19 Episode results for "University of Minnesota Duluth"

2: Mariah Schumacher  Thoughts and Experiences of a Psychology Student

Masters in Psychology Podcast

1:26:17 hr | 1 year ago

2: Mariah Schumacher Thoughts and Experiences of a Psychology Student

"And. Welcome to the masters in psychology podcast. One of our goals for this podcast is to interview and highlight psychologists, psychiatrists, educators, and practitioners to better understand what they do how they got there in share the advice they have for students wanting to receive a master's degree in psychology for one of our first podcast. We wanted to talk to a student who recently finished her undergraduate degree in psychology. Today I have the pleasure of talking with Mariah Schumacher. Mariah has a bachelor of science and psychology with a minor in cognitive science from the University of Minnesota Duluth. Mariah has presented at multiple conferences in various states. Including Wisconsin Tennessee in Washington DC in two thousand seventeen. She received the undergraduate research opportunity grant for her research project titled Empathic Response In sub clinical psychology. She previously held her role with a mobile neuroscience lab for you. MD neuroscience outreach upon completion of undergraduate degree from U, MD, she then joined the Department of Psychiatry as a full time, clinical research coordinator in the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders lab at the University of Minnesota Mariah's primary research interests include neural development, cognition, psycho, neuro, immunology, and neural correlates of consciousness Maria, welcome to our podcast. Thank you? Excited to do this podcast. Webcam! Yes, and in today's world with a covert and the riots and everything else that have been happening. More and more people are doing the The virtual meetings like through zoom in anything else so I. Think more and more people are getting comfortable doing it, but it's still a little strange because you're not. With that person and you don't really pick up on those non verbals as much as you would if you were in person but. We. See You you look great. You got a background Tattoos Sa- tell me first of all. What made you think about getting tattoos? And how long have you been getting tattoos? Wow, that's a question. I guess my first. Tattoo was when I was. Eighteen or nineteen and a an in college. Pursuing, my bachelor's in psychology for about a semester. And really was loving. Everything in my life and the place where I was up in Duluth Minnesota next to Lake Superior and I just. Wanted some sort of symbol and being eighteen year old, wanting tattoo on my body ended up getting Minnesota and Lake Superior on my ankle and Espirit. Cool Watercolor wasn't. The most above board operation for my I. I didn't ask for our ID's. We had to pay all in cash, and it was a little bit questionable, but I was really excited to have it, and then after that. more things just came up in my life that I wanted to put on my body for various reasons in our have. Some tech teams. How many do you have? I loose count some time. I think. It's one two three, four five. Six seven eight. Something like that. In what is your most recent tattoo? I most recent tattoo. Is this mosquito on my arm? Let's see. How can you like that? Mosquito right above the brain tattoo that I have. I. Love a lot also I got right after I graduated. MOSQUITO TATTOO I got in clues Romania. August. Summer? And speaking of that you mentioned a couple of things related to some of the questions I was going to ask so the first one was obviously you were at the University of Minnesota in Duluth so Tell me some of your finest memories while you were up in Duluth. Up Into, live. The city itself is a really magical place. Because of. Being on a hill all the time and Gravity kind of feels like it is pulling you toward. The water because at the bottom of this hill is the Great Lake Superior. Built a really nice relationship over my years living in the city. but one. Thing that's coming to mind for memorable moments when I was at the University of Minnesota, Duluth are. Not Actually so much to do with my psychology. Courses but with how I implemented the knowledge I think it was pretty subconscious at that point, but. Also, not I worked at a radio station at the time, and was a DJ Knighton during the day and a Lotta Times while I was in the radio station, I would have really good one on one conversations with people, so I would either be doing my show, and then while songs were playing, someone would be in there with me and we'd be chatting or I would be the one hanging out in the radio station while someone else was doing their show, and it became a release special intimate place to. Kind of use my inquiry tools that was learning so much about in my classes and got to form some really strong connections because of those. Conversations and being able to use my tools that I. had been gaining on the human psyche, and how to inquire with other humans about their experience more accurately. So. I have so many questions for you I'm trying to flow naturally with what year responses were and one of them was. Some of your interest in and you know why you went to the University of Minnesota in Duluth and I guess the one basic question for the listeners and viewers, because this is going to be both in the audio and visual visual form. Is What. What initially got you interested in psychology? Yeah. I was thinking about this. Earlier today I thought I had an answer. But the more I thought about it. I'm not exactly sure who were. I really enjoyed my general psych course that I took in Community College Actually got see in that class, but it was so challenging and I loved the materials so much that definitely had influence, but I had this other type of motivation that drew me towards. thinking, about thinking, which is how? Often presented to me and I knew that I was interested in for a long time, I remember in middle school and high school. Thinking I was going to grow up and do my doctorate. why people acted the way they did, and one of those little subsections being how if someone gifted and talented program in elementary school someone else was not how the pressure of that system changed outcomes for people who if they had been? The same ones in separate situations would have different experiences and so. I had these kind of questions coming to me throughout my. I guess. Pre College Education and When I found psychology. It seemed to really connect. Can I give words to these questions that I had been asking? So, what areas of psychology did you find the most interesting back then and have those changed now. It's kind of. A lot of people really like abnormal psychology I i. did find it very interesting. That's a specific. Mental disorders I suppose arms schizophrenia bipolar. Learning more about these. Illnesses, mental illnesses and people survive with. But I am actually. Remembering that I connected really well with developmental psychology that was fascinating to me learning how the brain formed and grew, and over time really was impacted by so many factors, so that was a big one. Another class I really enjoyed was trans. Personal psychology is very different. Guy Different. And I liked the different credit. So. A lot of people remember some favourite teachers end or courses, and you've talked about a couple courses. Do your number or have any good memories where teachers had a positive influence on you. Yeah, for sure I had one biology professor who? Really! I guess. Believed in me. Released strongly I really liked the class in the way that he presented, he was very passionate about. Everything he was teaching, which is always? Something that stimulates me in a professor. I actually had a really. Strange experienced one time where I was doing very well in this class and stopped by his office to talk about. Something as I did when I was passing, and he was grading the tests that we had just taken. And I walked in, and he said that he was checking the answer key against my test to make sure that his answer key was right. Which? was very strange to think that a professor had thought that maybe he made a mistake and was checking my answer key so. Maybe, he was just trying to flatter me because we had great discussions or something like that. I really connected with this professor and you actually helped me navigate. How to integrate biology classes toward. What I really wanted to be learning which was. A lot closer to neuro science than just psychology. So picking the right biology classes that fit my interest kind of helped me create A. Neuroscience degree without having an official one and it was very helpful. Let's owns. That sounds logical I remember. You going through that. Stage, with your classes and your teachers as well. and I think that's about the same time that you got your brain Tattoo, because you're so focused on the neuroscience and neurology aspect of it as well so. So talking a little bit more about your experiences. We've talked about kind of your pre college experiences, and now let's transition to kind of your memories in the courses that you took while you were taking undergraduate studies and tell me some of the things that you remember for your Undergrad. I know I had a few courses that were. Really helpful for? Shaping my perception of the world. And I took one that was psycho. Neuro immunology, learning about how your psyche your brain and you're thinking affects your nervous system, because they are one, and then how your nervous system affects your immune system, and so there are a bunch of examples of how. Thinking differently loosely. Can Affect your ability to fight off illnesses and that was super fascinating. Another thing that was. Very impactful for my decision to move into research for a little while was my own undergraduate research. Project. And I got to get an EEG CAP and put it on subjects and like squirt. Goo On their head to make it stick and I was looking at. Heart rate increases and frontal lobe activity changes when people were shown graphic video clip to see if they're zero. If their body reacted. The same as we thought it might react. Based on the empathy scores. and. That was really neat. I ended up going to the same neuroscience conference in DC. With that research. It was. Fascinating so for our listeners and our viewers I think you're referring to when you are a research coordinator at the University of Minnesota. I. was referring to that in this research project helped me. Figure that research was interesting. I did this research project while I was in Undergrad and then after I graduated I ended up in a position at the University of Minnesota twin cities. Are. Developmental Psychology again it was a neuro psychiatric lab and we were looking at brains, developing over time, and how kids brains who were and were not exposed to alcohol prenatally before they were born. How their brains develop differently, so that was also very neat. I was able to learn how to run FM. Rice Scans and Look at data. I've got to see so many brains on the screen. It was so exciting because I have been looking at them in textbooks for so long. And ANDROID that job while I had learned. It wasn't quite right for me, so I ended up leaving. I knew I was going to leave anyway. But. So are we find out why you left and I know the reason why you left, but before we talk about that. Tell me how you found that opportunity at the University of Minnesota. I knew I wanted to leave loose. I I wanted to work. With a neuro imaging. I wanted to see you more brains essentially, and there was one evermore eye clinic in Duluth and they were only hiring receptionists, and I applied for that and they didn't get back to me. And so I knew moving to the cities would bring me more opportunities. I ended up moving before I had a job. But I had. Applied to so many. Really was the key was just thinking about what I really wanted. In a job. And then I. Looked up. Key words and found this lab at the University of Minnesota, and just sent the principal investigator an email saying hey, this is who I am. This is what I'm looking for. I'd love to learn more about what you're doing, and if you happen to have a job opening, let me know. and. We got into a really good dialogue. Being. Opened and truthful and forthright about what I wanted was how I ended up. Getting that job is how I have gotten. Very, many of the things that I want in my life and learning how to communicate really clearly has come largely from the psychology background and other things I learned. Now you mentioned? That you were on the radio and some people bring this back up because I know that you enjoyed your time there and you had a great time being on radio and helping behind the scenes as well and I believe the name of the. Program at the time I. Don't know if it's still called is the basement. Ace Fanta in the basement. Yes, yes, so have you kept in touch with anybody from your undergraduate? Whether it be you know just going to school or those people who were involved with K. YOU MD.. I have a lot of those people who are mentioned re. You would have these. Really fantastic conversations during one of our DJ sets. are people that I'm still very close with right now. We may not be talking every day, but. We check in with each other pretty often. Make some really strong connections there. It's very helpful in times of big isolation and people feeling pretty. Lonely at times and a little bit scared about. Big changes and big uncertainty in the world it's nice to have some of those connections be able to check in on them and feel loved from them and be able to give love to them. Of course. Yeah, of course, especially during these times that we're going through right now, people are finding more and more that they need to have that connection whether or not. It's you know you can't have it in person as much as you could in the past, and so people are reaching out more and more so the reason I brought that up again as I actually have a little clip here that I wanted to share. View actually on. The program, so I'M GONNA. Go ahead and share my screen. I'M GONNA. Share the computer sound as well. And I'm gonNA bring this over. And here. We are only yes. You remember this one Yep I. AM indifferent, person your, but here we are. It's only twenty seven seconds long. I'm going to go ahead and play it for our listeners and our viewers in this is Maria. While, she was at the University of Minnesota Duluth in. She was at K.. U. MD.. It is College Radio Day on Ku MD, Duluth, public radio streaming online at KU MD dot O. R. G. I'm Maya, and we're GONNA get started with a track from mother mother. This is coasting. Hey. Folks in that video people, I still keep in contact with very good concerns. Cool cool, so what kind of memories and feelings come about when you see that little, clip. Much Joy, also a little bit of awkwardness I was usually. A slits on the radio and we ended up recording this little section for College Radio Day and I didn't know how to move my body. The right way I was like I'm not usually being video recorded during this yet very fun day. They fun. I'm in my life lucky to be surrounded by so many people that love me and I love them so much that spend. Abundant in my life, it seems like when I look for love. People. No that's. As as a parent and as a person, individual I'm glad to hear that We need more people to support others in their endeavors in along those same lines. You know one of the questions that I have prepared for you was Are there any resources or people that have helped you along your journey? And when I say journey I mean not only your educational journey, but life's journey as well so any people resources that have helped you along with your journey. Of course. Of course are aware that I. A phrase that I suppose that I came to recently was. The universes, my greatest lover. And whenever I need some sort of love or support, it seems to come to me. In some way, either through a person or through. Some sort of animal or action or other something from. My own existence I seem to be. Given exactly what I need. If I look for it, there's times when I seem to get distracted from. What? Maybe is really important to me. But if I look for that, I am often given exactly what I want a good. Example of that is the queer community that I found in Minneapolis, when I didn't totally not what words to some things, and I found a words, polly emery, and I found the word hand sexual to help kind of described might experience of the world, and that brought me to A. Beautiful Group of people who were all trying. Their best to live true to themselves and. Be kind to others around them and. Petitioned for their right to do so. And it was. Just it's. It's been fascinating being involved with this community and actually. I'm a big chunk of this group of people is now the one then seeing? Trying to rally together to? Fight for. Equality Right now in Minneapolis and stand up for protecting their own neighborhoods and part of like A. Little Group chat where I get to see people organizing and trying to make sure there's someone on watch for every neighborhood encouraging each other to drinkwater. Stay rested mental health I'm here to talk Here's places we found. You can donate money if you don't feel up to going out today. Stay safe. It's just this. This big community of people that care about each other and then are carrying about. Being safe in the super uncertain time and communities so important. And finding. And having a group of people who are there to support you and be supported by. You is invaluable. It. Is a crate. I guess inside I've found in my life. And I really push toward it constantly and. I find myself surrounded I more and more people in more and more love. All the time. You brought up something that I wanted to comment on and especially given the last week a little over a week's worth events happening around Mr Floyd, and and What's been happening there? I heard. Some people comment that the. Always look on the bright side and one of the bright sides of what has happened. Is it's it's? It's drawn attention to not only the black lives matter, but others that are almost forgotten a little bit in terms of being. Discriminated against and that would include everybody in the. And a environment and and groups I know that I'm involved with business resource group at where I work. In we always talk about. How can we say support? Those people I'm an ally and I think you already know that in so I think more and more people when you talk to them in a casual way nonthreatening way then they actually are more open to discuss that and I have to admit I. Don't know everything about the community. I even had to look up. What does Pan Means? What does Pan Sexual mean versus you know some other ones and so kind of in your own words kind of describe what what the differences or similarities are between Pan and polly. Okay. I like those words. Thank you for them. so pan sexual wool and Pollyanna. Sorry are just words that I found. Community near? Their good reference points for. Living my life. Pan Sexual means. I might be attracted to you. No matter what you look like or how you identify, because there's all for all sorts of folks who are on. Gender Anything? And that Super Beautiful. I love the fluidity and. I might be attracted anyone of US I. Guess is the way I interpret Penn, sexual. And polly emery. Is. So many things. For me. It means. while. It's the words I'll say for it in this moment are. That I try to be as in love with. Every person that I encounter? In whatever way makes the most sense for both of us? And sometimes those lines get really blurry. You know. Maybe you're not supposed to spend a lot of time. With one person if you're in a monogamous relationship, there's all these kind of unspoken. Things that happen and I know I can love so many people in so many ways and each relationship