27 Burst results for "Ural"

"ural" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

07:36 min | Last month

"ural" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Our current expectation and as I said, if we could sort of implement phase two a couple of years after that, then we'd be up to closer to a 175 million gallons. In contrast, in Maine, because we aren't limited in the availability of renewable power, we're going to go to a 175 million gallons a year immediately. And I think the main project will probably be, you know, we think there's a bunch of efficiencies in doing a second project as opposed to a first. So we think that will come online roughly 12 months after Louisiana. So hopefully let's call it mid 2028. Some of that capability will be available. And we also are toying if there's any way we can double the size of our footprint in main, you know, we may be able to bump it up to more like 350 million gallons a year capacity. But if we do increase the size, then the construction period is going to be a little bit longer as well. Well, I have friends up in presque isle that I go visit on occasion. So when in 2028, when it's all happening, I'm going to expect the grand tour. We're going to have to definitely get together up there. You'll be invited to the grand tour. You'll be there for the ribbon cutting ceremony. And that goes for both of you. And if you're not there, I will be sorely disappointed. I spent my entire career in the computer industry and I understand how incremental approaches have to come in doing any large scale project. I'm assuming you guys have some sort of a demonstration unit built or some sort of a prototype that's producing product today. If so, how much are you producing and what's the next step? How do you scale from the development environment that you're working with now to full scale production? Brian, we get asked that question all the time. We don't have a test site. We're not doing this on a smaller scale and then proving doing proof of concept and then ramping it up. Every component that we have in our system in contrast is out there, it's operating and has proven itself in a variety of different contexts. We've just cherry picked a variety of different technologies and reassembled them in a way that's in a more clever fashion. For example, the fulcrum project, which is mechanically completed, but they haven't, and they're making syn gas. So in other words, they're making the gas that goes into Fischer tropes, but they're not at the point yet where they're producing syn crude, which is the liquid product that comes out of the Fischer tropes unit. They're very similar to the technology that we use probably for the first 60% of their technology. It's not just the same technology. It's the same suppliers. It's the exact same units. And so every day we look to see if they've announced that they've sort of accomplished that next milestone step. But in a way, there are test case. We are different enough. They use municipal municipal solid waste. We use timber waste. There's other things about ours that we think or maybe a little bit less risky. But it's probably too glib to just point to them. And honestly, I'm not super comfortable that our success is not tied to when those guys get to the finish line. But we do not have, you know, we don't have like a small DG fuels project out there that we're then going to scale up. The other thing is just by nature of the SAP problem. If we did that, which is the typical way of going, then saf is not going to be available in any meaningful supply for 15 years. We have to go big. We have to go big now. Yeah, but the question that I have, though, if you don't have any proof of concept, any prototype, when you get all your ducks in a row and build the facility, isn't it kind of a big gamble if it will actually work and you get the numbers that you're claiming that you're going to get? Well, like I said, every single major component that we have is out there, it's proven technology. And we have, you know, you raise a good point, but we have what we think are probably the world's best engineers for this kind of project. It's black and beach. We have company called lidos, which is the independent engineer, and they're issuing an independent engineers report. They're very experienced in this exact kind of technology. There's companies in the insurance industry. One company that we speak to quite a bit called new energy risk that will come out and actually they'll provide an insurance policy that if you build it, it will work in a type of policy, which in some cases is very valuable. But it kind of comes down to how well educated are the debt and equity investors. In this particular space and how comfortable can they get? And so as we go through due diligence with a variety of potential investors, the ones that really are sort of probably going to get to the finish line are the ones that have gone out. They either have a massive number of processed scientists and process engineers on staff where they really can get to a very granular level on the technology and they have familiarity with gasification. They have familiarity with water, electrolysis, and Fisher tropes. It's really in a world with investors that look at trillions of dollars of deals. There's really a small subset that are in a position to reasonably evaluate the opportunity. You see, that's what I loved about the project when I first heard about it. When it comes right down to it, it's science. It's chemistry and it's physics. And we know how that works and we've known how that works for a long time. And what you're doing is putting together the engineering, proven engineering that's been done in other ways, and you're just applying it in a new way to come up with something that's necessary at this time. It's really, really interesting. And I wish you guys the best of luck and looking forward to flying in a jet with your product in the wings. Well, it sounds like you fly in and out of LAX quite a bit. So that's our destination. That I do. So Chris, thank you so much for joining us here on the airplane geeks podcast. And it was just a pleasure learning so much about DG fuels. Thank you. Thank you, Micah. Thank you for having me. Next, Brian Coleman, and I talked with doctor uri Io shami, cofounder and chief AI at fetcher about continuous pricing models and how they can address challenges faced by the airlines. I'm here with Brian Coleman, Brian hi, it's good to see you again. How are you doing? Hey, max. Long time no talk. I know, actually, it was just last night we recorded an episode. Well, Brian and I have a guest that we are speaking with today and because of time zone changes, it's not at all practical to do that during our normal recording time. So we're doing this kind of off schedule, but that's fine. And our guest is doctor uri, Ural shami, who is the cofounder and the chief AI at fetcher in Israeli tech company that developed a proprietary AI powered engine. It predicts demand and enables continuous pricing for the airline industry. This company was founded in 2019 by experts in the fields of deep learning and algo trading, ecommerce, digitization of legacy architecture. So uri, welcome to the airplane geek podcast.

presque lidos Maine Louisiana Fischer Brian Brian Coleman fetcher uri Io shami Fisher Brian hi Micah Ural shami Chris
"ural" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"ural" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"An airline. Yeah, and they've got good luck to stand on now that both of these airlines, I believe, are raking in record breaking revenue post pandemic or whatever it is we're in now. So that's a real nice bargaining chip. Yeah, so no strikes are imminent, but it is a strike authorization vote intended to send the message. Hey, let's, you know, kind of buckle down and get on with this and get a contract. The flip side of all of that, Lufthansa has reached an agreement with its cabin crew, that squares them away at least through the end of next year. So there will be no Lufthansa flight cancellations because of cabin crew strikes at least to 2023. Yeah, don't forget about the flight crew or the baggage handlers or the fuels that Frankfurt still lots can go wrong, but at least that's one check mark. Taken one piece of the puzzle away is fine by this nice. All right, so here's an interesting one. And by interesting, I mean frankly kind of terrified. A viva a three 20 neo was flying from Cali to real hot chip. And the weather was bad, and so they tried to divert to Medellín and the weather was bad. And so they went to monteria. They landed fine, they taxied to the gate, they parked the aircraft. At the beginning of flight, the aircraft had a hundred and 80 minutes of fuel for the 80 minute flight. So plenty of fuel and they were ready to go. By the time they landed and parked the aircraft, they had about 200 kilograms of fuel left. That is not a lot. That's about the combined weight of two and a half people. A little bit more than that. I think, is it? I don't think it is. 200 200 KG to pounds is like quick. Four 140 pounds, so that's like, we're talking about Americans. It's like two and a half people. Fair enough. All right, so not a lot of fuel left. But they landed safely. The Columbian authorities released a preliminary report. We'll link to that in the show notes. And they are serious incident. That's something, right? That's the good thing there. And then this happened today, a Ural airlines flight landed apparently with locked brakes on the main gear. The information that came across at least Twitter said the brakes were locked up, which is interesting because I don't know. That's a very odd thing. And Peter leming on Twitter stated that there's no procedure, I guess, in the QR C or the manual about what you do if the brakes are locked up or what the lending procedures are because it's not something that I guess really happens often, but we did some research and we found this is actually happened before. We don't know why this particular incident occurred, but there's a bulletin from the AIB way back in September of 2007 in a lead. Well, that's the second mention of leads today. That's interesting. Basically, an a three 19 operated by you know what? I don't think it actually says. In a three 19 operated by an airline, the pilots meant to deploy the flaps to the full position, but the pilot accidentally somehow engaged the parking brakes of the aircraft, which is kind of like mind-blowing in that they are very, very different switches very, very different mechanisms. One is a pull and kind of push down and the other is a twisting mechanism. So that's very odd and the pilots didn't realize that this happened and neither of them noticed the parking brake display on the ecamm, so what if mistakes were made there? I would imagine the same thing happened here, but I guess we will wait to see if and when a reporter's ever published because these days in that region who knows if we'll ever see. So two things, two things, one, it was BMI, the a three 19 was BMI. Ah. Rest in peace. So there you go. And then the second thing is there's already preliminary reporting from the Ural flight. Really? That was quick. So the pilots of the airlines and I'm quoting accident investigation authorities on aviation safety networks database. They're quoting the aviation authorities in Russia. The pilots of the Earl airlines Airbus a three 20 reported the experience that critical break failure and an altitude of 500 meters when the parking brake spontaneously applied on the aircraft. The alarm was triggered, the wheels remain locked for landing. So it sounds like the same thing happened, but spontaneously or not. It will be the interesting thing there. Interesting indeed. I can't say parking brakes spontaneously activating is something anyone is really heard of happening much in the past, but we'll let the investigation do its thing. There you go. So that's all we've got for episode 188. I want to thank everyone for making it through the sound of my voice today. I hope you enjoyed my dulcet tones. I hope you enjoyed our conversation with Mark and and I hope that you'll look forward to a conversation with John ostrawa. Next week where we're really going to dive into Boeing's investor day and for the first time in a few years, get an idea of what that company is all about. What they're planning on doing over the next few years and how they're going to get to the point where they're going to build a new airplane. So I'm looking forward to that conversation with John. If you have questions about that, please, please email us podcast at FR two four dot com. Put Boeing questions or something in the subject line so we can look out for that and send us your questions. Anything you may have about Boeing and its

