 delivered a second consecutive crop failure. And two failures in a row is where famine comes from. One crop failure is terrible, but endurable will sacrifice. To in a row, and you're dealing with a humanitarian crisis. But it's not as if the peasants weren't familiar with the phenomenon of crop failures, they were a recurring feature of Russian life, and the peasants knew how to ensure themselves against the random vicissitudes of God in nature. As a matter of course they kept preserves of grain. Seed banks, food and fodder stored in case of emergency. They had done this for centuries. And this is when we turn from the natural causes of the famine to the human causes. Years of Civil War over these contested areas like the Volga meant constant forced requisitions from both the red and the white armies. When the reds gained the decisive upper hand, areas under their control were subject to the policies of war communism. As we've discussed, the practice of seizing food, grain and fodder by force without compensation, led the peasants to simply stop producing surpluses, anything they produce was just going to be seized. So why bother producing it? The result was that the amount of land under cultivation dropped dramatically, and the amount the peasantry saved and stored also dropped dramatically. After years of this, the peasants were out on the thin ice of bare subsistence. And in 1921, they fell through the ice. When the second crop failure hit, there was nothing to eat. There was just nothing to eat. In huge chunks of the former Russian Empire, not just around the Volga, which was the area hardest hit, but also western Siberia, the steppes around the Ural Mountains, the area around the dawn river, southern Ukraine, all of them places I might point out that were on the front lines of the civil wars. In the spring of 1921, roughly 25% of Russian peasants were already starving from a long winter after the failures from 1920. This would only get worse as the months went on. The spreading curse of malnourishment brought with its secondary wave of disease and sickness as typhus and cholera started taking over entire communities severely weakened by hunger. The ultimate death toll of the famine includes those who died from these sicknesses, which were so directly caused by it. Now in the big picture, the Soviet leadership knew how bad things were out there. It's a huge reason Lennon had initiated the new economic policy at the tenth party Congress in March 1921. He recognized how counterproductive war communism had ultimately been, and he was very motivated to reverse course, increase the amount of land under cultivation, revive heavy industry and fix the railroads. This would put rush on a more productive course that would hopefully allow them to make gains and leaps and bounds once things started clicking. The Bolshevik vision for Russian agriculture was ultimately about large nationalized estates using advanced mechanization and the most advanced tools and theories to create the kind of abundance that would make famine or relic of the old world..

Ural Mountains Volga river dawn river Volga Russia reds Siberia typhus Ukraine cholera Lennon Congress
"ural mountains" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