is. Entirely unique. Sometimes there's romantic pieces of it sometimes there, sexual pieces of it sometimes just being really psyched about existing together and. Spending my time in setting boundaries in very specific ways has really sharpened my communication skills. It has been so valuable in my life to. Navigate relationships in a completely new way without relying on a structure like monogamy. For me. and. I say I love you to so many people all the time. And it's just so lovely. So you know I. The viewers and the listeners are obviously going to pick up that you are very open, minded hand you love everything and everyone and you are positive. people feel that when they're around. You and I'm somewhat biased so I think they're the listeners and viewers have figured it out by now that I'm your dad, and so I'm very proud of you, but without that even being there. I also have noticed you grow from. Somebody who is just a young inquisitive person in to somebody who is always searching always seeking more experience, more knowledge, and sharing that with others, and then being open and transparent about what year feeling and thinking while you're going through all of these stages, and so everybody knows you know when you're going through grade, school and high school and college you. You are trying to figure out who you are. What you WanNa do where you WANNA go. What kind of career you want to have an one thing that I did see and you updated at you? Know every once in a while on your facebook. You have a saying underneath your name and your current one says Mariah Schumacher. I'm parentheses, MOSS so tell us how you came up with that nickname moss instead of using mariah. I noticed a lot of people around me in the queer community, choosing names or Having, names come to them that felt. Very right for them. and. Moss felt very right for me. And when it began traveling. Our jaded for about nine months i. Just, introduce myself as Moss and people were like Nice yeah okay. Moss and it felt really to be called. This squishy warm thing. This plant that I've identify release strongly within a bunch of ways I suppose. And, just have that picture I guess be brought up in my own head as something identify with. Now that's. The one thing that I would say is Some people may not know this about you, but you at a young age now when you are viewing words and sentences, you actually visualize those in colors, and so that come about with the word. Moss as well, or what do you see your picture with the word loss and you're in when you use that. You send us the. Is Beautiful thing. I'm very happy to. Have noticed that exist with it. But. It's a little different for the word Moss for me. I usually get really strong colors with people's names, so you can tell me someone's name or I can meet someone, and they'll tell me their name and I will get colors for their name. I've not ever been able to do it for my own name. I've tried, and it hasn't really worked I've. I've met other people named. Mariah and I've been able to see their name. But it's different for every person. Different John's have different colors lightly. In. Some sort of my mind's eye. so I don't actually really get colors with Moss I. just get. The feeling that. Gives me, which is overwhelmingly positive, and if someone hearing, my name were interacting with me, gets a Smidge of that overwhelming Lee positive. Life. Force. That is moss from hearing my name than. Great. Well. Thank you I I've never asked that before so I, I wanted to have that in, and it makes sense I would be difficult for me to kind of describe my own name as well. I've I've met other? Bradley's Brad's. and I. Picture them with that name It's unique to them even though I share the same name so I kind of understand what you're talking about You mentioned earlier when we were talking about feeling. Good that you're surrounded with a community that is open and your its ever expanding. You're meeting New People all the time I know that you did an interview with a friend of mine And his show is actually called the people. I know show and Curtin. I actually went and traveled and met up with you and some friends as well Tell me some of the Happiest, memories memorable moments that you have during the time that you you traveled What were some of the ones that come off the top of your head? Well a lot of them Yes, I was gone for a while and I had so many amazing experiences. Moving to different places, but once a month meant. Grew very fast, I felt. and so many different experiences, the one that's coming to mind I guess because we're talking about. Holly Emery is ahead. was traveling with a long term partner of mine and row. and. We ended up in a place where. I connected with someone else. That was there and we had to navigate. Existing in the same space together. and. A, lot about uncomfortable ways. And there were times that everyone was pretty uncomfortable. And we had to. Communicate Pretty hard. To try and figure out why we were uncomfortable. And the way approached a lot of these conversations was. In my heart. Believing Everyone wanted. Everyone to be. Having a good time and to be safe and to be comfortable. And learned that lesson over and over and continue to learn that lesson whenever I inquire. With anyone. Had some. Very. Intense healy conversation with a good friend of mine yesterday. A phrase that we came to is one that I wanNA share wrote it down seems like a good time to do it into. And it's one that is sometimes hard to sail the way I'm GonNa, see if I can do it. If I think back. To Times. I've been hurt. By someone or something? The hurt is there. and. So far when I do enquire. It seems like. This hurt. Was the result of. A misunderstanding. Every time. OR A. Difference in relativity. Between my experience in someone else's. and. We just couldn't understand each other. Somehow in that hurt one or both of us. And if I think about? All the people that I've met in my life and Times I've been scared or hurt. I don't think anyone has ever. Meant to hurt me. And that's maybe a very fortunate place to find myself. I don't know if everybody feels that way, but so many of the conflicts between Tokes. When I've talked through them with between myself in another or Talking with two other. It always seems to boil down to a misunderstanding. And Our bodies holding trauma from. Live. Your life is really traumatic. So. That's a quote that I came to. And it felt really powerful. So. Thank you for hearing it. Yeah well, thank you for sharing. I! Believe a lot of. Listeners and viewers could relate to that and when they look back. At some arguments or breakup or failures or Anything along those lines, and after everybody has calmed down and you have some clarity. regarding the episode of the situation. A lot of people would wish that. I wish I would have said this or I could have said this where I would've thought about asking it this way instead of. the way that I did. Because semantics is is something that comes into play, and everybody has their own experiences. And experiences help determine you reality, and so you know one thing that I had. Is another question? Was You know? Some of your experiences while you were traveling. You know one of the things that you have on. Your facebook is traveling and listening as best I can on this little place. So why why did you choose that? I know that you had some other ones previously, but that one is definitely interesting so I. Think you did that after you? Were traveling for some time and so traveling and listening as best I can on this little place, so tell me a little bit more about why you have that on your facebook page. I think I'm glad you brought it up because it is something I wanted to say. A word that's really important at this point in my life is. Listening. I believe so much of my wisdom. Of. Being alive and existing at all has come from listening to other folks experiences. And more I traveled around Eastern Europe. Or wherever I was or my home country. Talking to people have so many different backgrounds it. And I listened. With a heart that. Believed that they were good. And, just doing their best to be a good person in the world. I, that's what I found. Over and over. And in finding the more I listened, the more interested I am I. Don't run out of questions. There are so many different ways to be alive and I know. Mine pretty well. and. It's really neat to learn about other people's. So. That's the listening piece I was traveling and the world seem so small sometimes so I guess that's why it's a little place sure. I understand. You mentioned something, and and this is going to be a difficult question and I. WanNa ask it because it, it makes you. Think for a second, so take take a moment after after this question. What's been your biggest failure over the past year? In, why do you think had happened? I think. I will just go with what's coming to mind. And That is my. Youngest brother. Came with me. For about six weeks of traveling. and. I underestimated. How difficult it would be to travel with a fourteen year old. In the way that I was traveling, which was. Quite rough. Working for my food and my board. and. He. Got Pretty hurt from it. He wasn't totally expecting what we were going to be doing. I think he felt a little lost. And really wanted to be on. His phone didn't want to engage so much. I tried some different tactics to get him to engage, but we had. kind of ED started off with such a big misunderstanding that a lot of hurt was caused. I think. From me to him and from him to me. And, so we had a lot of really beautiful experiences and I hope he remembers them in good light. But we also had a lot of ones and we haven't had too many hard experiences siblings before then. I don't think it's invaluable. But. It was very hard. I think if I had approached it. With the mindset of really trying to understand him. Maybe we would have had a different outcome. Or maybe if I'd waited a couple years until he wasn't fourteen. I'll never know. I'm still got it happened, but it was very hard. So, you know life perspective on that is. Even though it was hard and difficult at times. I think time will show that it. It helped him to gain perspective. and. It will help him. Realize A, you know traveling a you know that I'm a firm believer in traveling as much as you can outside the United States. Right now a lot of people. I can't remember the last assistant I I read, but vast majority of people haven't traveled outside the United States and it's a shame because you just. Develop these blinders on, and when we were talking about expanding your experiences and knowledge That's one of the best ways to do. That is to travel, and I'm glad that he was able to go with you. And even though there were some tough times hopefully he is going to be able to put that into perspective, and in really appreciate both the bad and the good. That happened through that since you have returned. Have you guys had any discussions on what happened in? Have you kind of resolved some some? I don't want to call them issues, but talked through what happened and why each other? Behave that way and have you had that opportunity? We have yeah. Read really talked about it pretty quickly after I got back. He actually stopped texting me for about a month after he had left arm and we just needed a real break from each other. I suppose. and. Give back, we talked about it and what we would probably do differently and. He asked if he could come again on another traveling time, so I'm hoping we'll be able to do that again. At some point because I. I would love to bring. People I love. Out into the world and see what that's why. I'd be. We would go for six weeks maybe a couple of weeks. Sure sure. And handle his expectation toward what to expect during that traveling He probably wasn't aware that it was going to be harsh, and you'd have to work for your food and that sort of stuff. Whereas normally he was thinking. Oh, we're going to stay in a hotel and we're going to do this and and travel and so Yeah if I if I were his age, and and I had that expectation that didn't come true I'd be. What am I doing here? What was going on? I love you. However, this is difficult. So I want to get back to a little bit more about your education and I know that before you started traveling, you had plans to continue education and go on for your masters in Psychology, and you actually narrow down i. believe at the time. Some schools that you wanted to attend so for our listeners and viewers you know. One of the goals of our website is to help them on. What resources are available. What kind of questions you need to ask yourself before you start going down that road of picking a program picking What type of area you want to study? Let alone where you want to go for school so. Kind of. And think about what your frame of mind was when you were going through those stages of trying to figure out. What while on focus on where do I want to go to school? What were some of the criteria that you used in? What were you thinking when you're trying to narrow down where you wanted to go and in what you wanted to study? A big motivator for me was. Finding a university that. Was Not in the United States. And a piece of that was that I wanted to be experiencing. Different. In the world and going to a new place I thought that would be a good way to do it. Spite myself in one spot for a few years and see what happens. up another language possibly and I live in a place long. Enough I will be speaking that language because my brain will want to. So kind of starting their narrow down. On I guess selected what I was going to be doing mass specific way. I knew I was interested in. More of the neuro signed. And so I looked into some neuro psychology neuroscience. I looked a little bit into. Cognitive Sciences. There was a consciousness and cognition lab I believe in British Columbia. That was so fascinating. That was I think my number one choice. and. There was A. Few great schools in Germany. A are really leading lot of. The research, and it's fascinating, but I did not wanna live in Germany especially after traveling around for a little while I realized. That's not a place for me. At this time. But during my research I found. Narrowing down to some sort of program seemed like the first step after finding where in the world that wanted to be. And from there, looking at the program, looking at the costs was a little bit overwhelming to do it all like clicking by myself, and finding from which was this actually? Does it matter if I'm in the country or not? Should I be contacting certain person sometimes I would email someone inquiring about the program and they would say we're not actually taking applications right now, and I was like Oh. That's not what I was asking. It got a little bit confusing. So binding. Four or five schools I was really interested in was the result of hours of research rarely. and. Do you remember some of the sources or or who you talk to to help you narrow down. Some of your decisions was just a lot of online research, and then talking to people. Did you talk to colleagues? Other professors other students. I did talk to one professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth because I was really interested in the University of British Columbia and he had taught there for a while, so I had a meeting with him, and we had a dialogue, but what? Place was like and what may be I could expect. That was helpful. A lot of it was my own research. Schools and kind of getting to their site and. Navigating figuring out somewhere easier than others. I was surprised by how. Difficult, it was to navigate the sites Merrill Different. So. You brought that up a little bit I. I'm going to share my screen again. I have something else that I wanNA share with the viewers in the in the listeners and I'm sorry. Listeners I I didn't describe the previous. Cher that I made, but you did listen to her so obviously in that last clip was her Ku md. I didn't describe what I was. seeing this one is actually a pitcher. Let me go ahead and share my screen. And hopefully you can see this guitar. This picture is actually from win. You attended. You actually presented at the Society for Neuroscience Conference in Washington. DC back in November of two thousand seventeen, and this is a pitcher. I believe of one of your professors. Is it Lloyd or Yes, so tell me what you think of feel when you see this pitcher and for the viewers out there you see this, but for the listeners this is a picture of row in Las and a professor known as Lloyd and behind her behind Mariah. She has a placard a billboard of her study and that she actually presented at this conference. So tell me a little bit more about this. some professors in my life. Were just. So fun to be around. This professor was very weird and very lovely. And really helped me with this research project. A lot of the ideas were. About using heart, rate, variability and The physio aspect of it, were. Just. Had No idea how to do these things, so he was very helpful that. And Well. Yeah I got a lot of great feedback for writing my submission and writing my paper. Things like that is really useful to have someone there to help. You and I believe there was one. Or two like. They had one or two people that were kind of mentoring and got to be one of them. was a wild ride I ended up in Washington DC at this giant conference. It was very overwhelming sometimes, but I am so glad was able to give it. I was just GonNa. Ask You. I know that I saw some of your post on facebook and. It seemed like you were. You, didn't necessarily enjoy the experience, but you were enjoying the fact that you could have that experience and that he really enjoyed having Lloyd there as well. You remember that facebook a post So, it's it is who you know. contributed to who you are now in that experience when it was good or bad for you is his part of who you are now so. I like that now. Along the same lines I'm GONNA. Share one other thing. with the viewers here. And I'M GONNA go right here and who bring this one up I'll bring this one down. And then I'll bring this up in this one is interesting and this is actually. One that I wanted to share with you Back in November, twenty, seven, two, thousand, eighteen. You actually rested this on Facebook, and for the listeners out there it's a pitcher. Of Mariah you know winter jacket with her hood over her head, and she also has a cap on over head, and then she kind of has a. what color would you call that scarf teo? Teo Teo scarf covering your face and this picture is next to one of the paintings that you did and She actually named this two picks of a work in progress. And so tell me the first thing that come to your mind when you see this, it's been years since you've seen me. Yes, it hasn't been a few years since I've seen this I was in the middle of a painting. And really liked how it looked so far. and. Also had recently taken a picture of myself on a very cold day. Wrapped up. Completely, said just kind of my eyes and nose were showing. And Thought about my painting was still a work in progress and had heard a quote. Recently around that time from my partner of dial. How everyone is always a painting in progress, and you can always add new brushstrokes to your life painting, and it's never too late for that, and that was what was on my mind when I posted. Painting picture me picture with the quote to pictures of working progress. I like it I like it. That's of course. Why brought it up for you so This wasn't preplanned for the listeners and viewers I I we did talk about what we wanted to accomplish on today's podcast, but she had no idea what I was going to bring up on. Some, of these other pitcher, so it's nice to see your reactions and get your feedback, so we're almost done here, but I do have some other a few other questions for you if you still have some time. I asked you a little bit about your biggest failure, and you