17 Burst results for "University of british columbia"

"university british columbia" Discussed on Future Ecologies

Future Ecologies

07:49 min | 5 months ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Future Ecologies

"Their NACRE. or The pearly inner layer of the shell. And like almost everything else that we've discussed around cup. Forests abalone are delicacy that's prized in Haida culture and around the world. At. Rooney's is is another animal that grazes or is on the bottom of the ocean. and down, we use it for food again or we used to am. It's amazing if you eat it right at the water, I remember. As a young girl, my father would take us out. We'd get abalone and you didn't die for it. You just took what was along the shoreline that low tide. It was a way of conservation. And so now when when? People are diving Even though they're protected, they're not. At their very important. What does she mean by protected? Northern Abalone, which is the species that occurs along the coast, is currently listed as endangered under the species at risk act, and to tell the story of how it got that way. I'm going to bring one more person into the conversation I am Charles Menzies I from the North Coast of British Columbia member cat'll nation faculty member university, British, Columbia and I spent most of my adult career, either catching fish or is I'd like to say writing about fish. Charles is actually selling himself short here. He writes about shellfish to. and. Specifically abalone or in my leg, the sonic language spoken by the Kotla. BILHA. Charles has lots to say about Bela. Well, it's a tasty. It's one of the most delicious sea creatures one consume. People sometimes think it's Kinda tough and hard, and there's an element of that because you're eating the foot of an animal, and so that in terms of way that it's like a snail single show over its back, and there's strong kind of Suction Cup like foot, and that's mostly what that that is what you eat. What out of the shell you scrape off the little bit of the Viscera. Throw that it's there. You clean it a little bit to get the black around the edges, and then you kind of some people like tenderizer them, but you don't really have to. You can slice them. FRY them steam them. Dry them the older woman. I talked to some of the older matriarchs in the community and they will talk about. The old days Yohe, time drying abalone, and where they'd I steam them in a pit of the beach, and then after they were steamed to cook the taken out and skewered on the Little Cedar steaks, and then hung in the in the in the smoke house, and so you can almost imagine you could. You could kind of hear them clunking if you're banging them together. As A. Write about this one of my papers, but as a as a kid I remember we'd always got a few to abalone would turn up somewhere somehow either dad will bring it home from the bowed or somebody with drop it off, and I can remember him seeing because of course, he's old style kind of guy, so he only cook certain things. It was kind of like steaks or carved the Turkey and prepares the Turkey so. So by my mum do most the cooking, but when abalone or fish like look on turned up, he did those but I remember he. Of course he had a big production. He take these and he'd melt. Hit them with a mallet. He dropped them in a Nagwa. She'd put them in flour and he throw them in the Pan. And you know, and they really kind of look. They literally do kind of melt away And I know my comparative to tell you what it tastes like necessarily going to help because I think it tastes like the lateral muscles in a sea cucumber. So you know, how is that going to help people and I actually have eaten the lateral muscles of a sea cucumber, so I think I get the idea. I can only imagine because dear listeners. We were unable to sample Bela in preparation for this episode due to the fact that it's endangered and therefore illegal to harvest right. So how did that happen? Charles says that important cultural foods that weren't commercially viable to settlers tended to remain largely within Kotla Control under the radar, so to speak and up until the nineteen seventies. Settlers weren't that interested in bill in a weird way, there is no no pressure on Abadi stocks up into the Seventies. And they were sitting there. People at harvest them. There's a recreational harvest. There was a modest. Commercial Harvest, but then in the seventies there were major changes in the fishing industry. This was about the time that Jim was first heading up to the Aleutians, and when whaling was really picking up in the north, Pacific, the Japanese fish market to expand in a different way, there's a lot of investment into Canada and other parts of the world and became a species of interest. And within about fifteen years, apple only were destroyed as a commercial fishery. And it's every single maneuver that was made to abalone in terms of controlling regulating them led to increase catches. Led to greater chasing them down and lower diminishing stocks, and by the time they get to the mid somewhere around the late eighties, they basically shut it down and made it illegal for anybody to capture abalone. The Department of fisheries and oceans closed the abalone fishery in nineteen ninety, but they didn't just close a commercial fishery. They closed all fisheries. But as Barbara points out, it hasn't worked even though the laws. -sposed to protect it. It's a commodity that's very precious and goes into the black market. And people who are diving for other things. Are speculated to have access to those things at the same time and. On HYDAC, why, because we have, big islands. And big water around us. It's hard to keep track. What's happening everywhere. Once the ABALONE stocks were depleted by extractive fisheries. It doesn't take a lot of illegal harvesting to keep them from recovering. At the same time, first nations people like the Haida and the Kotla who highly prize abalone are now criminalised if they attempt to harvest it, even though it wasn't their fault, the stocks were depleted. A, whole generation of young people, indigenous and non-indigenous, like ourselves has never tasted the signature food of the cup forests. And for the elders who remember eating it, it's even harder. When our people get old then they're in their last days. That usually one of the foods set they ask for. They would like to have. abalone before they pass on, and so it's very emotional for us. And we talk about it all the time. How we'd like to be able to. Bring them what pay want. and. You can't easily because of the Canadian. Government Renewal Yeah. That's one of the big prop loose right I mean these. Implications. Of lease extract events.