Lufthansa Medellín Peter leming Cali Frankfurt Twitter AIB Earl airlines Airbus John ostrawa Russia Boeing Mark John
"ural" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:51 min | 5 months ago

"ural" Discussed on ESPN FC

"They might just control the game. I'm going to see an edgy one Liverpool win. Meanwhile, after a number of seasons, away from the competition spurs return to the Champions League and interesting opening time for them as they take on a Marseille elsewhere, I'm trying Frank for the open league winners entertain sporting. Let's get the former captain of Marseille, shall we on the show to discuss this tie. How do you see it going, Frank? Well, it's going to be interesting to see much coming back to the Champa thing. They have a very bad records. I think they lost the last 13 games of the competition, which is a very big record, a bad one. And I think they want to stop that. And they will have to count on three. I think a couple of former arsenal players to do so against stock Nam is going to be a big task for the Marseille team because I think Tottenham is superior to his name in names in, I guess, in talent, but they will have to but Tottenham will have to play against a fantastic spirit in that most state team. So is that going to be easy for spurs? I think he's going to be even more difficult for Marseille, but everything is possible for the mastery is. And it's going to be very interesting to watch that. Go work some computers outside our studio here. So why don't you talk about spurs more? In the show. And it's like, well, there's not much to say about them at the moment, because they're just kind of ticking over under the radar. I've never said that to me when I walked past. You have this air of unapproachable abilities in the building. That's not true. I was eulogizing about talking south of the season to him. The other day. When he was slightly frustrated, they're getting a job done by just the odd goal. But they're getting the job done. And I think that's why this is going to be another good test for them. This is a decent group for them, but I think after having a spell in the Ural polygon, the conference, whatever it was that we're in the last year or two, to go back in here amongst the big boys, even though it's not the strongest of groups, just to prove to themselves that they can be in there and keep their momentum going. Yeah, I mean, they've got the squad to do it. It's not a game I'm looking forward to, I have to say, I don't think any Tottenham game is. That's not to say that not got a good squad. They're just not an Antonio Conte is never a super exciting to watch. And I don't think Tottenham must say is going to be up there with the people that are more controlled, flicking on to watch that one. Luckily we have many screens, and that one is in the top corner. Let's remind you of the other game showing there taking place on Wednesday just an addition one. There are some decent ones, not this one. That's also in the top corner. It's not even on. It's cloud cruise

Marseille spurs Tottenham Frank Champions League Liverpool arsenal Antonio Conte
"ural" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

06:08 min | 5 months ago

"ural" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"Wow. I got chills when you were talking about, you know, some of the responses to things that are happening in our everyday life, and I think that chills are really just from this idea that as writers, we can always do something. And I think a vein also about translation really struck me, you know, I often thought of myself as a translator, even though I'm using English language, but really translating space and voice for a lot of indigenous speakers. My parents spoke Navajo at home and that was the rhythm and the musicality that I was raised with. And so it's so familiar to me, you know, although the comprehension is not quite there, like I might not have the literal translation, but I know the context. I know the emotion of the language. I know the musicality of the language. And I know the power of it. So, and as far as you and your history, I mean, I know you came to the U.S. from Ukraine shortly after Ukraine declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, which leads me to believe that those intergenerational effects of war are remembered somewhere on your body. Because you lived with relatives with parents who witnessed those tragedies, firsthand, and that's kind of similar to me in my experience with my parents were the first generation to experience boarding school and displacement from their homelands. And so I'm curious how the journey of place from the Ukraine to the United States and the connecting emotions tether you to place, especially through the use of language and how that shapes your writing. Well, you know, first, I want to go back to something you said about writing in English, but hearing all the Navajo cadences and the music because I very much feel this right alongside you. Even though I write in English, I grew up on Russian language poetry, you know, speaking Russian in the home, it being read. So when I write, I do feel like there is an element of very Slavic cadence in the way that I approach English language poetry, so there is a way in which multilingualism kind of sings through my work, you know, whether I intend it or not, I can't help it. It's an intergenerational song inadvertently so always. But in terms of specifically the immigrant experience and its connection to war, I think that I, you know, grew up in the residue of trauma with it hovering in the house, always hovering in the house. My great grandmother was a Holocaust survivor. I mean, as is my grandmother as was my grandfather, even though they would never name themselves that. They were children, they survived in evacuation in the Ural Mountains. South of Siberia. And so they would never consider themselves survivors. And also the war in the way that the Holocaust was perpetrated in the Soviet territories, is very different from the model of extermination in the west. And the concentration camps. It's not one that's very much studied in schools. In the United States, especially. And it's one that in Soviet history was often denied, right? There was no acceptance that Jews were targeted, and so when we emigrated here, it was a big change in the narrative and in what they could claim as their story. And so when I started to write this story and to understand this story, it was my way of trying to understand how to write about a trauma that I did not experience directly. How to write about this intergenerational trauma without appropriating it with clearly demarcating my distance from it. But at the same time, understanding the way that I have been imprinted by it as well. And when Putin invaded just to bring it full circle, my mother and grandmother were in complete complete disbelief. My mother said, I can not believe he would do this while there are still those alive who remember hiding in those same subway metro stations during World War II. That's what was so unbelievable is that there are still people alive who remember the trauma of World War II because this is such a national trauma, you know, according to the Soviet ideology that he is horrifically trying to bring back. So it was unbelievable to them that he would re traumatize a

Ukraine United States Navajo Soviet Union Ural Mountains Siberia Putin
"ural" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