talked about that and I could sense that you. You wish that you handled it better and handle the expectations a little bit better with your brother. But let me ask you this kind of general question now that you've gone through a lot of your training in some of your education in psychology. You know what's what's the most common reason why you feel? Fail or give up. Given your take, take that question kind of in a psychological view What is the most common reason for people failing or giving up? An interesting question. I feel like it's too. Failing. I suppose I would. Think of as a perception. Whether or not I consider myself. Failing at something has entirely to do with. If I think I'm failing at it. Maybe! Saint Book Giving Up. I bet it has a lot to do with trauma. And our bodies in the world's react to things before our brain stew so often. We find. And fight later freeze mode and. Make decisions that don't always seem logical to our logic brain. And I find my logic and my emotion. Don't always match. Even if I logically know. This is okay and. It's not a failure. It's just a opportunity to learn. My Body might still feel like this is a failure somehow. This. That's a really big piece of it. I Hope people can find peace from that I. Try to help people around me. As much as I can. That's all I can never do. Is Turn help. them feel comfortable and safe. And loved. And maybe that will help shift their perception of. Something being a failure to some sort of exciting learning opportunity. Or giving up has. Listening to yourself. Clearly! I like the answers. You've talked about a couple of concepts there which leads me to another question that I had ready for you is. What is something new that you have learned recently? So many things. A. Lovely love in my life. named is a lovely lovely Liza. Is currently reading a book that she's shared some. Ideas with me and it's about. Emergent Strategy I. Believe is the name of this book. And she's been talking about. Critical connections versus critical mass. And how there are some connections in one's life. That are very critical. They are people you can interact with and have healthy dialogues with, or maybe you're working towards healthier dialogues together. And these critical connections are very important to. You and your growth. And then critical mass. As the other people in your life that are also so important. Maybe your neighbors family members are not quite as close with friends that. Are Very Important for interaction and living your day to day life, not lonely. And how to set certain boundaries between those two types of connections. and. Instead of spreading oneself very thin over all the people. That exist recognizing which ones are very important to you in specific ways. And putting more energy into movies connections. And getting rich. Rich. Connection. By putting in the work, I've had some I. I've had relationships where I have trouble communicating with this person for a little while. We don't understand each other all the way because we are different. And When I work on this connection. If. It's important to me and it seems important to them and we WANNA. Keep working on it. Then we find better ways to communicate and it's hard. But the richness that we kit from making our soil, really really good. Brings. Such great benefits I have. Such great communication that I learned about every day by. Working on my communication every day and trying to get better. And I. Think to jump on that as well. part of the communication is being very good listener. And not only the listener to the word, but the feeling and the non verbal that is coming through in in. In people, and as I mentioned earlier in the podcast it's it's difficult to pick up on that non verbal coming through the technology versus being in person as well so. I struggle with that all the time and try to pick up on that all the time as well so. Try To. Some words that helps me were trying to send this person. Energy. As, I'm communicating with them, which does a bunch of little things, even if I'm just thinking I'm sending you energy and giving them my attention very specifically, and they can feel maybe that or me sending them energy somehow. And that often helps people. Relax and feel. Seem I hope? I agree I agree. I have two other questions regarding kind of the educational aspect of psychology in one. It's kind of a fun one that I am planning on asking all of my guests and you know the people on the podcast of this is one. That's GONNA. Be Universal throughout. Is, what is your favorite term, principal or theory in psychology in why? Convince. I think I have to choose one that I have already mentioned. and. That is psycho. Neuro immunology. and. Big reason is. It's very fun to say. And it's very fun to write a lot of. Letters that don't have tails. And so it looks really pretty to me. And the whole field is very fascinating learning about thinking and its connections to your whole body. Can I give one more answer. Guys was just would go. The other one is that kind of? Found through, this is psycho. Neuro endocrinology. So your psychology. Affecting your nervous system, psycho neural, and your endocrine system is the hormones that are all. Through my whole body and your whole body, and changing all the time and. Oh my goodness. It's so fascinating especially after being involved with the creek community for a while there, folks in the world who? Feel very masculine, but maybe are born in your body. It doesn't have a peanuts. But their brains and their bodies often are so much more reflective of what we may be genuine generally. As masculine. and. I? This study is investigating. That relationship. I suppose. And that's. Making to me also. It is fascinating. One thing that I kept thinking about when you were talking about that as you know, the old adage is. You. Know the the positive positive and positive feelings and vibes now we have research to show the reason why you need to be positive all the time. It actually helps improve your mood. It helps improve your health and it helps stave off some of these. Diseases and anything that. Could be attacking your year your system and so it is interesting, and some people don't look at it that way. They just say Oh. Yeah, well, state positive. That's not gonNA. Help me well. It actually does if you look at the hormones that are released when you're happy when you smile when you laugh all of that stuff and so I'm glad that you brought that up. So! This is kind of a difficult question because. I know that since we talked before you started traveling now that you've gotten back. From traveling, it almost feels like and correct me. If I'm wrong that it was cut short, and you wanted to continue to travel and so I know that your original plan was to Start Your masters in psychology and and going to that program after you're done traveling, so tell me a little bit more about what your future plans are at this point. Well. Decision on continuing my education was. Before this. Coronavirus happened. Big piece of that was. How much I was learning about the world and that I didn't feel ready to continue. My education. Concrete Way Always the question, but you're having a future plans and so. Even though you're not going through formal education, you have been I I would argue that you have been experiencing. Going through education through your travels, and coming back, and so just getting you back on on the question I was just asking you what your future plans were for? Both formal informal education anything like that. I know that you're always wanting to learn, but kinda speak to. You know your future plans. Catch. I would say they are extremely uncertain. I do like learning very much an imprint of a permaculture course that I'm working on online reading all sorts of books about trauma and communication, and trying to actively use them every day. Right now I am trying to. Take a short term and long term action every day. At steps toward what I'm. Believing in what goals have. A. Lot of that is pretty focused on this movement happening in Minneapolis. some short-term goals that I can have are donating. Some money to buy says where it will be used right away. people that are on the frontlines that need. Water and medical gear and support, and he will stay. Doing Community Watch is trying to send money to these places that I care about and then longer term actions. Often being conversations. Just to talk about how weird stuff in sometimes. And how we ended up in these situations in our communities where people are so scared. Just so scared! On. Many different sides. And talking about how strange that is when it's likely. It's all miscommunication. and. It's likely that. Most, people don't want to be hurting each other. And are really fearful. Of something. Or another. So that's really worrying focusing right now i. I know that the future is uncertain. It always is and always has been. And I'm just taking it day by day and trying to focus on what really is important to me and it's this community that I find around me and my family and people that I love near me animals. and. Trying to. Make sure that people near me are comfortable and safe. That's a good answer. I was. Waiting for you to talk about hey. You know the uncertainty in a lot of people. Are you're not? You're not alone there especially in an today. They're uncertain, not only about where we're heading. Their own lives in what's happening in their. World, but also what's going to happen in in terms of how are we going to get out of this covid out of these these times dealing with and healing going through the healing process as well so You're not alone. A lot of people are are going through that as well I do have kind of one. Actually lied. I have two questions left. One maybe I'll just do one. The one question that I wanted to Ask is now you having me narrow it down because I have about three of them ready That's GonNa be one the the one that I would probably ask I is. What should I have asked you that I haven't asked you yet. Oh What should I have asked you? But I haven't asked you yet. Maybe. How? Psychology has impacted my relationship with. Universal Communication. Task that right so obviously. That's very specific, so ask yourself that you know how ecology impacted your universal communication. I think you asked. I. Strongly believe that the. Education I received gave me so many tools on how to. Inquire and learn about. My own perception of the universe, and how others perceptions may be. Excuse me others. Perceptions may be different from mine. and. Other. Really. Is Everything to me. And I've found that when I ask the universe for something. It will. Bring it to me. Somehow I mentioned earlier that the universe seems to be my greatest lover. and. Developing these tools on how to look inside myself and look at. The world and use my senses b-o-l-l and breathe and touch and see and focus on the senses. I usually can find what I'm looking for. Even if I don't know what exactly I was looking for. Answers usually come to me. And having background has spend really useful. that. Well, that was a good question that you asked yourself. Thank you. Again the goal of this is to help. Those who are seeking to further their education so I will ask this one and I will ask this every guest as well. Even, though you have changed in, put on, pause your formal education, I can still ask this because you did go through those steps. So what advice would you give to someone who is interested in getting their master's degree in psychology? Suppose. Hind. Investigator. Connects well with you. From my research, it seems like. Finding someone who is doing the type of work that. I would be interested in is. The most important piece. Money is also very important, but finding what connects to I want to be doing, and what would be my motivation through a program. Is. Really. What seemed to be the most important part. So what I hear you. Find something that you're very interested in and try to pursue that even further. That a good summary. Okay, one final question and this is kind of a fun one. Since he talked about money, I actually had a question about this. Last question of the podcast. I promise. Thank you first time and patience, but if you have the time and money to complete one project or go on one trip. What would you do? If you had the time and money to complete one project or go on a trip. What would you do? It's tricky. Because I feel like I. Have. Everything that I want. A. I guess. If the world opened up again. I would really like to. Get to Thailand because that's where I'm supposed to go freight before I was not supposed to be traveling anymore and I had to rush home. Retirement not very expensive. Probably continue traveling. I guess that's that's the first thing coming up inside of me. Maybe I would buy A. Little. Van and make it event I could sleep in and travel around for a little while. That's a good money project. had. Money for that. and. So. You'd have to bring that van or by that van if you're I'm assuming if you're traveling outside the United States, you'd have to find that man in by it over there or rent it or bring it with you over there so I think I would keep the band limited to the United States. A lot of other countries have just. Fantastic public transportation systems. I really experienced that. Rate. Okay. Is there anything else that you would like to add to this podcast? I done with my questions. And this is your opportunity to bring up anything else that I did not bring up that you. Could about. I guess what's coming to mind for me. Is Your. View on this phrase that I came to yesterday. And whether Rings true for you. so minister say it one more time. Curious about. Your experience of this race. It is. If I, think back to times. I've been hurt. By someone? Or something. The hurt is there. And so far. Seems like the result of a misunderstanding. or Difference in relativity. Me Think. My first reaction is and you mentioned that earlier on the podcast and I had a reaction then, and it's the same reaction now that you're seeing it again, First off. My background and education is in communication and interpersonal communication to be more specific I did have a broadcasting degree, and was on the television and in Radio but I really enjoyed learning more about interpersonal communication so. What that phrase means to me the first thing that came to mind? was. Instill does. Is How similar And how much overlap there is between psychology and communication as a field. As well as interpersonal communication and one of my undergraduate studies I looked at. Couples and we looked at what we're called hidden agendas in back then it's it's not what you think. A hidden agenda is a hidden agenda is something that you have that you haven't purposely kept from your spouse or significant other or your partner, but something that you just haven't realized verbalize verbally shared that with them, and so a hidden agenda could be something that you're unaware of that. You didn't share with your your important, a spouse or other. And your phrase comes to mind where. If, you were hurt in the past to me. I agree with your assessment that. The vast majority of the time. Is because either a you. You're listening as well and you didn't communicate exactly what you wanted to convey to that person where they weren't in the right frame of mind to receive it. Some people have to be open and receptive to taking in new information that differs from their own, and if they're not in an open frame of mind, they're already closing you out in. They're not going to listen to what you're having to say and so. A lot of times in the interpersonal communication in in the studies that I've done both undergraduate and graduate were. People just did not know how to connect to truly connect. They would just talk on and until they felt listened to in respected. They would just keep saying the same thing over and over in their mind. They're thinking that they're communicating, but they're not because the other person is an open to that and so. What I found his that more and more people. have to level set before they have a good conversation with somebody and what I mean by level is not only with the other person. Why are we here? What are we gonNA talk about? What would we like to accomplish? The level set with themselves and and take that introspective approach of. Where am I at right now? Am I ready to have this conversation, and can I be open to it and be honest and transparent with that other person? If you're not ready to have that conversation, you not in the right frame of mind. You have too many things on your mind. Were you still have not? moved past what has happened from a previous experience or conversation with that person on? That's why I asked you earlier with your brother. Have you had that chance? And sometimes you need more time in order to time and space to settle down and then have that conversation and people. People feel rejected and feel like the other person doesn't love or care about them. If you're approach them in WanNa. Talk about something, but that other person isn't ready to do that and that isn't. That isn't the way that you should respond you should. Acknowledge and say what I hear you saying is this and I understand why it would feel that way, and and if we WANNA talk about this at a later time, we can and then go about it that way instead of Oh sure I wanNA. Talk, but you don't ever want to talk with me whenever I want to. And then it then it just escalates. So It does kind of answer. Your question I guess I. On and That's great. Yeah, so. Roy I. It's always a pleasure. I'm biased, but even if I wasn't your dad, you are a beautiful human being, and I I appreciate you sharing your time with me, and the listeners and viewers I will with this podcast I will put a link to your other podcast with The people I know show with Kirk Karston and all also provide a little bit more information For the listeners viewers, but again I appreciate you taking the time and I'm glad to see that you're happy and healthy and. Continue Your Education One. Thing that I learned if you were to ask me. One of the questions that I asked was who influenced me. When I was going through school or life there was a professor in my master's degree that said a phrase that I remember to this day, and I I take it to heart, and the phrase is. Always push always strive to push back the frontiers of ignorance. And think about that for a second I had to think. About that well after he said it. You're trying to push back. The frontiers of ignorance and there is a difference between ignorance and stupidity. And if you're always striving to learn and learn and learn. And accept that. You're not stupid. You can't know everything This would help the world in a lot of ways Trying to expose yourself to different experiences and knowledge in different people, and that's part of the reason why I know I love traveling. Is You get to meet all these different people and in doing so? I am pushing back. Those, frontiers, of ignorance because. I've never been to this place or experience this conversation or this type of person, but now that I have now you've expanded your experience a little bit more and more and more, and so I I'm a firm believer in in striving to push back the frontiers of ignorance, so I'll leave at the words. So again I appreciate the time I love you very much and I'm glad to see that you're happy and healthy. At this time. I will go ahead in Stop Recording. Thanks. Thanks for listening to the masters in psychology podcast. If you want to learn more about our guests or listen to other podcasts, you can visit our website. Masters in Psychology Dot Com, where you can search through all of the schools in the United, states that offer advanced degrees in psychology. You can also find us on facebook, twitter and Lincoln and remember if you enjoy this podcast, please like follow or share.