06:51 min | 10 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The Russians fighting Putin in Ukraine by Amy Ferris rottman a war within a war has emerged in Ukraine, more than a month after the Russian army invaded on the order of president Vladimir Putin, more and more Russian nationals are fighting alongside Ukrainians. The combatants who appear to number in at least the hundreds describe Putin as the enemy, even as they take up arms against their countrymen. They range from captured Russian soldiers to political dissidents like the 30 year old Russian who asked to be called Yan, and IT worker who now spends his days scouting, identifying potential artillery targets and bringing medical supplies to Ukrainian soldiers on the front. No Russian should have crossed the border with a weapon in his hand and tells time from a district near the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, where he has served in the country's territorial defense forces since the war started at the end of February. I'm here to oppose Russian aggression and also defend Ukraine. He produced a valid Russian passport, but requested the pseudonym out of fear for the safety of his family in Russia. He said he moved to Kyiv from Russia's Ural Mountains three years ago, fearful of imprisonment after his office was raided, a self described anarchist Yan had taken part in demonstrations against Putin's rule. Vitre is the Nam de guerre chosen by a 25 year old Russian political science student who said he also joined the Ukrainian territorial defense forces to continue his fight against the Russian government, having attended anti government protests in his native Moscow since his early teens. I love my motherland VTS says from Kyiv, where he is stationed. Hopefully this war will break the political regime. I would like to return home one day. He said his parents, who are in the Russian capital, know their son is in Ukraine, but think he is donating blood and helping the Ukrainian war effort and other ways. But if some Russians fighting beside Ukrainians were challenging Putin well before the invasion, the conduct of the war has brought in others deepening existing fissures in Russian society and likely further demoralizing the country's military. In the first weeks of the war the force was criticized for its battlefield performance, struggling to advance on the capital, and even to maintain supply lines. As it retreated from the suburbs of Kyiv, evident atrocities against the Ukrainian civilians were revealed on the ground it had held, and Russia's military now also faces allegations of war crimes. Ukraine's government, which has cast the war as a contest between the forces of darkness and light, is leveraging Russian disunity, on April 5th, three men wearing military fatigues and black balaclavas faced reporters in Kyiv, where they announced a new battalion called freedom for Russia, composed entirely of Russian citizens, including former POWs, addressing their fellow Russians, they said they were morally outraged by Moscow's lack of discipline and apparent disregard for human life. One of the unnamed men said the Russian government had tricked them into going to a sovereign country to carry out what he described as genocide. After he was taken prisoner and later released by Ukrainian forces, he switched sides to fight for Ukraine. We were told propaganda, but there are no fascists here, no Nazis, but a civilian population, he said, I want to fight this lawless Putin regime, so people can speak and breathe freely. Sounding indignant, he said he witnessed firsthand the atrocities committed by the Russian army in buchach, and kharkiv. It was images and reporting emerging from bucha, a commuter town near Kyiv, showing mass graves and streets strewn with dead civilians that prompted president Joe Biden to call for a war crimes charge to be brought against Putin. A second speaker described himself as a sergeant in the Russian special forces, condemning the widespread looting of Ukrainian civilians homes by marauding soldiers, he urged other Russian forces to lay down your arms and fight for your future. As the masked men spoke, a sign on the table offered instructions for donating to the battalion using cryptocurrency, the unit also has a telegram channel which urges muscovites to attend anti war protests and includes instructions for Russians wishing to join their legion. Sign up at a Ukrainian embassy in a nearby European country on their camouflage sleeves, the men wore the white blue white flag that has become symbolic of Russia's anti war movement. Russian defectors are also welcome in Kyiv on April 2nd Ukrainian parliament passed a new law saying any Russian soldier who surrenders with a warship or jet will be awarded $1 million, a captured tank will earn them $100,000, and there is a $10,000 award for smaller military equipment. The first vice speaker of the Ukrainian parliament, Alexander kornienko, said the rewards would motivate the demoralized occupying army, the law comes after a previous offer by Kyiv of $10,000 to any Russian soldier who surrenders. In late March, Ukrainian authorities said hundreds of Russian soldiers had deserted their army. Inside Russia, the extent of support for the war is difficult to determine, Russians face heavy consequences for protesting or vocally opposing Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Though recent public opinion polls show over 80% of Russians view Putin favorably, many may be fearful of expressing their true opinion when new censorship laws can send people to jail for up to 15 years for fake news about the war, including using the very word war to describe what is officially known as a special military operation. The Ukrainian government has openly welcomed foreigners to their fight. Since the president volodymyr zelensky established an international legion to defend Ukraine at the start of the war, an estimated 20,000 people from 52 countries from the United States to Denmark have signed up. The freedom for Russia members declined to say how many men belong to their battalion, except to describe it as large and claim they had received over 300 applications to join in a single day. Yen, the IT professional said his platoon of around 40 men in Ukraine's territorial defense forces contained several other Russians, and he knows of more in other parts of the country. There is a reasonable number of us across Ukraine, he says, adding that while Russians in the Ukrainian armed forces are generally well tolerated, there are also a lot of jokes told at their expense. And why not, you know? Ukrainians are going through huge psychological trauma, so this is totally understandable. I am not offended..

Kyiv Putin Russian government Russia Amy Ferris rottman Yan Russian army Vitre Ukrainian parliament Moscow Ural Mountains Vladimir Putin buchach VTS bucha president Joe Biden POWs
"ural mountains" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm Manu zamoro. And today on the show, what lies beneath. Starting with someone who spends a lot of her time, beneath the earth's surface in underwater caves. You know, most people hear the word cave diver and they picture me like jumping off of a cliff into the ocean. It's like, no, that's not it at all. I'm actually swimming through water filled passages beneath your feet. This is cave diver Jill. The best way for me to describe it is to think of the planet as a body. And I am swimming through the veins of mother earth. I've been cave diving all over the planet in underwater caves and Florida, The Bahamas underneath the Ural Mountains in Siberia inside lava tubes in volcanos. And even inside icebergs. Jill has hundreds of stories to tell about magical adventures she's had deep underground. But often these dives are pretty dangerous. Like the one she took in January 2011 in northern Florida. I was guiding a scientist into a very small underwater cave. And it was for the purpose of sampling some algal materials. That might closely resemble life we would find in outer space. The dive was going as expected. Until it was time to exit the cave, which was really more like a narrow passageway. That's when Jill's diving partner got wedged in the rocks. And in the moment she got stuck, her gear became entangled in our safety line and she became wedged in this space that was about as big as sliding underneath your bed, like literally shoulders pinned to the ceiling and chest scraping along the floor. And as she became entangled and unable to swim forward, she panicked. And in that panic, just a couple of errant fin kicks. Stirred up everything to the point where I was literally like suspended in chocolate milk. I couldn't see anything. And I had one hand on the guideline and one hand on her, and she was moving to my left. And I'm stretching out my arms more and more and more. Until the guideline is being stressed in my right hand and she's in my left and I feel it getting tighter and tighter and tighter. Like a piano wire. And then suddenly pink, the line separates, and I have the bitter and of a guideline in my hand and my diving partner in my other hand. And I'm thinking, oh boy, we're in trouble now. The guideline is basically a rope leading back to the mouth of the cave. Yeah, if you don't have the guideline, the cave is just full of traps. You know, it's not marked by anything other than your guideline. And so you would have to re explore in complete blackness to find your way out. So Jill started to think through all she needed to do to save them. I needed to calm down my partner. She needed to get them unstuck. I needed to patch the guideline and then work our way out of the cave. Her thoughts were racing. You know, oh my gosh, I have to get out of this cave to women can't die in an underwater cave. That would be international news. And then you think crazy things like, oh my gosh, I have to get home. My husband doesn't know how to do the taxes. But the important thing is just to take that deep breath and center yourself and just make the best next step towards survival and then keep doing it. Until you get home safe. But how deep were you into the cave like from the mouth of it? So we were over a thousand feet back in the cave. And we had to come through several small restrictive spaces in zero visibility. And that could take you a long time. Now, I had to patch the guideline and that needed two hands. And that's when I lost track of my partner. Where did she go? I mean, where was there to go if you're all tight and packed in like that? Well, that's the thing. When you can't see, you don't know. And in the end, it took me an extra 73 minutes to get out of the cave. As I worked out of the cave searching for her all the way out, I stopped and checked side passages and then finally, when I got to the doorway of the cave, there.