06:36 min | 8 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"And bottom spreading apart, creating drag and during the aircraft. When wanted, both sets of flaperons can be deployed creating drag like air brakes, so that the air speed or glide angle can be altered. A fuselage like crew cabin was to be embedded inside the wing, the design included a tail cone protruding from the trailing edge, which would contain the remote sighting stations for the bombers, gunners, and a cluster of rear firing machine guns. In the midsection of the cabin there were folding banks for off duty crew on long missions, the aircraft's bomb load was to be carried in 6 bombays, three in each wing section, fitted with roll away doors, although the original design precluded the carrying of large bombs, such as the early atomic weapons. Production aircraft would have defensive armament of 20.5 inch machine guns, or 20 millimeter cannon, carried in 6 turrets along the air across center line four above and below the wings, and four in the tail cone. In June 1946 the ex B 35 made its first flight, a 45 minute trip to miura dry Lake without incident. The XP 35s engines and propellers were army air force property, and had not been tested for compatibility by either Pratt and Whitney, Hamilton's standard or by the army. Reports and correspondence tell of three or four flights, when power plant and propeller vibrations increased, and the very efficient contra rotating propellers began failing with frustrating frequency. In meetings no agency would accept responsibility. The army also refused to allow northrops proposed modification of the bombays to carry the standard Mark three atomic bomb, whilst at the same time declaring that they wouldn't buy the bomber, unless it could carry the a bomb. Problems with the propellers are Scott worse, until Jack Northrop himself grounded the XP 35s, until the government fixed their propulsion system. As a solution, some aircraft were fitted with single props, with a severe loss of performance. And then the army ordered Northrop to convert a pair of the aircraft to accommodate 8 Allison turbo jets. As a result, the airframe promptly flew to more than 40,000 feet and topped 520 miles an hour, 840 km/h, in flight tests. Verifying the XP 35 airframes aerodynamics, but at the price of range, by using the thirsty jet engines. A prompt version had a design range capable of reaching targets 4000 miles 6400 kilometers away, but the jet engine versions range was cut nearly in half. This disqualified it for the air force's top priority mission as a strategic bomber, which, at the time, meant striking at the USSR's industrial and military complexes in the Ural Mountains. The air force itself involved in a confusion of rank and job changes eventually canceled the XP 35 project whilst continuing to test the airframe as the jet powered XP 49. The second XB 35 converted to an XP 49 all jet airframe crashed after an air force test pilot pulled the outer wing panels off, at 4.8 G during stall tests. The first, completed all its stall and spin test satisfactorily, but was destroyed by a fire after the news gear collapsed during a high-speed taxi test with full fuel tanks, which then leaked. A third XP 35 was converted to jet power, with four engines mounted inside the wing and a pair of potted jets slung underneath. It was to be a long-range reconnaissance aircraft. After only a few months, without explanation, the air force canceled its order for 30, and the last of northrops big flying wings sat abandoned near the edge of the airfield for two years, before being finally ordered scrapped on the 1st of December 1953. In front of Northrop and his devoted workers the aircraft were broken up, jigs destroyed and blueprints thrown into a bomb fire. Their design of the flying wing had been Northrop's passion, and its failure to be selected as the next generation bomber platform, and the subsequent destruction of the prototypes and incomplete aircraft was a severe bloat to him. In 1952 he retired at the age of 57, and virtually ended his association with the company that bore his name. However, in 1979 he finally broke his decades along silence on the matter, alleging a conspiracy within government centered around the then air force secretary Stuart symington. With a mind that appeared as sharp as on the day he retired he recalled an interview between symington and himself, apparently Northrop was told he should merge his company with consolidated. After the lengthy diatribe on mister symington's part, Northrop asked what the alternatives were. He said, alternatives, you'll be God, I'm sorry if you don't. General mccarney also in attendance exclaimed oh mister secretary, you don't mean that the way it sounds and this to symington said you're damn right I do. Richard Miller, who in 1948 was the Northrop chairman.

miura dry Lake army Jack Northrop Northrop Allison turbo air force Pratt Whitney Ural Mountains Hamilton USSR Scott confusion
Christine Lagarde Signals End of Eurozone's Negative Rates Era

The Trish Regan Show

01:57 min | 8 months ago

Christine Lagarde Signals End of Eurozone's Negative Rates Era

"Think that we've got a problem and it's happening again all over the world. The ECB just came out finally. Christine Lagarde and said, we're going to raise rates. They're following in the footsteps of the Federal Reserve. Of course, they're negative rates right now. So they get a ways to go. They're going to raise by 25 basis points. We've been raising by 50 basis points. The other thing is they're not unwinding their balance sheet. We're looking to unwind our gigantic balance sheet at the fed. And so that's a little bit of a difference and so consequently, I think you're going to still see the Ural of suffering some weakness compared to the dollar, which how is that relevant? Perhaps if you're doing a currency trade and you're buying blue chip, European companies, maybe you're able to get them in a little bit of a discount because the dollar is so much stronger than a historically, at least over the last, however many years has been. Quick story. I got married many years ago in 2001. So quite a few years ago, in Italy, we celebrated our honeymoon over there, and I remember the Euro, which was just coming out right at that time. The Euro was trading at a 15% discount to the dollar. So it was great. Like everything was on sale. You know, you'd look at a price and it was 15% off and those days were short lived. As I look at The Wall Street Journal dollar index, you see that, well today anyway, the dollar is training higher, 95.85. Again, this Wall Street Journal dollar index, but you know what's amazing. You think about the Euro right now and Europe's on sale because you're looking at basically a buck 6. Per Euro. So if you look at the Euro over the last year, it's really been challenged. And even with Christine Lagarde coming out and saying, okay, we're prepared. We're going to raise interest rates. At some point in negative territory, it's not enough to convince the market that Europe is going to get out of its inflation trouble. I

Christine Lagarde Federal Reserve ECB Wall Street Journal Italy Europe
"ural" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom Elizabeth Holmes asked a judge to toss out her conviction claiming no rational juror could have found her guilty of conspiracy and wire fraud beyond a reasonable doubt The request filed late Friday in federal court in San Jose California is a routine and long shot attempt to overturn a jury verdict The founder and former chief executive officer of theranos was convicted back in January of four out of 11 counts of conspiracy and wire fraud and acquitted of four counts that she'd deceived patients The jury was unable to reach a unanimous consensus on three other counts A record volume of Russian oil is on board tankers Bloomberg's Greg Jarrett tells me unprecedented amounts are heading to India and China as other nations restrict imports because of the war in Ukraine Between 74 million 79 million barrels of mostly sour Ural crude from the OPEC plus producer are in transit and floating storage over the past week more than double the 27 million barrels just before the February invasion of Ukraine Bloomberg's Greg Jarrett What are you waiting for That is what actor comedian Jon Stewart wants to know He spoke at a rally today in Washington D.C. in hopes the pact act will finally come to the floor of the U.S. Senate for a vote The pact act expands health benefits to veterans sickened by burn pits and toxic exposure while serving the country when Stewart was on a USO tour to Afghanistan He told the gathering at RFK stadium he thought the U.S. troops had been hit by the enemy We took a C one 30 over to Afghanistan and when you come in and you see the burn pits you think it's an attack Oh my God did they get hit with missiles No that's just the contractor Just burning everything we make here The bill has passed the house with some bipartisan support Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm Susanna Palmer This is Bloomberg I'm Barry Ritz you're listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio My extra special guest this week is.

Greg Jarrett Susanna Palmer Elizabeth Holmes Bloomberg theranos Ukraine Bloomberg Washington D.C. San Jose Ural RFK stadium OPEC Ukraine California Jon Stewart Afghanistan U.S. Senate India China
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:28 min | 9 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"Grain, rice, beans, pork, milk, and sugar. The ARA brought in hundreds of onsite relief managers to oversee a small army of a 125,000 Russia's tasked with unloading warehousing, hauling weighing cooking and serving food at the more than 21,000 kitchens that would be established throughout the country over the next two years. But unfortunately, the winter of 1921 came all too quickly. And the relief efforts could not move fast enough to stave off the horrors of another long hungry winter. Once the ice set in, and anything edible disappeared, people were forced to resort to cannibalism. With people dying left and right, it seemed like an absolute stupid waste of perfectly good flash to let bodies just be buried in the ground. Especially around the Volga and Ural areas, a thriving underground culture of cannibalism got many people through the winter. When relief workers came around and attempted to properly dispose of corpses, people quietly begged them not to take the meat away. As time went on grave robbery became a thing, and of course, eventually, there are stories that it wasn't exactly safe to go out at night. The week might get jumped, murdered and eaten. Nobody really talked about it openly, nor wanted to talk about it openly, but cannibalism was widespread in many areas, and at least a few more people lived than would have otherwise perished. Beyond the deaths caused immediately by starvation, relief workers also reported back the appalling material conditions they found in Russia. Even if food was available, there might not be sufficient fuel to cook it. Nor sufficient fuel for anyone to stay warm during the long winter. Russian peasants out in the villages and Russian workers in the cities often lived in a single pair of tattered rags, children and orphanages often had only one garment, and that was often little more than a converted flower sack. Kids out in the rural areas who might have been fed at a kitchen, had to stay home as they lack sufficient clothes to safely leave the house. Taking in these distressing reports, the ARA expanded its operations and initiated a plan to collect and send clothing packages to Russia, all of which would be funded by private donations..