Mariah Schumacher University of Minnesota professor Duluth facebook United States MD University of Minnesota Duluth Developmental Psychology polly emery Moss Minnesota Minneapolis Lake Superior Maria DC Cognitive Sciences
Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

Climate Cast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

"Climate change is making more waves and eroding the shoreline of Lake Superior more quickly. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter on the shores of Lake Superior this is climate. So I'm back from vacation now, working inside the lab today, but I can still hear those lake superior way of swooshing in my head for the last three summers. We've stayed at some lovely cabins near. Grand Marais each year. The Big Lake has eroded the edge of the bluff closer to our cabin and this year. The edge is only about three feet away, and it's a fifteen foot drop down to the waves below. Charlie. Walters owns the cabins hi Charlie. Doing I'm doing great. How much would you say that? Shoreline has eroded in the past couple of years well this last year has been about a foot the previous year. It was only a couple of inches, but this last season it really picked up pace. We were pretty stunned when we saw the cabin this year that we stayed in its now perch, just a couple of feet from the edge. What are your options to save that cabin and address the shoreline? To Cabin, but you'd still have the Rozhin problem. I'm told you know they'd have to build up with rock and put some type of filter Mesh screen in and back fill with some soil and. Anyway be a long process and in the range of forty thousand dollars, so Charlie if this repair does turn out to be forty thousand dollars. What does that to Your Business? What's the impact there? My wife grandmother came over from Norway and his only things since nineteen thirty two. And right now in the process of fixing up the cabins, and then paying off loans, so it's a pretty big dent. We basically have to stop everything else. We're doing Charlie Walters. Your cabins are lovely I wish you the best of luck and I hope we talk soon all right. So many Lake Superior Property owners like Charlie are now facing costly repairs from erosion damage heavier precipitation in the lake. Superior watershed is boosting water levels to near record, highs and warmer winters mean less protective lake GEIS's forming to buffer the waves that may be speeding up the erosion process. Jay Austin is a professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and works with the Large Lakes Observatory Hi Jay here from you, Paul? So how high are water levels running on lake superior now and in the past few years. We've had a remarkable run since about. About twenty seventeen of extremely high lake levels on the order of ten to twelve inches above what we would normally be seeing at this time of year, and what's the climate change signal for higher water levels in Lake Superior is it as simple as heavier precipitation in the Lake Superior Watershed when it comes right down to it? Yes, last several years have been much wetter than we would normally see here. The other one is the fact that is suppresses surface waves, and hence protects in some sense shoreline from that sort of wave driven erosion. The long term trend is indeed towards less is and how much of a winter temperature difference between total ice and no is does there need to be to make that change unlike superior? A year, where there is significant ice on the lake, and so people are going and visiting the ice, caves and people are ice fishing, the difference between one of those years at a year with basically no ice can be due to winter air temperature differences on the order of two three degrees. Fahrenheit, so the system is extremely sensitive to these relatively small shifts in winter, climate conditions J. Austin. Thanks for making the time in good to talk with you again. Thanks for having me on. So the next time you come up to this beautiful jewel, we call Lake Superior. Take a look at the waves. Watch them hit the shoreline and think about how much force they have. Climate change is making a longer waves these in on this Big Lake And that means this valued shoreline is eroding much more quickly. From the shores of Lake Superior with climate cast I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul.

Lake Superior Charlie Walters Big Lake Lake Superior Watershed Jay Austin lake GEIS Paul Hunter chief meteorologist NPR foot drop Grand Marais Norway Large Lakes Observatory University of Minnesota Duluth professor forty thousand dollars two three degrees twelve inches fifteen foot
Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

Climate Cast

04:26 min | 6 months ago

Expect low ice years on Lake Superior to continue

"Climate cast is supported by bank of america through global business strategy sustainable operations an employee programs. Bank of america is focused on helping society transition to a low-carbon economy bank of america. Na member fdic little to no ice floating along marquette bay noah reported january's total ice coverage in the great lakes to be the lowest in the last forty eight years lake superior. Ice cover briefly grew to fifty percent during our february arctic outbreak but that fleeting is vanished just as quickly with our mild march. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton. And today on climate cast. What are longer term lake superior ice trends telling us about climate change in the upper midwest professor j austin researchers all things lake superior with the large lakes observatory at the university of minnesota duluth high. Welcome back to climate cast. Thanks for having me on paul. Let's start with this past winter. What was notable with ice cover on lake superior It was a really unusual year very low ice covered starch and we had that remarkable cold air in february and we ended up with fleetingly above average ice levels superior and just as remarkably. They went away really quickly. And how does this fit with the longer term ice trends that you're seeing on lake superior and the great lakes. I expect that we're going to see Significantly lower than average ice cover this year and basically since about nineteen ninety eight. We've had a long string of relatively low ice cover on lake superior with some exceptions like like the polar vortex in twenty fourteen where we had nearly complete coverage for two months. How sensitive is ice on lake superior to climate change. I mean what kinda temperature difference does it take between no ice and total ice on lake superior. I think this is one of the really fascinating things about how superior response to changes in climate. The difference between a year where we see lots of ice on the lake and people are out ice fishing. We're going down to the ice caves and the shipping season is impacted and a low ice here can be due to differences in winter air temperatures on the order of two to three degrees fahrenheit. So even small differences in temperature can cause large changes in the amount of ice. We see on lake superior j. I sometimes think of lake superior as sort of a thermostat for weather in the region right because we've got this big huge body of relatively cold water house lake superior ice cover and water temperatures impact weather and climate in minnesota in the upper midwest. One really interesting thing that we've found here over the last several years. Is that what we see in the winter. Ice cover has a really strong impact on what happens the following summer and so years where we observe a high levels of ice cover tend to be followed by relatively cool summers with respect to the temperature in the lake. And anybody who's been to duluth at the north shore knows that the air temperature that you're experiencing can be a very strong function of what's going on out on the and that's why i see to lilac blooms every year right because there's one in the twin cities in may and then i drive up to the north shore in june. It's happening again. You can actually watch it move downhill in duluth. Though i likes come out much earlier up the hill than they do down by the lake. How should we think about changes in lake superior overall and changes in our regional climate and weather patterns looking forward as we talked about earlier. Lake superior is very sensitive to relatively small changes in winter. Air temperature average winter temperature and so as the climate warms. Ice conditions on lake superior are going to follow in suit and what we're going to see are more and more years with relatively low or ice cover on superior and fewer and fewer years like twenty fourteen for instance which was a relatively high cover year j austin with the university of minnesota duluth and the large lakes observatory. Thanks so much for sharing your science on climate cast today. Thanks for having me awful. That's climate cast. I'm npr chief. Meteorologist paul hutton.

marquette bay bank of america paul hutton large lakes observatory j austin university of minnesota duluth midwest fdic Bank of america great lakes npr arctic duluth north shore paul minnesota Lake superior university of minnesota duluth
Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

Climate Cast

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC good morning. Twenty one percent. That's how much of the world's freshwater lies in the Great Lakes. Thirty four million people live in the Great Lakes basin. Now, a new study finds climate change in the Great Lakes is happening faster than the rest of the US study co author Lucinda Johnson is the associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth for the US as a whole to average temperatures have increased by one point two degrees Fahrenheit, whereas for the Great Lakes in the states bordering the Great Lakes that is one point four degrees Fahrenheit. And actually if you just look at the base in itself, the increase has been one point six degrees Fahrenheit over that. Period. Of the last century. So the Great Lakes is warming faster than the rest of the United States. It looks like it's also getting wetter. I saw this in the study US annual precipitation increased four percent between nineteen o one and twenty fifteen but the Great Lakes region saw about a ten percent increase with more of this precipitation coming as unusually large events what jumps out at you there in that piece of data. Well, the problem with large events is that they are just so destructive. They are distracted from the standpoint of our infrastructure and just the destruction to people's homes is is heartbreaking. But similarly, we see these large events responsible for moving a lot of the sediment and nutrients from the landscape into nearby water bodies, which has a very detrimental effect on what a quality. And we hear about algae blooms we know that lakes like Erie that are much shallower. Are more prone to those what about lake superior? I know it's a cold lake. We don't get a lot of algae blooms there. But as we wash these nutrients in and as the lake temperatures warm is that's something we might expect more of in the future. Well, one of the things that we are really quite concerned about is the fact that we have been observing algal blooms in lake superior. We've seen three blooms that happen to coincide with these very very large rain events. So just this past summer. There was a bloom around the little town of cornucopia. And although this wasn't the toxic algal bloom that we know of it is a huge concern to us to begin to see elbow. Blooms in water body, like lake superior, which is known to be very pristine. Now, we have a terse base to Konami where people in -ticipant that the water quality is going to be very clear and the thought that we might be. Experiencing algal blooms this very clear and pristine body of water is of huge concern to both the ecologists as well as to society as a whole big picture Lucinda as you look at this study, what changes on lake superior will you be monitoring closely and keeping an eye on in the next ten years or so the most important changes that we think are going to be the surface water temperatures and the number and intensity of these large storm events. So the combination of these warmer temperatures with increase nutrients coming in from the land have the potential to really change the ecosystem along the shoreline. And and we have a lot of concerns about that loosened Johnson associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth. Thanks for your insight today on climate cast. Well, thank you, Paul. And I. Really appreciate all of the great reporting that you joined climate change that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner.

Great Lakes lake superior Great Lakes basin United States Lucinda Johnson university of Minnesota Duluth associate director Bank of America FDIC Paul Hefner Konami Erie chief meteorologist NPR -ticipant four degrees Fahrenheit six degrees Fahrenheit
Minnesota's biggest climate change signals

