19 Burst results for "Upton Sinclair"

The United States of McDonalds

Gastropod

12:45 min | 1 year ago

The United States of McDonalds

"For ME GROWING UP IN CHICAGO. McDonald's was always around. We had birthday parties at McDonald's because her apartment was on on the small size I went to McDonald's after work in high school and after school. It was the go-to meal when my mom Um and I were driving far distances and we needed something to eat and so I have probably spent most of my life inside of McDonald's so the fact that I wrote a book about McDonald's. McDonald's is actually not that surprising. This is Marsha chatwin. She's a professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University and her new book. The book about McDonalds. It's called franchise the Golden Arches in Black America and speaking of the Golden Arches. There's another new book out called drive through dreams. James A Journey through the heart of America's fast-food kingdom it's by journalist. Adam Chandler the Golden Arches are thought to be according to independent survey more recognizable as a symbol. Both then the Christian crosses around the world recognizable or no. I didn't imagine we'd ever focus an entire episode on McDonald's but here we are Dr Together. Adema Marsha Taylor story about McDonald's that is about much more than McDonald's making it perfect for gastropod and we of course our guest repod the podcast. That looks at food through the Lens of science in history. I'm Cynthia Graber and I'm Nikola twilly and this episode. We're getting to the bottom of how McDonald's took over America. The story starts with WHO invented the hamburger burkart. And how did it become so ubiquitous that it gets bigger from there this episode. We're asking his McDonald's basically America's national cuisine and if it is is what can it tell us about who we are as a country less. How did the tax payer ended up funding the spread of McDonald's in the inner cities and why we're civil rights groups on board? Well whatever idea you have of of. How huge fast food is you should double or triple in your mind because the statistics are bonkers? They're completely bananas us. Eighty percent of Americans eat fast food every month. Ninety six percent of them eat fast food every year which is more than the number of Americans that participate participate on the Internet atom. Says there's not a single place in America that eighty percent of Americans go to at least monthly not a library or Jim or any house of worship according according to the Centers for Disease Control which is not happy about this stat. More than a third of American children eat food every day and for the population as the whole. It's roughly the same thirty six percent of us. Eat it every single day out of all the fast food available to us in the US. The biggest I the most popular chain the one that serves literally one percent of the world's population every day of course it's McDonald's which according to somewhat recent stats sells seventy five burgers every second and Serbs sixty eight million people per day. There is no real way to get your head around numbers that large. But what's weird is that's is makes McDonald's the biggest almost everything everything. It does so marshalled as the McDonald's is even the largest distributorship toys in the world just because of happy meals. At how do they get that big to answer that we we have to go back to the beginning. It all starts about one hundred years ago with the invention of the hamburger. Well there is a lot of debate as is debate about anything culinary in this world about who invented invented any particular item there are many authors but a lot of historians culinary or otherwise. We'll give credit to Walt Anderson. And he was a fry cook in Wichita who one day in one of those kind of Isaac Newton Aha moments got really frustrated when he was cooking a meatball on a griddle and smashed it flat right with the SPATULA and the result was a burger that cooked through really quickly and he put them in these specialty buns. And that's sort of the most recognizable version of of the Burger that we have well Anderson's meatball. Smashing moment was a breakthrough. He went onto lunch white castle. And that what is believed to be the very first fast food chain in the nineteen teens and twenties. There weren't fast food chains. Americans lived in a very different world less connected less cosmopolitan. I'm a politician. Even as late as nineteen twenty five only half of all the homes in the United States had `electricity even fewer had indoor plumbing. People weren't used to dining finding out regularly. Generally speaking there wasn't a unified culinary culture. There wasn't one item. We had ethnic enclaves that had their own specific blends of items that that were cherished and part of a tradition but in the nineteen twenties America was starting to change. The model t was becoming more affordable and the number of people who owned cars more than quadrupled. Adam told us that nineteen twenty was the first year that more Americans lived in cities the not the US was starting to become urban. The First World War was the first mechanized war and the nineteen twenties. He's was the machine. Age Technology promise to streamline and modernize every aspect of American life the nineteen twenties was also. The beginning of radio's Golden Age and more and more people started to tune into music and mystery and comedy shows. Radio started to create a national culture at the end of World War One reserved this unifying aspect to American elect. Technology was bringing about and the hamburger was part of that was part of finding a national diet. The hamburger did have one hurdle to overcome Americans. At the time. I'm was scared of ground meat. They were scared of it. Because they'd all read the jungle by Upton Sinclair and they were nervous about the quality of the food. The jungle was a really important book from the Early Nineteen Twenties. We talked about it in our episode. On the history of preservatives. It told the tale of a semi-fictional worker in a Chicago. Slaughterhouse and the nightmarish conditions there for both the workers and the resulting meat while Anderson than meat ball smashing genius behind the hamburger. He was fully aware that Americans thought ground meat was likely full of dirt and and dead rats and even workers fingers so what he did was he designed these stores that all look the same. They had stainless steel interiors white tiles and they look like castles