Charles Menzies Kotla Rooney Turkey Nagwa Columbia Department of fisheries Little Cedar Bela apple Yohe faculty member Abadi Pan British Columbia Kotla Control Canada Barbara Jim Pacific
"university british columbia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:08 min | 7 months ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Your eighties cover band goodwill doing stuff create jobs find your nearest donation center at goodwill dot org a message from good will in the ad council this report is sponsored by ruby Tuesday by heat as are back at ruby Tuesday stop in for fresh grilled veggie shrimp or chicken fajitas for only seven ninety nine authentic flavors that turn a meal into a fiesta only for a limited time only at ruby Tuesday weather forecast from news radio seven hundred W. well after starting the teens this morning but the sky is clear will see a mostly sunny sky throughout the day and a high of thirty four still under the influence of high pressure and it'll be a cold night down to seventy but tomorrow clouds slowly increase for the temperature improves to forty from your severe weather station I'm nine first warning meteorologist Jennifer catch mark newsradio seven hundred WLW right ours clear it's twenty degrees right now have a traffic issue this morning again westbound seventy four shut down just past one twenty eight because of a wrong way crash our next update at seven thirty on newsradio separate W. O. W. eight thousand cars Wyler dot com your shot at one thousand dollars now text of the two hundred two hundred you'll get a confirmation text and in why this nationwide contest to change that two hundred two hundred Hey good morning seven oh eight seven hundred W. well W. no different ways to fight drug addiction and this is one I never would've crossed my mind in Vancouver British Columbia not Washington Vancouver British Columbia how about an opioid vending machine this is the fight overdoses and an opioid vending machine will dispense opioids to individuals who are certified medically to be addicted other machines a pilot program university British Columbia does it the first loss to Vancouver in December so the machine which has been described as resembling an eight hundred pound ATM dispensers tablets of the.

"university british columbia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"That's right it's all true okay everybody Dennis Prager happiness our second hour every Friday a Daniel in Cleveland I really really really really want to talk to you but it's not all the happiness subject please call as soon as soon as this hour and so you can get in in the next hour where we talk about anything okay Daniel because it's a very important to me to take that call so I will let you go now thank you my friend okay don't forget soon as is our ends colon and yes so if it's not on the subject so to a John in Peotone Illinois me I'm gonna let you go because of thought on the happiness topic but I would like to hear from you as well all right thank you my friend with that go all right so folks this is the happiness our I am committed to keeping it about happiness it is about V. all the studies that show if you talk to strangers you'll be happier so very important stuff and you know mother studies fan but as I said if they're if they're right there right so here goes so I told you this university British Columbia psychologists two of them tested whether short conversations with strangers could lift moods so they asked them they ask participants to enter busy coffee shop grab a beverage half would get in and get out the half would strike up a conversation with the cashier quote we found that people who were randomly assigned to turn this economic transaction into a quick social interaction left star books in a better mood and they even felt a greater sense of belonging in their community that is exactly right I've advocated this all of my life I have naturally done and I'm very lucky if many people most people this is not natural to talk to strangers and this article which is a really good article this article makes makes it clear to me why why would people math talk to strangers and one of the reasons that it gives is very interesting social anxiety could be preventing these types of interactions says Nicholas appellee a university of Chicago behavioral scientist one day during a daily train ride he noticed something paradoxical people social creatures we're basically ignoring one another why he wondered if connecting with others makes us happy do we so often avoid it either solitude really is more enjoyable than talking to strangers he figured or we have mistaken assumptions holding us back his curiosity led to a series of experiments revealing that train and bus commuters who interacted with other passengers experienced a more pleasant ride even when they believe they would prefer the solitude of say reading a book and now a coupon it is fear that the person sitting next to us won't enjoy talking to us that makes us keep to ourselves Eppley found is that true that I I that is so it makes sense re read it to you again it is fear that the person sitting next to us warm enjoyed talking to us that makes us keep to ourselves so is that is that what prevents you from talking to a stranger here is what I do on airplanes or I I fly every week of the year so if I if I miss one week then I'll fly you know twice the next week but I I fly I'm sure a hundred times a year at least so the what do I do I should I sit down am I always say hi if the if the person is already seated among next to them I hi and sometimes it is clear they have zero desire to interact with me so number one I am never insulted I'm not insulted for a lot of reasons one if I can't be insulted it's not me it's they don't want to interact with the person next to them number two I'm very interesting I get paid to talk well it's very a loss by the way I don't want to talk for a long period of time I have I do so much work on planes that I I actually benefit work wise I benefit from airplane rides but so much work I get them but I do want to have some interaction so if they don't they don't but even before I was paid to talk I I was the same way you don't want to talk to me alright fine so why why why am I in so I'm it's very hard to insult me that is a is worthy of its own happiness our view or which I thought I did recently we'll have to do it again are you easily hurt and that's that's a very sad thing if your so anyway I'll say hi so so then what if the if the if there's a smile and a hockey then I feel better I am actually happy I want to have a minimum abound but I still want some amount of social interaction with the person I will be with for the next three to five six hours right because I do a lot of cross country trips that's five and a half hours but taxiing and and waiting to take off it's really six and a half hours you sitting next to a person for six and a half hours and you don't say anything that's not normal look if I start up something in the elevator I'm certainly going to start something up and here's a good one so I I have a typical question are you from here or there right so let's say I'm in Chicago warm on the plane so are you from Chicago or you from wherever we're flying back to LA for me are you from here they're all I'm from here what brings you to well I I I love when people sit so interesting very often someone will say my work so I off over thinking well wanted to just like say what your work in I don't think he may maybe they work for the CIA maybe they can't reveal more my work well and what is your work all.