Climate Cast

14:57 min | 2 years ago

Minnesota's biggest climate change signals

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC curly. Let's talk about the two biggest climate signals in Minnesota ormer winters and heavier rain events. What does the latest data show about? How fast winters are warming in Minnesota winters warming at? You know, I don't know which adjective to us, but it seems pretty fast to me. It's if we look at the rate of change the rate of increase per decade in Minnesota. The wintertime temperatures are increasing at about one degree Fahrenheit per decade. Now, if you compare that to summer, which is also warming winters warming about ten times faster than summer. So. Yeah. Real fast. And it's even faster if you look at how the overnight lows during winter are warming. Well, and it seems like it's harder to get to twenty below zero. Now in the twin cities and zero days are fewer overall. At least the trend is heading that way. Does the data support those thoughts? Oh, yeah. We're we're actually seeing it's not just the twenty below. It's the forty Belo's in northern Minnesota. The thirty Belo's out in the central part of the state the twenty below here in the metro. I think it's just a matter of time before we see a winter wear some communities in Minnesota, don't go to zero or colder. And of course twins. Cities we've been below zero every winter on the record. I think we had one winner maybe two thousand one or two or we only had two days zero correct? In two thousand two we we we made a run for it. But we did go below zero. But one of these years will it'll happen. You mentioned winter is warming ten times faster than summer. Why aren't our summers warming faster? Well, I think there's there's a couple of things and one of them's pretty complicated. But the obvious is the reason that we're warming. I mean, if we are accepting the science of climate change, and we understand how greenhouse gases work. The the atmosphere is warming because the earth is not cooling as much. We don't we, you know, we don't release that radiation of two space some of it gets trapped. And so that that has a real advantage towards night and towards winter. It's not actually, you know, I kinda use example. It's not really intensifying the sunlight at all in fact, sunlight just passes right through. But then once the ground gets warm and it star. Releasing that heat at night. And in the winter, you see this you see more of that heat retained. So we have this tendency towards warming those times of day and times of the year. And then there's this other kind of deeper question that I think a lot of researchers are interested in as well is there something about the way the landscape is being managed that is because we have more vegetation and particularly more intensive crops. Perhaps the corn is actually resisting our ability to get hot. Because it's there's more evapotranspiration putting more moisture into the atmosphere, and that as you know, Paul would would keep the temperatures down. So, but, but we know for sure that the greenhouse gas basics suggests that we should be getting warmer faster in the winter than we are in the summer. One of the great parts of my job is that I get to talk to Kenny Blumenfeld about things like corn sweat. So let's talk about that for a minute. We know that corn does produce evapotranspiration. That has two effects, right? It produces evaporation cooling in the lower levels of the atmosphere. But it also might spike are do points. There's been a little bit of work done on that. What do you think this see of corn that we live in how much of a signal could that be in that our summers aren't getting warmer in the mid west? Well, I think there's some research to suggest that that plays a role. But I think that you can also look at other research into the behavior of the jet stream that suggests that perhaps perhaps it's it's more of a global phenomenon that we're actually responding to hear, you know, with the with the dew points, also Paul it's it's not cut and dry. We of course in two thousand eleven we saw the state record do points at morehead, and we saw a widespread do point temperatures in the eighties. But we're not buying large seeing huge increases in those extreme do points. What we're really seeing just like with temperatures were seeing a loss of what? Used to be the really cool crisp kinda comfortable do point temperatures in the summer in those are being replaced by something a little bit more moderate. So we're losing, you know, the forty eight in the fifty twos and being replaced by do points that are fifty five or sixty degrees Fahrenheit. And so we're kind of losing that lower dryer end of the spectrum and replacing it with something that's more moist. But we're not seeing huge increases in that upper end. And and nobody said whether climate is easy. Do we know why I that's a great question. No, I think there's one of the wonderful things about research and scientific research into the climate is there's always room for discovery. I think that easy answers are hard to come by especially as we've got such a dynamic system. That's undergoing change. Interesting. The way you described that it's almost like instead of moving the fences in for the baseball analogy, we kind of moved home plate forward and that higher base level of do points than winter temperatures. We know a warmer atmosphere. Kenny. Holds more water vapor, and that's capable of heavier rainfall. We've added some more of these mega rain events in the past few years. What do the latest numbers say about heavy rainfall frequency in Minnesota? It's gone way up way up way up. I think you know, one of the things that we we have to be a little careful about is. We do know that there's there's more water in the atmosphere just because of the evaporation off the ocean. And then that increase in temperature globally is actually driving a lot of that evaporation. So theoretically, there's more fuel available for these passing storms. So that's happening everywhere. Not just in Minnesota in the midwest. We averaged it around the globe or seeing it in lots of places, but no not quite everywhere because we also know that erred places are tending to become more erred. But then as you know, Paul we also have a naturally variable climate, and we're used to highs and lows, even as we have a systematic changes. So one of the things that's interesting a little difficult to tease out is we've been so wet in the last. In the last decade. This is probably going to be the wettest decade on record in Minnesota. And we've seen more extremes than we've ever seen in terms of number of rainfalls about three inches above eight inches. We're just kind kinda crazy and one of the things that I think will be interesting to discover is how much of this is because of the climate change. We know a significant portion probably has to do with the systematic changes in the climate. But then how much of it has also been, you know, egged on by variability similar to how when we've had the the warmest years on record. Those are gone by El Nino moments of variability, even though they're the stage is set by the existence of the trend that allows them to break the old record. So it'll be there's there's a little bit of both going on here. But we've been we've kind of loaded the dice towards getting more of these heavy rainfall events, let's talk about lake superior. Minnesota's love affair with lake. Superior is a deep one. What does the data show about? How? Climate change is affecting the world's largest freshwater lake. One of the things that researchers have shown is that the water temperatures are increasing even faster than the air around. That's probably the biggest the biggest finding that's a jaw dropping finding. Because if you scientists to understand the way that water heats up it generally takes more time things more time to get warm than the air. So the idea that this lake at least near the surface. It's temperatures are increasing faster than the areas around. It is that's mind boggling, and I think you really have to ask the experts in the echo, the aquatic ecosystem experts exactly what that's gonna mean. But it would as you know, it would affect the transfer of heat between the lake and the atmosphere dramatically, so we'd expect to see changes in the sort of micro-climate of lake superior, and I've talked with Jay Austin from the university of Minnesota Duluth large lakes observatory he tells me that three to four degrees Fahrenheit and winter is all that it takes the difference between. Total ice cover and little or no ice cover. It. Looks like perhaps ice cover is the biggest driver of change on lake superior. Yeah. Well, that makes sense too. Because if you think about the what happens to sunlight when it hits an icy lake versus one with no ice on it. I mean, there's a big difference. So if there's no ice on the lake then the sunlight, even if it's really weak in the summertime or in the wintertime, it can be absorbed by the water a little bit. Whereas if it's is covered the sunlight's just going to bounce right off. So during when you have open water, the lake can actually acquire heat and can heat itself up and get a head start during spring and summer, and that's a big difference from when the lake used to more frequently iced all the way over mostly iced over one of the things that I do on climate casters kind of SAS as well. What we're seeing in Minnesota. We know the data is showing changes in ice cover on inland. Lakes to right. It's about one to two weeks last son average is that about right? Yeah. There were some recent analysis. Done internally in the DNR and showing that the current rate is about four days earlier per decade over the last three decades. And that's on the it's on inland. Lakes that have both a that's the total is cover over the seas total ice cover. Okay. Yeah. You know, we know shallower lakes like Malak are the most temperature sensitive looking at the trends that I see I'm convinced when the data finally is in we're going to find out that climate change is the biggest driver of walleye population changes on lake Malak. What can we say for sure about climate change and in the lakes at this point? I think as a climatologist all I'm comfortable talking about is that we are seeing definite shortening of the ice overseas in and it seems you know, we have more lakes that report is out dates than I indicates and that's going to skew this the distance a little bit. But it seems like we're. Seeing the ice out and earlier faster than we're seeing the ice in coming later. So we're kind of having that effect on the springtime side of the season. We have talked to some experts in fisheries who do say, yes, while I are definitely being affected in that. Minnesota should really shift. Get ready for kind of a cultural shift in terms of what we expect from our lakes in terms of fish stocks. But that's a bit out of my domain. I don't wanna claim expertise in that area. What other trends are you watching going forward? Oh, wow. I mean, I think we we wanna know what's happening with winter always because winter is culturally Connick from Minnesota. And we also a lot of our ecosystems depend on winter, depend on cold winters and snowy winters. But one of the things that I'm really looking for is. When do we get to the point where we begin summer and spring from a warm enough baseline that we start seeing that extreme heat. We haven't seen extreme heat yet really tick up in Minnesota. In fact, you could say we're getting warmer. Without getting hotter. And that's scientifically accurate statement. But the models tell us that sometime we don't know exactly when we get twenty thirty years out in twenty forty twenty fifty and we will start seeing those hotter summers with more days above ninety five. So that's what I'm watching. When when do we start seeing signs at that's begun? And of course, it's gonna take more than one year to show us. It's going to take many years behaving as hotter. Summers of kind of jumbled together before we'll know. But that's something. We're going to definitely watch for and we're also watching for polar. We're going to break that two thousand seven record from Hokka terms of daily rainfall are we going to see some station in Minnesota received more than fifteen inches in a day because that had seemed inconceivable, but the way that we're going with extreme rainfall, I actually wouldn't be surprised if sometime in the next decade or so we see a a rainfall amount that breaks that record. Yeah. Amazing. Kenny, I always say the most important word to remember with climate change. Is change. And the changes were seeing in Minnesota may seem good or bad, depending on your perspective. If you like driving on safer roads or paying lower heating bills in winter that might be a good thing to you. If you run a resort that depends on consistent snow cover and ice cover and good fishing climate change, consistently drive your revenue down and impact your livelihood. What's your perspective on how Minnesotans should think about the climate trends that were watching? Oh, that's a great question. I mean, I think that you know, the one way especially for people who maybe struggled to think about it think about what what seems real to you. We have these scientific facts in these things that we can point to. But most people you can push away from the data, and you can just ask yourself. Well, okay. Have I seen winters not being as cold as they used to be have. I seen longer growing seasons. Does seem to be more heavy rain are these things true. When I talked to people who maybe don't know how to approach the topic because possibly political reasons they often will say what seen these shorter winters in these kind of weaker winters and I've seen longer growing seasons. And I've seen seen more heavy rain, but I I don't believe in climate change. And I think that I think it's important that, you know, find where it's true for you. And I would encourage people to keep can watch for the unexpected. And maybe not the obvious. Yes. Because the story of climate change in Minnesota's not going to be the Hollywood thriller with you know, massive spiraling storm complexes going out of control. Like, we're going to see on some of the on the coasts. It's really going to be it's going to be a little more subtle. You know, the changes in winter temperature, those are increases that are generally making winter more comfortable, so people tend to go well that that's good. I like paying less for heat. I like I like being more comfortable and having the weather be less lethal. But there are secondary effects of that, for example. The there are forest implications. Because some of the forest pests require cold temperatures to keep their populations at bay. And once you don't have those cold conditions while they can proliferate, so I would say sort of watch and think about the subtle changes that might be the secondary impacts as are often called those are going to be important to watch. Minnesota DNR senior climatologist Kenny Blumenfeld. Thanks for updating us on the. Latest climate trends in Minnesota today. They're good talking with you, Paul. Thank you.

Minnesota Kenny Blumenfeld Paul lake superior Bank of America university of Minnesota Duluth FDIC DNR Belo baseball morehead lake Malak Summers Malak Hokka Hollywood
218: Holly Winn | Why You Need To Use "The Color Code Method"

The Dental Marketer

38:53 min | 1 year ago

218: Holly Winn | Why You Need To Use "The Color Code Method"