ARA Russia Ural
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"Have literally nothing to eat. The story of any famine is obviously going to begin with some kind of natural or environmental catastrophe. And so it was for Russia in 1921. This catastrophe was centered on the region around the Volga river, and the steps by the Ural Mountains, but it was not confined there entirely. There was a crop failure in 1920, followed by a particularly heavy frost over the winter that killed off a ton of seed. Into these inauspicious conditions would follow an extreme summer drought that turned fertile acres into a dust bowl. Dry thin topsoil was just blown away by the wind. So 1921 delivered a second consecutive crop failure. And two failures in a row is where famine comes from. One crop failure is terrible, but endurable will sacrifice. To in a row, and you're dealing with a humanitarian crisis. But it's not as if the peasants weren't familiar with the phenomenon of crop failures, they were a recurring feature of Russian life, and the peasants knew how to ensure themselves against the random vicissitudes of God in nature. As a matter of course they kept preserves of grain. Seed banks, food and fodder stored in case of emergency. They had done this for centuries. And this is when we turn from the natural causes of the famine to the human causes. Years of Civil War over these contested areas like the Volga meant constant forced requisitions from both the red and the white armies. When the reds gained the decisive upper hand, areas under their control were subject to the policies of war communism. As we've discussed, the practice of seizing food, grain and fodder by force without compensation, led the peasants to simply stop producing surpluses, anything they produce was just going to be seized. So why bother producing it? The result was that the amount of land under cultivation dropped dramatically, and the amount the peasantry saved and stored also dropped dramatically. After years of this, the peasants were out on the thin ice of bare subsistence. And in 1921, they fell through the ice. When the second crop failure hit, there was nothing to eat. There was just nothing to eat. In huge chunks of the former Russian Empire, not just around the Volga, which was the area hardest hit, but also western Siberia, the steppes around the Ural Mountains, the area around the dawn river, southern Ukraine, all of them places I might point out that were on the front lines of the civil wars. In the spring of 1921, roughly 25% of Russian peasants were already starving from a long winter after the failures from 1920. This would only get worse as the months went on. The spreading curse of malnourishment brought with its secondary wave of disease and sickness as typhus and cholera started taking over entire communities severely weakened by hunger. The ultimate death toll of the famine includes those who died from these sicknesses, which were so directly caused by it. Now in the big picture, the Soviet leadership knew how bad things were out there. It's a huge reason Lennon had initiated the new economic policy at the tenth party Congress in March 1921. He recognized how counterproductive war communism had ultimately been, and he was very motivated to reverse course, increase the amount of land under cultivation, revive heavy industry and fix the railroads. This would put rush on a more productive course that would hopefully allow them to make gains and leaps and bounds once things started clicking. The Bolshevik vision for Russian agriculture was ultimately about large nationalized estates using advanced mechanization and the most advanced tools and theories to create the kind of abundance that would make famine or relic of the old world..

Ural Mountains Volga river dawn river Volga Russia reds Siberia typhus Ukraine cholera Lennon Congress
"ural" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm Manu zamoro. And today on the show, what lies beneath. Starting with someone who spends a lot of her time, beneath the earth's surface in underwater caves. You know, most people hear the word cave diver and they picture me like jumping off of a cliff into the ocean. It's like, no, that's not it at all. I'm actually swimming through water filled passages beneath your feet. This is cave diver Jill. The best way for me to describe it is to think of the planet as a body. And I am swimming through the veins of mother earth. I've been cave diving all over the planet in underwater caves and Florida, The Bahamas underneath the Ural Mountains in Siberia inside lava tubes in volcanos. And even inside icebergs. Jill has hundreds of stories to tell about magical adventures she's had deep underground. But often these dives are pretty dangerous. Like the one she took in January 2011 in northern Florida. I was guiding a scientist into a very small underwater cave. And it was for the purpose of sampling some algal materials. That might closely resemble life we would find in outer space. The dive was going as expected. Until it was time to exit the cave, which was really more like a narrow passageway. That's when Jill's diving partner got wedged in the rocks. And in the moment she got stuck, her gear became entangled in our safety line and she became wedged in this space that was about as big as sliding underneath your bed, like literally shoulders pinned to the ceiling and chest scraping along the floor. And as she became entangled and unable to swim forward, she panicked. And in that panic, just a couple of errant fin kicks. Stirred up everything to the point where I was literally like suspended in chocolate milk. I couldn't see anything. And I had one hand on the guideline and one hand on her, and she was moving to my left. And I'm stretching out my arms more and more and more. Until the guideline is being stressed in my right hand and she's in my left and I feel it getting tighter and tighter and tighter. Like a piano wire. And then suddenly pink, the line separates, and I have the bitter and of a guideline in my hand and my diving partner in my other hand. And I'm thinking, oh boy, we're in trouble now. The guideline is basically a rope leading back to the mouth of the cave. Yeah, if you don't have the guideline, the cave is just full of traps. You know, it's not marked by anything other than your guideline. And so you would have to re explore in complete blackness to find your way out. So Jill started to think through all she needed to do to save them. I needed to calm down my partner. She needed to get them unstuck. I needed to patch the guideline and then work our way out of the cave. Her thoughts were racing. You know, oh my gosh, I have to get out of this cave to women can't die in an underwater cave. That would be international news. And then you think crazy things like, oh my gosh, I have to get home. My husband doesn't know how to do the taxes. But the important thing is just to take that deep breath and center yourself and just make the best next step towards survival and then keep doing it. Until you get home safe. But how deep were you into the cave like from the mouth of it? So we were over a thousand feet back in the cave. And we had to come through several small restrictive spaces in zero visibility. And that could take you a long time. Now, I had to patch the guideline and that needed two hands. And that's when I lost track of my partner. Where did she go? I mean, where was there to go if you're all tight and packed in like that? Well, that's the thing. When you can't see, you don't know. And in the end, it took me an extra 73 minutes to get out of the cave. As I worked out of the cave searching for her all the way out, I stopped and checked side passages and then finally, when I got to the doorway of the cave, there.

Jill Manu zamoro northern Florida swimming Ural Mountains volcanos NPR Siberia The Bahamas Ted Florida
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"But that was it. Faced with the decision to fish or cut bait in Russia in early 1920. The allies cut bait. Now this decision to cut bait was, of course, massively influenced by events in Siberia during this same period. The allies had put a great deal of stock in supreme ruler Cole chuck. They, in fact, presently recognized him as the sovereign head of Russia. But by the end of 1919, it looked as though the supreme ruler of Russia was in control of little more than his own immediate staff. With denikin's forces being pushed back away from Moscow, and that northwestern army being pushed back away from Petrograd. The reds felt comfortable sending reinforcements across the Ural Mountains to take the fight to supreme roller kolchak. Although there was practically nothing to take the fight too. By November 1919, kolchak's armies were falling apart, and his government, they could even be called that, was an increasingly hopeless bunch of corrupt officials who didn't really have power over anything. With very little standing between the Red Army and their capital at omsk, they decided to just abandon the city and flee east towards Lake Baikal. Maybe regroup in irkutsk. They abandoned arms in a hurry, leaving behind tons of supplies and ammunition, which the Red Army gratefully absorbed when they captured the city on November 14th. Those officials and officers and troops who managed to get away, then embarked on what is dubbed the great Siberian ice march, which is not to be confused with the first thing that is called the ice march, which was the volunteer army wandering off into the wilderness in early 1918. This great Siberian ice march was a rolling and chaotic retreat 1500 miles east across the Siberian winter from omsk to Lake Baikal. The great Siberian ice march represents the disintegration of kolchak's forces in the east. Peasant soldiers who had been conscripted simply deserted and went home, typhus raged through the ranks, railroads were frozen and clogged with traffic as refugees and soldiers were trying to move in both directions. Local anti white partisan groups all along the trans Siberian railroad attacked them as they moved east, capturing some killing some wounding others forcing them to remain behind, preventing trains from moving at all. As was happening down in southern Russia, the senior leadership around cold chuck resorted to pointing fingers at one another, quitting and disgust, or just looking out for themselves. What was left of the political officials who had made up kolchak's quote unquote government made it to irkutsk where they tried to reestablish the government, but they had no authority whatsoever. Cold chuck himself was separated from what was left of his main forces. But he would not be separated from the single most valuable thing in his possession. 36 freight cars loaded with gold. This gold represented a large chunk of the Tsar's gold reserves. Reserves which had been stashed in the city of Kazan on the Volga for safe keeping during World War I, and which were subsequently captured by kolchak's forces and taken into his possession the previous year, and as he claimed to be the sovereign rule of Russia, he claimed control of the gold as his right, and as his responsibility. He was still making his way east with this gold when he got word that irkutsk was probably not going to be a safe haven. In December 1919, a left wing group of SRs and mensheviks took control of the city,.