Cleveland Dennis Prager five six hours one week one day
"university british columbia" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

13:35 min | 1 year ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on KNSS

"Number one talk ninety seven and thirteen thirty AM as an first Marcussen filling in and just getting started really with our conversation with bird Bernie Taylor Bernie has authored a couple of books biological timing and before a Ryan finding the face of the hero we're dealing with the question tonight are we alone in the cosmos Bernie earlier you talked a little bit about the importance the moon has for animals is that something that exists for all animals to they all have western action or has some good question and what we're talking to the California growing you we're gonna go fly across the Pacific Ocean to the island of Taiwan so the the rogue province of the people's Republic of China and all on the island of Taiwan there's a indigenous people so like need of America it's a given not that they're not original Chinese and they're called the yeah I meet people and every every late spring the ME now go out in the new moon account noon the newest twelve last twelve twelve new moon says the count from the last twelve new moons ago and they go out for a fish called the flying fish and the garage in the dark of the night in the hold up their torches up and if and if the flying for sure they are they are the best fly around the catch of internet so they bring back and had a slight the ceremony if the flying fish doesn't it isn't there they wait one more new moon so it's a twenty twenty nine more days and then the the flying fish is always there well the importance of this flying fish is amazing is that it resets the appearance of the migratory flying fish resets their entire biological calendar for hundreds of species of marine life so when the flying witches later so let's say hypothetically the elf and Judah and yeah the jacks and whatever else they that they they they harvest in the marine world so hundreds of species of fish that the yeah I mean I've been timing since time immemorial so high that the hot ten at least ten thousand years if not twenty thousand years that the army have been doing this or and their predecessors so is is important to us which sure as heck important to the enemy because they don't have they don't have historically enough cosco's name McDonald's and everything else that we do and if they miss that they missed if they were if they're clock was you know when they hear the yellowfin tuna and and they were out looking for sea turtles because they are they were off of the clock well they they miss the food so it's important for that historically and still port is the enemy to keep this calendar it is there Baltimore tradition in the Pacific Northwest the United States where I live native Americans have the same tradition but it's it's salmon and they would tie the salmon to other animals so near near the the twelve people near Seattle they go out in the late spring and they look for the white pine butterfly in the White Plains butterfly appear as they wait for the next high high tide around this than the new in the full moons and that sets them in motion to go find the salmon because they believe that will because the the salmon in their in their tradition in a mess it's time to that white pine butterfly and every it is in the same way that the hunches beach the marine life for time to the the for the flying fish but they're not exactly time one to the other they're both from lunar calendars that's the important thing and in the Pacific Northwest here Sam and earlier later formula next but they're not really that way they're just on a lunar calendar the moon is out of sync with the sun the lyric the lunar lunar cycle light is twenty nine half days twenty nine a half days divided by three sixty five and divide by twenty four twenty nine F. days is eleven day short so hypothetically the salmon migrate during the new moon on January twelfth one year it would be January first of next year so the reason the salmon are perceived to be earlier later in the same way the white came by to fly and the flying fish is that both times the sun and the moon which is out of sync with each other which of course is Easter Easter is the first full moon of sixty succeeds that as a first Sunday that succeeds the first full moon after the vernal equinox that's what you strings around one year for the next of course east you can use it Easter calendar the time fish migratory fish I mean we know where it's not you know with a fish needs to come from yeah so as a concept this is since the beginning of man as far as we know this has been like the big kahuna this is the big knowledge to be able to know where and when you should be and how you're going to find the food this is a native Americans if they showed up late earlier for the salmon they miss their food right and they died end of story so the fish have the connection what about other kinds of animals well good question well as you as you move up I love this I live in Oregon near Portland as you move up the Columbia River the native American tribes not just have salmon the calendar but they have black here deal and deer and they have helped and so and that that for example Thompson in the Indians work for from British Columbia they instead of resetting offer the flying fish they should reset their calendar or further the right of the black tailed deer of course the black show there's a section station so so many so many so many days later you can tell when you would know when they they dropped their young and so and then when they would drop their antlers and so on and so the entire year of the the Thompson Indians etcetera blacktail deer and the other animals fit in there do you have a big job a big game hunt never okay and so this is one of those big you know the elk and deer hunters they talk about this but it was never no one actually had the the date or to actually show this Friday in biological time will actually modern times but native Americans knew which since time immemorial the Toms River calendar Thompson eating counter goes back before white men arrived and they no longer use this calendar we have it we have the record of it from anthropologists who who recorded all over a hundred years ago and so these large animals have it as well there was a university British Columbia biologist name should Claire and he looked at this question among the staring Gerrity Wilder this notice are getting older is a huge migrations across Tanzania and you see