24 Burst results for "Unscreened"

"unscreened" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"unscreened" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"When holding out for a hero started played. Bonnie tyler is raking in royalties anyways. The show on another level anytime loki and mobile are unscreened together. The pace of the show seems to be a lot quicker than the other marvel disney plus releases. I'm thoroughly enjoying it so far. And then he says if there's not a just a promo in this week's chocolate nerd. I'm gonna be pretty disappointed so fear not jose bar. I don't have a problem with. But i have this. You guys gonna play the original thirty second commercial for justice cola so some of you may remember this. This thing was around so briefly. That i don't remember it and it's basically it's too old guys. Sit he garden with botchy balls Just talking to each other. But you'll get the gist..

Bonnie tyler this week marvel thirty second commercial justice cola jose bar loki disney
"unscreened" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"unscreened" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It's free talk. Live six zero three. I'm not gonna bother to number at this point that you could. I know but. I don't want to risk taking unscreened calls. Even though there's no rest i know and even though it rebuilds instantly it's just not a habit i want to get into. I guess okay. But anyway i wanna say thank you to our see who is tonight's amplifier. This means he likes the show enough to give us all. We ask just by bucks per month. Thank you on the program absolutely. This is.

tonight bucks six three zero
"unscreened" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"unscreened" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"It's working and then I'll press the record button then I spend the next somewhere between five and fifteen minutes recording a video, looking at my iphone or my ipad I mean you're not looking at the screen and I will. I will find out that like thirty seconds or one minute in. It just stopped. For whatever reason. And I did all that work and I didn't capture it. So it's just you know that's the worst thing. A captured device can do is not capture so quick time does a good job of it, so if you open up quick time, there's a a movie mode and you can capture your Mac screen or your Iowa's device so I capture that with my fancy Mike and just save that raw video than I am port, the video screen, flow and work from there. So that that's the way I do I. O s I'll s is a pain in the neck because I have to manually add touches in anything you're going to do on the screen. in terms of you know affects from finger touches. You've got a at manual. Add to a lot of unscreened flow. I can also do it in final. Cut Off I. Need Okay. Has Kershaw. Support changed. Any of that does that can can you pass that through video? Yes, it does, and in fact with the photo skilled. God, I had to scrap a bunch of video that I recorded on IPAD and I went back and rerecord it once. Kursk his cursor supported, showed up kind of in the middle of me. Doing some of those videos because it's so great you know I mean the cursor little round circle. Looking at the videos in hindsight next time I'm. GonNa use some of the more accessibility features where you can like surround the cursor with a bright white line into. You can do some more stuff to make it more visible. Right so I learned that lesson. Another question that was in one of the form threads on this is how I do the titling. Historically I made them in keynote. I would I would create the titling Keno. And then I would run the KENO recording screen flow so record. The Keno slides into screen flow, and that would be my titles. Okay, super super time. It just took a lot of time. Share that. And if I then you'd finishing, you say you'd find a Typo or something. You'd have to go back and do it all over. So the way I do that now is I've made a slide an image that is the background in the now use the screen flow text tool to add text so I create the slide in screen flow, okay, and and add a bit of animation, but everything else. That's like construction on. On the courses are keynotes like if you look at the photos field guide, I did a whole video on types of image image files types. I did one on. You Know Best Practices for taking pictures. All that stuff were screened flow site slides on. It put together and magic move. Is your friend when you're making stuff like this? So it's a real smooth you know and then I would basically perform that presentation. While recording audio, and sometimes they have to go back and make an edit here or there, but largely I've I've Kinda got that figured out, so there will be some videos in any course and make that are a bunch of keynote presentations. I do it in my videos. Were if I have a lot of tax, if I'm reading from a quote or a press release, then I will do those in keynote and animate them in keynote, if I want some transitions, and then I will export it as a video and then dropped that whole video into final cuts is a really. NEAT way to sort of combine multiple applications did I. Ever Tell You met the guy who came up with the idea magic move? Did you give him because it's all high. Did I totally did? We were I was at wbz mushroom, supposed to say this or not, but one of the guys on I. I work I work anymore, but you know the there's a team. At apple that makes pages keynote and numbers, and he said Hey, you WanNa have lunch in the guy all the time times really nice guy and I'm like and I'm always looking forward to talking to them about what I like and dislike about the APP and and Katie and I had just recorded a show about. Pages keynote numbers. What's the status of apple is? This was two or three years ago? And then was that WABC text me says it's okay if I bring a couple of friends along I'm like yeah, that's cool. You know so I. Go to this lunch and like like it seems the whole team. Is there right all these guys? Like Hey. We listened to your show while we were you know we listened to your show. You and Katie said we wanted to talk to you more about it, and and we had you know how to record a podcast. You kind of forget what you said. and. This was like two or three weeks earlier. In a Mike. Oh did I say. It's like and And then they're asking, but they had really great questions like halfway through the lunch. I said you know whoever came up with match. Movies should double their salary and the guy like across from USA. Hey, that's me, you know. If, I had known I would have paid for your lunch out a paid for your beer I would pay for it all you know. but yeah, it's it's awesome, but anyway so magic move is your friend when you're doing stuff like this and you make really cool animations, and and you can drop those in. Some other tricks to to making these screen casts is the the the technique for recording. Them is just remember that you can make cuts anytime you want. If you run an animation or if you do something with the mouse, and you realize you don't like what you just said, the trick is that nothing on the screen moves you. Lift your hands off the keyboard and. And everything and then you restate it as many times as you need to get it right, and you can..

Katie unscreened flow apple Kursk Mike Iowa Kershaw USA. WABC
Be Water - The Life and Legacy of Bruce Lee

30 For 30 Podcasts

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Be Water - The Life and Legacy of Bruce Lee

"Welcome to Jalen Jacoby the after show just watched. Be Water. The story of Bruce Lee and we are joined by the director bow win bow. What a masterpiece! Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. Well I WANNA. Start this where the film started with test footage of a young bruce leak getting camera tested for Hollywood film. Why did you side to sort of cold open with that? I think this is like a version of Bruce Lee that we're not used to seeing these kind of like Ansi anxious, not his confidence self right away doesn't know what's going on. This is his first screen test for Hollywood that he's been a part of even though in his past life in Hong Kong, he was a child star. At the same time the footage shows justice charisma as as the screen tests continues. You can just see him about to what this guy's asked. Right, onscreen and so I think it showed all the different layers that I wanted to tell the story, of Bruce from kind of Bruce's insecure, having vulnerabilities to his rise in tow like being this bad ass. Martial artists and I think within just that screen tests. There's that many layers. As a huge Bruce Lee stand myself. I applaud the work you did with this. Because I remember in my childhood making the ghetto noon Chucks or wearing the Bruce Lee shoes as we call them. Go on to see two movies and stuff like that and really mimicking a lot of what he did. What was your goal when you decided you were going to make this documentary? For me. I came in later generation. I was four in ten years after enter. The dragon came out so I wasn't going to see them in the movie theaters with Mike Chinatown up in Harlem I was watching Bruce Lee on syndication on Saturday night television, and at the time I didn't know who he was really, but I just remember like as a little kid. I wasn't used to seeing faces that look like me unscreened right, and if I did see them, they were using negative. They were like a psychic or Like a servant or a villain sustaining someone like Bruce Lee with all his energy all his. ONSCREEN CHARISMA I was like that's the first time I see a hero that looks like me, and that's when I kind of knew the mythology of for sleep, but I didn't know who was person, and that's one of the reasons I made. The film is kind of unpack that mythology in figure out how bruce turned into Bruce Lee.

Bruce Lee Bruce Jalen Jacoby Director Hong Kong Hollywood Mike Chinatown Harlem
Adam Driver, 'Marriage Story'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:17 min | 2 years ago

Adam Driver, 'Marriage Story'

"I learned to be comfortable in it just because it was unfamiliar to me when we started force awakens and not so much in how we were working on it but the scale and size of it. I'd never works on the just getting used to rhythm of a set being so long before we you know there's so many special effects and so many people on set I was used to just smaller groups the people in small rooms with like borrowed costumes. So I mean that's been but just like a smaller smaller people around and suddenly the set in itself is a huge theater for like one hundred people. I took me a while to get used to that. The rhythm in what like the technical part of the you know the CGI th the effects into me a while to get used to but because it was jj and because it was Ryan working on it apart from our costumes being dramatically different than anything. I'd worked before they made it feel like small independent movies. And that I had a preconceived idea that you know you were going to lose those conversations about the humanity and sake of the spectacle of it but B I J J. You don't lose any of that. The first conversations that we have were about the humanity of that character. How do we make that person? Not Two dimensional but someone you can watch breathing unscreened and and so. We didn't in that sense. It didn't feel that that-that markedly different. Did you take anything anything of Kylo. Yeah all sorts of stuff. I have a whole costume. Yeah they know you took it. Yeah Yeah Okay so this is not really taking anything I have two helmets. Have Light Sabers. I have all sorts of stuff. I don't want to do with the costume because right now it's just in a a box but I'm trying to be weird to see you at home. Basically with all right. Here's everyone war museum to me this week. So great and we'll just have this together could do that. All right a sanctuary you've got to-do anybody who comes and visits knows that star wars in terms of you looking at you do you watch yourself no. You don't do it. No I've seen things things like I watch star wars Somehow once but apart from tied down and forced to look at yourself yeah yeah yeah me and no one. I are having a debate about marriage story. You know It's hard to to watch myself for for lots of different reasons. You know you just critical of yourself self. Well it's that and also to kind of really absorb what's happening. You KINDA gotTa Watch it like three or four times to to practice. Not You know not thinking about you doing it and watch it four times. You can't do that and also I feel it just leads you to trying to well not only being self conscious but I kinda like orchestrating it onset so I went on the unaware and being unaware of. We're a camera is or you. You know what you're doing or how you look. I think sometimes we don't have that in life so no you don't have it so I don't want to. I'm not so curious I'm trying to make it look better her. You know unless you kind of have to the thing kind of requires visual well over most of the time. If it's a movie you can do that on the stage you could play Pale tonight and knowing what's going on internally and not really necessarily seeing what the outside is who do you trust you trust your wife. is she a good critic of you did she say she's a great great critic. is she kind or just ruthless. No she's ruthless. In a way that is Is Thoughtful not. I just like you know you suck. Let's let's let's split up but like yeah that would be that would be. I can't stay married to you. Know She's just this she's honest about it as is really good at articulating The good and bad in a way that you I kind of need in life I want. I don't want people around me telling May I also don't want a lot of people telling me what's wrong with it so you try to pick like one or two people that you trust their opinion and they say oh. Yeah that thing so you. You have a problem with. I can see but it doesn't register or or the opposite the thing that you think. It's working truly sucks. Isn't it also almost as bad when when the to me. It's all deserve what's happening to you. I'm really happy for you. Know that it is and you should trust it but I think any actor is a little bit. You know suspicious of this constant praise or you're going to win the Oscar for this sort of like you were nominated for Black Klansman and you get into that race. Do you try. I keep that out of your head. You have totally. I know. It's I think it's really I've been lucky and having people around me who are I mean like you know I'm I'm around my wife my family. They're very quick to tell me all the mistakes that you make and I don't I don't give that much. It's all good. Good all when you do win the Oscar for this which I think you should you should say how did this come from. Nobody around me. Even thinks I'm I'm good in so anyway. Congratulations on all of this. And again we come to the end of the show as we did the last where when I asked you to sing just a little moment I was having a good time. I'm not a singer right. And then Dan people go to marriage story and watch him do like a Sun High Aria being alive. I sat there watching. That was the only time it took me out of the movie. The Bachelor told me he can't sing anything and he does. Maybe the toughest eleven o'clock number number as they call them in Broadway history. How did you steal yourself or that moment? How come you didn't say to Noah Baumbach I can't it was different when you're like you know sing? Sing Sing Jingle Bells as you as opposed to sing a jingle bells okay. Don't you remember the song he did sing for me. No twinkle twinkle little. So I'm just asking uh-huh from Monaco Mall Man. Come on look at this fearless actor. No no no character and that's easier place. I don't know how Kylo Ren be. Would he actually listen to the Henry. The fifth singing twinkle. Drink a little stuff. No Ma'am Damn. I can't do twinkle twinkle. I won't do a little bit of something different. That's their that's being alive quite yet. It's panic time now. All the the world of a song relates to travel but I I don't have to sing the whole. Aw on my bags are packed. I'm ready to go. This is terrible. I'm standing here outside your door. And that's it the way I You're not leaving. I hate to wake you up to say goodbye so kiss me and smile for me talk. Tell me that you wait for me. Holy go on. I'm leaving now doubt. I trust me when you see marriage story. You'll hear what he he could do. Aren't you now going with less Carranza and making a shooting stick. You can't touch it like a nightmare. It's a nightmare so so much fun on that set. Yeah no it's not follow. Thank you actually is credible Komo news ago but it's like opera so we're doing this just a man but I to me. You could get away