and white castle was meant to kind of convey this stately safe grandeur of a place where you could go and it would be the same everywhere you went so it was meant to reassure consumers. Who didn't really know what was safe to eat? And that really set the tone for what would come in the future of these industries of franchising of seeing something wherever you are in saying. Oh I knew it. I'm going to get here. This is familiar to me. White Castle was the first to open in franchise fast food restaurants. But it isn't the biggest today as you all know. That title goes to McDonald's. McDonald's brothers were these two men from New Hampshire sure who had kind of seen the extremes of the great depression and they headed out to California to see where they could strike business. Gold Dick and Mac McDonald headed West in nineteen thirty. They were in their twenties and their thought was. Maybe they can make it big in the movies. That didn't find as much success as they'd hoped they were two sons of a shoe factory foreman and they found success more for in the business side of production the catering. They went from that into the restaurant business. They opened up a barbecue. Stand in nineteen forty and southern California and and it was one of the drivers of the era. That people are often familiar with car. hops in major at boots and a young guys cruising in in cars and people hanging out and just kind of a big scene and they were successful. First restaurant was called McDonald's and it was in San Bernardino which is just east of La. It's meaningful that. McDonald's started in southern California because southern California was really where a lot of changes that overtook. America were happening kind of on on steroids by the early nineteen forties. The Great Depression was finally over. San Bernardino is shifting from being farming town to more of a manufacturing and service industries industry center people were moving their into the growing city and suburbs and increasingly. They had a little disposable income but also San Bernardino was on route sixty six and so it was a place where a lot of people were traveling throughout California as well through as the rest of the country. So Dick and Mac McDonald. Were doing pretty well for themselves. But but then after eight years in the restaurant business. They surprised everyone by deciding to close their popular successful restaurant and entirely revamp it. The re diagram to what the kitchen would look like they use this assembly line model that White Castle and kind of employed and they cut the menu items from twenty five to nine. They also fired all all of the young women who are car hops because they felt like they were flirty and they would distract from the work that was happening there. They also wanted to pivot away from being a teen hangout to family friendly place. They got rid of silverware because people would steal it or break it and they went to wrapping Burgers in paper and they wanted to create the most efficient kitchen possible in order to serve as many people as possible. And so the revision of the McDonald's drive in is what we are living with today a highly automated mechanized kitchen and that is able to produce high volumes of food and a very short period of time. What they did was they basically just souped up the kitchen and turned it into a factory? An assembly line dusted with Hollywood magic. And the result was they could serve food for cheap even cheaper than their previous menu items had been. I didn't know what to make of it but it caught on very quickly. This new McDonald's factory style restaurant didn't just catch on with eaters. It became a total phenomenon. Within the restaurant industry. Eight people were coming from all over the country to kind of hear and see what was going on because there were these whispers in the industry about this place that was so popular and and you know there were long lines and people were talking about this place. That was not just serving a lot of people but serving a lot of people quickly so eventually the founders of Burger King Taco bell a couple of other chains that didn't quite make it ultimately stopped by and they copied with McDonald brothers. Were doing as Z.. Listeners know some of those copycats are still around today. One of the businessmen who came to see it was none other than Ray KROC. He was a salesman and he sold the mixing machines machines for milkshakes and the McDonald Brothers had bought a shockingly large quantity of these machines so great thought he'd go and see what they were doing with them. Ray had been in nearly every kind end of commercial kitchen available. At the time. He'd played jazz at speakeasy. During prohibition he'd sold kitchen and restaurant supplies around the country so he came to the McDonald's restaurant in San Bernardino we know and he saw the crowds and he was completely blown away by it and so immediately said this needs to be national. This needs to be everywhere. Ray convinced the brothers. Let him start working with them before long. He bought them out. And the tool that ray us to fulfil his dream of taking this model national and then global global was the franchise so franchising is this concept that a parent company provides all of the blueprints and the instructions and the recipes for a product or service and the Franchisee pays Hayes for the right to deliver that good or service to an audience. Ray KROC didn't invent this franchise model White Castle had already been using it and in fact many experts think that at the root of the idea goes back to the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages tax collectors did the work of the church and collected tithes and the kept some of the money for themselves at the start of the twentieth century. Rick Coca Cola had used the franchise model to make their sugary drink available at drugstores across America. But it was ray KROC who really took this franchise idea and ran with it. The franchise model. I think is amazing because it allows companies to pass on all of the liability to this other party so so that was sort of the way in which McDonald's grew really quickly and also took a lot of the risk out from opening places and this is the way they maintained control over franchisees so it was consistent. You didn't have rogue franchisees trying to sell Pepsi when you had a contract to sell coke and so it was a complicated system. But it's what turned McDonald's into the the biggest in the fastest growing fast food restaurant. The