"Alright it's time to talk with our featured guests Holly Win Holly. How you doing today go good doing great the sky. That's good here. It's good to hear it's refreshing. Say this quite a bit with other guests but like it's refreshing to hear that people are doing great and we're experiencing recession and experiencing a pandemic but it's good to know that you're kind of looking at this in a positive way you know what. I mean an optimistic view. You gotta find the good in things. That's for sure. Yeah I completely completely agree so holly right now. Tell us a little bit about your past your present some of your future goals. How'd you get into this field For me original background is graphic design and marketing Being from Minnesota I went to the University of Minnesota Duluth and gained my graphic design degree. There I mean focus. Early on in my career is it. Basically the design and marketing aspects and kind of alignment future goals. I've pressed forward with a little bit more of my marketing Aspirations so I came from the background of trade shows and large format printing. So you think. We're getting into the dental industry with marketing. Was there channel products where I'm at now currently and I was looking to be a part of something. That's good company was looking to be able to better people's lives and I've definitely found it worth their external products. So it's an interesting start but I really I have enjoyed it fully and I don't know if I could ever get out of dental at this point so you started off not in dental though right. You're what was the link to dental? When did you start saying okay? Let me start working per to just yeah it was. I guess I like. I'd mentioned that reach out for anything. Better people's lives I mean. I looked for different jobs in like art education and just didn't really make any connection there and Other than Matt Dental just kind of jumped out at me and especially their dental products. I mean there's lots of fun. Bright colors their brand awareness that I've been working with this is really eye-catching and it just kind of captured me and and I've been here ever since so then in the you mentioned your experiences or your expertise is like mainly in designing and marketing. What have you seen since the day you I guess graduated from that design and marketing to now. How has that changed? What's what's been changing. What's evolving well? Definitely just communication in general mean I graduated in twenty twelve but we have a social media graphic designer that she graduated just recently within the last three years here and just the amount of stuff that she has learned with social media and how to approach consumer is in a different way has just old light years of different than like. I said I liked the couldn't Claire Age but I know she was quite younger than me but she's just such a great skill set that I've found and yeah mostly that communication. It's just there's so many different outlets in trying to hone in just a few and really just rocket launch so communication is what you feel like something. That's I agree. I think communication I mean. We've we've I guess made more ways to communicate with people in a ton of like before it was just thrown than phone text. Email right and then now it's like social media and all these thing it's almost like as if we have our phones but then when we get a call where like. I don't know this number WHO's this and we don't antibiotic. Yeah but when we get like a direct message. Dm or or something right on social media where like Oh let me open it up. Let me see what this is about right? And you're more inclined to to look at it so it's almost as the phone has a different purpose for it. You know what I mean then. Just like answering. They're playing kidding because of because of the way we utilize social media and communication. What about design? Yeah Vault what's in design that you've seen has evolved in the design aspect I would say capturing consumers differently I mean. People are definitely pushing their brand awareness and just coming from a more relatable source. I mean each brand I feel has a certain voice that they need to feature and if you can find that voice than really connect with your audience like that seems to be key with the design. I mean You can have an amazing product but you definitely need to have some type of voice and backing in story that really needs to push it forward and that seems to be kind of like a key thing in design. I think that makes things have that little spark that kind of intrigued the consumer which is needed. How can someone find that boys? For example of our starting mile business or something and then I said I want my designed to look like I care. Okay now now what right like? How do you put that into context? Have you put it into like a design? Or how can you even find that voice? Where were you can outlay it to design? Yeah I think like you said like if your message is something that you WanNa promote about that you care and that's where you're kind of your voice is coming from. I mean working with the designer and really expanding that message of the feelings and usually with this design and creative background that you have like even this format of carrying like there's a sense of a color power that can go with a softness that needs to go with it so you kind of build on that and within design and marketing. I mean it's huge the communication that you have with your end user. Whoever you're communicating with how to push that forward and just bring up examples and if you like something and grabbing inspiration I think it's just that's kind of the main focus is getting that inspiration invoice out forward. Seru that creative net. Gotcha Gotcha okay. So then let's talk about business. I know he kind of alluded to it before. But your area of expertise is especially in zirk. What is it? I'm currently the marketing manager. But I do work closely with our a graphic designer Again main background had started off early career as graphic design to move very creative outlet person. And that's do you feel and this is kind of a hard hitting question here. Do you feel like most dental offices? You work with or dental practices or just dentistry in Dent. In general do you feel like it's sometimes a creative industry or not so much of a creative industry definitely a creative industry? It's I mean I've looked at different Aspects of dentistry. And just kind of coming from that design background like one of the main things is even just how people match shades of T- The to till make that stealing or whatnot and that artistry in itself and very impressive like that just like blew my mind watching videos of that and being more aware of bashing. I mean it's definitely an art form. Yeah I agree I agree. How can someone? And this is the marketing background of few. How can like someone has dentists? Who who is creative? Who's doing on that? How can they market that to the general population in the best most easy way to understand or not the best way because there be many ways but like the most easy way to understand most acceptable way for the patient or the community? It'd be like Oh they're artist. How does that work? Yeah definitely I think just making sure that you brand your practice and that your present in the community and I mean video and imagery goes a long way. I mean cell phones nowadays. That's how we capture life and I think it's something that dentition utilize and look at what we're doing and posted on social media. Show their patients what they're proud of and passionate about. I think that's totally. Were putting out there. Where do you think right now dentition? It'd be posting or putting that out there on like what what what social media platform or or what will adjust their website. Like where do you think would be best right now right now? I would say instagram. That seems to be like kind of the hot topic and I mean even on top of that with the younger generation I mean I have it. The Tick Tock. App is phenomenal. If you need a good laugh but there's great stuff on there. I think you just need to put yourself out there on any pot from you. Can I mean obviously there are certain platforms that reach specific audiences like Lincoln? More that professional aspect. And there's facebook that you can probably go more business with where instagram intake top. You can maybe have a little more fun with it. I think it's one of those things. Like any of them are really great but instagram seems to be kind of my talk. One that people really connects with and message back and forth on and comment on products or Just communicate that way. Yeah Yeah Take Talk. I don't I mean I know a lot of people are starting to use it but I I haven't heard and maybe it's because like I don't have my ear to the ground but I haven't heard many new patients coming in from there or like what what what is the demographic for. Tick Tock like. I said it's Kinda younger demographic stuff nearly a comedic relief and found myself during this pandemic. It's something that just kind of like it. Just kind of. It's nice little release but I do find lots of the hygienist on. They're just doing fun. Little things are missing their patients and doing dental on their dogs or their cats and trying to chase their husbands down cleaning their T. If so it's like I said more becoming directly but it's definitely kind of fun to share and be a part of and Again it shows that passion that you have for your job and I think a lot of dental professionals do have that passion otherwise they wouldn't be doing it. Yeah and I do believe like Tick Tock continues it will it will continue to pivot and involved so I mean I think it is good thing to to stay on top of mind right. I would be interested to know anybody listening like if anybody has already gotten. You know you patients from there but with Instagram yes. We do an facebook too but I know instagram right now and to me. I feel like incorrectly from wrong. But do you feel like those are two different beasts like instagram facebook. Yeah I do. There's just it's a different audience in a way And again different communication I mean. Instagram is very picture motivated. So I think people like to scroll through and if you have something interesting show like that's a good place to do it. Yeah I think so. Then how do you think someone should if I'm listening and I'm like okay on a star posted on instagram? I'm committed I'm ready now. What do they post like a picture of their outset of their practice and be like? Hey we're accepting new patients like what do you think is the best way for you? I Want I want you to think like as the general population and you're just scrolling on facebook right. How would you stop? Or what would make you? Stop on Ah DENTAL OPPOSITES FACEBOOK or not. Facebook instagram page. And be like. Oh this is well. This is interesting. Yeah definitely I mean like. I said dental to professional passionate I mean. Show the inside of your practice. Show how you organize the near Sterilization Center. I mean this is stuff that patients don't always get to see like your day to day life and Interview your staff people like to be relatable and I think getting that out there of that communication back and forth as a patient and seeing it and introducing your staff like what better than a friendly face that you've already seen on instagram. And you're walking into it like hey I know you I mean. I think it's a great way to do that What should they not do on instagram? I think it's good to keep it light hearted definitely Keep Communication Open But I don't think just don't let it drop. That would be the main goal. I would say you're gonNA start an instagram. I would certainly post as often as possible Once a day just make sure your president. Because that's what people WANNA see. I mean if you post one picture of your practice accepting new patients and it dies down I think you're going to kind of lose that luster of what it could really be calm and then instagram also has instagram's stories right. So what would you recommend for that? Oh again same kind of thing. I mean showing off your practice showing off your brand Maybe even something. If you go out with your team or celebrate Tori thing I mean again. It's not relatable factor of seeing these people doing what they're passionate about in connecting that way got you during this pandemic. How can they do that? Because I feel like we might get tunnel vision and be like okay. I have no idea what else to post about I am. I'm not seeing patients. I'm not seeing my team. I'm basically home. I mean I can go to the office but I'm basically home and I. I mean I took and like so many shots and videos of my sterilization. Now what certainly I think. A huge Part of that would be what you're doing to get ready for reopen and then it's GonNa Happen it's GonNa look different. People are probably going to be a little nervous to come and but I think you need to show your patients that you are taking the Syria. Then you're moving forward and doing the best for your staff as well as the patients themselves. You WanNa make them feel safe. I mean of course everybody wants to feel safe or have the answer is and sometimes. It's hard to take that when you don't have all of the answer is but if you can at least give them what your doing your sterilizing in between You're going to be wearing personal protection equipment as best you can. I'm sure that's kind of a hot topic. Obviously one dental practices can get that type of stuff Another one would be that aerosol control I'll do a shameless plug here. We HAVE OUR HIGH VOLUME MR thirsty. Which is a great piece to control Aerosol in the dental office And I think you're showing that you care about them enough you're passionate enough about your business that you are taking precautions for that. Yeah I think what would be really nice. You kind of sparked idea right. Now he's like maybe make a a post about each of those right now all in one day but like this is to step one. I'm like what we're doing number one. We're doing this right. That's you posted on Wedneday number two. Were doing their assaulting number three. You're doing that and you compile those videos and then put them on your website on like frequently asked questions somewhere in there you know. And then when PLO scroll down yeah they can see like oh I had. How safe is? Now what kind of baby P P P do you have? How are you making sure? I don't know something right with Arezzo. And then you they can click the video and watch it. You know what I mean. And it's also been on social media so it's GonNa it's GonNa leave them to your social media from that Web from your website but at the same time. It's a frequently asked questions you know. So in case they people did miss it on your social media in the past. It's on your website now. So it's interesting. I like that idea right now. Hollywood can identify do today. There listening right now and they're like okay. If I did exactly what holly is about to say my business will improve. What can they do today to improve their business? Certainly I mean there. Donald products were all about helping practices with safety happiness and efficiency. So the main goal I would say is just taking this time this time to clean out get organized in Gulf shores and cultural your cabinet get expired materials pushed out I mean again. It's an unfortunate situation that we're people are not able to see you patience. But I think you should utilize this time for growth and really dig in as much as you can get organized and get a system in place. I mean. We're GONNA eventually going to reopen and it's GonNa be hard hitting I mean. Certainly People Wanna get their teeth cleaned. I had an appointment right before this and everything shut down and I can't wait to get in. I mean it's getting those systems in place to really make sure that you're ready at year. Efficient team will be happy at lower those stress levels for staff and patients That would be my main thing and of course again dessert. Donald Products and other shameless plug. We have our caller method which is a great way to Color Code and get organized and be ready so breakdown to be really quick. What is the color code and and the method so right now if I have the free time what should I be doing with that? Yeah certainly so we have a staff. We have our sales staff that have clinical backgrounds. They each have a boat. Twenty years of clinical background and so working with one of them to holding and with that kind of consists of is that we have the Resin products that have antimicrobial inside of them. It's it's not like coding of any sort but it's actually in the injection moulding inside of the material so it box any type of mold or bacterial growth which is fantastic but Beyond that there's trays. We have instrument holders everything is color coded to the point of making it easy for everyone. So if you have a crown and bridge that you're wanting to do everything. Is that in the pink tab the pink trae and the pink insert and holder. So you're not guessing or anything is it's all available to you. Pull IT ready to go. It has a locking cover on top locking cover on top of the top and the TRAE. Everything's covered safe from It's really the best way to kind of push forward to get that efficiency and overall just a great atmosphere feeling even for the patient. I mean the stuff is colorful. It's bright it's welcoming. It's kind of the route to go. And that's been that saying We can that on your website right. The color coding and really quick other shameless plug guys. I believe Holly has in case you are interested in search. You have a special offer deal. Yeah we got a little something going on. So essentially we're really wanting to help practices be as efficient as they can win. This reopen happens and We know people not practicing at this moment with Overhead costs. I mean. It's it's going to be tough and we're kind of Pushing forward with an organized. Now pay later option but we want you to take this time get organized get the color methods Sutton play. Become the most efficient practice you can. And we'll defer the payment and Tau November twenty twenty. So kiss anybody's interested in like they're listening to like those are coded then. Now is the time so awesome? We'll talk about that a little bit later but right now these next questions are just again to the head of someone who isn't totally involved and the clinical side of dentistry every single day on the day to day. What would you holly like to see more from a dentist? Oh absolutely definitely a patient. Involvement that interaction With patients I know usually when I go in you know you sit down and say hey John as you get to know your hygienists really well I mean there with you most of the time and the dentist POPs in checks your teeth and pops right back out but I think it's great to maybe take an extra minute or two and really converse with them. Show them your system and your passion about your practice. I mean you've you're there you're opening it. It's exciting. I mean. Share that experience with them and market yourselves like here our system. This is what we're doing. This is how this works. I mean get them interested. It's definitely something that I've never experienced and I think it's it's worth doing to come back with the patient to connect with them to take the time right like to get them to conversation. Yeah to see about their lives a little bit more. I agree I feel like sometimes we tend to try and rush it right because we wanna see more new patients but I feel like that's more of a thinking wider mindset instead of more of like in-depth like let's get more from this patient in the sense of what their Abou- who their front where they're from who they are and in return. I mean everybody knows somebody so they might refer you somebody right in return and so forth but you're building a deeper relationship with them beyond just like teeth make sense. I liked that certainly absolutely And then right now Ali. What do you hate or dislike about dentistry? Oh that's a good one I would say to not sell yourself short as a dental practice. Take Pride in your brand awareness. I mean you are a business and connecting with the community and putting it your branding out there I know we do a lot of imprinted insurance retainer boxes that we see come through and Before I started at Donald Product. We just did that text on these boxes while now I mean we've come into the twenty first century and we are printing full color logos on these things and full capability of that printing style. And we still see a huge amount of them. Come through with. Just touchstone them. I mean you gotta you definitely have to be your own advocate. I'm in push yourself and get a logo created and and put that out there. It's worth it. Do you feel like that's getting better now. Or It's getting the same or worse. How do you see that? It's probably about the same. We've had a couple of comes through that extra. I've taken kind of upon myself got. I'll see it's just a text and I'll look up their website and I see a beautiful logo and it's like. Oh Man so. I'll usually send a little sample of what it would look like printed just for them to see and that usually entices them to change their change their order the next time around. So take pride in those logos and what you've built your passion overall. Do you feel like sometimes people are like I mean who who really going to see the logo right or like to you actually. Holly what's the definition of a logo to you? Oh Another good one. Cut me off. Guard there I guess it's something that represents your business. Obviously that's kind of an obvious answer but there's definitely more meaningful behind it. I mean anytime. You're shopping as a consumer. I mean not just visiting a dental practice I mean packaging and different things. Kinda catch your eye and I mean certainly with my creative background. I tend to go a little bit. Probably further in my mind of what these things mean or why it looks that way but yeah I think again it. Just kinda backstop your brand awareness and your voice really Dacha rebrand awareness your voice so it's super important to to kind of already have before you're making the logo to have like a your mission statement or your values really your voice right and then that's your so that makes sense. Then what what you say because if you are hiding your brand it's Kinda like you're hiding your voice right certainly. Yeah Oh get it out there. Shot it up the rooftops so then to you. Where have you seen the most effective places where people can put their logo on? Oh that's a good one two. We know with the social media marketing. That's really easy to push it out. There it's free. You've put it on instagram. Your facebook Obviously we do like the venture retainer boxes. That's a kind of brainer. I mean if you have someone with a retainer or mouthguard I mean that's certainly an easy way to get your advertising out there for free if you're giving those away Yeah that's kind of our name here at dental products so then zirk how did how did they do it? How did they I guess? Use Your logo as a voice our logo you're saying Yeah No I mean we try to brand everything that we can. I mean from our high-volume section with Mr Thirsty. It's branded right on there. And as well as our crystal HD mirrors we have zirk right on the front of them but again even beyond just the physical drying or digital logo itself. I mean it's the whole aspect of the feeling and the brand awareness. So it's it's colorful. It's eye catching. It's it's different than most dental advertising out there so I think it definitely sets us apart so I was just keep that in mind again the whole your voice and what you want to put out there. I mean we're a fun friendly company and I think it really reflects in those colors and Canada overall organization that we like to promote man. I agree one hundred percent. I think it's more like if we were to look at Holly. Would we know and like a dental conference? She's with zirk right. And it can either be because of the way you talk about Cirque or what. You're wearing or something so. I think it's the same thing like if we were to look at you practice owner right. Do they know you or your team. Works for your practice. And if you're if people are y never heard about that practice the you need to be. You need to have more brand awareness right so people know about your practice for foremost. But they're like Oh you know what I you look like that you look like a dentist who works here or you look like you work for. Holly's practice right. It's like yeah I to me because you're out and so I think yeah you're right. It goes beyond. I think that's a good question. I always ask yourself like. Just walk around with people know that you know what I mean because it goes beyond just like almost the logo. It's more like hey. Are you talking about your brand? Are you showing your brand? Are you doing everything you can with your brand and then that's where you can ask yourself? Yes or no I mean you can tell yourself yesterday now right so late. Yeah let it for rush. I mean it's a part of you and get it out there What do you love about dentist? She right now has afraid now with everything going on. I guess just the sense of community and we're all in this together. I mean I know that. It's Kinda that stereotypical cheesy answer at the moment. But it's really interesting to see the support that everybody has been giving. I mean different online forums and social media and just communication even with those A manufacturer manufacturer to the end user and Yeah just support and communication and really putting it out. There of how practices can help each other. When it's time to reopen and then to you what needs to change for you or like the general population to be more open to dentistry. Now I know like things might be a little bit different. Now right people might start seeing dentistry a bit more essential especially because now but I know before in the past people are like. Oh the dentist I gotta go. You know. They have like that little. Guess right what do you think? It's a change in order for people to stop doing that. It'd be more open to it. Yeah I think just the patient experience and in general I mean the overall atmosphere of practice. I mean if you're personable and taking that time to communicate with your patient and I kinda reiterate the the reopen of what you're doing for them and kind of going beyond just are okay. Your teeth look good byes in six months if thing just taking that that little bit of extra time with them is totally worth it. She's taking a little extra time to you. How much time is too much time Wow here in Minnesota we have the Minnesota goodbye with relaxed from forty. Five minutes to two hours. I mean obviously you kinda now you gotta you gotTa Communicate. See where people are at. Some people are sharers. They like to over share. They liked To talk a lot and you kinda just have to know when to cut it out there I feel like there's a sensor feeling When you kind of need to close things up but there's people that don't like to share and I think it's just kinda gauging where you're at with people. Some people are going to accept it. One hundred percent appreciate it and some people are going to be like. Why are you telling me there's some I think you'll just have to engage with how people are feeling and I think that's definitely going to be a thing for reopening as well of gauging people because again the whole safety factor and there's Pin Democrats. It's scary and I think just making sure they're comfortable as much as possible. Also definitely Kinda gauging it out I'm ready and then talk to me about cirque. What are you guys doing right now? How are you guys helping out? Dentist what are you guys got going on? Let me know yes. Certainly I mean. Of course our mission is help. Dental teams achieve safety happiness efficiency like I inside and our expertise is just vast. I mean we've been in business for fifty years and producing an extensive line products that help elevate the patient experience and improve infection control and just overall getting organized. And I think it's a great time to do it and Again with Aris old kind of being on the forefront of everybody's mind we have an innovative isolation evacuation products like Mr steeper the high volume and think puddle for our low volume creating just an overall easier working environment for dentists and their staff as well as just comfortable patient experience and I think just trying to make sure that anxiety is kind of a common aspect. I feel like for patients. And now it's going to be even more heightened with this pandemic so I mean I think it's time to change it and you know our resin based products per caller method or A great attractive way to keep organized and keep things colorful at your side deal. I mean it can be scary to see anything beyond that. I mean making sure that things are cleaned up and prompt and good to go with a simple way to create a peace of mind for patients and their visit. You give that the warm fuzzy feelings during during their but Do you feel like You mentioned the colors right As far as the. That's a big thing. Do you feel like that has A sort of impact on the patients the colors that you guys use. Oh Yeah It's like a shot. It's kind of an atmosphere and I mean even goes beyond that. It's kind of a cognitive thing. I mean if you kind of think about it that stainless steel the instruments against like a stainless steel tray or even the instrument holders the cassette some kind of like clanking and whatnot. I mean it can be a little frightful for people so that our resin kinda products kind of eliminate that factor and They stay looking sharp through sterilization process. I know sometimes a stainless steel can get more oxidized looking and kind of have a dingy look to So I think it helps a lot gone. I think so too. I feel like Now it's more than just like you know I mean Gone Yup right or gone. Google and you'll see people nobody ever talks about and we mentioned this a lot like A. Oh my Gosh my number four on the cavity this came out and then the shadings little. Nobody says that they're like Oh. My Gosh. This office is old like back in the nineteen hundreds or you know what I mean. They're like this is the worst experience or they'll talk about paint rate or whatever where they might say. Good things right like this is like futuristic. This is the best I felt so calm. I felt so relaxed. It's the experience that people talk about. And so if the stuff that you use on the day to day to make profit right just the function if you use that stuff on the day to day already but you can utilize it to create a better experience at the same time now doing to you know what I mean like. Now you're now or talk in an hour talking because it's like I feel that's why like cirque because I feel like you guys have kind of utilized the stuff that we have to use right like fourteen knife spoon knife right. We gotta use the stuff to eat but you a way to make it. We're GONNA use a four expert or knife making enjoyable for the doctor and the dentists but at the same time we get a better experience for the consumer or the patient or the prison eating right so to me. I think. That's that's that's awesome. You know what I mean so I appreciate what he's doing so if anybody's interested Holly. Where can people find you? Can People get more information on? Zirk all that stuff. Yeah absolutely You can go straight her website. There DOT COM Z. I. R. C. DOT COM We also have an instagram and facebook. In you'll find those that virk dental products that right online We Post as much information as we can. And we reach out. We liked to communicate. We have our social media designer courtney who was communicating back and forth as much as possible along with our sales team. I mean we're friendly people. We like Harkens awesome. Awesome guys in all of that is going to be in the show notes below so your interested. If you want to know more about Zurich and everything like that please go on the show notes below and check them out at Holly. Thank you so much for being with us. It was a pleasure and we'll hear from you soon. Wonderful thank you so much.