Jill Manu zamoro northern Florida swimming Ural Mountains volcanos NPR Siberia The Bahamas Ted Florida
"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

"But that was it. Faced with the decision to fish or cut bait in Russia in early 1920. The allies cut bait. Now this decision to cut bait was, of course, massively influenced by events in Siberia during this same period. The allies had put a great deal of stock in supreme ruler Cole chuck. They, in fact, presently recognized him as the sovereign head of Russia. But by the end of 1919, it looked as though the supreme ruler of Russia was in control of little more than his own immediate staff. With denikin's forces being pushed back away from Moscow, and that northwestern army being pushed back away from Petrograd. The reds felt comfortable sending reinforcements across the Ural Mountains to take the fight to supreme roller kolchak. Although there was practically nothing to take the fight too. By November 1919, kolchak's armies were falling apart, and his government, they could even be called that, was an increasingly hopeless bunch of corrupt officials who didn't really have power over anything. With very little standing between the Red Army and their capital at omsk, they decided to just abandon the city and flee east towards Lake Baikal. Maybe regroup in irkutsk. They abandoned arms in a hurry, leaving behind tons of supplies and ammunition, which the Red Army gratefully absorbed when they captured the city on November 14th. Those officials and officers and troops who managed to get away, then embarked on what is dubbed the great Siberian ice march, which is not to be confused with the first thing that is called the ice march, which was the volunteer army wandering off into the wilderness in early 1918. This great Siberian ice march was a rolling and chaotic retreat 1500 miles east across the Siberian winter from omsk to Lake Baikal. The great Siberian ice march represents the disintegration of kolchak's forces in the east. Peasant soldiers who had been conscripted simply deserted and went home, typhus raged through the ranks, railroads were frozen and clogged with traffic as refugees and soldiers were trying to move in both directions. Local anti white partisan groups all along the trans Siberian railroad attacked them as they moved east, capturing some killing some wounding others forcing them to remain behind, preventing trains from moving at all. As was happening down in southern Russia, the senior leadership around cold chuck resorted to pointing fingers at one another, quitting and disgust, or just looking out for themselves. What was left of the political officials who had made up kolchak's quote unquote government made it to irkutsk where they tried to reestablish the government, but they had no authority whatsoever. Cold chuck himself was separated from what was left of his main forces. But he would not be separated from the single most valuable thing in his possession. 36 freight cars loaded with gold. This gold represented a large chunk of the Tsar's gold reserves. Reserves which had been stashed in the city of Kazan on the Volga for safe keeping during World War I, and which were subsequently captured by kolchak's forces and taken into his possession the previous year, and as he claimed to be the sovereign rule of Russia, he claimed control of the gold as his right, and as his responsibility. He was still making his way east with this gold when he got word that irkutsk was probably not going to be a safe haven. In December 1919, a left wing group of SRs and mensheviks took control of the city,.