the cross the river and the crocodiles jump on them you've seen on National Geographic right sure you see the picture okay well if you want to go see that if you want to go see the ceremony will reduce migration and you caught the trip that the African travel agency and you say I want to go June first I'm gonna say well we don't look at that way we actually look at it as a lunar calendar because the surgery wildebeest migrate by the moon and not only the microphone room with Sinclair from the wrist British Columbia he demonstrated that the start of the right other staring Yuri wildebeest was time to the moon and how they did that was a look at that the young the juveniles the game was that the juvenile may back calculated the just station here to figure out when these Adam when the Serengeti wildebeest were having their right we just thinking it is a concept a synchronous and now just to the Thompson Indians a British Columbia which timing offer the blacktail deer on different continents have the same biological or scientific knowledge that goes back since time immemorial so no big deal this is like the most important so let's say after fire okay after fire the end of the time these animals and know where when they're going to be based on the sun and the moon is like that it is the most important thing we ever figured out and without that we'd be like a chimpanzee or guerrilla smart animals but they can't tell time this way in fact as far as we know we are the only animal on this planet that can do this second consciously tell time so the black tailed deer they respond to the light dark cycles as does the salmon and the the flying before flying versus title and but every all these other animals respond to natural cues they can't think for him back in time you know rainy tank and screw member had a bad day last week it's can't tell you which day it was we I can tell you which day it was and that's the difference in cost and all the other animals it's like the big it's that it is the most important concept get possibly imagine how much time we have left before the break well it's a floating breaks so that's a hard question answer okay that's right okay okay so what we're going to so this this question of the big the big game to the animals I wrote biological time was writing biological time someone said to me no you should really think about isn't even merit and have this tradition maybe people had it in in the palace at you know tend to you know forty thousand years ago so look at the caves in France replace coolest go famous cave the images go back to about seventeen thousand years ago and on one wall this cave you have this this huge red deer red deer is like an elk in North America and got thirteen dot that lead to a box and this red deer in a running it's running it's got huge and says got it it's got as back up it's got this huge billow of like it's not like I'm hard pressed there so it's in the morning the that that red deer is Kong in the capitals that's what they do and that's the start of the right in the same ways for the Serengeti wildebeest and so native so if you go on this these caves you can actually see that they have one for the case of an older running animals on the part of the key they have well you know the females dropping their young they knew this and they had to go to to live the actually to survive in in and have time to make all this fabulous art so native Americans who work native Americans were lived in brand year they came down about fifteen thousand years ago their brand you which is that it was was a land mass between Alaska and Siberia when the lotions what were lower and they were there for about for about ten thousand years Soviet fifteen thousand to ten thousand that's twenty five thousand years ago so the the let's go Katie which has the same tradition is is closer to our time in the native Americans have come down up from brand yeah and so this tradition that the native Americans have a telling time by the by the sun the the the sun and the moon goes deeper in time goes even deeper than about telling the cave art at the skull from seventeen thousand years ago and I believe that a great deal this this keyboard in Europe is about telling time of the animals because if you can't tell the time you can't find the food right now they didn't have they didn't have you know they didn't have watches as we have and they didn't have you know big freezers and if you miss the food you messed everything yeah at and when I start working the biological time work that was about in about fifteen years ago and I would give presentations of the Fisher Wallace ages who was cooperating on because we're working together in the data and that okay presentations to the tribes and the Columbia basin and just go to the tribal councils and I'd get about half with the presentation and then they start talking to each other because they had the calendars but they never recognized they were just following the calendars and I'm not not just on the the following the counters the never recognized that they will lose out of sync with the sun they were just going from one animal to the other harvest them yeah and they had moved they also had no mess and it would be after the American locally based and when he called back when it when is the time to catch the salmon the gonna tell you the story the all tell the story of that hi to the swallows and the Senate and after about twenty times during the storm like maybe there's something to this story what they say in their midst is that the swallows Percy the salmon and the same with the white pine butterfly proceeds salmon village Wallops up in Seattle the only issue a little more about the cave paintings are these things that you've been able to see your digit you've just wrote about the need to all publicly available images that you can find a lot I have not been was contact actually known can go let's go it's been close for about fifteen years the roving exposition X. exposition of this go but if you go to if you type in red deer for let's go you'll see the image because actually I actually do you go to my before my YouTube channel before Ryan dot com all spelled out I have been the gist of the stuff I do videos too many videos people get the idea and you can see all the sort of stuff I don't the presentation I dip into for strongly university of quiet few months ago is also on my is on my before Ryan dot com and you can give the hope the presentation all the images all the the topics that we're gonna talk about tonight or but the actual show the images of the calendars of the.