kolchak Russia Cole chuck denikin northwestern army omsk Red Army Lake Baikal irkutsk Ural Mountains Petrograd Siberia reds Moscow Cold chuck chuck Volga Kazan
"ural" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"When the fish and Lake Karachi south of the Ural Mountains in Russia went blind. Not everyone stopped eating them. It was only a game. Angela peltzer is a writer. She's reading here from a story she wrote, called the boys of Cara che Lake. The boys, bored on a hot summer day, would wander down to the Lake through the forest and pull off shirts and pants and splash into the murkiness, jump on one another's backs and spit Lake water into the air from their sunburnt lips. He was always warmer and Karachi than any other Lake. Angela's story is a slow unfolding of the nuclear disaster at the nearby plant. How it seeps into the Lake and the lives of the people who live nearby. She was inspired to write about it after reading an article. But a man who lived in the Ural Mountains, and while reading about the man, she discovered the Lake. The story became about these imaginary boys, and their imaginary lives near this very real Lake. When they had cooled off, they stood with their toes shoved into the silty bottom, knees bent, eyes flickering over the surface, hands hovering. The fish came to nibble at their calves and ankles, and even blind they could turn and slick away from the boys diving hands as fast as light winking off glass. Angela's story was published in 2011, but she says that every now and then, reader still contact her, asking about the boys of Cara cha Lake. They want to know which parts of the story are fact, and which parts are fiction. We're Angela drew the line. It's interesting to me to see people thinking through what do we do with this mashup of mythology and truth and when we can't tell where those borders are, where do we end up? Then mash up of myth and truth. Is exactly what makes a place like Lake karachay so compelling. Because we still know so little about it. Becomes a vessel for our imagination. For musicians, that vessel may morph into a metal concept album. For Angela, became her story. The space to test out, ideas, emotions, curiosity, and to try and understand a barely understandable world. Just a tiny bit more. I mean, I guess that's what we're always looking for, right? Something to sort of shake us away and see things differently or understand the world's differently. But then part of it is just a mystery, right? Like if you understood.

Ural Mountains Angela peltzer Cara che Lake Karachi Angela Cara cha Lake Angela drew Russia Lake karachay
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"Was up to end including selling things on the black market to buyers representing the Red Army. General Knox, the senior British military official attached to kolchak, was jokingly referred to as the quartermaster general of the Red Army. And at one point, Trotsky sent a note to Knox teasingly thanking him for helping equip the Red Army. In the coming battles many Red Army soldiers marched out wearing British manufactured uniforms. Now beyond the corrupt greed of the people in omsk, the white forces made themselves hated wherever they went. Everything I've just said about Red Army abuses applies just as much to the white armies. Their armies were also built on forced conscription at gunpoint or bayonet point. With their supply lines being so long they too had to requisition food from the locals, they too used abuse, torture and executions to extract food supplies and anything else they could carry off. When people resisted, villages were burned and people were shot. On market days, white army cavalrymen would come around in conscript young men into the army. Many of these conscripted soldiers promptly deserted as quickly as they could, taking with them even more uniforms and equipment and weaponry over to the side of the reds. So, in all those respects, the abuse of the peasantry basically. White, or red, it was all the same. But in the final analysis, the reds still wound up looking like the lesser of two evils. This was because kolchak's forces were viewed fundamentally as restorationist in their aims. Because even if they weren't fighting for the romanovs or anything like that, they absolutely refused to recognize the revolution in land that had taken place since 1917. So wherever white armies went, officers and officials tried to reinstate the old economic order, and especially west of the Ural Mountains, they threatened to take away the land that had been taken over by villages and give it back to the previous owners. And so for as much as the local peasantry didn't like the red commissars..

Red Army kolchak General Knox white army omsk Trotsky Knox army reds Ural Mountains
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"1919, the local communist officials and Red Army leaders prepared foreign invasion through the Ural Mountains, by the military forces which had coalesced in western Siberia under admiral kolchak. With this attack looming, communist leaders and Red Army officers put the local population in the Volga region under enormous pressure to produce food, supplies and soldiers. Armed detachments fanned out to expropriate grain to feed the army, and to conscript eligible young men to fight in the army. Whenever these armed detachments came into a village, resistance to their demands, were met with a mostly unsupervised campaign of threats, abuses, torture, execution, and rape. This, of course, infuriated the local population. On March 3rd, 1919, a squad of red soldiers tried to requisition more grain than was even stipulated in their orders from a small town in the province of Samara. The enraged population mobbed the soldiers, disarmed them and deposed the local communist representatives. When additional soldiers were sent in to bring these peasants to heel, they promptly mutinied and shot their own officers rather than attack the peasants, because they were mostly conscripted peasants themselves, and they were entirely sympathetic to the angry people. From this initial spark, flames of popular revolt fanned out across the Volga basin, and this all became known as the Chapin rebellion. After the sheepskin winter coats worn by the local peasants. Their collective demands were simple. They wanted an end to forced food requisitioning. Forced conscription and abuses by communist commissars issuing authoritarian directives. Far from opposing the Soviet regime, they actually sought to restore the kind of free elections to the local Soviets that had prevailed in 1917, but which had been steadily eroded and co opted by the centralizing instincts of the communists throughout 1918. In many cases the rallying cry was Soviets without communists. After a week and a half of spontaneously spreading insurrections, a huge portion of the Volga around Samara and simbirsk were in a state of acute anti communist insurrection. And this was just, as admiral kolchak's white armies were launching their attack, aimed at precisely this location. The spring offensive of the white armies under kolchak was not a little thing. Their military forces in Siberia had grown to number some 100,000 men by the spring of 1919. And that sounds like a lot and it was, but they were also spread out over thousands of miles of territory. And as with the Red Army, their numbers were enlarged by forced conscription, which does not always produce the most reliable committed soldiers. But still in March 1919, they were a formidable army, especially because the British were dumping insane amounts of munitions at Vladivostok and then shipping it along the trans Siberian railroad. In the first 6 months of 1919, the British sent cold chuck's forces, 1 million rifles, 15,000 machine guns, 700 field guns, 800 million rounds of ammunition, plus clothing and equipment for 500,000 men..

admiral kolchak Red Army Ural Mountains Siberia army Samara Volga basin Volga simbirsk kolchak Vladivostok chuck
"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

Revolutions

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on Revolutions

"Brought Nicholas back to Moscow. It might spark an uncontrollable lynch mob. It might spark an uncontrollable uprising to set him free. Well, maybe not. But without any real pressure to come up with a final plan, the people's commissars procrastinated, and they set the decision aside for another day. The pressure to come up with a final plan ultimately started building from local circumstances east of the Ural Mountains. In February, a Congress of Soviets from the Ural region convened in the major industrial city of yekaterinburg, which elected a Bolshevik dominated executive committee. The Ural Bolsheviks tended to be more hard line and radical than their comrades in Moscow, and they were also more immediately annoyed that bloody Nicholas and his family were allowed to just hang out in their backyard like nothing had ever happened. They started petitioning Moscow to transfer the romanovs to yekaterinburg, where they would be held in the kind of real prison they deserved. This was a matter of some delicacy for the central committee back in Moscow, because they were aware many of their comrades in the urals were itching to answer the question of what to do about the romanovs with a few well placed bullets. The central committee of the party in Moscow wasn't sure that's what they wanted to happen, but they also didn't want to cause any schisms with the Ural Bolsheviks nor provoke them into doing something they'd all later regret. Pressure mounted further when red guard detachments finally arrived in tobolsk in late March. The problem being that the red guards were not on the same page. One group of about 250 were sent from yekaterinburg, while another 400 arrived representing the rival city of omsk. Neither detachment was particularly disciplined nor were they interested in subordinating themselves to the other's authority. Meanwhile, the guard units at the governor's palace were getting awfully restless because their wages hadn't been paid for an obnoxiously long time. With reports about all this in hand, Moscow finally appointed a guy called vasili Kafka, to go take command of the whole situation..