Mcdonald Mac Mcdonald America Mcdonald Brothers San Bernardino White Castle Ray Kroc United States Walt Anderson Early Nineteen Twenties Chicago Adam Chandler California Golden Arches Mcdonalds Marsha Chatwin Georgetown University Professor Of History
When making medical decisions we often act irrationally

Second Opinion

03:40 min | 1 year ago

When making medical decisions we often act irrationally

"People don't often make decisions by acting as their rational balancer of risks and rewards. That is assumed by economists this Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion with regard to making medical decisions. We assume that doctors and patients are rational decision makers, will we are not and clinicians and patients often see the world very differently. Both are experts, the clinician an expert on their medical view. And the patient is an expert on themselves, and what they value most. If we were all rational and weighed the risks and the benefits similarly, we could have a computer calculate the very best choice for us based on our age earth, Mississippi, perhaps family history. However, as humans we are influenced by irrational, beliefs, and fears and asked experiences. Doctors have a strong confidence in themselves in the power of their medical. Training and in quasi science. This is particularly true for experts as opposed to generalists as Upton Sinclair, once wrote, it is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it in contrast patients have their own experiences, and they have their own values and preferences that alter their decision making both doctors and patients are often overly influenced by personal stories that they hear rather than looking at an integrated overview of lots of data across many people who all have the same problem, and it turns out that are more. Recent experiences say last week or last month are far more influential to us than distant experiences, perhaps, we simply remember them better. What recognizing when we are making predictable errors in judgment can prevent harms and dissatisfaction. Another example of our fallibility and making decisions is that people value choices differently when they have only two choices so say you have to decide between surgery or no surgery compared to multiple choices. You have the option of surgery one or surgery two or no surgery cognitive. Scientists tell us that when we are faced with multiple attractive choices for something we are more likely to delay making a decision than if we have only two choices as an example, you're driving home from work, and you're going to stop and pick up some groceries on the way a friend calls and invites you to a concert. Well, do you go to the concert, or the store, most people, it turns out, would go to the concert, but let's say the stories the same, but now on your way home, one friend calls and invites you to a concert and another calls and invites you to a movie. Now you have three options the conflict now between multiple choices lead. Most people to go back to the original plan, and go to the store, the more options exist in life, and in medicine, the more likely a person is to choose the easiest plan in medicine. This has enormous implications. It turns out when there are greater number of alternatives say multiple surgery options, or multiple pills to treat, depression, or multiple antibiotics to treat an infection. The decision maker be a doctor or a patient will often choose an option that they would not have selected if you were options had been available. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion.

Dr Michael Wilks Upton Sinclair Mississippi
"upton sinclair" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on EconTalk

"Gave recently it starts with a quote from Upton Sinclair, and then you have another number of different applications of the Upton Sinclair, quote, it is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on not understanding it, then you're right is difficult to get polishes to understand something to get a politician understand something when his campaign contribution depends on understanding it and my foot note to that is that, you know, my my cynicism grew after the two thousand twelve election when Mitt Romney and Barack Obama both ETA chance to campaign along some of the lines. We've been talking about they could have spoken out against the current financial system. Mitt Romney spoke Mitt Romney could have done it. Because here's his chance to show. It wasn't just a rich plutocrats. He actually had was going to say something. That hurt his rich friends. Obama was coming from the left could say because he was going to be representing the little guy and that would have been great in either. One of them said word word issue in that campaign for that election. Very well because I was I was writing the book at the time, and you know, it actually interesting I was following who would ever say a word not in the debate. Not anytime did it come up at all should have been the single biggest issue of the campaign in my wrote a book right around that time screaming about this literally came the she loves Sheila bears came right before the election. There was a book by Nita barrow escape the way, the bailouts went and an an Amish corruption that was in the way that tarp was was managed, and and and if you other other books of that sort, and, of course, our hours trying to scream, you know, a bunch of cadets, and they economics there were twenty economics across the board. The did sign a petition that you know, that we sent to the financial times. Which by the way, it was moved in this into the letter section. The next quote, you we're gonna ask what you're going to read was about the media and their incentives difficult to get a journalist to understand something when his excess than his depends on ads, they you know, there's a whole layer of incentives there in our letter was pushed into the letter section and the next day that was a really stupid Ed by Pandit from city saying the same nonsense that we debugged on the on the more minor pages of day before. But anyway, would it was going to say was that at the time in two thousand twelve interestingly, the only one who said something about the big banks and how unhealthy they are in how they would have to be something done about them was actually pulsing saying that if Romney is elected have unmanaged about the big this Elliott, you know, vulture, you know, find the hedge hedge fund guy saying, and he was one of the only people who really spoke in two thousand sixteen that was in the Democratic Party more talk of that. Because you had the. Anger bobbling into into. You know, Bernie Sanders, and they lose it was on. And all that. But and Trump was speaking about it to only to you know, to totally fill his cabinet with with the same people. So, you know, my joke is is that the Republicans Democrats are the same. They both like to give money their friends that just have different friends, but they do have one friend in common, which is the financial sector. So they both sides. And it's bipartisan fraternity too. So, you know, you have a situation in which Senator Sherrod Brown who among was among the best on this teamed up within no longer, you know, Senator David Vetter of any had Brown Vidar propose to end too big to fail in which before it actually said anything to do ninety nine senators unanimously decided in around two thousand thirteen fourteen to end 'too-big-to-fail and end the subsidies of too big to fail, they unanimous. And then and then on inventor had a proposal to have fifteen percent with you for the banks, and it never got discussed bipartisan from you know, democrat and very right wing Republican, and they could agree on that. So my question is I want to re restate your your when riff on your quote? It is difficult to get an economist understand something when his what depends on it. Not understanding it his. His shot. Salted is a consulting. It's some of that. Yes. I can tell you that after the original I sent three organized three multi signatory, you know, around twenty kme IX letters.