Oscar JJ Noah Baumbach Kylo Ryan Monaco Mall Man Kylo Ren Komo Bachelor DAN Black Klansman Henry
Will there be any true innovations at next week's Apple keynote?

The 3:59

06:35 min | 2 years ago

Will there be any true innovations at next week's Apple keynote?

"Do you think that apple's apparent lack of innovation will hurt sales. I think people that love iphone will make an excuse as to why it took so long for something like a simple unscreened fingerprint reader to come about yeah. I mean look. We've i think apples or if feeling the hurt already their sales have been in decline <hes> they've they stopped reporting how many units which is always a red flag revenue relatively stable because they keep checking the price and you know this this iphone wpro. I don't really have an idea what it's gonna be priced at by suspect. It'll cost even more than ever. If you remember the iphone ten s max was eleven hundred dollars dollars. This might go even higher. You know they could justify the fact that this is. The only model with three cameras got the nights glass black. You know which is relatively new and it's it's got a few things that you gotta tout as like yours the new iphone i had the latest iphone and brag about but generally at this point the apple relies on install its installed base as to say well. It's time for an upgrade those three or four years old. I don't wanna switch android because it's scary going to a new us so just by this new iphone yeah and it's important to remember that glad they make a ton of money off of the iphone. I look this up ahead of the show they made one point one hundred and nine billion dollars in the first six months the first two quarters of this past year so they're still doing incredibly well as far as business it has been declining and it's it's expected to decline again with the iphone eleven but they don't really have to innovate nearly as much and that was kind of your point is that people will buy that product act regardless and it's almost to their benefit not to drastically change it an offer people something hugely different yeah. That's that's why they're they're focusing on services. That's why we were expecting them to talk a bit more about things like apple arcade and apple t._v. plus. I i feel like that's really the big moneymaker for them. You know sell an extra subscription on or whatever get on that bandwagon. Get people hooked on something a little bit different apple music is a great example of that which brings up the question of whether they're going to announce some kind of bundle which is i think what people really want out there. If you're an apple guy give me you know i cloud. Give me apple music. Get me the new t._v. Plus at a reasonable price and and throw it all together and you know you have another compelling thing to well. You know stick in the apple. Universe greg on twitter says. I cannot wait to see what they come up with. I think for sure there will be a bump in storage to the one terabyte model and some other spec increases. I really hope more carriers support e simpson. There's some we don't talk about a lot isam. Yeah definitely that's something apple introduced a couple of years ago with the ipad. I've had many in the carriers. Were kind of scared about it. There are more more carries that are starting to support e. Sims which is a great thing like having to not the physically remove dan and go to a store and get another sam part is cares had been resistant to it because they didn't want folks to kind of freely switch between carriers but i think a lot of them are seeing seeing the writing on the wall and like the sims are basically feature that they seem like they're more secure and they're just it's just a better customer experience overall and it makes it less likely to have to spend a lot of money on the stores wars and everything i mean there. There's the idea of going to the store to buy something but i think more and more people moving away from that brick and mortar experience and making it easier for people that not have to go get storm. King asks any ideas what pro features apple might introduce the camera. The camera i think is it. I'm sure there'll be some software bits or maybe some app new applications through something that emphasizes the ability to create content as opposed to consume it but i don't know if you remember from last year they emphasize the camera for most most of the presentation and tricks you can do they always it's always like a big to do like a presentation is always like makes. It seem like it's so you know. It's like a big event ultimately. What was the big presentation from last year granted. That was an s. year but i won't unless there's a huge design change yod. The people aren't going to get terribly excited about this. When you talk about apple missing out on innovations i mean three lenses on the camera hammer. That's you know it's it's pretty big and at the end of the day apple does have the reputation pretty well warranted for having the best camera out there if not one of the best cameras so and people generally you know that's the thing that people care about on their phones is the camera performance so i think it makes a lot of sense for them to continue focusing on that and maybe they'll throw something really cool out there. I mean they. They're pretty good at that you with software some new camera feature that might be the most exciting part of the presentation yeah. I wouldn't be surprised if there'd be some if there isn't some sort of long demo where you know you can shoot video shoot high quality all the video edited on the fly basically have this kind of polish produce you know we've already got filmmakers shooting movies on iphones that this is the next logical step of them promoting that i've seen seen that they do that on the demos but i don't think regular users ever use those featured excellent those are those are really nice to present on a staged event where they're saying like hey look at this awesome skateboarding video that i shot how many of your users are actually using that kind of thing but it's the same case when you know samsung or l._g. These guys are all deposing these like insane demos and the highly slickly produced videos that come out of their phones. I don't think most people are using any of these features. I mean what you really want. Is something to screw up. Your crappy camera work sorry to make him right well. It'll do that to to make your meek. You not such a bad photography and people you know still have this issue of vacation. I have like one good picture out of the whole thing and if apple can somehow nail some sort of improvement feature or you know make it look more instagram ready. Whatever ever it is both boost the colors you know get rid of bad focus make you know night shots which is a continual issue with cameras. Look better than you know. That's that's kind of a win. Remember for one apple used to make phones and not just cameras. I feel attacked. I want actual phone feature improvements better wait wait wait. You better signal. You don't use the phone bryant. Don't don't kid you actually get on the phone someone on with your phone now. He's right <hes> storm king. Let's talk to storm king any a any any warrant on the rumors that iphones will have pen support. Oh pencil style southern pro might get a style of support. That would be fitting considering. It's kinda allies up the ipad pro branding and and its own pencil support so i wouldn't be surprised if that was another differentiating factor for the the eleven pro

Apple Twitter King Greg Samsung SAM DAN Eleven Hundred Dollars Nine Billion Dollars One Terabyte Two Quarters Four Years Six Months
"unscreened" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Hey, Elizabeth has born in nineteen ninety-five some right on the edge between the generations probably relate more to the boomers, I keep waiting for generations e to decide that they want to be rebels and go against the millennials by leaning conservative. You think I'm being too optimistic? I don't I think there are a lot of. Rations folks are looking at the millennials and they're saying, these people are woke scolds, they're annoying. They're irritating. We can't have conversations. They suggest that people that disagree with them are bad and evil and can't be talked to. And I think that, that is obviously not only wrong, but stupid, if I don't questions, it says haven with the John wick trilogy and his appearance at e-3. I've noticed a rise in his popularity is very popular for being wholesome in culture cultures. Well, why do you think this is what do you think of him? Thanks for all you do. Well, first of all, he's great and John wick because he's perfectly reads, it's just the perfect part for him. Perfect part perfect time in his life. It's terrific. I m noticing the popularity of Kiana REEs is largely related to the restoration of an idea of a movie star that existed in the nineteen thirties, forties fifties and sixties and that was that movie stars were protected from studios. See didn't know much about the personal life. What you saw them. He saw unscreened and then in their regular life. They're expected to act like just normal decent human beings. We didn't care all that much about we cared. But we didn't know much about their sex. Lives or about whether they were drug users or their family lives. The studio's really guarded, the image of their stars and the stars are what you saw on screen, which is why you would go see a Katherine Hepburn movie because Katherine Hepburn was a start anything about her other than what you saw on screen, and you saw some glamour shots in the paper, that's basically canneries. He acts like a nice guy publicly. You don't know much about him in his personal life. He doesn't make his personal life into a political issue. And then he goes, and makes movies that you like you want to restore the star system in Hollywood. This is actually what you need to do. It's very ironic. That so many members of Hollywood think that the way to create stars is to put them in the public eye at every available opportunity, and to make them as human beings, the issue you wanna create a star. It's the image that matters, not the actual human being behind the image. The way to wreck in image of a star is to turn the star into a human being is you wouldn't turn Coca Cola the brand into the group of people who work at Coca Cola because that's not what you're buying. You're buying the brand, it's very weird that, that Hollywood doesn't seem to understand.

Hollywood Coca Cola Katherine Hepburn John wick Kiana REEs Elizabeth unscreened
"unscreened" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"So I'm right on the edge between the generations. Although I probably relate more to the boomers. I keep waiting for generations e to decide that they want to be rebels and go against the millennials by leaning conservative. Do you think I'm being too after mystic? I don't I think there are a lot of generations. Folks are looking at the millennials and they're saying, these people are woke Skuld, they're annoying. They're irritating. We can't have conversations they suggest that people that disagree with them are bad and evil and can't be talked to. And I think that, that is obviously not only wrong but stupid a final question. David says haven with the John wick trilogy and his appearance at e-3. I've noticed a rise in canneries. His popularity is very popular for being wholesome in meeting culture as well. Why do you think this is what do you think of him? Thanks for all you do. Well, first of all, he's great and John wick because he's perfectly canneries. It's just the perfect part for him. Perfect part perfect time in his life. It's terrific. I am noticing the popularity of canneries is largely related to the restoration of an idea of a movie star that existed in the nineteen thirties, forties fifties and sixties and that was that movie stars were protected from studios. See didn't know much about the personal life. What you saw them. He saw unscreened and then in their regular life. They expected to act like just normal decent human beings. We didn't care all that much about that we care, but we didn't know much about their sex lives. About whether they were drug users, or their family lives, the studio's really guarded, the image of their stars and the stars what you saw on screen, which is why you would go see a Katherine Hepburn movie because Katherine Hepburn was a starting know anything about her other than what you saw on screen, and you saw some glamour shots in the paper, that's basically canneries. He actually nice guy publicly. You don't know much about him in his personal life. He doesn't make his personal life into a political issue. And then he goes, and makes movies that you like you want to restore the star system in Hollywood. This is actually what you need to do. It's very ironic. That so many members of Hollywood think that the way to create stars is to put them in the public eye at every available opportunity, and to make them as human beings, the issue you wanna create a star. It's the image that matters, not the actual human being behind the image, the, the way to wreck in image of a star star into a human being is you wouldn't turn Coca Cola the brand into the group of people who work at Coca Cola because that's not what you're buying. You're buying the brand it's very weird. That Hollywood doesn't seem.