kolchak Russia Cole chuck denikin northwestern army omsk Red Army Lake Baikal irkutsk Ural Mountains Petrograd Siberia reds Moscow Cold chuck chuck Volga Kazan
"ural mountains" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"When the fish and Lake Karachi south of the Ural Mountains in Russia went blind. Not everyone stopped eating them. It was only a game. Angela peltzer is a writer. She's reading here from a story she wrote, called the boys of Cara che Lake. The boys, bored on a hot summer day, would wander down to the Lake through the forest and pull off shirts and pants and splash into the murkiness, jump on one another's backs and spit Lake water into the air from their sunburnt lips. He was always warmer and Karachi than any other Lake. Angela's story is a slow unfolding of the nuclear disaster at the nearby plant. How it seeps into the Lake and the lives of the people who live nearby. She was inspired to write about it after reading an article. But a man who lived in the Ural Mountains, and while reading about the man, she discovered the Lake. The story became about these imaginary boys, and their imaginary lives near this very real Lake. When they had cooled off, they stood with their toes shoved into the silty bottom, knees bent, eyes flickering over the surface, hands hovering. The fish came to nibble at their calves and ankles, and even blind they could turn and slick away from the boys diving hands as fast as light winking off glass. Angela's story was published in 2011, but she says that every now and then, reader still contact her, asking about the boys of Cara cha Lake. They want to know which parts of the story are fact, and which parts are fiction. We're Angela drew the line. It's interesting to me to see people thinking through what do we do with this mashup of mythology and truth and when we can't tell where those borders are, where do we end up? Then mash up of myth and truth. Is exactly what makes a place like Lake karachay so compelling. Because we still know so little about it. Becomes a vessel for our imagination. For musicians, that vessel may morph into a metal concept album. For Angela, became her story. The space to test out, ideas, emotions, curiosity, and to try and understand a barely understandable world. Just a tiny bit more. I mean, I guess that's what we're always looking for, right? Something to sort of shake us away and see things differently or understand the world's differently. But then part of it is just a mystery, right? Like if you understood.

Ural Mountains Angela peltzer Cara che Lake Karachi Angela Cara cha Lake Angela drew Russia Lake karachay
"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

"Was up to end including selling things on the black market to buyers representing the Red Army. General Knox, the senior British military official attached to kolchak, was jokingly referred to as the quartermaster general of the Red Army. And at one point, Trotsky sent a note to Knox teasingly thanking him for helping equip the Red Army. In the coming battles many Red Army soldiers marched out wearing British manufactured uniforms. Now beyond the corrupt greed of the people in omsk, the white forces made themselves hated wherever they went. Everything I've just said about Red Army abuses applies just as much to the white armies. Their armies were also built on forced conscription at gunpoint or bayonet point. With their supply lines being so long they too had to requisition food from the locals, they too used abuse, torture and executions to extract food supplies and anything else they could carry off. When people resisted, villages were burned and people were shot. On market days, white army cavalrymen would come around in conscript young men into the army. Many of these conscripted soldiers promptly deserted as quickly as they could, taking with them even more uniforms and equipment and weaponry over to the side of the reds. So, in all those respects, the abuse of the peasantry basically. White, or red, it was all the same. But in the final analysis, the reds still wound up looking like the lesser of two evils. This was because kolchak's forces were viewed fundamentally as restorationist in their aims. Because even if they weren't fighting for the romanovs or anything like that, they absolutely refused to recognize the revolution in land that had taken place since 1917. So wherever white armies went, officers and officials tried to reinstate the old economic order, and especially west of the Ural Mountains, they threatened to take away the land that had been taken over by villages and give it back to the previous owners. And so for as much as the local peasantry didn't like the red commissars..

Red Army kolchak General Knox white army omsk Trotsky Knox army reds Ural Mountains
"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

"1919, the local communist officials and Red Army leaders prepared foreign invasion through the Ural Mountains, by the military forces which had coalesced in western Siberia under admiral kolchak. With this attack looming, communist leaders and Red Army officers put the local population in the Volga region under enormous pressure to produce food, supplies and soldiers. Armed detachments fanned out to expropriate grain to feed the army, and to conscript eligible young men to fight in the army. Whenever these armed detachments came into a village, resistance to their demands, were met with a mostly unsupervised campaign of threats, abuses, torture, execution, and rape. This, of course, infuriated the local population. On March 3rd, 1919, a squad of red soldiers tried to requisition more grain than was even stipulated in their orders from a small town in the province of Samara. The enraged population mobbed the soldiers, disarmed them and deposed the local communist representatives. When additional soldiers were sent in to bring these peasants to heel, they promptly mutinied and shot their own officers rather than attack the peasants, because they were mostly conscripted peasants themselves, and they were entirely sympathetic to the angry people. From this initial spark, flames of popular revolt fanned out across the Volga basin, and this all became known as the Chapin rebellion. After the sheepskin winter coats worn by the local peasants. Their collective demands were simple. They wanted an end to forced food requisitioning. Forced conscription and abuses by communist commissars issuing authoritarian directives. Far from opposing the Soviet regime, they actually sought to restore the kind of free elections to the local Soviets that had prevailed in 1917, but which had been steadily eroded and co opted by the centralizing instincts of the communists throughout 1918. In many cases the rallying cry was Soviets without communists. After a week and a half of spontaneously spreading insurrections, a huge portion of the Volga around Samara and simbirsk were in a state of acute anti communist insurrection. And this was just, as admiral kolchak's white armies were launching their attack, aimed at precisely this location. The spring offensive of the white armies under kolchak was not a little thing. Their military forces in Siberia had grown to number some 100,000 men by the spring of 1919. And that sounds like a lot and it was, but they were also spread out over thousands of miles of territory. And as with the Red Army, their numbers were enlarged by forced conscription, which does not always produce the most reliable committed soldiers. But still in March 1919, they were a formidable army, especially because the British were dumping insane amounts of munitions at Vladivostok and then shipping it along the trans Siberian railroad. In the first 6 months of 1919, the British sent cold chuck's forces, 1 million rifles, 15,000 machine guns, 700 field guns, 800 million rounds of ammunition, plus clothing and equipment for 500,000 men..