Mitt Romney Barack Obama Upton Sinclair Senator Sherrod Brown Democrats Nita barrow Bernie Sanders Senator David Vetter Sheila Democratic Party Pandit Trump Elliott Brown Vidar fifteen percent
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Anytime we can put things in terms of big. Cat attacks that always just seems to really help. Explain a topic. You should know. I'm picturing not a real tiger. But Tony the tiger. Tony the tiger mauling and killing people. All right. That works for me. Okay. So here's the question. If this hypothesis is correct. Why would it be the case that political charging issues would make us unable to use our normal reasoning faculties? Well, first of all, I mean think about the Upton Sinclair, quote, it's difficult to make a person understands something when their salary depends on it here. We're not talking about a salary, but about something else of immense, psychic and material value, and that is your membership status and standing within a social group that is in part defined by its commitment to certain moral and political values. I think that's very much like salary. I mean salaries money money is life money is happiness. I mean, we say it's not, but it is. And then and then, but, but it is the thing that allows us to eat and live in be in most circumstances, certainly. In the world that we've we've we've made and remade for ourselves. And likewise in a more primal since belonging to a grouping part of a group that is that is survival for for the homo sapiens, yet is that is how we have historically in pre historically manage to live. It's psychically necessary to us. It's necessary for us to have good mental end. In fact, I think in some ways good physical health to be a member in good standing of a social group a social network, but if you want to go into our, you know, our our evolutionary history, it is literally materially necessary to be accepted as a member of the group. Fear driven out of your hunter gatherer tribe that things are not looking good for you. You're just waiting to fall into a tiger thicket at that point. Right. And so if all your friends and allies believe one way about any politically charged issue climate, change or gun control, or whatever. And you put yourself at huge personal risk by advocating a position that that group disagree. As with you could be alienated from your social group. You could lose connections that you.

Tony Upton Sinclair
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"They come out to tell you that the scientists are wrong. But anyway, given evidence that has emerged in recent years. I think maybe later on episode. We should come back and try to do an updated version of this Upton Sinclair, quote, because I think that the scope of this quote is actually to limited but just focusing on the salaries, so so we'll come. Back to this. But today, we're going to be talking about a form of motivated reasoning form of motivated reasoning called motivated numeracy. And specifically how that relates to the idea of identity, protective cognition, and this is come up on the show before we talked about it in an episode while back called science communication breakdown. I think that was like a year and a half ago or so I believe so. Yeah. But it was based on when you had gone to the world science festival and seen talk that included the work of the Yale psychologist, Dan Kahan. Who is he does a lot of really interesting research about biases and motivated reasoning and the ways in which our brains failed to be rational in one way, sometimes by being sort of subversively rational in another way. Yeah. Isn't it? Interesting. How we sometimes as seem to outsmart ourselves these matters. Yeah. So I want to start by thinking about two different kinds of disagreements that come up when people talk about politics. Obviously, lots of different ways. People can disagree about politics here, two different kinds of currently politically, relevant statements. One is somebody who says the government shouldn't have a right to tax my income. Right. You might talk to a libertarian who says. And then here's a different politically relevant statement human activity is the primary driver of global climate change. Now people have political arguments over statements like both of these to all the time. But these are not at all the same kind of statement one big difference is that the first statement is a statement about values like you can't do a bunch of empirical experiments to determine if it's correct or not that the government should be allowed to tax people. That's just a question about what you believe should be the case, what about values and priorities and about the priorities of the person making the statement. Right. It's it's a it's a commentary on how you think or how one group thinks politics should work or how government should work rather? And we shouldn't be confused by the idea of political science political science, though, a serious field is a different matter compared to the natural sciences. Well, it's certainly true that with questions about like whether. Not you should tax income. You can approach that question from the point of optimizing for certain goals like you specify goal, and you compare different methods of achieving that goal then you can do that. But like absent all of that kind of framework. That's just a statement about values on the other hand that you've got the human activity is the primary driver of global climate change that statement is not like that. There simply is a fact of the matter either human activity is the primary cause of global climate change or it, isn't and you can do empirical experiments to test this hypothesis. And of course, the answer is. Yes, we now know that it is the primary driver of global climate change with like a, you know, ninety something percent certainty, we really really strongly. No, this this is undoubtedly the scientific consensus, even though this question is politically controversial, it's not scientifically controversial. And if you doubt, this you actually have the ability to go look up the evidence yourself, especially that's one thing that the internet is great for you can go read the most. Recent IPC report, you can read the thousands of individuals studies you can look at the data and read the climate. Scientists own words about how their conclusions drawn from the data of their experiments, and if you actually do that, I think any reasonable person should be able to conclude, of course, human activities the primary cause of climate change. And yet that's not what happens is it questions. Like this remain politically controversial with people often judging the answer in a way that aligns with their political identity. Now speaking politics, I just wanna throw a quick fact Lloyd here about the episode we were recording this on election day, it will be published after election day. So yeah. So we don't know what the outcome's gonna be. Yeah. So so none of this..