Moscow Ural Bolsheviks Nicholas yekaterinburg Ural Mountains Ural central committee of the party tobolsk Congress red guard omsk vasili Kafka
"ural" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"Still today, Jack. All right, okay, okay. Hold on. Now you know DreamWorks got a new movie coming out called the prince of Egypt. A white man. Who made the movie Stargate? That dehumanized the builders of the pyramid. Yeah, they did it. All right. Gorillas in The Miz out of Africa. Cecil B. DeMille's the mason of Hollywood, who did the ten commandments. Feral Ural Brennan. Moses Charleston. If Cecil B. DeMille didn't get the story wrong, you think that thing would be on every Easter? That's right. It did fit like birth of a nation. And the book is how the Jews invented Hollywood. As the name of the book, how they invented Hollywood. Now, if some things about the industry that I need you to understand and I'm actually so glad that he helped bring all of you to me. Now, we're going to take a break here and we're going to play more from mister coakley's opening statement, but I think you get some idea of what I'm talking about. The other times right up also mentioned that during the Q&A, one of the persons there was an actress named Anne Marie Johnson. She jumped up by the way during a Q&A and she said that she was a living testament of racism in Hollywood. We're going to have that exchange for you later on. By the way, it turns out that Amari Johnson is married to a white man, and I mentioned this to my mom after the debate. And I told my mom that she jumped up and she yelled at me and screamed at me and I told her that she was married to a white man. My mother said, I bet she didn't bring him. She didn't. She hadn't. Triple H 1901 F AGE on Larry elder..

Cecil B. DeMille Hollywood Feral Ural Brennan Moses Charleston DreamWorks mister coakley Egypt Anne Marie Johnson Jack Africa Amari Johnson Larry elder
"ural" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"ural" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein at three sites in the eastern U West. Today, recollections resurfaced grief and reminders of those lost in the terrorist attacks of September 11th 20 years ago. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin paid tribute at the Pentagon, stressing remembrance is crucial to the endurance of the nation's ideals. As a year's march on we must ensure that all our fellow Americans know and understand what happened here. On 9 11. And in Manhattan. And in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It is our responsibility to remember. And it is our duty to defend democracy. Commemorations were held this morning in Shanksville, where a hijacked airliner crashed. NPR's Scott Detroit, Oh was their former president George W. Bush and Vice President Kamala Harris. Both spoke at the ceremony in Shanksville. In different ways. They both talked about the unity in the immediate days after September, 11th and the unity shown on United Flight, 93 went 40 passengers and crew fought back against terrorists and likely saved the U. S Capitol, and they both contrasted it to the anger and division in the country today. After the ceremony was over, President Biden arrived in Shanksville. He laid a wreath at the marble wall, naming all 40 passengers and crew who were on the flight that day. NPR's Scott Detroit, president Biden was also in New York City for today's 9 11 observances, as were former presidents Obama and Clinton. Former president Trump did not attend. Biden is due at the Pentagon later today. The CDC is reporting another high daily tally of new coronavirus cases in the U. S. More than 100 and 67,000. New infections were confirmed in the last 24 hour period as we're more than 1800 deaths from Covid At the same time, Hospitalizations for Covid are surging across the Southern U. S, especially among Children. Blake Farmer of member station WPL N Reports from South Carolina hospitalizations are rising with new cases in South Carolina leading the nation, According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children's hospitals are receiving more covid patients than ever. Dr. Brandon Traxler, the state's public health director, is asking residents to take personal responsibility. The way that we protect our Children is for everyone who is 12 and older to get fully vaccinated immediately. Tracks are also says everyone should be wearing masks indoors, especially in schools. But South Carolina officials, as in most Southern states, have refused to issue school mask mandates, even though cases among kids are surging more than any other age group. For NPR news. I'm Blake Farmer in Charleston. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people and Ural and Pamela Mon, thanking the people who make public radio great every day. And also those who listen..

Barbara Klein Clinton Shanksville Manhattan New York City Charleston 40 passengers Pamela Mon NPR U. S. Brandon Traxler Centers for Disease Control an 12 Today South Carolina Blake Farmer Obama Ural CDC Southern U. S
My Top 3 Tools for New Businesses

The $100 MBA Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

My Top 3 Tools for New Businesses

"Starting a new business can be overwhelming. You don't we need. We don't need what you need now. What you need leader. That's why i wanted to create today's lesson with these three tools. You can get your business up and running you can actually cover a lot of ground. Run every aspect of your business when you're getting started with these three tools. Now the reason why. I only chose threes. Because you don't need everything at once this will get you off the ground. This will get you selling your products or services. This will get you started. It's important to get started to have momentum too many of us think about the next year when they just need to think about the next week. Get the ball rolling. You will have new challenges and you'll new tools but think about those when you need them right now. I need valley your business. You wanna make sure people actually by what you have so. Let's get going. My first tool that i recommend is actually not a tool at all. Let me explain. I highly recommend anybody starting a business to buy a domain name. There's a lot of reasons for this and in fact this tool is a precursor all the other tools. All mentioned today Build upon this tool. Doumanian is what you think it is. It's the ural it's the name of your website. For example our domain is one zero zero. Mba dot net. That's my domain. You want to secure domain because this is a like securing your land securing your address for your business. You wanna take ownership of that domain and just as a side note. Known really owns a domain. You're actually like renting it because you have to renew your licence to it every single year every two years or whatever you choose but you gotta grab the name of your business in a domain. Now if you can't get the dot com. You can't get the don now. You can't find a domain. That has the name of your business. Try to guess close as possible different kinds of maybe options like shortening the name or adding something like. Try your business name. Were trying the beginning or app at the end. If it's an

Doumanian
EU Threatens U.K. With Tariffs as Northern Ireland Spat Escalates

Ask Me Another

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

EU Threatens U.K. With Tariffs as Northern Ireland Spat Escalates

"Auction On the sidelines followed more of than the summit, a month British of Prime online Minister Boris bidding, Johnson and the winner met will with his be French identified and German counterparts, in a couple of weeks along just ahead with of EU the flight, bloc leaders more on than the 7500 issues. people NPR's from 159 Eleanor Beardsley has more. countries The two registered sides are locked to bid in an on escalating that ride. diplomatic feud This over is Northern NPR Ireland, news. the only This part is of the UK 90.9 that has a land w border bur with an e U member. in sports. The Republic Blue Jay of Ireland. six Red Sox The zero EU is threatening in the sixth legal at action Fenway of Now, Britain continues our forecast to delay partly implementing cloudy new tonight checks alone on goods in the upper coming fifties. into Northern Mostly Ireland sunny from tomorrow the rest low of the eighties. UK Chance They're of required showers under on the terms Monday. of the breakup, Mostly cloudy but London mid seventies says the checks, impose sunshine a burden Tuesday on businesses Chance and of threaten showers, the hard Low eighties won peace. and President sunny and dry Biden Wednesday doesn't and want Thursday to get pulled Upper into seventies Brexit but is concerned It is about 68, its potential now threat in Boston to Northern at 66 Ireland's peace were accord. funded by you, our European listeners Commission and by the had Corporation Ursula Thunder for Public Line Broadcasting, tweeted after a meeting private Johnson corporation that Northern funded by Ireland the American peace people is paramount and and that both Ural sides and must Pamela implement Moment, what thanking was agreed upon. the people who Eleanor make public Beardsley. radio NPR great NEWS