John wick canneries Skuld Coca Cola Katherine Hepburn Hollywood David unscreened
"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

10:29 min | 2 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"To come this hour talking about five G. Yes, you can download HD movie and just a few seconds. But are there any health issues that you should be concerned about, I'll tell you, it was one of the lead story's on drudge report this past week? And I'm gonna give you the straight scoop, and I think you're gonna be surprised about it. And before we move on, I wanna talk to you little bit about what's also trending on Pinterest. I know so many you're hanging out there. It's a homemade cooking spray or what they're calling a bug repelling concoction. It's a natural sunscreen. Well, it's kind of a bad idea to new study could be putting you at risk. These do it yourself, sunscreens, apparently all over Pinterest with the primary ingredient being coconut oil, and a lot of them promised protection of fifty SPF. The problem is the study found that most didn't, and then simply because tests on coconut oil only show that they can go up to seven SPF, and that's far from fifty. So if you. See something on, Pinterest might be okay for lasagna recipes, but it's not really the best. When you go to do your own DIY and affects your health. My advice, just go buy some honest to goodness unscreened. That's one that you want that just about maybe thirty that's good. All right. So because Anders on vacation this week, we don't have brand new or not true. And I think I'm winning. Is that right? Or way ahead five is five to three right? You're ahead. Five to thrive to three. And I don't know does that you think that has anything to do with Andrew going on vacation. Well, I'm prepared to negotiate like upping the bed on his behalf. Don't do that. Okay. Get so upset. So you have to go, not just an airplane, but in an era batting plane. That's what it is gonna do. Loops and loops and loops. All right. So, but I understand, you know, whenever Mike and I do the consumer tech update folks, which we require that every every day. Is that Mike will sometimes we kind of sit there and chitchat now you're telling me about a scam that you saw some type of shoot em up game and process. I was on vacation a couple of weeks ago as a Monday, I was in a hurry. And so I have a windows ten machine, and I have to log in it's locked down in its window defender on it, and I actually have a couple of scams. I wanted to talk to you about this one, I logged in really quick. I had to print something, and I opened up the computer and I think it was Microsoft edged because I saw a Bing somewhere K, and there was a shoot em up game like a World War Two game or something going on there and I just closed it out. Did my thing just printed? I needed to print and then out the door on my way to my meeting. I was like, wait a minute. What was that? And should I be worried that my computer's compromised? What I think it was is that you were on some type of website that opened up a pop up window. Okay. Did have other windows open. I think five banking and it was trying to encourage you to play the game by the game get involved in the game. And so I would look at your security settings. And sometimes when there's an update to any type of rouser fuselage Cromer, have you can mess with the settings. Why would go into your privacy and security settings? They make sure that you're able all pop up windows. You open up a new tab. Maybe if you click on something, it all up in new Tampa, make sure that you get rid of all the window scam. Number two, I got an Email. I think I mean maybe she didn't even Senate. I don't know if her computer could be compromised, but I got an Email, and everybody seeing these, it's like a diet pill that's as seen on shark tank or good Morning, America and CNN. That is always legitimate Mike. After. Okay. You ready for scam? Number three. I was in there, not legitimate couple, my gosh. Okay. Make all kinds of money on these diet pills. So, so you're wondering if the pills are legit. Well, I you know, I looked at it, and I thought, well, this is kind of cool because as on short tank, and I remember seeing something like this on for good Morning America. That was a scam. And so I thought, okay, well, let me look at the episode, and I looked up the episode and on YouTube, and then it wasn't there. So then I figured well can always do. So next time you get an Email that promises. You like to lose fifty pounds and ten days, just no, that's not legitimate. Okay. But what you can do in your, you are interested in buying in particular product is that to make sure that you, always, Google search the name of the product with the name like review or scam? And you can also look it up and Better Business Bureau is there's a particular website. A lot of people don't know that it's BBC dot org is not just for brick and mortar stores, but also they cover website so you can always look things up there. Okay. So scam number three. You know, I love real estate. We've talked about it before on the air, I have small apartment complexes and I love real estate, real estate meetings. And read new realist- realestate newsletter. What you tried to turn me onto that real estate podcast. Don't you that guy? I couldn't stand him more than more than two men kind of a. Yeah. But I just felt like he was trying to sell me. He is. He said real estate guru, but he's got a lot of good advice. I think at any rate. One of the scams that's been coming up in the real estate newsletters in meetings lately, is called the wire transfer scam. And I know you know, about this go ahead and explain how it works and what to watch out for well, no, you tell me what, what happened to you. Or wouldn't you say well, is there's a whole, there's all kinds of different varieties. The one that I heard about at the meeting was a Friday afternoon. Don't do your wire transfers on Friday afternoons because you could not see anything until Monday and by that time your money could be long gone. And what happens is, if emails are compromised or your real estate agents Email is compromised like we've talked about, like a lot of people say, I don't care if my emails, there's nothing really important on there until you're buying a house, and then you're back and forth with your agent or whatever. And you're. Getting closer and closer to the by and on the day before the by somebody then captures your real estate agents Email or comes from a different Email, or it looks like a wire transfer number to this number and off you go, and money goes really have to double check, every single thing anytime, money's involved and everything. And you're absolutely right about Friday's. You don't want to do any major financial transactions on a Friday. As a matter of fact, a lot of financial scams will happen around Friday midnight, because most people are sleep. And then they have you think about the scammers have Saturday and Sunday and possibly part of Monday before anybody actually realizes that anything's wrong. It addition to these type of scabs that we just talked about, think about docu signs scams as well. Or you have to sign this document. See what's also happening, too, is that the scammers are actually getting smarter. So that instead of just sending a mass Email out. I mean we used to make fun of the Nigerians all the time. Right. With the four nineteen scale. But instead of sending a Massey mill out now, they're actually going to target you by saying, you know, you are in the market for buying real estate. Maybe that you've left a profile on Zillow or maybe like we talked about on Airbnb or, or Virgo wherever you're at. But the wire transfer scams are really, really prominent right now need to be careful that, that's why I always recommend that you have to computers, especially if you're going to be doing a lot of transfers and a lot of financial transactions, so you have actually to computers, one can be cheap Chromebook. And I think it's actually not a bad idea. But what you want isn't one computer, do all of your documents. So your finances, and things like that. And that what Racine is not tied to the internet, your other machine where you are doing money transfers and paying your bills, and credit cards and things like that, that one is tied to the internet. But what you do is you're separating that time between your Email and your Bank accounts because. This way, if you get a phishing Email, and then if you go to click on it, well, that's not going to be tied to your finances. So that's why you want always recommend that you have to computers, especially now Mike as you are becoming the real estate mogul. Right. Hope. So someday, they are is that you want to really make sure that you pay attention. No longer do you just point and click because you're in a hurry. I have a story about that. Scam is a guy in Texas. I was just listening the other day. What happened is he's a syndicator so he by big apartment complexes, and he had five point one million dollars for a down payment for an apartment complex did it on a Friday afternoon. Got the Email sent the five point one million in a transplant. Normally these things do not take very long 'til it's confirmed and it's there. He didn't get a confirmation one. Hour goes by two hours. Go by Friday afternoon. He's talking to the Bank president, they're panicking that they lost their money, the investors money finally. Five thirty on Friday afternoon. He gets a call from the Bank president, that the F B I actually stopped the transfer because they have an algorithm that looks for associations between like either terrorists or drug cartels and the name of the building. He was buying was the same name as a drug cartel exit co. In bad news. They found the money, but yeah, scared. One billion dollars. Yeah. So bottom line just have to be aware. You know, you've got to keep your wits then, you know, do not drink, and compute, because that's always a bad idea to still come this. We're talking about the blazing fast five G network. I mean, okay, it's going to be fast, and we want it, but are there, some health ramifications? Well, you wanna stay tuned for that. All right. Guys, you know, were terrible at taking care of our health, whether it's a knee injury or a bad back or something worse. We usually like to just wait and see if it heals itself on its own rather than go see a doctor and the same is true for erectile dysfunction. I know a lot of guys you don't wanna talk about this. You don't even want to think about this, but it is an embarrassing subject, and it's a real issue for a lot of guys studies show that seventy percent of guys who experience, e don't.