Bernie Taylor Bernie Ryan seventeen thousand years ten thousand years fifteen years one year twenty five thousand years fifteen thousand years twenty thousand years forty thousand years hundred years eleven day
"university british columbia" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on The Big Story

"Of stuff the first to go? When papers have to make a call. I understand that newspapers are in trouble. And that's something. I think everybody kind of knows and that stabs are being cut. But. What who makes the call on what gets covered in? Why? If this is so critical to to an election. Does it go away? Well, it's not just political news. That's disappearing. I mean, this is part of a wider problem. So for instance, I dug around for some numbers and talk to the union that represents journalists in in a bunch of different newspapers across the country and even I- who've been looking at this issue for like a five or six years now was shocked by the number of. So for instance, the Ottawa citizen in the early nineties had one hundred ninety people in their newsroom today. They have fifty the Kingston week standard. You know, winner of number of Michener couple of women Schnur awards for public service journalism in nineteen ninety used to have fifty five people in its newsroom today. Eight. Wow. And the story the Montreal gazette used to have two hundred and seventy five people now they have forty one. So it's not just political news. That's falling by the wayside. It's all sorts of news in the community and some research been done in the states on to. Aspects of this. The first is what this penny Abernathy has called the emergence of ghost newspapers. And the idea is that it still publishes or they're still a newscast or or they're still a TV cast, but the capacity of that newsroom to actually tell people keep people informed about what's going on in their communities. So limited that is there, but barely so I think that's so it's not just that news organized. News outlets are closing. And we know that two hundred seventy five have closed since two thousand and eight it's not just the closings. It's the it's the sort of scaling back to the point where newsrooms are really struggling to tell political stories, but also to tell all sorts of other stories in communities, tell me a little bit about how you try to determine the scale of this problem and what the local news research project does. Well, we've done a couple of projects we're working on a couple of others. But I had this question, you know, it's a big country every little new community has a different media landscape. And we know that there are problems. But how do we track that? And we had a real difficulty in being able to measure it and track it, so I was working I worked with a colleague at UB, see John Corbett university British Columbia, and we created this crowd source map called the local news map and the map allows people who know their own communities to go in and added information whenever a local news outlet closes or one opens or there's a service reduction or there's a service increase, and so we've got data now going back to two thousand and eight and it shows the two hundred seventy five local news outlets of all kinds. So we're talking newspapers radio stations TV stations have closed since two thousand and eight in about two hundred different communities. Most of those closings actually have been of local community newspapers. What was maybe a two newspaper town is often. Now, just a one newspaper town and people say, well, okay. Who cares? You know, you still have one newspaper. But that means that there are fewer journalists tracking what's going on. And also, you don't have. A diversity of perspectives. You know, it was interesting. A talked recently to the mayor of Collingwood, and they've got a scandal underway up there in judicial inquiry into a into a situation where they sold off part of their public utility and the request about how the money was used and the actual sale process. And he said, you know, I think actually if we'd had more active, vibrant, robust, local news system here that this situation may not have developed because more questions would have been asked throughout the whole process. So that's you know, an example. And I thought it's kind of a powerful example, where even the mayor's thinking like there's there's a problem here of what happens when you don't have a really active local news environment with reporters were keeping track of what those guys in those people in power are doing you kind of mentioned a minute ago that when one of the two local papers in an area closes some people will say who cares, and I feel and I don't think too many people would disagree that there's been a rise in anti media sentiment. In Canada and the United States, especially how can you fight against that? And are people reacting to the work you're doing with alarm, or with the who cares attitude that you spoke of well, I think you're right in that people in many cases shrug there's a few things going on first of all his people are struggling and saying who cares? You know, the local papers closing because often what they have is one of these ghosts newspapers that I mentioned recently. So what they've they open the paper or they look at what's online, and they think well, there's nothing there like softens going on. There's nothing they're they're nothing's happening in town. It's an interesting survey in two thousand seventeen that they ask people about their local news situation. An eighty six percent said they still would they would still get news. Even if they're local paper goes out of business. So they, you know, people are thinking, okay. It's still going to happen. I'll still find out what's going on. And even people who lived in a one newspaper town eighty four percent of them said they still stay informed, even if that one newspaper closed so people I think maybe they're getting more aware of the issue. But I think there's a lack of awareness of where news actually comes from. I think media literacy and understanding how how news where news comes from. And it doesn't come from Facebook. It comes from news organizations that are producing news in that gets picked up and disseminated on Facebook aside from obviously promoting themselves on social media everywhere else our politicians heading into this election cognizant of the decline of local news. And are they change ING what they do because of it? Yes. I think that's happening. I mean, first of all. Nobody phones them up to interview them anymore. So that's a bit of an issue or men, in many cases, you know, I talked to a politician out in the name. Oh, and she said she was in Ottawa most for the last few years, and she said that she was so concerned about and recognize the lack of capacity for journalists to cover the stories that she was involved in that when her staff started preparing the press releases from her office, they started phoning up local politicians and local service agencies and getting comments from them and actually putting that into their press releases. So that the journalists could just rewrite the press releases in another case, I spoke with a guy who runs a think tank on rural Ontario, and he said, you know, they produce all sorts of interesting stats one of which was some some numbers showing how uneven availability of long term care beds were depending on where you live. So one small town might have a lot of beds available in another wooden. So what's not about? But he said, you know, they used to if they put out. Statistics like that in the past. They'd get a phone call about it from journalists or more than one in many cases. But he said, you know, that's really dried up, and now what he sees happening is in many cases, just the actual press. Release itself is taken inches plopped into the newspaper with no filtering of it. And no questioning of what it says by journalists and no interpretation of it and more importantly, no work on explaining what the local situation is. You know, because there's two districts would be province-wide. But well, okay. But how's that playing out here in our community?