Dan Kahan Upton Sinclair Lloyd
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"We ever gonna clean the bathrooms in the park? No, absolutely. Not. Oh, that's okay. That's his wife's desk for shirt works at the place at the Clinton with her. Okay. That's complicate the kid who's also babysitter. Honi when I say Upton Sinclair. Oh, there's the kid, the kid. That's the kid that get slapped. Okay. That little bastard. Listen, I don't want to conclusions, but it feels like that kid deserves does right off the bat. I read. Here's guy for news room, terrible show. Forget it. That was a pretty. His sister kisser sister on the neck. What the fuck. Losing her soul. It's my brother the next time I see him kiss him on the nape of the neck pro. Just look at each other because they don't like the mom. But after all. With foreign accent, probably push food on people. What. Talion. Scary. We gave you the painting, uh, Christmas. Close. We not. Some sort of like eastern euro. Yeah, sister. I the pig, which was a so much better than the Greeks. She's jewish. She said that Jews are better than the Greeks at the. Say they're better. So I think she's Jewish. Oh yeah, buying it. And that's user saying critique of the food, Brian Cox, hell you. He must be the narrator maybe to grab the narrative. Clinton. I said there'd be a lot of food food, foreign mother in America. They're making a ton of food always do. Key. Imagine going from training Braveheart to this role. Remember my hair when twice overnight. Shit, awful accident. Aren't.

Clinton Brian Cox Upton Sinclair Braveheart America
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"We ever gonna clean the bathrooms in the park? No, absolutely. Not. Oh, that's okay. That's his wife's desk for shirt works at the place at the Clinton with her. Okay. That's complicate the kid who's also babysitter. Honi when I say Upton Sinclair. Oh, there's the kid, the kid. That's the kid that get slapped. Okay. That little bastard. Listen, I don't want to conclusions, but it feels like that kid deserves does right off the bat. I read. Here's guy for news room, terrible show. Forget it. That was a pretty. His sister kisser sister on the neck. What the fuck. Losing her soul. It's my brother the next time I see him kiss him on the nape of the neck pro. Just look at each other because they don't like the mom. But after all. With foreign accent, probably push food on people. What. Talion. Scary. We gave you the painting, uh, Christmas. Close. We not. Some sort of like eastern euro. Yeah, sister. I the pig, which was a so much better than the Greeks. She's jewish. She said that Jews are better than the Greeks at the. Say they're better. So I think she's Jewish. Oh yeah, buying it. And that's user saying critique of the food, Brian Cox, hell you. He must be the narrator maybe to grab the narrative. Clinton. I said there'd be a lot of food food, foreign mother in America. They're making a ton of food always do. Key. Imagine going from training Braveheart to this role. Remember my hair when twice overnight. Shit, awful accident. Aren't.

Clinton Brian Cox Upton Sinclair Braveheart America
"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Librocube

The Librocube

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Librocube

"Geeky not nerdy i'm going kiki as closer circus keith that anything dude and we're sort of following him trying to make money for the reason that his mother got an a car accident and his sued and they'll basically lose everything they have unless they can pay back the person that they wronged in this automobile accident yeah the third of the main story focus of this this is a question i i wish i had like someone who had read every book i had read in i bounces idea for them but the you know what there's possibly crossover here upton sinclair his book called the jungle for some reason and it's hard to put my finger on exactly this book and that book remind me the have similarities where when as i was reading this and this really doesn't make sense almost if you've read both because definitely much more leaning towards a comedy whereas the jungle by upton sinclair is one of the most pressing books i've ever read in my life a read that when a couple of times actually so i don't know why i'm getting in up to an including and this is where it's sort of cemented for me the most is i really liked the beginning of this book and i realized like the beginning of the jungle but eventually both book sort of reach a point where the gets i don't wanna say impenetrable but instead i will say boring.