admiral kolchak Red Army Ural Mountains Siberia army Samara Volga basin Volga simbirsk kolchak Vladivostok chuck
"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Revolutions

"Brought Nicholas back to Moscow. It might spark an uncontrollable lynch mob. It might spark an uncontrollable uprising to set him free. Well, maybe not. But without any real pressure to come up with a final plan, the people's commissars procrastinated, and they set the decision aside for another day. The pressure to come up with a final plan ultimately started building from local circumstances east of the Ural Mountains. In February, a Congress of Soviets from the Ural region convened in the major industrial city of yekaterinburg, which elected a Bolshevik dominated executive committee. The Ural Bolsheviks tended to be more hard line and radical than their comrades in Moscow, and they were also more immediately annoyed that bloody Nicholas and his family were allowed to just hang out in their backyard like nothing had ever happened. They started petitioning Moscow to transfer the romanovs to yekaterinburg, where they would be held in the kind of real prison they deserved. This was a matter of some delicacy for the central committee back in Moscow, because they were aware many of their comrades in the urals were itching to answer the question of what to do about the romanovs with a few well placed bullets. The central committee of the party in Moscow wasn't sure that's what they wanted to happen, but they also didn't want to cause any schisms with the Ural Bolsheviks nor provoke them into doing something they'd all later regret. Pressure mounted further when red guard detachments finally arrived in tobolsk in late March. The problem being that the red guards were not on the same page. One group of about 250 were sent from yekaterinburg, while another 400 arrived representing the rival city of omsk. Neither detachment was particularly disciplined nor were they interested in subordinating themselves to the other's authority. Meanwhile, the guard units at the governor's palace were getting awfully restless because their wages hadn't been paid for an obnoxiously long time. With reports about all this in hand, Moscow finally appointed a guy called vasili Kafka, to go take command of the whole situation..

Moscow Ural Bolsheviks Nicholas yekaterinburg Ural Mountains Ural central committee of the party tobolsk Congress red guard omsk vasili Kafka
"ural mountains" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"Strangers, no joke, my partner and I are discussing the very real possibility of fleeing the country. Don't worry, we're not criminals. We're just terrified. The number one place on our list is a Spanish speaking country, and we don't want to be those guys who show up and just start speaking English really loudly when we're not understood. Fun fact, saying it louder doesn't help. So we're using Babel, the number one selling language learning app. Babel's 15 minute lessons make learning on the go so easy. I can learn Spanish while I'm driving, walking my dog or doing my dishes with 14 different languages to learn from whatever your reason Babel will get you speaking like a native. There are so many ways to learn with Babel in addition to lessons you can access podcasts, games, videos, stories, and even live classes. Plus, it comes with a 20 day money back guarantee. Right now, when you purchase a three month babble subscription, you'll get an additional three months for free. That's 6 months for the price of three. Just go to babble dot com and use promo code daisy that's BA, BB, EL dot com code daisy Babel. Language for life. Strangers, the holidays are coming up. You really want to give dad, another tie? Does your mom really need another rope? This holiday season, why not give the gift of memories with story worth? Story worth is an online service that helps you and your loved ones preserve precious memories and stories for years to come. Every week story worth emails your relative or friend a thought provoking question of your choice from their vast pool of possible questions. After one year, story worth will compile all your loved one stories, including photos into a beautiful keepsake book. I gave story worth to my parents earlier this year and I can't wait to get the keepsake memory book at the end. My dad really enjoys getting the questions in his inbox each week. Honestly, he's no spring chicken. And those memories aren't gonna remember themselves. You know what I mean? With story worth, I'm giving those I love most a thoughtful, personal gift from the heart and preserving their memories and stories for years to come. Go to story worth dot com slash daisy and save $10 off your first purchase that story worth dot com slash daisy to save $10 on your first purchase. And what about the radiation levels in the hikers close? And the reported unnaturally tanned skin and suddenly gray hair some people think the most likely culprit was the secret military test gone wrong. Or possibly gone right? Lev ivanov, the lead Soviet investigator on this case, noted another group of hikers 32 miles south of Igor and company. Reported seeing a series of orange spheres in the sky above the Ural Mountains that night. In his investigation, ivanov learned that for a month and a half after this incident, lots of people in the area reported seeing these orange orbs. What were they? At this point, it's not really a secret that governments like to test weapons and places that are not necessarily devoid of living things, and then afterward be like, oops, are bad. Like they'll wait until after people have been killed or lethally poisoned and then be like, we didn't realize there were so many people there. So, what if the USSR at the height of the Cold War was testing some kind of nuclear weapon in and around the mountains of Siberia because like who lives over there anyway? Spoiler alert, millions of indigenous people. Ivanov himself said it's possible that one of these orbs exploded close enough to the campsite that the force of it knocked some of them down, resulting in fractured skulls, for example. Radiation from such a blast might explain.