Facebook Ottawa Montreal gazette Collingwood penny Abernathy Michener Kingston Canada UB Ontario United States John Corbett university Britis eighty four percent eighty six percent six years
"university british columbia" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"DHA's important for amount nation of your central performers. Need PA for your rewards? If you wanna take a look at pro inflammatory fats. They come from animals, they're eating grains or GM. So the eight grass-fed beef that has the same fatty acid profiles wild salmon. So fools that say eating meat is bad or fats bad. These people don't understand that are ancient man, a primarily fats knots and patially meat when it could get it, and they berries and seeds, and that's that actually are high in fats, their pro anti-inflammatories, everyone knows that all on coconut. Well, coq to cook with. Well, the main thing that's band is to take partially hydrogenated oils and heat them and become trans fats those are inflammatory. So you don't take any partially hydrogenated oil or heat and eventual partially drive needed. That's deadly and donate meat. That's let's say grain fans. Coconut coconut that'd be coconut all manning MC TBN chain, triglycerides, which by the way, our fuel your brain and your your muscles. For example, are Kita powers not just weight loss. It's fueled athletic performance brain performance. So you have to somebody that's got post traumatic brain injury or Alzheimer's disease Parkinson's fuels neurons. So these doctors are grant if we brought up somebody's dishonorable documentaries ears is a biochemist ended, doctor he would say we can do a profile of your fatty acids, but I do profile actually fraction. It's your fatty acids of mega three six and nine tells you what's your ratio pro inflammatory anti inflammatory, fats and your diet. Basically oils are good not bad. What's bad is high is high sugar diets high glycemic index diets and things are pro insulin like aspartame span to and advertisements on their incredibly toxic. They have for example, aspartame decays to die keyed up papers, which is Jeff Hewlett additive. Formaldehyde which embalmed you and methyl alcohol. Make you blind by managing the retina in the back of the eye. So these doctors are idiots do not listen to them. No matter how many YouTube say put up next this lease Kansas. I'm hi my name is Lisa, and I'm one appear nature medical customers. I'd like to. Thank you, we excellent formation. I found on new medical dot com. It's always a great pleasure to read your articles on live in Kansas where I try to increase the awareness of different kinds of cholesterol. Good advance facial. She's talking about questrom, right? Right. Over the difference between good and bad cholesterol. Well, first off good class. Drawl is all that's not ostracized cluster. All is basically like a catcher's mitt. We had to study Dr Moskovitz as a biochemist at the university of British Columbia was a PHD biochemist and cardiologists and we under hundreds of of cluster all fractionation that university. British Columbia does reference lab in Lafayette, California, and cluster all doesn't do any which we had eskimos head cost Rawls, none of St. hundred which is considered really high but thirty five hundred and they had a little poach on their belt and the NAR wall blogger which is higher vitamin C them oranges from NAR wall, which is a type of whale of the north and the had seal flipper that was gum. They didn't eat white man's food in have p canned peas Brad alcohol or anything else. And so there are primarily oil. They would eat lots oils like eating chewing seal, blah, blah, blah, all day long or seal flipper, which is a lot of blob fats. They never got heart disease. Even though when you actually drew their blood separate likely milk when I was a kid in the fifties. It would separate and you try to steal the milk before. Mama got up and Puerto coffee, and what would happen is you get the cream on top because it would separate didn't when this modulation didn't get the cream anymore. Well, their blood would separate as we as I firstly do the bladder of the nurses would drive. So people have to understand is that fractionation of your blood will tell us which ones are prone flam, Tori, and the other thing I used eight yell and I can actually do test for measuring antibodies against oxidise. Doctors say, oh, that's a good question. I'll or back. They're idiots there. Blithering? Good good classroom. All foods have class draw in animals that are eating grass like grass-fed, lamb and beef, and what's bad any animal. That's fed grains, or GM food. All right. And then you wanna have if you're gonna have pimps haven't Revo the fish. It has to be fed not bottom feeder fish into pellets because what happens in really bad places bottom. Feeder fish that grab all the pollution of the bottom of the ocean. And they have been feed him as a feet to the salmon. So the Sammons bodies are not healthy, you want v salmon fed by good healthy feed or wild, salmon, or wild fish and donate fish or shellfish, especially from the Pacific Ocean. Because he contacted they concentrate radio toxins like Sese and says even women breast cancer does small animals like gerbils where did research says because breast cancer. In the olden days like just a few years ago that lease is to always have a good joke. Right member customers give me Joe jokes wants to while you James one Robert to over there Copeland as this people always give. Well, I just got one this week. And I thought you know, what I say joke in between all that Email because I think it's funny now, I don't know if our listeners. You know, I think it's funny. That's Ron northern California. What is the definite? It's not a long one get off your computer. Go ahead. I'm not looking at looking at you. I have. I'm just waiting for the joke. What is the nation of mistress? Some what is the definition of mistress mistress? Okay. Yeah. Someone between the Mr. and the mattress. Oh.

GM Kansas California breast cancer YouTube Alzheimer Pacific Ocean heart disease Jeff Hewlett university of British Columbia Lafayette NAR Lisa Dr Moskovitz Parkinson Mama Tori eskimos Sese
"university british columbia" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"That's bad that's bad strategy so and it's and it's all covered up with well what better if no one was ever offended who thinks that you know how naive you have to think that how you have to be pathologically naive which is the kind of naive that you could have grown out of but you will flee refuse to because you weren't willing to see what was in front of your face and then you impose that blind ninety on everyone else because you don't want to allow them to upset you're like rosy view your rosy view of yourself in the world it's just there's no end to how terrible that is one of various jute ride has recently my comment that freedom of speech is the most important freedom because it's the freedom by which we defend all about all the freedoms it strikes me that freedom of speech is most important not for the powerful of the elites it's actually for the minority groups a free society surely is one that allows those who swim against the todd and have a different perspective the right to do so without fee of mob all state sanctioned i had some personal experience i gave a talk and university british columbia about a year ago it was called a leftwing case for freedom of speech it's like it's really easy to make a left wing case for freedom of speech it's like i have the opportunity to make their suffering known right.

todd university british columbia
"university british columbia" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Sure you know you have great stories to tell you can now make your web sewed tape it and upload it somewhere and kind of build your following and that's all i can encourage people to do is create content and tell your story and and and hire people around you that support and uplift your story so that they can then tell their story zoe lister jones said a phenomenal job she did a film called bandaid that she wrote directed and starred in i play a small part in that film to and it was really important to her to create an all female crew every single person that worked on her film everybody the entire was was women and it was actually difficult for her to be able to do that for her film but she she did not relent on it at all and the film went to sundance did incredibly well at sundance but that was that was her trying to use her position in platform to open doors for other women and we were also excited to be part of the project just to kind of support her on what her vision was but it's women like that that makes such a huge difference hannah i wanted finish up with you with a maybe a proposition you've you've found all this incredible six s abroad but you are canadian you went to university british columbia went to ryerson what could we do get you back.

zoe lister jones sundance university british columbia ryerson
"university british columbia" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Ideas

"F thirty five jet fighter which has recently been offered to canada jet the pierce spray a former pentagon aerospace design engineer who appears in the film describes as the biggest piece of crap of any jet fighter produced for the united states military but it will cost the american taxpayer one and a half trillion dollars and is of no value to the us in any conflict that it is currently engaged in or likely to be engaged in for generations to come and this is the first way in which the trade makes us less safe spending got gum tournaments of money on equipment we don't need which means we're spending on what we do need this could in a narrow understanding of national security be more appropriate better equipment that we need to defend ourselves or it could if one takes a broader approach to sustainable security include vastly increased expenditure on climate change on inequality and all of its myriad consequences both at home and around the world andrew feinstein in vancouver he is head of corruption watch uk former south african mp and the author of two books about corruption in the arms trade his memoir after the party and the shadow world inside the global arms trade on which this talk is based the lecture was recorded in november as part of the wall exchange series a twiceyearly event presented by the peter wall institute for advanced these at the university british columbia i'm paul kennedy and you're listening to ideas you can hear ideas through these cbc radio app cbc dot c.