instagram facebook Holly Donald Products zirk Matt Dental Minnesota University of Minnesota Duluth Claire Age Arezzo Google Sterilization Center marketing manager Dent Gulf shores Canada Lincoln Tori
Is the U.S. Ready to Reopen? 2020-05-04

The Takeaway

44:47 min | 1 year ago

Is the U.S. Ready to Reopen? 2020-05-04

"The when the worst of this is all over will begin to reopen but that process will not be cut and dried snobby versus album. Hell's it's that economics health lead to be working together. I'm Shumita Basu. In for tenzing Vega and for today on the takeaway may fourth. We're breaking down. How or if we'll be able to go back to normal after the pandemic then how leading Democrats have dismissed Tara Reid's sexual assault accusations against Joe Biden and what it means for the metoo movement. Do they actually believe any of the things they wrote? During the cabinet hearing also a look at the high cove nineteen death rate in nursing homes and long term care facilities and then how the Navajo nation is grappling with the virus with limited resources on the Navajo nation. We are looking now at a pandemic on top of epidemics that we currently have. Let's get to it across. The country states are starting to relax. Restrictions put in place due to cove nineteen even as the number of confirmed cases continues to climb and the death toll surpasses sixty seven. Thousand People. Experts say the pandemic could go on for another two years with subsequent waves of infection in the fall and winter. Still that hasn't stopped places like Georgia and Texas from allowing businesses to reopen on Friday governor. Brian Camp lifted the stay at home order. For most of Georgia's residents with an exception for people who are elderly or quote medically fragile who are required to shelter in place through June twelfth. We'll talk more about Georgia's reopening on this show in the coming days and elsewhere in the country stay at home. Orders are still going strong but in states like California and Michigan government officials are facing increasing backlash from protesters who want things to return to normal so far. The protests have been limited in size and people participating range from anti vaccination activists too far right extremists using the pandemic to push forward white supremacy still these protests and the reopening process in general raise serious questions about when and how states should resume business as usual. And what happens if we reopened too soon for more on this? We're joined by. Caitlyn rivers an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Jeremy. You'd global health politics expert and dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Thank you both for coming on the program. Caitlyn I think a lot of people here reopen and think that means go completely back to normal. So what does reopening state-by-state mean to you? That's right reopening is not going to be a light switch where one day we wake up and are able to do all of our normal activities. It's going to be a slow reincorporation of community activities back into our lives and so we might start with things that are low risk like more outdoor activities maybe some essential shopping locations the businesses that are asked to reopen. I will vary state by state but it certainly will not be all at once and then as we take that first step and start to reincorporate those activities. If things go well we can start to do more and we will proceed like that slowly. Jeremy a lot of the governors who are talking about reopening their states as quickly as possible. Keep saying that. It's an economic necessity. How fair is it to be thinking of this? As a sort of zero sum game economic health versus public health. I think if we frame it in that perspective we actually lose out on the bigger picture here. That's not about economics versus public hells. It's that economics in public. Health need to be working together and so if we think about this in terms of we have to do this for the economy. Were losing sight of the fact that if we reopen too quickly. What we're likely to do is to see another way to come slater on in the year and that wave could be as bad if not worse than what we're currently experiencing so even though there are the pains right now to go along with Having these restrictions in place it's actually better for us in the long run as opposed to opening up too quickly caitlyn. The federal government has released some guidelines on the reopening process including the criteria to consider. I've heard a lot of elected officials site new cases per day as a meaningful metric. When thinking about when to reopen is that the right way to think about it yes we do. WanNa see the start to slow before we consider reopening and keeping an eye on the number of new cases. Each day is one way to do that. Other metrics that are important. Are the number of people hospitalized both currently and new hospitalizations each day and the number of deaths and again those all us to understand whether we are in the acceleration face or whether are staying home to slow the spread has begun to break chains of transmission and slow the epidemic Caitlyn what are some of the approaches to reopening that we're seeing here in the US? And as I mentioned earlier Georgia was the first state to start doing this. So there are discussions about what industries are what segments of the economy can reopen and that does vary state by state. We've seen in Georgia that they are leisure activities. Personal services other states have chosen to focus more on businesses and so there are decisions that will vary about what will be allowed to reopen. But there's another side which is what's what is the public health approach to keep the community safe during not reopening and that site focus is really a lot on diagnostic testing and contact tracing. Those are the tools that will allow us to control transmission during that reopening process and that second public health part is pretty widely understood pretty Widely shared amongst states and again. That's diagnostic testing contact tracing. Yes so tell me where we stand on those two things right now. I know that Georgia has been saying the past. Few Days that they've pretty significantly ramped up testing But that's also from a very low number of tests earlier hauer states doing on on testing and contact tracing we have seen a pretty substantial expansion in our testing capacity last week the United States ran one point six million tests which is a great improvement over what we saw even earlier in April. But it's still not the level that many experts recommend recommendations range from about three point five million tests a week and go up from there and so there is still more room to grow and I think that's important to make sure that we're not just finding people with severe illness but really everybody with covert like symptoms and again that's to enable the second piece which is contact tracing. We have estimated along with the Association of State and territorial health officials that the US will need about one hundred thousand additional contact tracers and states have begun to make moves towards hiring those contact. Tracers again this is happening at the state level. So the the movement to hire those varies from place to place but there are efforts underway to expand our capacity to do that. What kind of skill set do you need to be a contact tracer? We recommend that contact. Tracers be familiar with the local community and they need to be comfortable with conducting interviews and collecting data. It is a skill position. But it's the kind of skill you can teach through maybe a decor or a couple day course in so. It's quite approachable. This is also a good opportunity to hire people who have not been able to work. Perhaps because they've lost their job because of the pandemic Now when we think about Vaccines and Therapeutics. And the timelines for those. How does that factor into how states can think about their plans to reopen? It's unlikely that will. We will have an effective therapeutic or vaccine in time to affect reopening plans. You probably heard in the news. Recently that any product by Gilliat is becoming an option for treatment which is exciting but that product is used late in the course of illness so when people are already quite sick in order for therapeutic to be useful to break transmission and to influence the epidemiology. We need something earlier in the course of illness. And unfortunately that's not available yet. Jeremy how much of a role is public pressure? Playing in reopening states. Like what we're seeing with some of these protests even though they're fairly small in scope. Yeah I think we can't underestimate the role that public pressure is played. And I think you hit it on the hit the nail on the head when you said that a lot of these protests that we have seen are actually other political movements that are glomming onto this but in a lot of places you are starting to see more of this public demonstration. That's taking place and governors are starting to feel pressure and I think what's actually going to be really complicated about this or puzzle of problems. Is that if we're going to do this? Sort of reopening governors have to be willing to step that back if the testing is showing that we are seeing an increase in the number of cases of the number of of hospitalizations is going up. Governors are going to have to be able to make that essentially difficult political choices. Say Okay I know. We opened up businesses. But we need to close some of those back down because we're seeing too much community spread and that's going to take a whole whole huge amount of political skill in order to be able to walk that back in the face of that potential political and public pressure Caitlyn. What do we know about the best practices around easing out of a lockdown in terms of walking back restrictions? We don't have a template because we are in a place we have never been before we have never asked everyone to stay home before. And so the exact right moves. I think are still a little bit uncertain. But we recommend that states start with low risk activities again. Those might be things that are outdoors. Things were social. Distancing is very possible. Make those first few moves and see how things go because it's much easier to pull back from low risk activities. That are unlikely to cause a great deal of transmission then to dive in with a mass gathering for example that might result in a lot of secondary cases. And then again you are in a place where you have a lot of community transmission and you have created the conditions that led us all having to stay home in the first place and so it's really about starting with low risk activties and proceeding slowly. Jeremy What lessons can we learn? From other countries that have already started the reopening process for example. I'm thinking about Singapore. And maybe you want to bring up other examples but Singapore was praised as having handled things really well from the start. They were testing extensively. There was contact tracing happening there but now the number of new cases per day is just shooting up. Their Singapore is a great example. I think of of the potential issues that can come up with this reopening because as you pointed out they received a lot of praise for their early and aggressive actions but we are seeing the second wave of cases and one of the things. I think is really interesting about the Singapore. Case is that it is is highlighting some of the existing social Cleavages that exist within Singapore so a lot of the new cases that are popping up in Singapore are happening among my workers who are oftentimes living in less than ideal conditions and so it it's reflecting some of these other sorts of social political and economic divisions that exist within society. So there are some issues there but we can look to to countries like South Korea. Which again lots of testing lots of contact tracing that has enabled these sorts of of moves to be able to to move forward and we're seeing some real potentially positive signs coming Austrailia New Zealand even the earlier today. They were talking about how they're thinking about creating a travel bubble where people who were in Australia. New Zealand would be able to travel between the two countries but they're still might be restrictions for people coming from other places but again it's that ability to do the testing to the ability to do that contact tracing and then the ability to use those data that are collected in order to inform the policy making process going to be so incredibly vital for making this Something that works. Caitlyn here on the takeaway we've been talking about the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on low income communities on people of color especially black Americans. Should we assume that reopening too soon would only further impact these populations the most? It's true that health disparities play out in so many different ways so I think one of the key pieces of missing data right now is understanding where people are getting infected even during being asked to stay home and I suspect that people who are still considered essential workers and participating in community activities are at higher risk in those will largely be under resourced communities communities of color low wage workers and so when we do reintroduce more community activities it will be still those people at risk and so. I think it's really important that we understand. How and why? New cases are arising so that we can take additional steps to protect people in those settings underlying health conditions and other factors that put people at risk for infection and for severe illness again. Disproportionately affect under resourced communities. And so I do think we will continue to see that. Show up in the epitome allergy doctor. Caitlyn rivers is an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and Jeremy. You'd is a global health politics expert and dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Thank you both for joining us. Good to be with you thank you. It's been one month since tower. Read a former Senate staffer publicly accused former vice president. Joe Biden of sexually assaulting her in Nineteen ninety-three in early April. Two sources corroborated the details in her claims and last week two more sources came forward last Friday on MSNBC. Mika Brzezinski asked Joe Biden about the accusation. Would you please go on the record with the American people? Did you sexually assault Tara Reid? No it is not true. I'm saying unequivocally it never never happened. Joining us. Now is rich mccue. An investigative reporter and producer who has reported on Tara Reid's allegations for business insider rich. Thank you for being here. Thank you for having me and also with us. Is Sarah Jones Staff Writer? For New York magazine. She's written about what this case means for the feminist movement and twenty twenty. Thank you for coming on the show. Sarah thank you so much for having me rich. Walk US through. What Tower read has said publicly? And what you've learned through your reporting so far so Atari came out with an allegation Lulu every year ago. Actually her first allegation was that there was sexual harassment. That was in a small paper called the the Union in in northern California. A month ago. As YOU'VE SET UP. Tara came out on a podcast. Katie Helpers radio show and accused Joe Biden of sexual assault so now all these years later. She's come forward and basically has this is what happened. But the number of voices have come forward in in corroborating parts of her story or them as a neighbor who. I spoke with Last week who live next to Tara in nineteen ninety five and ninety six and said look. She told me of this event in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. We're right next to each. We live right next to each other and You Know I. I've found her. Her voice compelling believable because she says look I am. I'm a lifelong Democrat. I will be voting for Biden but I know Tara. She's she's a good person. You need to understand this happened. And that's the reason I'm coming forward. I WANNA come back to what that neighbor had to say to you in in a few minutes but Sarah. It's no secret that many people have seen Joe Biden as a complicated figure to say the least way long before read came forward about her alleged assault and now that he's cleared the path to the nomination. He has promised that his running mate will be a woman. Can you sort of characterizes track record on women's issues you know Biden had built up a lot of a lot of goodwill over the years Thanks to the Violence Against Women. Act which he helped right He was a notable voice addressing the subject of campus sexual assault. But he was still complicated. Figure as you know Due