Babel Lev ivanov Ural Mountains ivanov Igor USSR Siberia Ivanov
"ural mountains" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

"For and his group of hiker friends who died there, and why we're still talking about it 60 years later. Just a quick note before we dive in, the names of the people involved in this story are Russian. And while it's true that my grandfather was from the USSR, he died before I was born and I never learned any of the languages from the Soviet empire. That said, I researched pronunciations and will do my best. I beg you forgive me my shitty New York City public school education and don't come for me on Twitter. In late January 1959 ten Intrepid souls mostly students in their 20s at the Ural polytechnic institute in Russia, set out for the a torn mountain range in the northern Ural Mountains of Russia. When I first heard of this story, I assumed this was a group of scientists or military people doing some kind of official mountain Y type business, collecting ice samples or whatever people do.

"ural mountains" Discussed on Car Talk

Car Talk

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Car Talk

"And even though jurors everywhere beg to be sequestered whenever they hear us saying this is npr support for npr and the following message. Come from better help. Offering online counseling. Better help therapist. Has you joe. Explains the importance of creating a safe space for therapy. I can't tell you how many times i've had clients that. Say that expression. Like i've never told to anybody. That's when i know. I've made some kind of momentous move with this person. They feel safe enough to expose that part of themselves and doing that together with somebody else can be very powerful to get matched with a counselor within forty eight hours and save ten percent. Go to better help dot com slash car talk on. Npr's consider this podcast. We don't just help you keep up with the news we help you make sense of what's happening like why. The housing market is wild right now. What safe looks like once you're back sonate it and how an increase in border crossings is testing the biden administration all of that in fifteen minutes every weekday. Listen now to consider this from. npr hawk. Back you're listening to talk with us. Click and collect the tapper brothers and we hit a discuss cars car repair. And the new puzzling. I can hardly wait well. I encourage that you didn't go ball. August over the last week paws. Learn and know. That wasn't bogus his another cheating. Bogus this week is this part of the goes into a convenience store. Say no no no. This is the world war two series. This is rising floodwaters series. Okay go ahead. A family of four in the dog are trapped on an island of these. What you're going to like it when rising floodwaters taraoke day bridget. They'd use just a few hours before so they're on this little island and they can't get back and they got one little row vote in the light thinking frantically. They searched for some means of crossing. Of course they find nothing and then finally when they just given up hope. The son says i've got a boat a small boat in ors the gather around but the joy was short lived because the manufacturers instructions printed on the boat's stern tell the bow can carry one hundred and eighty pounds. That's right thank you like. Grandma is with the mother-in-laws so the mom dad and the two kits that it and the dog dogs only one who could swim and the boca carry one hundred and eighty pounds. I'm writing this down the farther ways. One seventy the mother says she weighs one thirty. But i think it's more like one fifty five actually. The sun is ninety pounds. The daughters eighty and the dog is fifteen but the dog can swim but the dog can dog is going to have to take the back. Is there any way which the family can be saved and of course. We know that they can be saved because we would never give a puzzle with that didn't have a happy ending. Then how could they be saved. What's the fewest number of crossings. Yeah to save. Save everyone off. You're thinking oh the answer. Read it on a postcard on the back of a twenty dollar bill and send it to what happened to the ten inch reflecting telescope thing. It was hopeless. I'm telling you shoot for twenty bucks dole over stole over overstretch. Twenty bucks is good. If we can only get twenty s we'd be good ended up twenty goodbye a telescope send the to puzzle tower car talk plaza box thirty five hundred harvard square cambridge or fist. City matt zero two three eight or you can email your answer of course from talk dot com right now if you have a question about your car or anything else numbers. Eight eight eight car talk. That's eight eight eight two two seven eight two five five lawyer on car talk. Hi i'm christina. And i just moved here with my husband. Here's north carolina heavenly mountain from california. And we have a ninety six toyota land cruiser. Wait a minute california. So that means you spelt christina with a k. No ca heavenly mountain heavenly mount north been. Could there be a better place on earth. Oh god no. Today is the singularly. Most beautiful day. I've ever had in my life. How long have you been there a week. Pulling last night though. Really a civil singularly beautiful day. I mean that's that's quite a thing. I thought about that earlier. Driving around first of all we had the blue ridge parkway and they're no commercial vehicles and no signs all the blue ridge parkway is beautiful gorgeous isn't it and the clouds are these big white clouds and the wind is blowing in. The cows are out and the grass is green and the winds going through the os. Just gorgeous heavenly move from california to north carolina to be heavenly mountain. Good idea to me the oldest mountains in the world and some of these roads are the oldest Probably ever made told you that. Carl sagan oldest mountains in the world ural mountains in the world. They are nothing really matters. Civil says oh. That's very old into second oldest river in the world. It's called the new river. The newer of good name guy taking this course about geology and stuff and the teacher says does anyone know how old the amazon river isn't the guy in the back raise hand and he says yes sir i know it's one billion and three years old teachers says how did you come up with that number. He says well. i flunked. This cost the last time. I took it three years ago. At which time to teach us it was a bit in these mountains. so anyway christina. What are you driving. So we're driving ninety six toyota land cruiser. Which you think would be perfect for here you know. The roads are narrow because they were made when the cars weren't so big good and it's pretty precision driving on these mountain roads. I'm telling you there's no room for error i. We learned to have to tie everything down in the car. Or it comes and hits you And the second thing that happened is on a left curve. The doors would all in lock on their own and then unlock but not open. Yes and then the light overhead. The inside light started to flash on these curves not all the time. None of this happens all the time right. You can't like gear up for it and One night part We don't have a sensor alarm. The alarm went off just on. Its own no wind. You know now was parked outside parked outside. Yeah all right. We screen these call. What is this well. Let you say long left. Hand turns left. Left curve left curves herbs doors will unlock. Yeah if you're driving this thing and you would open the door. Let's say the doors were all locked while you're driving. Yeah opened the door with the other doors automatically unlock artists. That you have to unlock the manually. They all Unluck yeah when you stop the car with all the doors locked. Yeah how do you get out if you just open the doors. Well if you stop the car and turn it off they unlock. But if you don't turn it off you have to push the.