keith upton sinclair
"upton sinclair" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Many people although i'm going to party later that's going to be full of fiction writers we might be going to the same party later maybe i could see that so but nonetheless editing editing you in you're trying to solve our anthologies start out with an open call we just put the word out say we're looking for work that this is kind of what we're looking for broad strokes people send the material in look at what we get and then i strategically try to fill in holes i'm working on that right now with the next book that i'm working on which is another book about chicago that scheduled to come out next spring and this is one of those things where with the open call at least i got a ton of great submissions from the north side and very few from the south side so now i'm really trying to reach out to right on the south side and try to get representation from those communities as well because it's a neighborhood based book it's about writing about chicago neighborhoods anyway it's such a fine city i it's it's a big city though that's that's the hard thing about doing these books about chicago is that with belts we're based in cleveland we cover the we cover places like flinch youngstown akron cleveland detroit cities that are some of them are quite large but none of them are largest chicago and so when you do city based anthology in flint it's a somewhat more manageable project than doing a city and theology in chicago sure to cover seventy seven different neighborhoods and everything else right i still do wonder you know in particular the work you're doing it seems like you have to so purposefully challenged the the dominant narrative about place so often through other people's work my with the chicago book with belt chicago what i really wanted to do was to challenge the narrative like the classic macho narrative about chicago which is definitely been it's a lot of people are working against that narrative at this point but it's still one that's very very dominant especially once you get outside of the city once you get once you get to the coast and you get people or who are you know still think that chicago is all upton sinclair and circle who i love but.

chicago cleveland upton sinclair youngstown akron detroit
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"People supporting fifty thousand people's wellbeing and kids going to school and people employees at your company and a bunch of people's pensions and savings in the stock price and he can't shut the thing down do you think that if if zuck could shut the thing down he would or do you think for him the challenge of of of continuing to grow and being the biggest company on the planet is more important i'm really curious about his have you spoken to him since you started the the group i've not spoken to him personally since i started the group although he did take our our our whole concept of time wellspent make the new design goal for all of facebook but in doing so coopting it and not taking it seriously got it and have the people that you know that are close to him do they tell you i mean do they think that he is riddled with guilt around what this thing became or is it just like okay well this is just one of the things i have to deal with you know i think i think it's upton sinclair line which is that it's really hard to get people to question something that their salary depends on them not question him and i think that he's somewhere in between from every signal can tell everyone i know at facebook is really willing to engage in a conversation about how they can make things better and they're eager for feedback and they're really good people that are trying really hard because we're celebrating the people who are working late hours and trying to make sure fewer elections are manipulated but every change they're willing to make has to do with you know it's like the business model sitting over here in this corner and they're sort of standing in front of the business model the elephant in the room in saying what he wants to change outside of changing the core problem let me ask you questions so let's just pretend from minute that you soldier company to facebook years ago and you work your way up and you're you you realize all these things that you're telling me today and something happens is berg quits and goes to live in the woods or something or is run over by a bus and you're put in charge and it's right now.

zuck facebook upton sinclair berg
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Triangulation

"It was negative it was overpriced upton sinclair so you have you have some regulation you have entrepreneurs coming along the people who started whole foods you have consume is demanding better product products you have citizens articulating the import and it's not a perfect yeah it's not perfect and it never will be perfect but in a big but that's what needs to happen i in a bit so the examples the two industries which i think a really interesting compared to um the digital industries of the food industry and also the automotive industry same thing you talk about right in the fifth is safe at any speed in phillies american ada kok companies would completely dominant noted hud of honda rule volkswagen right belts exactly so they started being really arrogant they design bed essentially death traps coffins on wheels ralph natives book the unsafe at any speedy ninety 65 was a sensation anna fundamentally undermined the american dominance of the car industry and now we know where we're at an eye fair the same frankly with googling face no i think we're at a turning point i think this book and then he goes i mayor has said it's not just the spoke at a time to uh you know the germans in our region just because we a winning doesn't mean we will win we being americans the germans of very good at reengineering stuff the somebody else has created and they're reengineering search engines their reengineering social networks which a friendlier to consumers so i think we have to acknowledge them.

volkswagen anna honda googling
"upton sinclair" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

News Talk 710 KNUS

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on News Talk 710 KNUS

"I i think there is an answer to this and nick y we did a lot of research throughout the twentieth century for this book i i research people like upton sinclair and now he belie the chicago suntimes in these sort of bucket ema quakers progressive muckrakers lincoln stevens these these these you can you can you have an agenda and still do great reporting as long as you're showing stacks i mean i suppose the on the agenda to they really have is i believe that i believe strongman i've i'm a sort of first another extremist i believe that there should invest you can b a shield law for reporters that everyone in this country can be a journalist and i suppose that makes knee extreme but i i think you could have an agenda and still do great reporting amid often sinclair was all about everyone knows who he is he's the guy who exposed the chicago meat packing plants he what it was all about workers rights he he was almost a close a communist a he he was so vehemently for workers rights that have his book wasn't supposed to even be about to meet conditions gutu walrus in germany wasn't with a communist and he went undercover inch of the bild newspaper to expose how the leadership that newspaper was suppressing uh unionisation of the workers and that these these journalists are considered to be let you dare legendary undercover reporters even though they have the gender that was far far more to want extreme that line i think when it comes to donald trump i think the keyword is synergies there is a sort of synergy between what he stands for and what we a.

upton sinclair chicago germany donald trump
"upton sinclair" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on WJR 760