Boris Bidding Eleanor Beardsley Ireland NPR Fenway Of Now EU Dry Biden UK Johnson Red Sox Britain European Listeners Commission Public Line Broadcasting Johnson Corporation London Boston Ural Pamela Eleanor Beardsley
"ural" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"ural" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Were told to follow the science. You were admonished that we needed equipped politicizing things and follow the science. But when There's selective application of standards that are applied to those who riot versus those who peacefully gather. That's not science. When the certainties of lockdowns masks and social distancing or declared yet those areas with the strictest measures. Still dealing with Worsening spread of the virus. You know you're absolutely correct. Scratch our heads and go. What the hell's going on? And then we haven't talked about What is doing to a generation of kids were public schools have been closed for almost a full year? Forcing teachers who are Willing to do it. To deal with the virtual construct. That leaves too many students behind. No. If we're supposed to follow the story hints What does the science say? About Rugrats and covert. The think tank. The foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity published the story. Article. Title, estimating the risk of death from covert 19 versus influence or pneumonia by age. This research article says that school age Children between five and 14 Listen closely. Have a one in 200,000 chance of dying of flu. One in 200. 200,000 won 200,000 Chance of knowing from flu. Do you think it is recovered? 19. School age Children between the ages of five and 14. Have a one in 1.1 million chance of dying of covert 19. Toddlers aged 12 months to four years. Are six times more likely to die of the flu. Another Corona virus. Mackenzie and company, one of the biggest consulting companies in the in the world. They did a study projected students gonna lose him. Overall average of 10 months of instructional learning. And who's that hurting the most? Minority students. They're suffering the greatest loss. Homicide. Childhood cancer, heart disease. Congenital anomalies far outpaced covert deaths. But science Keeps most of America's schoolchildren, a state of confusion. In an ever changing him structural environment. I've watched my grandkids do this. Watch my wife do this. You're in school. Somebody's got a runny nose. Oh, now you're gonna be quarantine. Well, did they have covert? Well, they had a running nose. We don't know whether to go with or not. In and out this and that And then teachers in Chicago. Demanding that they be vaccinated. But refusing to return to the classroom. Anything's really going on there. Of course. It's nothing more than politics, pure, unadulterated politics. Live in this crazy time. Just absolutely crazy time with all of this stuff that's going on. It's just It's not Parents have a hard enough time fighting the educational indoctrination that occurs in public schools. Hey. Class of third graders in Cupertino, California. They were forced to deconstruct the racial identities. And rank themselves according to their power and privilege. What What are we doing? Teaching kids? About power and privilege based upon something they have no control over whatsoever. Their race. Shouldn't we? Instead of me teaching kids and I I believe you don't have to teach kids this His intuitively know. But whether that playmate is African American, Asian American Mexican American White American. Whatever, hyphenated American, you want to be rug rats don't care about that. They play. And they don't look Skin color. They don't look a race. They don't look a power or privilege. Kids are kids. What they're doing in Cupertino. Is indoctrinating them to a society that says, which is what the Democrats want. We're all victims, and we all belong in some form little vertical. Whatever that little bucket is of verticals that Democrats have based upon not only a beautiful traits Within chosen things like conservative versus liberal. Or religious or nonreligious. Or even what denomination religion you might be apart. They're teaching everybody That somehow you must belong to a group and that your group somehow unless your typical white male That you're a victim. And that somebody else is exercising power and privilege over you. Shouldn't be teaching kids that Book titled This Book is anti racist. Teachers, students, Little white, says gender man who is able body Heterosexual, considered handsome and speaks English. Was more privileged than a black transgender woman. Talk about the principle of Intersectionality going off the rails. This is it. The book, says, quote. There are parts of us that hold some power and other parts that are oppressed even within a single person. How about we do this? How about we teach kids? How to read. That all right? That'll do math. However, you teach them the tenants of science. The idea that you put forth a hypothesis and you and you test that hypothesis and sometimes Your hypothesis is right. Sometimes the hypothesis is wrong. So you go back and you re adjust your hypothesis based upon the results of whatever experiment you threw up against that hypothesis. Critical thinking, scientific thinking, reason and logic. Don't get me wrong. It's nothing wrong with emotion. You need to have a balance of emotion and intelligence. We're not doing it. In Illinois, culturally culturally responsive, teaching and leading standards. It's just one of the attempt to turn students into the fact that community organizers for whatever leftist causes they have in that curriculum. It's been approved by the little State Board of Education. And I'm sure it's going to get past If it gets the green light. Teachers will be mandated to make self assessment regarding their racism. Sexism, homophobia, unearned privilege, Ural centrism, with the possibility of being required to attend white fragility training sessions that the committee characterizes as an effort to get teachers to move past their whiteness. Wow. It's just time to stop the insanity. Stop the insanity of the covert restrictions. Stop the insanity of indoctrination,.

Democrats Cupertino little State Board of Educatio Ural centrism heart disease Mackenzie pneumonia America California Illinois Chicago
Atlanta - Marietta councilwoman has coronavirus

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | 3 years ago

Atlanta - Marietta councilwoman has coronavirus

"One of the more than two dozen confirm coronavirus cases in Cobb county turns out to be a local government leader a published report says instead of being at last Wednesday's meeting Marietta city councilwoman Cheryl Richardson was in the emergency room a ten hour visit after feeling flu like symptoms that day a Thursday visit to our doctor led to a nasal swab and the Kobe nineteen diagnosis came back positive this week the illness also caused her to miss her father's Ural over the weekend

Cobb County Cheryl Richardson Marietta
Stock market updates

Bloomberg Surveillance

02:23 min | 3 years ago

Stock market updates

"Here I really want to mention here besides oil up almost two dollars and that locked arms going to go away at some point S. B. Y. was up five point seven percent the ETF on the market German yields are up fractionally as well I'm dollar dollar dollar this morning it is been a one way street a stronger dollar and ninety eight point two three six really but just right up against the dollar strength we saw yesterday yeah and hammered one oh seven twenty five in the Ural churning your one eleven fifteen set just below when I started speaking was it too long eight days ago David ward you start today I mean you've got like eight options within this historic moment I would simply go for the stocks that fall in the most and you you've got go right to the cruise lines as far as that goes because you're seeing quite the recovery in those shares carnivals up twenty three and a half percent and its rally from the lowest price since nineteen ninety six per minute Connable fell yesterday by thirty one percent as it's princess cruises unit halted voices for sixty days and then you look over its peers you see royal Caribbean up twenty five and a half percent in Norwegian up thirty five percent Norwegian has been the worst performing stocks in the S. and P. five hundred over the past month as for that index fell into bear market territory down more than twenty percent and then you look at the airlines you see American up eleven percent delta up fourteen percent you've got south west up nine and a half percent United up ten a half percent American may be the not most noteworthy because the carriers climbing from its lowest price since merging with U. S. Airways back in twenty thirteen and then you look at the companies that make planes and engines for the airlines and their rowing as well following up eleven and a half percent and that stock has been down this week by forty one percent biggest drop for any board APR nineteen eighty I did not know that did you say that one more time Boeing selling much was down forty one percent in the first four days of this week hi I mean real company and drawing down on their on their credit lines I guess we discovering the P. E. Willard they they got a P. E. problem here but the yield is five point three percent growing twenty one

S. B. Y. ETF Royal Caribbean U. S. Airways Boeing P. E. Willard David Ward Princess Cruises
Heating pipe bursts in Russian hotel, boiling water kills 5

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Heating pipe bursts in Russian hotel, boiling water kills 5

"The hotel of nine rooms is located in the basement of a residential building in the city near Russia's Ural Mountains authorities say all of the victims which includes a child was staying at the hotel and three of the injured have been hospitalized with burns given the deaths the Russian parliament will consider a ban on opening hotels all hospitals in the basement of residential buildings police have opened a probe into the tragedy I'm Charles to live this month

Russia Russian Parliament Charles Ural Mountains
Peter Frates, known for ice bucket challenge, laid to rest

WBZ Morning News

00:59 min | 3 years ago

Peter Frates, known for ice bucket challenge, laid to rest

"A final goodbye Brady's the former B. C. baseball star in Beverly native who helped raise over two hundred million dollars with one of the most epic campaigns of all time raising money for A. L. S. the ice bucket challenge join the people bring attention to live Gehrig's disease by taking the ALS ice bucket challenge to about a great cause and I want to get involved with the full you have twenty four hours to accept the ice bucket challenge and a glimpse of celebrities politicians millions of people across the globe taking part in the ice bucket challenge over the years meantime a funeral procession will begin this morning on the north shore and wind up on the campus of Boston College for his funeral service WBZ's Chris farmers in Chestnut Hill this morning Ural services will be held this morning at Boston College and say the glaciers of Loyola church the cathedral that greets all

Brady Gehrig Boston College Chestnut Hill B. C. Beverly Loyola Two Hundred Million Dollars Twenty Four Hours
What is SEO?