ninety pounds Twenty bucks twenty bucks fifteen eighty california two kits twenty dollar one billion one thirty fifteen minutes ten percent August earth ten inch Today north carolina one hundred and eighty pounds twenty last week
"ural mountains" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Type products. David Wilson, Thank you so much greatly appreciated early season and winding her. We'll get a good summary of that from David, as we can Right now on the cold. And I would suggest north of Fargo, You go toe Winnipeg. Or maybe it's normal and it's not normal as you move self down. I 29 break off in Kansas City. On. I 35 to Texas with perspective on his cold rub. Caroline are Bloomberg meteorologist Rob How unique is this moment for the Midwest? Probably, you know, we haven't seen anything like this time in 40 years. It's just remarkable to see some of these temperatures. I mean, to put it in perspective. Dallas is normal high this time of year is 60. They got to 14 yesterday, so they were 46 degrees below normal. That's just exceptional. They're sitting it to above this morning. It's two above right now. In Amarillo, like the numbers are just incredible. How does it pull down? I mean, I know it's a polar vortex, and I get there's cold air. It's like kind of a bond movie. How does it Hold down through the latitudes. Well, what has to happen is we have to disrupt the polar vortex. And we did that back in January by building high pressure up over the Ural Mountains. So what happens is the jet stream gets diverted much further north than it normally is. It starts to push the polar four techs off the pole, and it moves around. Now through all of January, it was exceptionally cold from Western Europe across Siberia where you're in Russia. I was watching. I watched another Norman. The Northern Hemisphere is my focused on watching what goes on in Siberia because what we end up with is what? How we got cold. We got what we call cross. Polar flow. So at some point back in mid to late January, the cold air in Siberia was pushed over the pole and to Western Canada down through central candidate into the Dakotas last week, and now it's been pushed as far south as Texas this morning. So all that cold that was building up. We saw those protests. A couple of weeks ago in Siberia was 63 below zero people were outside. That air has been pushed over the pole and into the central United States. Alright, so rob our good friends down in Texas. What can you look forward to or the next several days when it's just gonna break, I guess is the right term. Well, I wish I had good news for them, but I don't. Unfortunately there's an area of low pressure developing in the four Corners region this morning. It is snowing in northeastern Arizona. It's snowing in New Mexico. That storm's going to move east. It's going to produce snow in the Dallas area tomorrow. They're probably gonna get 3 to 6 inches on top.