design engineer united states climate change vancouver uk series a peter wall institute university british columbia paul kennedy canada pentagon andrew feinstein south african trillion dollars
"university british columbia" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Ideas

"F thirty five jet fighter which has recently been offered to canada jet the pierce spray a former pentagon aerospace design engineer who appears in the film describes as the biggest piece of crap of any jet fighter produced for the united states military but it will cost the american taxpayer one and a half trillion dollars and is of no value to the us in any conflict that it is currently engaged in or likely to be engaged in for generations to come and this is the first way in which the trade makes us less safe spending got gum tournaments of money on equipment we don't need which means we're spending on what we do need this could in a narrow understanding of national security be more appropriate better equipment that we need to defend ourselves or it could if one takes a broader approach to sustainable security include vastly increased expenditure on climate change on inequality and all of its myriad consequences both at home and around the world andrew feinstein in vancouver he is head of corruption watch uk former south african mp and the author of two books about corruption in the arms trade his memoir after the party and the shadow world inside the global arms trade on which this talk is based the lecture was recorded in november as part of the wall exchange series a twiceyearly event presented by the peter wall institute for advanced these at the university british columbia i'm paul kennedy and you're listening to ideas you can hear ideas through these cbc radio app cbc dot c.

design engineer united states climate change vancouver uk series a peter wall institute university british columbia paul kennedy canada pentagon andrew feinstein south african trillion dollars
"university british columbia" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Than your words so it's a little embarrassing the day to listen to all this from you and all the money and i appreciate that but you know our goal is to help other people and the show people that you can give money either write a check and and volunteer you don't have to write a big cheque it's not about riding the big check using your expertise you might be a computer person that can help a nonprofit or some somebody else out there who's in hvac specialists that can come in and say to to the nonprofit while you don't need to spend thirteen thousand dollars on this you can spend eight and maybe you can donate some of your time will they do say that people who donate time and money are happier than those who don't that's a harvard in university british columbia study good i'm glad they say that i'm pretty happy person there was a guy bologna of i eat millstone whose instrumental in your life yes he was he was one of the great construction guys of all time he was he was a tremendous person and i used to have lunch with him at least once a month and he's really one of the reasons that i am as philanthropic as i am and we re dead the jcc in st louis and two thousand i think we opened the two thousand nine and in two thousand six he said it's my time he built at nineteen 64 he said um you will need to take it and tear it down and he had no problem with that any couldn't have been more supportive and any a every time i'd have breakfast or lunch with them once a month he gave me some great perspectives on life and another gentleman tom tom green and tom green was a great mentor to are used to give money anonymously and he.

st louis tom tom green university british columbia tom green thirteen thousand dollars
"university british columbia" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Saying this in japanese our principles that have really stuck with you tim you and i are really two birds of a feather we share some similar days and and cut though as i was one of my areas of i was kind of considered a nerd japanese language study it at university british columbia because i loved coming in with no coat allows us to share with everybody but one of my favorites is so go bob body meeting when you feel yourself in a great hurry in a kind of a panic to get things done that's the time to take a moment and regroup and take a deep breath and a really get your footing it make sure that you're making good decisions really like that one i like you she bus he'll title without a being very preceding so cautiously as to tap with a stick every single stone in the stone bridge as you cross it just to make sure the stone bridge isn't gonna fall down while you're on it so it's a it's used often to to illustrate an extreme level of caution prudence indu ply that in your life to knife making to other things where would you where does that come to mind for you most at making business decisions i got it okay rights definitely measure twice exactly except that would be this would be like measured ten tights thumb sometimes it's use to sarcastically for someone who is so cautious as that day they become mode petrified for doing anything you know i also like a.

university british columbia stone bridge
"university british columbia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Accused by amnesty international of using chemical weapons last fall i've not yet seen any further independent confirmation of of those allegations there is no suggestion of what agents might have been used indeed you know the reports that i've seen in the photographs that i've seen it's a you know modicum us but you can identify some agents and there are facts with experience and it's really not clear to me what might have happened to some of those victims of those are the two sorta significant holdouts besides egypt and israel don't suspect egypt or israel would would use them so it's really down to north korean pseudo my view and that's why when people say while stubborn against chemical weapons then really loan out by this constant use in syria say well you know when there's one hundred and ninety states' international system the fact that you got one using and maybe to others who might that's not the end of a norm it's been an incredibly powerful and successful normal over time if you wanna put it up respective compared to other international norms people want up all that of a challenge like porch her regroup scores of countries who been accused of engaging in torture so the chemical taboo is is actually incredibly successful one but not light i think richard price professor at the university british columbia author of the chemical weapons taboo thanks very much my pleasure later aaron david miller on how president trump's intervention in syria fits within his emerging policy than at least at right after the break the story of the father of kim stay with us i will come in its truth politics and power and support for gay community comes from birth justice were the environment is threatened the courts often stand as the last line of defense birth justice attorneys.