Mike Pinterest president Tampa YouTube Google Microsoft Senate Anders Bing Texas Andrew Zillow CNN America Better Business Bureau
"unscreened" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:36 min | 2 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Am. Narcissus? The summer. I was eleven years old a school of music and the dance suddenly appeared among the pines half a mile down the shore from our cottage. It sprang up overnight like an unwholesome flour and withered away at the end of August. But it's fouling memory clung to me through many an angry winter months. It was run by a Mr. and MRs Merlin Dorf who preferred to be known as Carl and Sonia and who represented music and dance respectively. Carl was a bald headed nearsighted young man with a skin intended by nature to be dead white. I never saw his true cast of countenance, however on account of his unfortunate susceptibility to sunburn and insect bites. His spoke seldom and with a strong foreign accent of some kind and played his upright, piano elbows. High knows almost touching the keyboard with what I can best describe as mechanical abandoned. There was always a distinct odor of citronella around the piano, which stood on the unscreened porch. Sonja who appeared to be older than her husband was a small wiry creature wrinkled and sallow faced with sunken eyes. Her black hair was braided and wound into fine substantial looking earmuffs, which protruded at least five inches on each side of her face and was banged in front and held down firmly to her far head by Kabul. Listrik Indian headband she dressed in sleeveless knee-length tunics of purple chiffon, which were always catching on the bushes. And she wore shapeless green sandals on her stocking feet on rainy or foggy days. This custom was supplemented by a long red sweater from which two buttons were missing Jade earrings. Swung from the earmuffs and yards of wooden beads rattled upon her chest. Sonya's accent was a mixture of Oxford and middle west. And she talked a great deal with much fluttering of the hair. There were six disciples youngish middle aged ladies all of them dressed like Sonya except for their hair, which then left floating, natural L. I never happened to see any of them dancing. But I often did hear music which could not have been corals mostly. They sat about on the beach knitting or doing their nails or rubbing their knees and noses with oil and looking like dilapidated, Laura lie among the barnacles and seaweed. It was really my own fault that I came in contact with this Manashe the day after we arrived. I was taking my annual walk of joyful recognition along the beach. When I was upon the group before I knew it. I was so astonished at finding people and such extremely odd. Looking people in a house, which had always been empty? That I stopped and stared and miss my chance to get away. Sonja appeared with a sweep swish fluttering draperies with her hands clasped upon her bosom. She dropped to her knees in front of me as if she had found a priceless jewel in the grass. Little girl Shakoor. How do you do? I said faintly and do you live in these lovely woods to? Yes. Down the way. Yes. In that perfectly darling. Little bed house by the war. Yes. Oh, then I know who you are darling. Your Muncie and daddy are artists too. Aren't they? This is my favorite Talisma forest and the fairy Princess, and all these are my subjects isn't that? So girls tittering from the girls and inside my palace is my prince charming done since sing and play the long summer day. What do you think of that? I was speechless. Wouldn't you like to join us? I have to be getting back panic-stricken stricken I began to move away. Goodbye. Then darling. What a lovely child girls girls. I want you to look at that lovely little Godley. See how shoebox how free under natural now. But I mean when I say I. That night Sonia called upon my mother treacherously after I had gone to bed. And when morning came I learned that I had been enrolled for three lessons a week in living through dancing, which came to be exactly that in another sense. Mrs Mellon Dorf is very nice mother said in response to some rather strong remarks of mine, just different. She liked you so much deer. And she thinks you may have a lot of talent it's wonderful exercise. And it'll be so good for you. You don't wanna be awkward when you grow up? Do you? It happened that my plans for the summer were entirely concerned with a book, I was reading entitled a thousand and one things can make and do in which aesthetic dancing was not mentioned. But the trap had been laid. And I was in it about one matter. I was adamant However, I would not wear Schiff on. I downsized in my Midi, blouse and blue Serge bloomers and my basketball sneakers. Sonja never again had caused to refer to my graceful little body, nor I believe has anyone else to this day at the beginning of the first lesson. Sonia took my hand and lead me to a rustic seat under the trees. Now Jarding I want to tell you the lovely legend of the youth NAS cicis one day. This handsome young man was walking in the woods. Among the. Full trees, he walked for a long long time and became terribly thirsty. Now. What would you do if you what terribly thirsty? Look for water of darling. That's exactly what did what do you do while you were looking for water? You don't know why you this way. And you that way and you shave with your hand. And you'd stand on tippy does to further, and you press your hands against your poor draw parched throat like this by now Sonya was on her feet in full swing and Jude walks Noah and Noah because you'd be tired, and then oh Gooding suddenly UCLA lovely pool as clear as crystal and you're. The musical accompaniment for this. As everyone will have guest was Nevins narcissus a composition which was not previously in very good standing with my family, but was to become an important item of my mother's repertoire. After the first attempt Sonia gave up trying to get me to express my own ideas. Since all that happened was that I stood indecisively on one foot biting, my fingernails, blushing Carl's piano from the porch wound onto its wary conclusion, eventually each note was to have it step. It's gesture it's facial expression. And we progress after a fashion. Dumb dumb dumb TD. I cross the leafy Glenn in a slow counter. Right. Arm outstretched for a sort of drawing room handshake left arm out behind keeping Satan at bed. Dum, dum, dum, dum, dum diddly. Dum dum dum. I look this way. And I look that way. And I stand on tippy toes. Then the original theme is repeated and something is wrong with my throat my mouth opens. I all but Rach my counter slows to a walk. I stagger. I real- bought. Look, what is that yonder? What what a pool who do trap clear us a mirror Eireann? I swoop. I kneel hands that chest look happy child. I cut my hands. I am about to drink. But I what see I in the pool a view phase. Can it be mine? I am an raptured fascinated hypnotized in exactly that order with unmistakable expressions to match gradually I weaken from admiration and thirst. And Finally I faint with a crash. I am dead for a long time while the music dies away. It begins again, softly softly. They call yells on. Yeah. I come to life first wriggling fingers, then waving hands and arms than up by com as my sneakers get a foothold on the ground. I bend, and I swear and dead leaves and pine needles fall. Like rain from untidy hair did ever lovelier flower unfold beside a crystal pool. Eventually the last precious drop of expression was squeezed from narcissus and Sogno began talking bravely and brightly of something new. I had had six lessons, and my disposition at home was very bad. Indeed. Furthermore, I was noticeably more awkward doubts about the good effects of sonya's teaching. We're growing in my parents minds on the morning of my seventh. Ordeal. I staged the only successful tantrum of my life at the breakfast table. I announced that if I were forced to return to Sonia once more I would drown myself from the war f- at high tide or so from at low tide at through box shredded weight from the dunning into the living room up prove that men. Why was sweeping up the contents of the box amid loud weeping mother went to see Sonia. Who was no doubt as relieved as I to have this whole affair over once and for all I should like to be able to state that I never again died and was reincarnated to the sounds of Nevins narcissus. The fact is that I gave at least twenty command performances during the ensuing. Winter every time we had company and the conversation began to run low mother would say, dear. I want to just show us what you learned the summer with a little private, look, which meant remember what I told you about being rude. I would then give a condensed version of sonya's narcissus omitting all the facial expressions. I had been taught and wearing a look of controlled rage throughout I doubt. Whether it was pleasant entertainment for anyone, but it did seem to create a diversion of sorts. The following year. I suddenly began to grow very rapidly and made such a thud when I fainted that the tenants of the apartment below us became alarmed and mother decided narcissus had to be put away forever..

Sonia Sonya Sonja Carl sunburn unscreened porch MRs Merlin Dorf Kabul Mrs Mellon Dorf middle west basketball Talisma forest Laura Nevins Muncie Schiff Satan Glenn Sogno UCLA
Kenan and Kel once sold their Super Bowl tickets, 'balled out' at Chili's instead

Jared and Katie

02:26 min | 3 years ago

Kenan and Kel once sold their Super Bowl tickets, 'balled out' at Chili's instead

"Keenan Thompson also talked about the time that he had the chance to go to a Super Bowl was his first one I have never been to civil. I got tickets to go one time when I was young, and they gave me and kale Zubov, and we were living in San Diego bad Super Bowl, and they send us down in this limousine or whatever, but my debit card game, and my money was funny. I didn't know how to juggle. My finances. It didn't make any sense to me to go to Super Bowl with no money and not be able to buy anything or whatever. So all these people were at the exit ramp seven tickets, and they got some tickets. I mean, how much would you give us a ticket? He was like twenty five hundred what you wanna make some super brand right now. Chilies and balled out. I like that seriously to me the Super Bowl tickets are ridiculous. Outrageous. Right now that are half a million dollars. That's outrageous and the cheapest bowl tickets like four thousand five thousand dollars, right? And you go there and what I don't like about. It is half the places rooting for one team half the place of rooting for. I'm saying it's like, and then you go there so crazy out of control, and yes, it's an experience. But I'll tell you one thing if I five thousand dollars per ticket or even twenty five hundred dollars per ticket for five to ten thousand dollars to sit at Chili's where you could see right unscreened. I'm doing it. Yeah. Yeah. L E not to take it up. Take them up on that. Although as a Redskins fan has been almost thirty years. Yeah. I would maybe try to go to a Super Bowl tickets were five. If I knew you can't win our friend tripper that we know that works here. He went to he's a big Denver Broncos fan, and he went when they played in New York the Super Bowl was in New York and his team got beat by forty sitting there like. I just spent two thousand three four or five thousand dollars to get their fly there. Did he go by himself? Yeah. And he's there and watched him get destroyed that would be just to get there through the security in the lines. I don't wanna wait in line. Security apparently is insane. I think the department of homeland security helping work this Super Bowl in Atlanta at the Mercedes though. So you just gotta sit there and away. And I guess the experience is great. And I know a lot of people that go, and they love it. I think going to the Super Bowl, and I I've never been maybe

Keenan Thompson Kale Zubov San Diego Redskins Denver Broncos New York Atlanta Five Thousand Dollars Four Thousand Five Thousand Do Twenty Five Hundred Dollars Ten Thousand Dollars Million Dollars Thirty Years
"unscreened" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"With Dr Robert pray third. The voice of health wellness tip with Dr Robert pray throughout the pray. Thir- practice. Dr crater, what is diet Thermie the way that we like to describe it to people is a large coiled magnitude produces a shortwave Wien goes into the body main thing that we like it is increasing circulation. The most common thing that we use it for is draining to the years. Otitis media, you're the ear pain ear infections for any mom who's been up with a little unscreened. The entire night us. How wonderful would be to get there. Yeah. I think about one little guy you just starting to walk and he had a terrible ear infection, the antibiotics hadn't really kicked in or done anything. At that point. They had heard that we do take care of otitis media. And you know, that we could make a pretty quick cure. And the husband was a little bit skeptical. They both came in 'cause mom had been up all night and didn't want to drive in. She looked like help me guy was just you know, thrashing in so much pain. So we brought him in and fifteen minutes on the dietary. He was laughing and looking around and waving at everybody. And and they just kind of looked at me like what the heck just happened. How did this occur? We find that fifteen minutes on the dichotomy will just take away the pain just like that. So it's something that.

Otitis media Dr Robert Dr crater fifteen minutes
Will Google's Instant Translator put interpreters out of a job?

Altered Geek

02:09 min | 3 years ago

Will Google's Instant Translator put interpreters out of a job?

"They they had see. Yes. Last week and the entire industry was all over it. So Google unveiled an instant translator. Yeah. A universal translator. It's it sounds a lot like Star Trek at this point. So I guess that you know in regards to their Google assistant. They're trying to have this new built in future. Call the interpreter mode. So basically, what it is is a new feature that is a role as an update over the next couple of weeks on Google home devices and smart displays so if you're in a foreign country or meeting with a person who does not speak the same language as you the Google assistant can't be used as a translator or more. So as an interpreter to order to get real time translations of words and sentences as in when you speak in the form of voice output, as well as text unscreened end the conversation, which is kind of cool. It also kind of breaks down that language barrier of having to learn a new language or say something incorrectly. In offend somebody and say something completely wrong because let's face it English is about the only language where you. It kind of is what it is. And there's like multiple meetings for everything. Whereas like everybody else has like kind of more normalized speech patterns. But anyways, the interpreter moat can be triggered by saying. Hey, Google be my French interpreter or Spanish interpreter or or whatever. So if you want to translate its. From or to French and replace with any language want. And yeah, so. But there's been a lot of tech. That's that's been touted over the last year or two of translator tack in interpreter tech and for Google to be finally getting on this bandwagon. It's kind of a big deal at this point. But it it should be it should be very impressive. When this gets rolled out. I'll be looking forward to seeing because I'm sure they'll be YouTube videos of it like crazy, although it might be fun to to get the Google home in ask it how to say things in