"Single source is disputed but what the media asks you to believe their narratives so along comes us and we go out to the sacred cows the sanctimonious beasts at the 4th the state this week we've gone after twitter undercover videos inside of twitter which is blown up all over the internet and no one in the media wants to cover that story why because the story is false no because our stories are true and the more true they get the worse it gets for the people in power who choose to retaliate against our journalists to this book american property is an unbelievable action packed adventure story following the triumph and tragedies of citizen journalists who seek to do the thing that that upton sinclair used to do that mike wallace used to do at the pool it's a prize winners at the washington post back did in the nineteen sixties and seventies but who no longer do because of various reasons and legal reasons and and obstacles so this book is a must read it took me a year to right and it's a really fascinating story about the way the media operates i'm through about a quarter of it that's that's all the time i had yesterday with my speed read i couldn't get any quicker with it but i i was just absolutely enthralled with it and and shook my head at at my own lack of realization that that i should have concluded a long time ago now because when people come and say they well you know they settle a law suit that just proves that they're they're not on the up and up at at project marathons because they set a lawsuit and and james points on his book he says yeah and right in the lawsuit says we've agreed to make the payment of a hundred thousand dollars we don't have to go through the expense of challenging the lawsuit was hefty lawyer fees by the way where all your stories about nbc and abc in the millions they paid out from their 40 stories well and our story wooden phoney it was an invasion of privacy with acorn we've you know where we filmed them you know at a public place in california but yeah i mean rolling stone had.

twitter upton sinclair mike wallace james nbc california washington abc invasion of privacy hundred thousand dollars
"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"At a rate of every second essentially hanging a bird and they're trying to double the line speed so the industry if if there is no oversight or there is no public scrutiny would continue to go down this path that obviously is bad for for animals but it's also bad for for consumers is as well and you know we're seeing more and more of these these agag type laws that are being proposed which which really seek to stop the type of work that upton sinclair did which led to the first two federal laws regulating slaughterhouses in our country and in a these agag laws which which essentially c a are intended to criminalise whistleblowing they they want to make it illegal to take a photograph or video inside of a factory farm they are intended to intimidate people from stepping forward and really pulling back the curtain and shelling people what where their food comes from and in a you see the meat industry in the dairy industry step forward and put their entire weight behind bills like this and then fight tooth and nail against regulations that would even require animals be able to turn around and their cages so it's really clear in aware the industry's focuses but these aca are are dangerous to democracy as well it's amazing to me that they withstand constitutional scrutiny like i don't understand other i feel as a lawyer like i feel like i need to educate myself a little bit more about this world because it just does not seem like it has a place in an open democracy tigre wreck these laws that are preventing consumers from understanding you know where their food is coming from is there anything more fundamentally you know needed.

upton sinclair
"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Inside of these operations see how people one really physically demanding work and then to as he said there's a motion all trauma that their suffering and i talk in the book bow perpetration induced traumatic stress which is a form of ptsd or you take people who are are put in positions of of jobs to carry out acts of violence that they normally wouldn't do and good consciousness and that's exactly what the jobs are at slaughterhouses you have people who come in take these jobs out of desperation are filled with compassion care about animals but within a day or a few days imagine what a what a month or a year would do um um a these these people half to phnom themselves half to disconnect have to not care about what they're doing in what's taking place in front of them and there is there is a study that looked up the sinclair effect this theory that upton sinclair put forward a hundred years ago when he noticed that there were rates of violent crime much higher around slaughterhouses than an and other areas and the the research shows that that is in fact a phenomenon and we have higher rates of violent crime with homicides in some cases being carried out in the same way that animals are or killed that people's throats being slit in that manner in communities where there slaughterhouses so animals are definitely the biggest victim in terms of of number and and and and and and and duration of suffering but they're not the only victims of these these industries and systems as well and to me it's it's a it's a simple.

ptsd upton sinclair hundred years
"upton sinclair" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Turn as prescott in there will be blood you mentioned that paul thomas anderson based his movie very loosely unon upton sinclair novel i would argue that had sinclair heard about a rat in a french kitchen that tidbit would have certainly made its way to his most famous work the jungle with its scathing indictment of health and safety violations in the food industry on a lighter note both movies have seen that involve a comfort food in there will be blood it was a milkshake and of course the titular vegetables of readytoeat bravo rose really going for some deep cuts they're joshua bertram in toronto says like there will be blood is about the cutthroat oil industry ready to ease about a similarly cutthroat industry the restaurant business we also heard from aerial row seen from watertown wisconsin readytouse protagonist was voiced by patten oswald who also had a bit part in the opening of paul thomas anderson's magnolia which of course came out in josh is number five in adams number three movie year 1999 clown just keeps getting better adam hoffer in memphis tennessee aside from there will be blood and readytoeat being released in the same year they also both explore the theme of capitalism where there will be led shows that at its utter worst in the ways it can be exploited rather to shows the good that comes from the personal incentive of working hard to achieve one's dreams but the annual claim view and are shown putting in the necessary effort to achieve success but playing view does it at the expense of others whereas remmy does it to the benefit of others another one here from donald in tallahassee florida adam i appreciate the accent work you may have only maintain the full french accent for fifty three percent of the time but hey that's about as much as janine garoppolo managed to so you did just fire you go why do you think that this well marcus hook cuisine is an antiquated hierarchy built upon rules by stupid old men not so says ronald in north providence rhode island is someone majoring in french i must side with josh on this by saying that you are accent barely registered especially when you pronounce the h in hotel it is silent but great effort nevertheless thank you so much ronald i probably would have done the.