David David Wilson New Mexico Kansas City Texas 3 Siberia tomorrow Russia 63 Caroline 46 degrees Western Canada Winnipeg January Dallas Western Europe last week Amarillo 60
"ural mountains" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"ural mountains" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The government that they could lead tours like this over certain distance, three kilometers or whatever it was because they were so experienced what they did all but one Would not survive. Nine bodies were found on this remote mountain. With horrific, inexplicable injuries. The mystery has spawned countless conspiracy theories. In fact, the authorities reopened it last year. We'll tell you what they found or what they pretended to find. But first, But first the trip let's go back in time. The party of these 10 people There's a lot of Igor is and Yuri's so will not get into too many details. But Igor is the leader, one of the most experienced athletes in the group Zen Ada 22 years old from the same faculty. Yuri 21 year old stuttering studying power economics. Alexander 24 studying nuclear physics another You're a 23 roost him 23 Nicholas 23, all of them engineering students, a 20 year old named Ludmila and another 22 year old Yuri, both of those studying economics. And then an older guy, 38 year old guy. Same Ian. It was a sports instructor who was a World War. Two veteran Lou Media was the youngest skier and eerily So we have excerpts from some of their journals in the days in the last final days of their lives, Ludmila, as I said, the youngest skier Wrote in her diary about the beginning of the adventure, saying in the train, we all sang songs accompanied by a mandolin. One of the guys is a mandolin aficionado. Get out of the blue. This really drunk guy came up to our boys accused him of stealing a bottle of vodka. He demanded it back and threatened to punch them in the teeth. But he couldn't prove anything. Eventually, he got lost. We sang and sang No one even noticed how he slipped into a discussion about love and kisses in particular. I mean, these see this is just kids, right? And they're talking about drunk guy on the train tries to steal the vodka. Well. They're going through this very long. You hike cross country ski trip, etcetera, and they spend the night in a couple of different places. They posting their posting their tents and finding small villages and things like that. Zenaida and Igor since their last letters home from a post office in a tiny little town. Further along the route called VJ. They spent the night there on the 25th of January, and then the next they got onto a truck. And went to a logging base of sort of another checkpoint that they called the 41st settlement. Some wrote in their diaries that they enjoyed chatting to the Lumberjacks around a warm stove. They talked about their favorite films. And then came the last part of the journey. The group hires a horse drawn sled to carry their supplies for the last 15 miles to the north to mining settlement. Going was tough, so tough that one member of the group said I'm out. Yeah. Yura Yura, an economics, I think yeah. And economics student Pansy had to leave. He didn't He felt sick, said he was sorry to leave his friends. But it was a decision that eventually Saved his life. Now they go to higher up into these mountains in the Ural Mountains and its absolute like you said late January early February when this happens After he left the group. You're I did like you said. They continued up to the mountains and their their mountain that they had their eyes on was mount or tort in and that that mountain's name means don't go there. In the language of the man. See? Heller, the man See you ask, man. See are one of the indigenous peoples in Russia on in this case, they happen to be reindeer herders that live in these mountains and have been there for hundreds of years. So there in the mountains, the reindeer herders, But in the fifties, they're not the only people who live there. There was once a network of prison camps. In the North Urals where 3 30,000 inmates would build roads, cut processed timber work in and makeshift factories. So you've got the inmates and you've got the reindeer herders, and then you've got this group of 10. Uh, on the night of February, 1st. 1959 What's left of the group. Remember one of the people left One of the 10 left, so they're just nine of them. Some reason they pitch their tent. On the eastern slope of Colette Shaikh Hell, which means Mountain of death. Now they put the tent up in a shallow pit. So you would think that that was because they wanted to shelter them from the wind. The next day. Or sometime that night, Something goes down to where they have to cut themselves out of the tent. It seems like in a real ship shot way they had to get out of there right away because Because we don't know. Just because dr dot because dot dot dot some of them took off without their shoes without their socks without their clothes. And their bodies were scattered all around. Now, they had told friends family that they were going to show up to their location to their eventual goal. On the think it was the 11th or 12th of February. It was the 19th of five nights in February, and they didn't They were late, But I mean, come on, You're hiking through the Ural Mountains, cross country skiing. Gonna be delays could be weather delays and there's gonna be problems and at first, it wasn't a big issue. Then people started getting worried. They sent out a group of other students to find these people and find them. They did. Missing a tongue missing eyes. Go through the list of Injuries like it wasn't the military. Was it? A military experiment? Was it a yeti? Was it the man? See what was it? The inmates? Was it something from above? How did these people meet their demise? They're violent demise. Talk about it when we come back. Where is that music? No, I should have them eating out of making violent. Say.

Igor Ural Mountains Yuri Ludmila Zen Ada Yura Yura dr dot instructor Colette Shaikh Hell Russia Lou Media North Urals Pansy Alexander Heller Zenaida Nicholas
Heating pipe bursts in Russian hotel, boiling water kills 5

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Heating pipe bursts in Russian hotel, boiling water kills 5

"The hotel of nine rooms is located in the basement of a residential building in the city near Russia's Ural Mountains authorities say all of the victims which includes a child was staying at the hotel and three of the injured have been hospitalized with burns given the deaths the Russian parliament will consider a ban on opening hotels all hospitals in the basement of residential buildings police have opened a probe into the tragedy I'm Charles to live this month

Russia Russian Parliament Charles Ural Mountains