Google Youtube
"unscreened" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

12:07 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Show right here on news ninety six point five w d go ahead and give us a call. We got the best bumper music on this show. We live in a country where we are so free. Yes, we only get out of it when we put into it. So we're going to talk to a gentleman from Houston named David. He has a question about his pool. Deck would you like to talk to him or put him on the air? I think let's do Dave is a great idea of the show. What's your question for Tony? Hey, tony. How you doing? Dave. All right guys about four years ago. We put a pool in and put pavers around the perimeter. Of course. Did I do it wrong? They're starting to fade already in parts are going up and down. I need some repairs. Like a little bit. I guess here's here's a question. I didn't what did you put them in yourself. Or did you have someone put the notes you had someone put them in for you? Correct. And it was a new swimming pool. Is that correct? It was a new swimming pool. All right. So one of the things that so far question did you pull leak by any chance? No leaks in your negative negative is screened or unscreened. Unscreened and do your is your deck is your deck settling maybe where your roof line is coming off the back of the house, or is it doing it in other locations around necessarily know different locations. Okay. So what happens is is the installer. Did a couple things that question first foray into that around the edge of the pool. Are they settling around the edge of the pool? Around where the. More than other places. Just sporadic, you know, like one or two papers would be creaking down in. Okay. So a little miniature trip hazards think about this way. Not enough sub base. And you're only foot traffic. I'm sure you're not driving your car your truck. You're riding low traffic. Right. So, you know, we do if you don't do enough base material. That's the material that goes under the brick. Are they thick brick two and five eighths inches thick they're not thin brick. Right. I would say at least it. Yeah. All right. So, you know, the proper way to do a swimming pool. Deck for foot traffic and foot traffic only we put down four inches of base, and we compact that four inches to become about three inches, then we put a Jew and a half inch brick on top of it. We have a five and a half inch thick deck versus a four inch concrete deck. So it sounds to me that you don't have enough base under your deck. And unfortunately, builders don't disclose we do we disclose we put down four inches a base in our contract that they don't disclose what they put down. And here's what gets me. Sometimes we go out. We built a brand new pool. Just like yours. David, and I hold the dirt down four inches down. Top of the pole structure, not the top of the brick coping and the inspector goes back and says, you know, I can't pass this a logical because it's not deep enough going. Wait a second. You're forgetting I'm putting four inches of material on top of the dirt. That's there today. And then I'm putting a two and five eighths brick on top. I'm adding six and a half inches of thickness of deck. Yes. Of course, my stuff is deep enough. But you know, what they don't care. So one of the things we're trying to get at is doing great at your yard out today. Great low enough. Did you see the pool deck construction being done by any chance? And they had the little Pounder and your opponent it down in. Of course. I was a measuring. Right. But you know, they did it. It seemed logical what they were doing. Okay. Now, if it's onesie twosies we've and get what we get onesie twosies. But let me just let me tell you about the onesie twosies. We're talking quarter inch not a half inch. Do you have half inch ups and downs? Yeah. There's a couple of inches. Yeah. Yeah. So can I give you the solution to fix them? Yeah. All right. You need to know. You can do it yourself by the by the way, you could just yourself if you wanted to to flat screwdrivers, you can down in the in the between the brick the sand joint you're gonna wiggle that brick up. Put put some nice place and down there and wet it up really good before you do that the place to brick back in place. But how do I tap it down? If it's still too high rubber mallet. Put a rubber catching or or a two by four on top of the brick with the hammer, you can pallet down that way, and you can miss you can go round and sporadically, you know, do some pavers that way and and solve your problem. But I can't tell you. It's not going to happen. The next break over five recover from that. But that's probably was probably was they didn't do it. Up to standard or up to high standards. I don't personally, and I put a an, and I know you say in four years ago, we put two years on it. And I'm gonna tell you right now it's going to fail in the first year if it's going to settle it's gonna fail in the first first year for sure did it start failing or settling in that first year. No, I don't think. So you don't think so? Well, a couple of things I'm not picking on your poll contractor. You know, we've had another question has your deck ever gone underwater because of rain. Do we to? No. You didn't lose me. Not not really. Yeah. We get a lotta rain is a big Lou funhouse, and it comes down in those pavers. Yeah. Forever. If you get a lot of water to hold on your deck, talking, you know, shutting poll style. But if you get watered it hold onto your Dak for, you know, five or ten minutes in about a pretty good bit. It's got to seep out somewhere and he run off somewhere too. So I think you can solve your problem honestly with some good place and a rubber mallet to by four and a hammer of that being said at a pair screwdrivers that'll solve your problem. But a wish you luck. Now about your discoloration Kay. How do you fix your discoloration where your brick sealed previously? Did they apply they were not? Okay. So not. Okay. But you can do that yourself, by the way, if you want to if not car company and can get you are paying for people that do it duck come out pressure wash it, they'll resend it. And then they'll seal it. So what is gonna look like before you even go that route take some water put it on your brick as it darkens at brick up. That's what you're going to look like sealed and say that's gonna make my backyard. Look, really good. That's what's called enhanced enhanced sealer if you like it the way it looks today, they make a non enhanced sealer it's still sealed at the end of the day. What that's going to do it to lock to sand in waters knock down between the joints. And it's going to keep your deck a lot solid longer. So hope that answers your. Degrade tone time, David have awesome weekend. Thanks for the call some greater formation there. Tony well that was a little long winded. But that's good information. I mean, I'm sure other people have that kind of same issue. And also, it's again it goes back to how we talked about earlier. How maybe if someone says, hey, be able to get your pool done in this amount of time. You better make sure that they're going to do a thorough and complete job because they didn't care about the debt there. They didn't care. Well, think about it. I mean, it depends. It look we don't want to speculate. But have you kind of if you had a thousand square foot Dak and you put down six by six and six by nine brick pavers. You have several thousand pieces of brick you're putting down. Okay. And when we do is our company when we put our brick pavers in we use ten foot long, screed boards ten foot long. So if I have a deck, we have smaller ones, we have eight foot and six foot four foot and two foot. But when we have decks that are, you know, five or six or eight. Eight feet wide. We have these long screeners, and they and they level the the base material out, then we compact it. And then is this gonna kinda undulate that again, we come back and refill that then great it off then compacted again, then we get a level. We put a nice leveling better sand on top of their what I mean about nice level 'bout a half an inch. Then we set our break. Then we compact it down again washed the sand. In course, we pour curb show. You know, we just finished a job a couple of weeks ago that had about thirty nine hundred brick in it. Thirty nine hundred now I did another one if I did a fifty seven thousand square foot driveway. There was five point five brick per square foot. So you do the math about three hundred thousand brick on a driveway. Eleven years. Day, Scott, eight inches the base on it. There's a difference between a driveway base a walking bass at a parking base. If you wanna go and see how well your neighbors. Bricks were installed look at his brick paver driveway. There's too little belly's were tires go it settled not enough bands up base. That's builder grade. That's what builders do for you. You know, they charge you a premium to put the brick in. And by the way, a dump truck load. One dump truck load of base about two hundred bucks. Okay. So is it worth two hundred dollars more the put down the right base? So the car simmers driveway as level and stays level for twenty years or ten years. It's worth the two hundred dollars to two hundred dollars without a doubt to these builders up. Man, Yau cheat your customers because you can't put the right amount of base down in. Why is every brick installer? Does builder work and the builder says. Up to two inches baser. Fine. Looks good through final get me to my first year and want us over not right? That's not right to the customer. We do when we do decking that has brick and you have existing driveway. We'll fix your driveway where we're at it. I mean, that's what we're there for were. We don't need to push it on the job that I talked to you about where they took this last one. I looked at took the customer for a boatload of cash, by the way, we do a forty grand driveway. You've got to be fixed to do the previous builder, but we're gonna why were there we're going to the driveway to share, and it's a big driveway? So I want to thank all of my customers from twenty eighteen and back and thank you for our wonderful year. We just finished a put a poll finishing yesterday. It's black on the bottom black on the sides. The sun shelf is an earth tone color fire net pull up on Monday. Now fill in Marie over there. In coca we just got there. Pull finish it's up and running got up and running. On Thursday or Friday, beautiful looking job man, gallon and cocoa. We're gonna put water in next week going to have another beautiful blue finish in it. And hopefully get that down in my friend sherline Ron down in palm bay. Soon as we get the coping issues resolved on your project. I'm gonna put water in your pool, and, you know, get you wrapped up its its go go go it's nonstop, you know, so we're doing the best. We can we're working five six we'll work in five days for sure six days a week again and twelve hours a day. We only have ten and a half hours of sunlight a day. Hours. So let me tell you. It's like getting the office at six o'clock in the morning, five thirty six sons, not up. So I'm out there. I'm doing my job early early in the morning trying to get things going before everybody comes in. And the reason I do that is because I don't want to be, you know, frazzled when it comes down to get in the guys out the door. Let schedules done, you know. So my schedules are done days in advance. I know what's happening five days from tell your tuition today. And I try to schedule jobs out two or three or four weeks out. Unfortunately, the the workload is based upon. What subcontractors are what their schedule is how well they're doing. Did the weather heart them, you know, if it's forty degrees outside let me tell you. It's really really hard to work with water when it's forty. Yeah. It was forty degrees outside. Yeah. I will you would imagine that once it gets down to a certain temperature. Makes it a lot more difficult to work with the end of the deal Nabal fingers right there. You get a little kid. Yeah. Kind of hard to hold on a sponge or nice row. So, you know, my guys really don't want to start to it's about forty five degrees out. You know, it's still cold granted water is warmer than the air. That's where the fingers. He starts to get bad. Because as soon as you get your fingers get outta that. Void all about that. Yeah. Yeah..

David Tony Dave Houston Unscreened Lou funhouse Yau Scott Marie palm bay Ron four inches two hundred dollars forty degrees four years five days ten foot
"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines were checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So soviet. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm Bob and I'm in Tahoe City, California. Well, welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I got solution to the barrier between California Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now, I'm a little bit crazy. But we built. Two thousand mile energy source with types with fluid that can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial community joint ventures between Mexico in America, and Richard a contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open and cost grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Domain. Oil well on the property that you want for eminent domain and gives the owner of the property of the oil. The production. The other finance security on the border. Richard C Plum is Diane Feinstein's husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. You know, I I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias. You there on the George? There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed, what time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties. We'll also get into the Alister Crowley story as well. But this is an amazing book, and it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But the actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I registered in in six months in a sort of white heats of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed. Like getting it off my chest. What was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in nineteen sixty I was born deaf. I couldn't hear until I was three. Defect..