providence rhode island french i florida tallahassee memphis adams patten oswald wisconsin watertown joshua bertram upton sinclair paul thomas anderson prescott ronald janine garoppolo donald remmy tennessee adam hoffer josh oil industry toronto food industry fifty three percent
"upton sinclair" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When when when you went to la the fifty six is your eyes would burn because of the when when the pollution of built up because we just did a programme recently though about how toxic sev shall we say not under the prisoners fish and under pruitt near all kinds of things we could go into the body pa that dyer disturbing too many but we've since we just at a program on it i'd like you to come in a there's an attempt to deregulate and directly to the point where there may be a lot more toxics out there for consumers to buy and not necessarily get past of litmus tests that are necessary the the fact the matter is we're we're not going to have a situation where suddenly you're going to buy your piece of meat and find out that it's tainted like 19 oh six and the when the upton sinclair wrote his book about to meet packers in those days not going to happen what what we're we're we're trying to get is a rules and regulations that to give safer products make the air cleaners we've done over the years but but also do it in a way that doesn't crush the economy the two are not contradictory one of the things and one of the things that i think we went off a little straight when we started realize we had a clean up the environment was the tendency to tell everyone how to do it instead of saying here are the goals here's what we want and five years or seven years you come up with a good way best way to do it instead of this topdown approach so the goal is when you get when where society becomes richer at wants a higher quality of life not just in terms of pay paycheck but in terms of of what they see the air they breathe we've so were the question is how you best do it without crushing the economy and the.

pruitt upton sinclair seven years five years
"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Our our woke up an inner to your my son ready for school and my wife was on the phone and she she said like a lot of people just got killed in vegas and of course and i think you know some i reaction was unfortunately familiar i mean that i think that's what bothers me the most about it i agree with you i mean it's almost as if were numbed to these things more as they come so frequently which i think is one of the most dangerous parts of us is is just the the idea that we can allow this to become part of american life but the thing about that is is that i feel like a lot of the a lot of the conversation right now rounded like when i look on social media and hear people talk about it though say well i guess were just okay with us now or i guess you know and people say well this new town happened in then we didn't do anything but the thing is the country is was ready to do something then in the country is ready to do something now but we the way we drug districts in this country the way gerrymandering works in the fact that primaries are more important in determining who gets elected than general election so often that's the thing that is at the heart of why were not doing anything on the issue it's not that the american people don't have an urgency to do something it's that you know which the over upton sinclair lying it's very difficult to get him and understand something is paid not understand i mean that's what i think is happening with this republican congress and i and i think it's important for us to recognize that the american people are ready to take action on this and the congress is just not listening because into to many districts their incentivize not to listen specifically on this incident in was vegas i mean this guy jerry rigged his semi automatic weapons to essentially make them oughta matic webs i mean these are weapons of war their net weapons for sport their weapons of war meant to inflict as many casualties and and kill as many people as possible in the shortest amount of time.

vegas social media congress jerry upton sinclair
"upton sinclair" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"upton sinclair" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"Can save costs on having stomach leads even though you're paying more for vile acts but you're gonna save costs in the long run because that person won't be rushed this somebody in a one out of one hundred people won't be rushed to the hospital with a stomach blay and it kinda leads into i'm not i'm not trying to talk about all the lawsuits i ha i have it gets more but one of his i represent unions health and welfare funds who are suing merck for the cost of the drug back because it didn't eliminate stomach leads via still causes stomach police it was better than on this the in the in the stomach area is better than aleve but it also cause heart attacks and nobody knew right mind would stop bullets which soi a a stomach upset stomach for heart attack and so many the union health and welfare funds which are already spending too much money for health care and every dollar that's coming out of a union members pockets going into a pharmaceutical companies pop pockets for the most part what their money back was they philippe in this led by the company i think that so i think that's very accurate we have companies that are are doing so much good and i think it's very difficult to compete with accompanied cry and do the right staff with the company that's cutting corners because they're all trying to show a prophet throughout trying to you pointed out chris they're all trying to tell wall street how much money were making at center well it takes a lot of money to put a drug on the market it takes a lot of money to promote this drug it takes a lot of money to do the research on this drug and then once you're there you have to start cashing in on it or that just loss so they're seeing norma's pressure on these companies these corporate heads we gotta get this out we et cetera you reminded me a south a really important upton sinclair wrote a book called the jungle he probably will have you heard of visit us at ultimately led to the passing of the food and drug administration act in turn around the turn of the.

pharmaceutical companies chris norma upton sinclair