Talking Tech

06:07 min | 3 years ago

What is SEO?

"So do you guys all know what SEO is this is called search engine optimization bat when Google started a lot of people were tweaking their websites to make sure they'd be found on Google years later. It's more important than ever. Emily Brown is sitting with me. She is visiting from back in back in the Virginia area. She is the the mobile. No. No, no, no. The, the SEO editor, what is your title? Those are just small hats that I wear. I'm on the audience team. And we oversee our twenty four seven digital platforms. So all of our social platforms are homepage, our mobile apps, we do push alerts, and where the hats I wear though is a search engine optimization strategy for the newsroom's. Well, let's talk some SEO basics for second. Whether you're working newspaper, whether you have a website whether you have a WordPress blog. It's all the same. I think you have some basics that you want to run by Y. You get people. Start with the headline and go down from there. Okay. Well, the very most important thing is your page title, so that's different from a headline. That's what we say we write for robots. That's the number one thing that if we're talking about Google, you know, Google they're gonna crawl the page title. I have a lot of weight to that it should be very literal. You should have your keywords upfront. Forget being witty or cute or punny. You are literally writing, keyword loaded accuser loaded headline for lack of better words for a robot to know exactly what your story is about it so important. So this weekend target cash registers down for two hours. What's what's the page title? You gotta get target. I word. And then I would have had to look at Google trends, to see exactly, which phrases, people are searching for, but you want that target cash registers all the way at the all the way at the front, not back. You know lingering toward the end you want all the way at the front. And when you searching Google that is what? You're actually looking at us the page title. And then there's description under the page title. What's that description? Yeah. The meta description and that is a wonderful place to explain to your readers, what this article is really about. And at space to give a little bit more information you want to repeat your keywords there. It's okay. If those keywords are already mentioned in the page title, repeating them is going to show, Google that it's a very important part of your article, or your website, or whatever, is that you have to share. And if people are searching keywords, like target cash register anytime those keywords are repeated. They're going to be bolted in that search result page again, draws a readers I to that content. Okay. So page title. Number one. Number two, number two is your headline? It's a really close second to peach title. So the headline is, what appears on your page. It's a more reader focused field where your page all your writing for a robot your headline. You're writing for human. So that's where you can include more engaging language. You want to repeat your key word repeat, your key words, plural? But they don't have to be front loaded. They don't have to be the first three words, you want to write more engaging content that's going to get a reader to click. And that's those headlines show up on Google news and Google news. Definitely drives Google search. So, again, that's why it's such a close second Russo R that was targeted cash, which juice go down. Inoperable in our headline would be what variation of that. So you might end up starting with those keywords again, but you wanna make sure that I mean, the news industry in particular has changed where it's much more conversational headline, and that you're grabbing people's attention with your headline, while still being, of course, accurate to the story three after pitch title and headline. So that's. Way your meta description, which we just spoke about comes in. That's your sales copy, you know, you have a little bit more room. And in for a room to add information about the story, four number four, is your, you are L ending. So you wanna make sure that you've repeat keywords in your Ural and, you know, if I shared with you Jefferson, I just copy, and pasted, a Ural into an Email and Senate to you without any explanation, could you read that you are all ending and know what the story is about? And if the answer is yes, then that's a good one. Okay. For word procedures. I own a few have a WordPress, but they make you put in all to all tax, I think and all text text. And, and how important is not. That's it's very important. So that's another kind of four robots type of thing if you think of a photo caption, and maybe the, the photo caption. Is for humans the all texts field if you hover over it might be for the robots. So it's again, it's just making sure that are all using all these fields to make sure our information is both discoverable by the bots. You know, all those things crawling the pages and then engaging for humans once it is surfaced by the butts. Okay. And tax we don't do tax. I mean, we're not big on tags at USA day, but anybody who has a it would press blog or probably SCR squarespace. And wicks has to do a lot of tax. Are they still relevant? So it's interesting because Google had Google keywords, which we did tag everything, and then they gave it and they take away. So it wasn't important part of our strategy. And it was important part of Google's algorithm. And then they changed it up as they change things they do that. And they took. It away. So Emily Brown from USA days audience teams. Thank you for these tips. I think there's a really good

Google Emily Brown Virginia Editor USA Ural Senate Wicks Jefferson Two Hours
SEO  basics from USA TODAY

Talking Tech

05:20 min | 3 years ago

SEO basics from USA TODAY

"Do you guys all know what SEO is this is called search engine optimization bat when Google started a lot of people were tweaking their websites to make sure they'd be found on Google years later. It's more important than ever. Emily Brown is sitting with me. She is visiting from back in back in the Virginia area. She is the the mobile. No. No, no, no. The, the SEO editor, what is your title? Those are just small hats that I wear. I'm on the audience team. And we oversee our twenty four seven digital platforms. So all of our social platforms are homepage, our mobile apps, we do push alerts, and where the hats I wear though is a search engine optimization strategy for the newsroom's. Well, let's talk some SEO basics for second. Whether you're working newspaper, whether you have a website whether you have a WordPress blog. It's all the same. I think you have some basics that you want to run by Y. You get people. Start with the headline and go down from there. Okay. Well, the very most important thing is your page title, so that's different from a headline. That's what we say we write for robots. That's the number one thing that if we're talking about Google, you know, Google they're gonna crawl the page title. I have a lot of weight to that it should be very literal. You should have your keywords upfront. Forget being witty or cute or punny. You are literally writing, keyword loaded accuser loaded headline for lack of better words for a robot to know exactly what your story is about it so important. So this weekend target cash registers down for two hours. What's what's the page title? You gotta get target. I word. And then I would have had to look at Google trends, to see exactly, which phrases, people are searching for, but you want that target cash registers all the way at the all the way at the front, not back. You know lingering toward the end you want all the way at the front. And when you searching Google that is what? You're actually looking at us the page title. And then there's description under the page title. What's that description? Yeah. The meta description and that is a wonderful place to explain to your readers, what this article is really about. And at space to give a little bit more information you want to repeat your keywords there. It's okay. If those keywords are already mentioned in the page title, repeating them is going to show, Google that it's a very important part of your article, or your website, or whatever, is that you have to share. And if people are searching keywords, like target cash register anytime those keywords are repeated. They're going to be bolted in that search result page again, draws a readers I to that content. Okay. So page title. Number one. Number two, number two is your headline? It's a really close second to peach title. So the headline is, what appears on your page. It's a more reader focused field where your page all your writing for a robot your headline. You're writing for human. So that's where you can include more engaging language. You want to repeat your key word repeat, your key words, plural? But they don't have to be front loaded. They don't have to be the first three words, you want to write more engaging content that's going to get a reader to click. And that's those headlines show up on Google news and Google news. Definitely drives Google search. So, again, that's why it's such a close second Russo R that was targeted cash, which juice go down. Inoperable in our headline would be what variation of that. So you might end up starting with those keywords again, but you wanna make sure that I mean, the news industry in particular has changed where it's much more conversational headline, and that you're grabbing people's attention with your headline, while still being, of course, accurate to the story three after pitch title and headline. So that's. Way your meta description, which we just spoke about comes in. That's your sales copy, you know, you have a little bit more room. And in for a room to add information about the story, four number four, is your, you are L ending. So you wanna make sure that you've repeat keywords in your Ural and, you know, if I shared with you Jefferson, I just copy, and pasted, a Ural into an Email and Senate to you without any explanation, could you read that you are all ending and know what the story is about? And if the answer is yes, then that's a good one. Okay. For word procedures. I own a few have a WordPress, but they make you put in all to all tax, I think and all text text. And, and how important is not. That's it's very important. So that's another kind of four robots type of thing if you think of a photo caption, and maybe the, the photo caption. Is for humans the all texts field if you hover over it might be for the robots. So it's again, it's just making sure that are all using all these fields to make sure our information is both discoverable by the bots. You know, all those things crawling the pages and then engaging for humans once it is surfaced by the

Google Emily Brown Virginia Editor Ural Senate Jefferson Two Hours
Ural unveils sidecar-equipped electric motorcycle

Your Weekly Tech Update

02:50 min | 4 years ago

Ural unveils sidecar-equipped electric motorcycle