Bob England California Mexico Richard C Plum Unscreened Alister Crowley Tahoe City Diane Feinstein California Tobias Churton USA America six months
"unscreened" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

14:51 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines were checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So so be it. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm Bob and I'm in Tahoe City, California. Well, welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I gotta solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now. A little bit crazy, but we built. Two thousand mile energy source with types with fluid that can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial communities joint ventures between Mexico in America, and Richard C a cost plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open end cost grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Eminent domain. Oil well on the property that you want for imminent domain and gives the owner of the property a cut of the oil. Production of the oil and the other finance security on the border. Richard C Plum is Diane science husband while you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. And you know, I I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias you there on their George. There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something something in the ad. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties will also get into the Alister Crowley story as well. But this is an amazing book. And it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But the actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I registered in in six months in a sort of white east of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed. Like getting it off my chest. As it were. What was it about the sixties at captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in nineteen sixty I was born death. I couldn't hear until I was three. Defect. And so the first thing I remember hearing other than echoey voices was the Beatles. Singing, please, please me. And I felt that I'd been I actually felt as a child that I've been born into an immensely special time, and I'm sure that's true children in any era. But the sixty seem to have it all it was moving so fast. And every time you looked at which there was something new in the air either. It was another space rocket gang up. There was a new kind of push button. Or the television was getting more exciting all the music was heating up. So it was it was it was it was a great Coldren of positive energy temendous positive energy, the like of which I missed it so much winning. We sort of slipped into the seventies. I remember this tremendous feeling of loss. You know? Where's it will go? What what was it about the sixties in England that really popped the culture because you know, here in the states, we had Elvis Presley emerging. And we had the beach boys, but the Beatles took the world by storm. Then came the Rolling Stones. How did this happen? Well, there's so many factors are involved. It was all cooking. It was all sort of under wraps in the fifties. And then started to come out. There's no data told that the advent of the Beatles was the the the catalyst you you have all these actors emerging a new generation a large number of young people an impatience with existing authority and structures, and then you put into that this magical component the Beatles. You seem to have inspiration energy newness fabulously, haunting image for people. And we're both divisive. And also uniting that United some people and divided others. They were part of what set the era side. I think we were also receiving San money indications from the United States at the time. I remember the day Kennedy at pass native myself. I remember my mother crying. Now this was in England. There was a sense that something was about to be born and had been snuffed out. And then it got religion. Again. It was quite extraordinary. It it truly was it was thanks to Kennedy and in nineteen sixty one he declared America's ambition to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade. And I think that this made it decade conscious. The sixties was an entity by the end of the decade you had a defined period of time. And what was the direction of this decade? We were going up. We were going out literally out of sight. These rockets were getting into regions that previously people thought were inhabited, by spiritual creatures angels, and the gods domain, and we were going that. So that's trust that that magical break. Through which people don't imagine in logical or in a fictional sense before suddenly became real. So we were introduced to new reality. And it was his incoming of new realities that I think characterizes the era, and if you open to it, and this is the important factor. If there was an openness to it, you you could bathe in this. This extraordinary energy. I mean, obviously, this isn't all that was going on. But this is what this was the center of the of what was going on in the great Lebar. Trae of the planets has great powerful moment in in the history of this planet. We seem to have a goal in a direction we seem to be a little rudderless now Tobias do you get that feeling very much? So yes, I think that's been a massive loss of confidence and and energy over the years and. Newton. You new thoughts and things of this suffered great repression. The opportunities have been there the collapse of the Soviet Union. For example, China Mazi Dong opening its doors to some extent there have been opportunities, but these have been treated very much, I in my view of things in a very opportunistic way, not in a spiritual way at all. I think it's all become very rail politique and checks and balances and accountancy and money, and and many of this are negative aspects of human fear and insecurity being regenerated. So we're all supposed to be scared of somebody else, you know. And you can't come out of your cave. If you think the tribe that side's gonna bash your head in, you know, right, right? If you look on the tribe outside the cave as well. They're pretty much like us. You just might be able to meet in no man's land. The sixties have a great deal to tell us about the nature of creative engagement, and and also the cost of that. Because the sixties wasn't the only in third few people. It was like a prolonged party. But I say in the book that they the two pillars of the sixties hope and tragedy, and it was in between this hope and this tragedy that the that the great drama was played out. And in that drama is overflowing. As I find the more. I examined it objectively with hindsight with with a spirit with spiritual. Meaning it is saying something to us. It's it's in a way, you could say we've not any go to have faith in the future. But we've got to have faith in the past as well. Sixties denial came in in the nineteen eighties bonfire of the vanities period. The sixties was a waste of time. It didn't really do anything. We better shore up. Our get already corns in China winter is to come. And and there was an enormous self obsession which has as Tokyo the mentality of the western world at whereas the sixties had both individual development and a cat. For those around a great day was spirit of generosity was much more in evidence than so, I guess I think we have lost our spiritual rudder, and we have this neoplasm today. It seems to me that when people stop believing all you are you have leaders who don't really believe in anything beyond their ego. Universe is what I think you have what I call the politics of despair. And they're always people are prepared to pick up despair. And with usually with an aggressive cudgel and take what appears to be a lead. I think the nineteen thirties in Germany, particularly where the economy was even worse than it was in the great crash in America and Great Britain the depression. Is it is it an accident when you get depression, you get dicta- dictatorship? There's a temptation could be on together in uniform. And these are these are spiritually negative tendencies. If you live from the spiritual dimension in life life is full of opportunities in today's as beautiful as it was in the sixties or any other time. But it doesn't seem that way doesn't we ought to the era. We're living in and I think we're less alive to our own times. Are these the sixties would you say were the best of times and the worst of times, I think it all depends on where you were for me. Personally. It was not the best of times. It was a marvelous time to be a child if you had very interesting family, which I did even though my my parents were very conservative. They were also excited about the future. And and their part in it, and that Abed children, I think. If you've got hope you'll you're going to have the best of times, you know, if you give up hope you're going to see the worst. They they always go together. These two two aspects of life, and you've got to be able to live in in the face of the other dimension. You've got to accept that half of life is always going to be what you don't want all appears to be threatening. And you know, thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. You have to bring into this us your experience of the heavenly. So you can't get out of it by denying the harsh realities of of natural life in this life, but we we have spiritual. And and and every other means to deal with these things. Well, you know here in the United States, we went through as you mentioned the tragedy of the Kennedy assassination in sixty three than his brother dies in sixty eight Martin Luther King gets gunned down, then then we turn the table and sixty nine and land on the moon in that you're for your seems to come back again. But that was it was the the sixties were rough times that we had the Cuban missile crisis in nineteen sixty two. I think he had it not been for music Tobias a lot of people would have gone crazy. Oh, absolutely. Sure. You're right. I mean, what is so incredible. And you're you're talking about we take semi things for granted. I mean, my publisher told me some years ago that he was beaten up in New York City for having long hair in the I believe that the people who stood out against this the tide of growing a war in the far east at that time what taking real risks. So they weren't having a party in that sense. And you know, a lot of people took the took the Knox. And I'm not sure how much we appreciate what they've given to us in terms of expanding the possibilities of liberty. So no you, of course, you're right. It was an apocalyptic there. There was much greater fear than of nuclear holocaust. It was far more realistic because the Russian sorry the Soviet empire of that. Aired really did look. Like a great great monolith. That was gonna fall on us. That was the sort of feeling about it. And yet at the same time you had this that people didn't just cower up and wrap themselves into a ball. Do you have this young generation which says, well, we don't want to go in this direction? We want a different kind of world and while that was a tiny minority. I do believe that the greatest changes in human history. Other always the result of a committed an identity mean that politically I mean, spiritually committed minority who have belief and faith in the future and. You know, people say, where's the leadership whereas the leadership? Well, the whole thing as I record Bob Dylan song was in need. Don't follow leaders watch the parking meters. We gotta take a greater individual responsibility for our lives. And so the is you did have this freeing up in the capitalist dimension of things where people are encouraged to have their own businesses, especially in England. This was quite a novel idea don't be dependent on the state and so forth. Well, that's fine. If we we're not going to be dependent on the state, then the state can no longer be dependent on us. So you have anyway, the other thing about the Sixers really is that it's it's it didn't end. Yeah. It's it's kept going. Yes..

England Beatles United States Bob America Tobias Churton Kennedy California Mexico Unscreened Tahoe City Alister Crowley Bob Dylan Soviet Union Elvis Presley neoplasm Richard C China Mazi Dong depression
"unscreened" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