chemical weapons egypt israel syria professor aaron david miller trump north korean university british columbia president kim
"university british columbia" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"To treat their multiple sclerosis despondent b_r brother are very rapid response by other researchers to replicate zim bunnies results and to look at this question him multiple different ways so after you know for you in just four or five years it was pretty clear clear that sam bowl nice original results were not being replicated that other research's we're not finding the same clock edges and then of young always go through the stains replacing are but they're not doing you're trying to not doing the right procedure that whenever so eventual you get to the largest just in it is trials answering all the objections and a pretty clearly showed that there was no difference between healthy patients vs patients with other girl logical diseases vs patience with multiple sclerosis they all have about the same rain of block which is in the saints it also appears that the veins kind of opening close over time that their dynamic it's not really static and you know these tercer can be highly subjective so it it seems like a pretty clear case of an raise the other people were just seeing what they wanted to see in the believers receiving block but the if you do blinded testing you know the penis block which is disappear just like an race disappeared once the observers replied that so the update is that there was i just reported the results of although largest clinical trial looking at these liberation procedure so this was a studying canada at the university of british columbia canada for whatever role came in as a large population of and as patients i just because that you know there are environmental triggers to am ass and different latitude to have more of a higher incidences a lot and missing canada is the bottom line so but there's a lot of patients pressure for the research and for this procedure there so this is a large study done at the university british columbia cost five point five million dollars and public funding to do this research and they looked a hundred and four patients with multiple sclerosis so they all caught the capital inserted into the vein right and but only forty nine you them today inflatable moon to in large the club's asshole and relieve any blocking is worst the other they should for the control group the capitals inserted.

canada university of british columbia university british columbia five million dollars five years
"university british columbia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"University in the uk she was previously a lecture and forensic psychology at the university of bet for sure that's what i say after i get home from hosting coast time off to bed for sure before that doctor shot taught at the university british columbia and the university of water loyal a canadian citizen doctor shot has a be a from simon frazier and ap age de from you be see he's only a handful of experts in the world who actively conduct research on complex memory errors related too emotional personal events so called foles memories he's also deliver general business and personal training warship workshops and advised the british police on historical sexual and physical abuse cases and her debut book is the memory illusion why you might not be who you think you are doctor shy welcome to coast to coast how are you and great great to be here pleasure how we're memories recorded in store it all that the big question everywhere recorded to fire spent the first of course they need to pick over the world in our best would it and try to make it into a member in the first i hit and then hopefully depending on how much and adrian allocated that if you're ever crash late you it go girl to at insurance her long term memory so it it's george trip effect and ertz and then if you're lucky a kept made until long term memory in at the big network and the brain it's what is the deciding factors to as to whether something is stored in long term memory or short term short term memory is i think everything is going to my short term memory backs for some reason everything that's that year short term memory thanks for and your search and we happy pop about short term memory at that and thing when colloquially like they i've i mean living let's start your memory and having trouble remembering what i did yesterday that quite happy because sort your memory back even started and it about thirty second the third a very short it's early seconds at the back end there's a limited babs or they played really well and play thinking thorn things for really short on a time the repartir a working memory so it it was the people that information for right well enough and ended.

uk university british columbia simon frazier university of water adrian thirty second
"university british columbia" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And forensic psychology at the university of bet for sure that's what i say after i get home from hosting coast time off to bed for sure before that doctor shot taught at the university british columbia and the university of water little a canadian citizen doctor shot has a be a from simon frazier and ap age he from you be see he's only a handful of experts in the world who actively conduct research on complex memory errors related too emotional personal events so cold faults memories he's also deliver general business and personal training warship workshops and advised the british police on historical sexual and physical abuse cases and her debut book is the memory illusion why you might not be who you think you are doctor shy welcome to coast to coast how are you and great great to be here pleasure how we're memories recorded in store oh well the big question everywhere recorded to fire spent the urge the core they need to take over the world in our best can code and in order to make it into a member in the quiet and then hopefully depending on how much energy of allocated that's it you are it go they'll two i don't short term or long term memory now it it's toward for it back and ertz and then if you're lucky a kept made in the long term memory in a big network and the brain is the what is the deciding factors to as to whether something is stored in long term memory or short term short term memory is i think everything is going to my short term memory banks for some reason yeah everything that that here short term memory thanks for and you're certain pop about short term memory at the end thing we colloquial you like they i i mean let's start your memory and having trouble remembering what i think yesterday that's not quite it because short term memory actually even started and it about thirty back and look at very very short it's early seconds as well limited babs or they played without a play pick and so i think there really short amount of time opener purchase a working memory.

university british columbia simon frazier
"university british columbia" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"university british columbia" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Com to forty or more like a passions today large or small we put them all designer pat sweaters dot com let's talk past lack count on it great late radio and welcome bakhtiari their line i'm here and i'm like radio at that yeah and here today very very fortunate every special guest toughest and the current who's a professor emeritus university british columbia vancouver away and now behavior i don't disagree your degree any solid zero i dislike out just i got so so very very impressive and doing a lot of studies with our behavior and he publicist study on a hugging and how the vast majority eighty two percent of dogs in pictures ever reviewed actually we're showing signs of stress by being out there reason being that this the inability for that white or flight response and you know as as we know from the nature from evolutionary standpoint dogs that we're going to be great to some other at all had to get away and if they're being confined if they're being home they may not be able to do so in that creates some stress response so why questions or by the way if you have any questions for doctor korean please give us a call at eight seven seven three eight five eight eight two mike you know question is up mike stretches that have been different again a final dogs and to some of the other factors an for example i threw a lot of media and often i will take one of my many dogs on two shows me as a guest now we're talking this same dog that in bed at night it can not get close enough that little use slipping on top of me in between my legs in betray me my wife i mean they are just that there are part of the family right and they love to caudal and the loves out yet when i bring him onto a set where this stranger people there's cameras there's no way so things don't totally different all i can rarely get him to do the same things at that he doesn't home he's much more cautious and and a case i get that i believe yes if he could get away he would have i try to have him at that time it would try to get away so reviewing the other picks also wondered who else was in the picture was the person taking a picture the real parent meaning that the alpha and a house and the dog is looking to stick get me facing his person i can be because i want to be with you or in a place like the beast on apart some stranger comes up with a camera and wants it picture and his august second obama you know i love your mom and if we're going to go.

vancouver obama professor emeritus university eighty two percent