14:53 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Nine we're gonna go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines. We're checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and so Soviet so let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm Bob and I'm in Tahoe City, California. Welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I gotta solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. No. A little bit crazy, but we built a two thousand mile energy source with types. With that can be heated up to steam under pressure. That can run steam generators set can run industrial communities joint ventures between Mexico in America and gives Richard. Plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open hand cost grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Eminent domain. Oil well on the property that you want for imminent domain and gives the owner of the property a cut of the oil. Production of the other finance security on the border. Richard C Plum is Diane Feinstein's husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. Dental. I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They told me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias. You there on the George? There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something something in the ad. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties. We'll also get into the Alister Crowley story as well. But this is an amazing book, and it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written. Growing up in the sixties and all that time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I registered in in six months in a sort of white east of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed. Like getting it off my chest. Does it what what was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in nineteen sixty I was born deaf. I couldn't hear until I was three. Defect answer. The first thing. I remember hearing other than echoey voices was the Beatles. Singing, please, please me. And I felt that I've been I actually felt as a child that I've been born into an immensely special time, and I'm sure that's true of children in any era. But the sixty seem to have it all it was moving so fast. And every time you looked at which there was something new in the air either. It was in another space rocket going up. There was a new kind of push button. Or the television was getting more exciting all the music was eating up. It was it was it was it was a great Coldren of policies energy temendous positive energy, the like, which I missed it so much winning. We sort of slipped into the seventies. I remember this temendous feeling of loss. It. What was it about the sixties in England that really popped the culture because you know, here in the states, we had Elvis Presley emerging. And we had the beach boys, but the Beatles took the world by storm. Then came the Rolling Stones. How did this happen? Well, there's so many factors are involved. It was all cooking. It was all sort of under wraps in the fifties. And then started to come out. There's no data told the advent of the Beatles was the the the catalyst, you you have all these factors. In new generation, a large number of young people an impatience with existing authority and structures, and then you put into that this magical component the Beatles. Seemed to have an inspiration energy newness of tabula city, haunting image of people and will boast divisive and also uniting United some people divided others. They what part of what set the era side. I think we were also receiving San money indications from the United States at the time. I remember the day. Kennedy fascinated myself, I'm my mother crying. Now. This was England. There was a sense that something was about to be born and had been snuffed out. And then it got religious again. And it was quite extraordinary. It it surely was it was thanks to Kennedy in nineteen sixty one he declared America's ambition to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade and. And I think that this made it decade conscious. The sixties was an entity by the end of the decade you had a defined period of time. And what was the direction of this decade? We were going up. We were going out literally at a site. These rockets were getting into regions that previously people what were inhabited by spiritual creatures angels, and the gods domain, and we were going that trust that magical breakthrough which people would only imagine in a logical or in a fictional sense before suddenly became real. So we were introduced to a new reality. And it was his incoming of new realities that I think characterizes the air, and if you open to it, and this is the important factor. If there was an openness to it, you you could bathe in this. This extraordinary energy. I mean, obviously, this isn't all that was going on. But this is what this was the center of the of what was going on in the great Lebar trae of the planet says. Great powerful moment in in the history of this planet. We seem to have a goal in a direction we seem to be a little rudderless now Tobias do you get that feeling very much? So yes, I think there's been a massive loss of confidence and and energy over the years and. New new new thoughts and things that they have suffered great repression. The opportunities have been there the collapse of the Soviet Union. For example, China's now's Dong opening its doors to some extent there'd been opportunities, but these have been treated very much, I in my view of things in a very opportunistic way, not in a spiritual way at all. I think it's all become very rail politique and checks and balances in canton, Tzi and money, and and many of this negative aspects of human fear and insecurity being jet regenerated. So we're all supposed to be scared of somebody else, you know, and you can't come out of your cave. If you think the try that side's gonna bash your head in, you know, right, right? You know, if you look on the tribe outside the cave, as well that pretty much like us, you just might be out of meet in no man's land. The sixties. I have a great deal to tell us about the nature of creative engagement, and and also the cost of that. Because the sixties wasn't the only a few people. It was like a prolonged party. But the I say in the book that they the two pillars of the sixties were hope and tragedy, and it was in between this hope and this tragedy that the the great drama was played out. And in that drama is overflowing. The more I examined it objectively with hindsight. We we the spirit with spiritual. Meaning it is saying something to us. It's it's in a way, you could say we've not any got to have faith in the future. But we've got to have faith in the pastas as well. A lot of sixties denial came in in the nineteen eighties bonfire of the vanities period. The sixties was a waste of time. It didn't really do anything. We better shore up. Our get our acorns in for the eternal winter is to come. And there's an enormous self obsession which has a as took the mentality of the western world, whereas the sixties had both individual development and a cat. For those around a great spirit of generosity was much more in evidence than so, I guess I think we have lost our spiritual rudder, and we have this need today. It seems to me that when people stop believing or you are you leaders who don't really believe in anything beyond their ego university. What I think you have what I call the politics of despair, and they're always people who prepared to pick up on despair and with usually with an aggressive cudgel and take what appears to be a lead. I think the nineteen thirties in Germany, particularly where the economy was even worse than it was in the great crash in America and Great Britain the depression. Is it is it an accident when you get depression? You get dicta- dictatorship temptation could be on together in uniform, and these these spiritually negative tendencies if you live from the spiritual dimension in life life is full of opportunities in today's as beautiful as it was in the sixties or any other time. But it doesn't seem that way. The era we living in and I think we're less alive to our and times are these the sixties. Would you say were the best of times and the worst of times? I think it all depends on where you were for me. Personally. It was not the best of times. It was a marvelous time to be a child if you had very interesting family, which I did even my my parents were very conservative. They were also excited about the future and their part in it, and that of their children, I think if you've got hope you you're going to have the best of times, you know, if you give up hope you're going to see the worst. They they always go together. These two two aspects of life, and you've got to be able to live in in the face of the other dimension. You've got to accept that heart of life is always going to be what you don't want all appears to be threatening. And you know that I will be done on earth as it is in heaven. You have to bring. Into this your experience of the heavenly. So you can't get out of it by denying the realities of of of natural life in this life. The we we have spiritual. And and and every other means to deal with these things. Know here in the United States. We went through as you mentioned the tragedy of the Kennedy assassination in sixty three. Then his brother dies and sixty eight Martin Luther King gets gunned down. Then then we turn the table and sixty nine and land on the moon in that you're for your seems to come back again. But that was it was the the sixties were rough times that we had the Cuban missile crisis in one thousand nine hundred sixty two. I think he had it not been for music Tobias a lot of people would have gone crazy. Oh, I'm absolutely sure. You're right. I mean, what is so incredible. And you're you're talking about we take so many things for granted. I mean, my publisher told me some years ago that he was beaten up in New York City for having long hair in in the early. I I believe that people who stood out against this tide of growing up war in the far east at that time what taking real risks. So they weren't having a party in that sense. And you know, a lot of people took the took the Knox. And I'm not sure how much we appreciate what they've given to us in terms of expanding the possibilities of liberty. I'm so no you, of course, you're right. It was an apocalyptic there. There was much greater fear than a nuclear holocaust. It was far more realistic because the Russian sorry the Soviet empire of that. Aired really did look. Like a great great monolith. That was going to fall on us that was the sort of feeling about it. And yet at the same time you had this people didn't just cower up and wrap themselves into bowl. Do you have this young generation which says we don't want to go in this direction? We want a different kind of world and while that was a tiny minority. I do believe that the greatest changes in human history. Other always the result of a committed. Doesn't necessarily mean that politically I mean spiritually committed minority who have belief and faith in the future. And you know, people say, where's the leadership whereas the leadership? Well, the whole thing is I I record Bob Dylan song was in. Don't follow leaders watch the parking meters. We got to take a greater individual responsibility for our lives. And so in the H is you did have this freeing up in the capitalist dimension of things where people are encouraged to have their own businesses, especially in England. This was quite a novel idea don't be dependent on the state and so forth. Well, that's fine. If we're not going to be dependent on the state, then the state can no longer be dependent on us. So you have anyway, the other thing about the Sixers really is that it's it's it didn't end. It's it's kept going. Yes. I think it's a play that that that keeps writing them..

England Beatles United States Bob America Tobias Churton Kennedy Richard C Plum California Mexico Unscreened Tahoe City Alister Crowley Bob Dylan Soviet Union depression Rolling Stones China Elvis Presley
"unscreened" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:51 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines were checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So so be it. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm Bob and I'm in Tahoe City, California. Well, welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I gotta solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now. A little bit greasy. But we built a two thousand mile energy source with types with fluid that can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial. She joint ventures between Mexico in America and give Richard Seibel. A cost plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industrial community with an open hand costs grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Eminent domain. Oil well on the property that you want for eminent domain and gives the owner of the property cut of the oil. Production a deal. She other finance security on the border Richard seat. Bloem is Diane Feinstein's husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. You know, I I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line Tobias. So you there on the George there you go. Hi, this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties, we'll also get into the Alastair Crawley story as well. But the this is an amazing book, and it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say a lifetime in the sense. The book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But an actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I registered in in six months in a sort of white east of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed, getting it off my chest. Is it what what was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in nineteen sixty I was born deaf. I couldn't hear until I was three. Defect answer. The first thing. I remember hearing other than echoey voices was the basal singing, please, please me. And I felt that I'd been I actually felt as a child that I've been born into an immensely special time, and I'm sure that's true children in any era. But the sixty seem to have it all it was moving so fast. And every time you looked at which was something new in the air either. It was in another space rocket gang up was a new kind of push button. Or the television was getting more exciting music was heating up. So it was it was it was it was a great Coldren of policies energy temendous positive energy, the like of which I missed it so much winning. We sort of slipped into the seventies. I remember this temendous feeding of loss. You know? Where's it? Go. What what was it about the sixties in England that really popped the culture because you know, here in the states, we had Elvis Presley emerging. And we had the beach boys, but the Beatles took the world by storm. Then came the Rolling Stones. How did this happen? Well, there's so many factors are involved. It was all cooking. It was all sort of under wraps in the fifties. And then started to come out. There's no data told that the advent of the Basil's was the catalyst, you you have all these factors emerging a new generation a large number of young people an impatience with existing authority and structures, and then you put into that this magical component the Beatles. He seemed to have inspiration energy newness fabulously, haunting image for people and both divisive and also uniting United some people divided others. They were part of what set the air aside. I think we were also receiving San money indications from the United States at the time. I remember the day. Kennedy fascinated myself, I remember my mother crying. Now this was in England. There was a sense that something was about to be born and had been snuffed out. And then it got religion. Again. It was quite extraordinarily it. It truly was it was thanks to Kennedy and in nineteen sixty one he declared America's ambition to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade, and I think that this made decade conscious. The sixties was an entity by the end of the decade you had to find period of time. And what was the direction of this decade? We were going up. We were going out literally out of sight. These rockets were getting into regions previously people thought were inhabited, by spiritual creatures angels and the gods demand, and we were going that. So that's trust that that magical. Breakthrough which people don't imagine in logical or in a fictional sense before suddenly became real. So we were introduced to a new reality. And it was his incoming of new realities that I think characterizes the era, and if you open to it, and this is the important factor. If there was an openness to it, you you could bathe in this. This extraordinary energy. I mean, obviously, this isn't all that was going on. But this is what this was the center of the of what was going on in the great Lebar. Trae planets has. Great powerful moment in the history of this planet. We seem to have a goal in a direction we seem to be a little rudderless now Tobias do you get that feeling very much? So yes, I think that's been a massive loss of confidence and and energy over the years and. Newton you sought some things that they have suffered great repression. The opportunities have been there the collapse of the Soviet Union. For example, China's Mazi Dong opening its doors to some extent there have been opportunities. But these have been treated very much, I in my view of things in a very opportunistic way, not in a spiritual way at all. I think it's all become very rail politique and checks and balances and accountancy and money, and and many of this negative aspects of human fear and insecurity being it. So we're all supposed to be scared of somebody else, you know, and you can't come out of your cave. If you think the tribe outside's going to bash your head in, you know. Right. You know, if you look on the tribe outside the cave as well that pretty much like us, you just might be of meat in no man's land. The sixties have a great deal to tell us about the nature of creative engagement, and and also the cost of that. Because the sixties wasn't the only in some people. It was like a prolonged party, but they say in the book that they the two pillars of the sixties where hope and tragedy, and it was in between this hope and this tragedy that the the great drama was played out. And in that drama is overflowing. As I found more. I examined it objectively with the hindsight with a spirit with spiritual. Meaning it is saying something to us. It's it's in a way, you could say we've not any go to have faith in the future. But we have faith in the past as well. A lot of sixties denial came in the nineteen eighties bonfire vanities period. The sixties was a waste of time. It didn't really do anything. We better shore up. Our get our acorn Vincent eternal winter is to come. And and there was an enormous self obsession, which has as Tokyo the mentality of the western world, whereas the sixties had both individual development and care for those around a great spirit of generosity was much more in evidence than so, I guess I think we have lost our spiritual rudder, and we have this needs realism today. It seems to me that when people stop believing or you are you have leaders who don't really believe in anything beyond their ego university. What I think you have what I call the politics of despair, and they're always people have prepared to pick up on dispatch. And we usually with an aggressive cudgel and take what appears to be a lead. I think the nineteen thirties in Germany, particularly where the economy was even worse than it was in the great crash in America and Great Britain the depression. Is it is it an accident when you get depression? You get dicta- dictatorship temptation could be on together in uniform, and these these spiritually negative tendencies if you live from the spiritual dimension in life life is full of opportunities in today's as beautiful as it was in the sixties or any other time. But it doesn't seem that way doesn't we ought to the inner we living in and I think we're less alive. Tomorrow times are these the sixties would you say were the best of times and the worst of times, I think it all depends on where you were for me. Personally. It was not the best of times. It was a marvelous time to be a child if you had very interesting family, which I did even though my my parents were very conservative. They were also excited about the future, and and their part in it and that of their children, I. I think if you've got hope you you're going to have the best of times, you know, if you give up hope you're going to see the worst. They they always go together. These two two aspects of life, and you've got to be able to live in in the face of the other dimension. You've got to accept that half of life is always going to be what you don't want all appears to be threatening. And. Have to say that I will be done on earth as it is in heaven. You have to bring into this us your experience of the heavenly. So you can't get out of it by denying they harsh realities of of natural life in this life, but we we have spiritual. And and and every other means to deal with these things while here in the United States, we went through as you mentioned the tragedy of the Kennedy assassination in sixty three. Then his brother dies and sixty eight Martin Luther King gets gunned down. Then then we turn the table and sixty nine and land on the moon in that you're for your seems to come back again. But that was it was the sixties were rough times that we have the Cuban missile crisis in one thousand nine hundred sixty two I think he had it not been for music Tobias, a lot of people would have gone crazy. Oh, absolutely. Sure. You're right. I mean, what is so incredible. And you're talking about we take so many things to granted. I mean, my publisher told me some years ago that he was beaten up in New York City for having long hair in the early. I believe that people who stood out against this the tide of growing up war in the far east at that time, we're taking real risks. So they weren't having a party in that sense. And you know, a lot of people took the took the Knox. And I'm not sure how much we appreciate what they've given to us in terms of expanding. They they lie the possibilities of liberty. So now you of course, you're right. It was an apocalyptic there. There was much greater fear than of nuclear holocaust. It was far more realistic because the Russian sorry the Soviet empire of that. Aired really did look. Like, a great great monoliths that was going to fall on us. That was the sort of feeling about it. And yet at the same time you had this people didn't just cower up and wrap themselves into a ball. Do you have this young generation which says, well, we don't want to go in this direction? We want a different kind of world and while that was a tiny minority. I do believe that the greatest changes in human history. Other always the result of a committed doesn't necessarily mean that politically I mean, spiritually committed minority who have belief and faith in the future. And you know, people say, where's the leadership has leadership? Well, the whole thing is I recall Bob Dylan song was in. Don't follow leaders watch the parking meters. We've got to take a greater individual responsibility for our lives. And so in the H is you did have this freeing up in the capitalist dimension of things with people encouraged to have their own businesses, especially in England. This was quite another lie dead. Don't be dependent on the state and so forth. Well, that's fine. If we we're not going to be dependent on the state, then the state can no longer be dependent on us. So you have anyway, the other thing about the Sixers really is that it's it's it didn't end. It's it's kept going. Yes..

England Tobias Churton United States Bob America Kennedy California Mexico Beatles Unscreened Tahoe City Bob Dylan Richard Seibel Soviet Union depression Richard seat Rolling Stones Alastair Crawley Elvis Presley
"unscreened" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines were checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So soviet. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm bob. Uh-huh. Who City California? Well, welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I gotta solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now. A little bit crazy. But if we built. Two thousand mile energy source with types that can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial community joint ventures between Mexico in America and Richard. A cost plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industry or community with an open and costs immigrants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Domain. Oil well on the property that you weren't for eminent domain and gives the owners of the property of the oil. The production the other finance security on the border. Richard C Blum is Diane science husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob. It's not a bad idea. You know, I I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias. You there on that George? There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties. We'll also get into the Alister Crowley story as well. But this is an amazing book. And it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say a lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But the actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I registered in in six months in a sort of white east of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed, getting it off my chest. Is it what what was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in nineteen sixty I was born deaf. I couldn't hear until I was three..

Bob England California Mexico George Richard C Blum Unscreened Alister Crowley Tobias Churton USA America six months
"unscreened" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on WLAC

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines were checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So soviet. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm bob. Our host City, California. Welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, gosh solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now little bit crazy. But if we built a two thousand mile energy source with types. With fluid that can be heated up to steam under pressure. That can run steam generators set can run industrial communities joint ventures between Mexico in America and give Richard Seibel a cost plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open and costs grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Eminent domain. Oil well on the property that you want for imminent domain and gives the owner of the property cut of the oil. The production of the other finance security on the border. Richard C Plum is Diane Feinstein's husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob. It's not a bad idea. You know, I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias. You there on that George? There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the midwest. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties will also get into the Alister Crawley story as well. But this is an amazing book. And it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But the actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I.

Bob England California Mexico Unscreened Alister Crawley Richard Seibel Richard C Plum Diane Feinstein Tobias Churton George USA America six months
"unscreened" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So soviet. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? Bob. Dr Who City California. Well, welcome to the show. Bob what's going on? What's on your mind? Well, I gotta solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now. A little bit crazy, but we built a two thousand mile energy source with types with fluid that can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial community. She joint ventures between Mexico in America, and Richard C Blum cost plus contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open and costs grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Domain. Oil well on the property that you want for eminent domain and gives the owner the property of the oil. Production of the oil and the other finance security on the border. Richard C Plum is Diane funk. Science husband. Well, you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. You know, I I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line to bias. You there on the George? There you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed. What time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the midwest. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight in on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties will also get into the Alister Crowley story as well. But this is an amazing book, and it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But an actual riding time. I can only stand the intensity for about six months. So I I registered in in six months in a sort of white piece of enthusiasm and interest. Indeed like getting it off my. What was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything about the sixties was interesting to me because I was born in.

Bob England California Mexico Unscreened Alister Crowley Richard C Plum Richard C Blum Tobias Churton USA America six months Diane funk
"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"unscreened" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Nine we're going to go until we find out if we get the bias back or not we're going to go with open lines. We're checking to see where he is right now he was on the line, but somehow disappeared those calls from England sometimes just drop out, and they're gone and. So soviet. So let's go to some of the calls to get things going, and I'm gonna go screen them. Unscreened calls like the old days. Welcome to the program who are you? And where are you? I'm bob. Oh, ho City, California. Where welcome to the show. Bob. What's going on? What's on your mind? Well. Solution to the barrier between California and Mexico. Well, tell us because somebody needs a good solution. Okay. Now little bit crazy. But we built two thousand mile energy source with types with fluid can be heated up to steam under pressure that can run steam generators set can run industrial commodities joint ventures between Mexico in America and Richard. I contract to design and build the energy source and the industry community with an open and cost grants could be employed on the project until they can enter the USA legally. Domain. Oil well on the property that you weren't for eminent domain and gives the owner of the property cut of the oil. Production of the oil on the other finance security on the border. Richard C is Diane Feinstein's husband while you're not insane, Bob, it's not a bad idea. I would guess it would be better than spending that kind of money to build a border wall. They tell me that Tobias Churton is back on the line Tobias. So you there on George there, you go this great introduction for you. And we couldn't find you you disappeared. Something in there. Yeah. Indeed. Indeed, what time is it in England right now in England. It is eight thirteen in the morning there. It is. Well, here I'm in the mid west. It's two o'clock in the morning here. It's just turned midnight in on the west coast, and it's in the wee hours on the east coast. So welcome to us. I'm going to talk with you about your latest work, the spiritual meaning of the sixties will also get into the Alastair Crawley story as well. But this is an amazing book, and it may be one of the biggest books in terms of size and thickness I've ever seen how long did it take you to compile this? Well, I'd say lifetime in the sense that the book was I lived before it was written growing up in the sixties and all that. But the actual writing time, I can only stand the intensity. About six months. So I it in in six months in a sort of white east of enthusiasm interest. Indeed. Getting it off my chest. Is it worth? What was it about the sixties that captured your attention everything.

Bob England California Mexico Tobias Churton Unscreened ho City Alastair Crawley Diane Feinstein USA Richard C America six months
Beyoncé and Jay-Z announce "On the Run II" tour

Lori and Julia

02:15 min | 4 years ago

Beyoncé and Jay-Z announce "On the Run II" tour

"To be seen as an adult yeah and and um and then he doesn't really want to be asked about any thing about political about his dad i would assume so even though five yuval him on twitter he gets very political he's great yeah i'll a i get a kick out of his way to see fall from the democrats the republicans dole god's house yeah yeah well you know arnold is over and over and over his true this is true yeah you know i mean i can't be blind the apprentice care fathalla thing was my favorite i'll my gosh that was unbelievable that was out state were really quite key every johnny did you see them in person did you get a chance to see them no i did it was slim had so many people did have chemistry with each other like was it obvious an evidence kind of fun in there a couple of reviews that i read i guess these to have crazy chemistry i want a degree i view it if they were interacting grain i bet it shows unscreened they must sad i don't know what all the entourage highly send people thank you about that afterwards naval gotha publicists merrin jersey omega paul yep another preval says here this luckily from here yeah there were alive anywhere we're going to give those tickets we all week johnnie talked about last hour that beyond say announces on the run tour two with jay z and she's broken the internet and contain yourself she took to facebook to announce the tour lung center has been this was rumored a couple of weeks ago because something went up and then went down about an on the run to on the run tour apart two and it was the black and white clip that she posted with some behind the scenes home videos of beyond say and j gallivan teen about their place and um her announcement broke the website two and august eighth in minneapolis at us banks stadium tickets go on sale march nineteen wow yeah why will be sold out on march nine t pathetic 22nd interval that's what we're looking at so if you're a big big fair and you might want to check out if there's an early booking thing getting a member of the.

Arnold Johnny Johnnie Minneapolis Jay Z Facebook Us Banks Stadium
Trump's video game meeting: Who's attending?

Orlando's News at Noon with Scott Anez

01:46 min | 4 years ago

Trump's video game meeting: Who's attending?

"And yes i do have opened likes telling us to stop interrupting programs for our traffic alerts to that does happen today president trump summons video game executive said the white house suggesting violence unscreened may trigger school shootings the president has repeatedly pointed to violence in video games and movies and talking about reallife violence including last month's shooting massacre thing the images and scenarios children's c can shape their thoughts and lead them to lash out abc's karen travers reports he's floated the possibility of restricting content as he shifts the focus off gun control the industry though argues that video games are not the problem will have an update on that on orlando's evening news also will have a big update on this and the president's pushed assigned tariffs on imported steel and aluminum this morning he tweeted about a three thirty event at the white house video games had two tariffs at three thirty if you're keeping track our washington watchdog jamie dupree reports said after the administration initially declared no exceptions are now may be carveouts for canada and mexico we also just heard about australia possibly being in their abc's cecilia vega though says she's hearing it's actually up in the air whether the president will sign it or not the president is having a cabinet meeting right now let's listen for second were negotiating nafta right now i think we're doing quite well it was always my feeling that i would hello rise cabinet meetings yet it an interesting that he has said of this cabinet meeting just a minute ago that he is going to make his announcement this afternoon on those tariffs so locks going on at the white house today scotland with president trump right off the eye and we are on top of it if there is news that comes out of it we will take you live to the white house gene thank you 1205 you're news ninety six five wdbo get your weather and traffic every six minutes during your afternoon drive it's gonna be a beautiful afternoon across central florida just on the chilly side will stay with at northwest breeze as we go through the day despite the.

Executive White House President Trump ABC Orlando Canada Cecilia Vega Florida Donald Trump Karen Travers Washington Jamie Dupree Mexico Australia Scotland Six Minutes