primarily to handling of Anita Hill testimony during Clarence Thomas. Confirmation hearings and also on abortion rates Biden supported the Hyde Amendment which bans the use of public funds for abortion Until he his most recent Campaign for president so a bit of a mixed bag there at least from a feminist perspective. Rich one question that came up during Biden's MSNBC interview on. Friday was about the complaint. That Tara Reid says she filed at the time and Biden says at this document would be in the National Archives if it exists but you actually reached out to the National Archives. What did you learn from them? So I reached out to the National Archives and they said no that that document would not exist there they have no such document. I mean according to her if she filed it was with an office called the Fair Employment Practices Office and so that was the question. We'd ask said you know if there were a complaint file that office would be in the National Archives and they said No. So that's why there's this renewed focus on the University of Delaware and senatorial papers and it is there any way to unseal those documents. They're at the University of Delaware. Or is that something that Joe Biden would have to okay himself? I believe it's the latter we've tried. We've you know I I follow the foia request and a apparently senatorial papers and congressional stuff like that is immune to request and if you were able to foil for that kind of stuff I mean what would you. What are you hoping to find their? What else are you hoping to find their well? Away to prove or disprove this happened. You know if if there was a document that she filed a complaint. What does it say does she? Does she say what she's saying happened in? If at document exists still It would answer. A lot of questions are also said. She went through the proper protocols in up to check command telling people her supervisor's she felt uncomfortable. She felt Harassment over to the certain issue Before the assault and so she said those people were taking notes So where those notes if if you know if they still exist that that would shed a light on on this whole conversation. Do you have an understanding of weather? Tar read filed a complaint about the details about this alleged sexual assault or was it about this. That's number of complaints leading up to it from my understanding. It's not about the assault from everything she said to me. It's about the the events leading up to it in her. What she was feeling at the time right. So in terms of corroborating the actual events of that day What is Tara hoping we'll be out there to to support her claims well A good question. I I don't really know the answer to it. I I only know that we're tresor reporter. I'm trying to find other people who can say you know. Yes I remember you know I. I worked in an office in. This happened or you know I work in this office in. She told just the opposite. You know or whatever But you know we're just trying to do our job in and find more people who can shed light one way or another. Which in your reporting you spoke to an old neighbor of Taras who says that she remembers hearing about this alleged incident in the mid one thousand nine hundred and she believes in telling the truth she also said that she is a Democrat. Who plans to vote for Biden Sorry Jones from New York magazine. What do you make of that? It's interesting it doesn't me all that much. I think it makes a great deal of sense to believe that Joe Biden did do this but also consider him against the person of Donald Trump. Who's been accused of sexual assault and harassment by so many women and despite everything that Biden might be the lesser of two evils rich in claimed in his interview with MSNBC last week that two major papers show that reads allegations are not credible and Stacey Abrams who is a potential vice presidential pick for Biden was asked about this on. Cnn last Thursday. Let's listen to her. I believe that women deserve to be heard and I believe that they need to be listened to but I also believe that those allegations have to be investigated by credible sources. The New York Times did a deep investigation and they found that the accusation was not credible. I believe Joe Biden that Stacey Abrams speaking there rich McHugh. What do you make of what? She's saying there about the New York Times investigation. Well I think it's it's slightly disingenuous to two point to that and say they concluded their investigation because after I came forward with my piece with two more on the record sources both the times and the Washington Post put out new stories and added their voices to the reporting. And so I you know I have to imagine that the reporters at the times and the Washington Post would would never say. They concluded their investigation. And I certainly have not Sarah. You wrote in a recent piece that Tara Reid has given public feminists and ideological test and many are failing. What do you mean by that? Do they actually believe any of the things they wrote during the Cavanaugh hearings or or before that as me to I gained public momentum and you took down figures like Harvey Weinstein Matt Lauer. Charley Rosen and liberal figures like Al Franken. It seems to me that you know some people. Viewed story of of Brad Kavanagh in particular and saw Christine Blazey for its allegations about him as though that they were principally story about the hypocrisy of Republican men or of conservative Christian men and viewed it through an Electoral Lens. When in fact what people had been saying about me too is that you know this is a story about power and how it gets abused by people who wield it and that seems to me. Something that Some public feminists are forgetting in the wake of Tara Reid's allegations about Joe Biden and Sarah. Looking forward to the presidential election later this year at risk of simplifying it. I mean. What's a feminist to do. It's a it's a terrible position. It is absolutely the purse position for feminist to be in And I don't think that there's a simple resolution to it at all. You know what I was really trying to get at at my in my piece. Is that sense of exhaustion of frustration. The idea that you are continually cleaning up after men like Joe Biden who have such complicated legacies and by the time Tara Reid came forward. She had already accused Biden of sexual harassment and she was by no means the only one who accused him of some some version of boundary. Violating Behavior This is not an ideal situation you know. I think there's some credibility to the argument that given what the alternative is Women have to vote for him anyway but I do think that there should be. You know really. A cost were reckoning with the Movement. About what we're willing to settle for from the Democrat Party. Sarah Jones is a staff writer for New York magazine and Rich macos investigative reporter and producer at business insider. Thank you both so much for joining us. Thank you you saw. This is the takeaway. I'm Shumita Basu a disproportionately high number of covert nineteen deaths in the US have been linked to long term care facilities like nursing homes and assisted living communities now a new estimate from USA. Today shows more than sixteen thousand deaths have been linked to nursing homes and long term care facilities Elaine Godfrey reporter for the Atlantic was reporting on why the death toll has been so high at long term care centers when her own grandmother died at a facility in Minnesota. Elaine thank you for being here. Thanks so much for having me and let me just say I. I'm I'm really very sorry for your loss. Can you tell us about what happened to your grandmother? Yeah Thank you for saying that. So my grandmother was ninety four years old. She lived in Minnesota at an assisted living facility and she had for several years. We didn't know that she was sick. She was dizzy and fell down one night and went to the hospital and at the hospital. They tested her for Corona virus. A few days later it turned out that she had it but otherwise she had no fever at first anyway she didn't have other respiratory symptoms really. It was really surprising to us. You know it was really fast. She died within just a few days of of her fall. Oh I'm so very sorry now. I I know that this is very personal for you but you also have done some reporting on this now and you've been talking to experts and other families is typical experience. I think it's a typical experience in the speed of it. Elderly people show different symptoms. There have been some studies that have shown that that elderly people show atypical symptom. So they don't necessarily have a fever they don't necessarily Had these respiratory symptoms that. We're seeing their symptoms. Sort of run the gamut and. I think it's important for people to know that the thing that is in common across the board is just the speed with which people become sick. Someone that I talked with in Virginia at a nursing home in Richmond Virginia told me as she was sort of working. The floors people would show signs of general illness or fatigue and then very very quickly become bedridden immediately. Lose their to move around by themselves and they'd have to be sent to the hospital So it was. It was very very common that within just a few days This this disease cold. Can you give us a sense of the real scope of this like we said at the top that at least sixteen thousand corona virus deaths have been linked to long term? Care facilities. Is that accurate? It's almost certainly an undercount Because we just. We don't have the numbers. We haven't tested everyone. We we are not sure at this point. Who's actually died of the virus that complications related to the virus In Minnesota where my grandmother lived some seventy percent of all corona virus deaths in the state have been linked to nursing homes and assisted living in six other states. Which which again. It could be more because not all states have reported their total numbers but in six other states at least half of their current virus deaths are residents and workers at these places that the scope of this is just enormous. You say it's not just about the health of that population. It also has to do with under investment in these types of facilities. Can you talk about that? And what? You've reported on a lot of the nursing homes. That are really struggling right now. They have a lot of patients. Paying through Medicaid Medicaid Reimburses these facilities at a pretty low rate compared to insurance most of the time or or private pay so these facilities aren't necessarily breaking even on the care that they're providing for people. Another part of this underinvestment. Is that many of these facilities are privately owned and sometimes the owners? You know any any money that the facility is able to make that money is used to pay shareholders. Basically this underfunding means often. These facilities are short on staff often residents have to share rooms and bathrooms which is not a great way to prevent infection spread. A lot of these facilities are struggling with a lack of P p. e. personal protective equipment. The kind of thing you have to wear when you're going room to room to room every day With these very very vulnerable people elaine. I want to turn to the question of people working in these facilities. Who are they and what are they facing? The majority of workers who make up staff at these nursing homes and assisted living facilities are certified nursing assistants. These are people who bathe patients feed them. Take care of their daily needs. There are some of the lowest paid healthcare workers in America. Most make less than fifteen dollars an hour. They're mostly women often. They're immigrants and many live in multi generational homes. They are taking care of older parents who are similarly vulnerable or young children. They are working multiple jobs. They might work at multiple nursing homes. They might have totally different jobs. But it means either way that they're being exposed to this virus at other places and potentially bringing it into the building so all of these factors sort of combined to make a really really deadly scenario for these these residents and end for staff In your piece you also raised the issue of testing and how proper testing could have dramatically reduced the spread of the virus especially in these types of facilities. And this is something that we've talked about in general a lot on this show but can you explain what you mean specifically in the context of nursing homes and long term care so we knew before this virus hit the US that the elderly were most vulnerable and that a symptomatic people could likely spread the virus so we knew those two things yet the CDC here in the US prioritized hospital patients and healthcare workers who showed symptoms to get tests over Nursing Home Residents. Who ARE SYMPTOMATIC? And over people who didn't show symptoms but might work or live in these high risk places the CDC announced that they're sort of switching up their priorities so now they include nursing home residents and workers with symptoms as high priority but either way healthcare policy experts that I spoke with said this is all wrong. It doesn't really help. They want there to be universal testing. So they're saying test. Everyone facilities. Why from the beginning did we not send tests to these facilities and require that all workers and all residents take them regardless of symptoms since they're such hotspots and since there have been so many fatalities in these places was an issue of bad prioritization from the beginning or were there not enough tests? Definitely both are big issue in this country with the response to this virus has been. We don't have enough tests. We did not ramp up testing quickly quickly enough so the CDC definitely had to make a hard choice there right. How do we prioritize what limited supply we have but experts say we knew that the quote unquote death traps would be nursing homes and assisted living facilities where people can't leave where they live in close proximity where they're already immuno-compromised or frail? So they're saying it was just a big mistake to begin with and they're saying that it emphasizes or reveals our pre existing disregard for older people in this country. That was a big point. That all of these experts Continued to me. You mentioned the recent change in prioritization for testing. Have we seen any other changes or are there any on the horizon at the state or federal level? The trump administration is doing their best to invest more money in rapid tests for residents and workers of nursing home. So we know that the governor of Maryland issued an executive order Telling all nursing homes to test everyone So so advocates are really happy about that. They say it could be too little too late. But you know if every governor said that. Let's prioritize these nursing homes. We could really stop a lot of these deaths. Elaine what do you want people to take away from your reporting and from your very personal story that you've shared here about your grandmother. I guess I'd say that we are all worried about contracting this virus our loved ones contracting this virus. I would say that we should all spare a thought for the nursing. Home residents assisted living residents and workers. Who are quite literally. You know at the epicenter of this crisis. They are really in quite a a fragile state right now if we could spare a thought for them Send SOME MEALS. Some extra extra p. p. e. their way and going forward. I think we should think about how we prioritize these vulnerable people people who are our parents and our grandparents Elaine Godfrey a reporter at the Atlantic. Elaine thank you very much. Thanks so much for having me and we've been hearing from some of you who work in long term care facilities or who have family working in one. I'm calling from New York. My name is not just an works at a long term care facility level of disrespect that they've been seeing towards not only the workers but also the patients is just atrocious. They've had times where they have had multiple debts. Five six seven eight. That's within a twenty four hour period. People have been out sick with Kobe. Symptoms no one has said anything to them and allowed them to still get sick. Ppa has not been provided to them the administrative state. Nothing they still have yet to say. Thank you to the staff or show any kind of dedication that these people are doing and the harnessing themselves into it is beyond fully. Hi this is Linda calling from West Palm Beach. I have a sister in Atlanta Georgia who works as a physical therapist and senior living facility Her patient was diagnosed with Kovac nineteen. she was alerted and had to take a test. My sister's initial test came back positive. She had to pay hundred sixty five dollars or that. Test has filed a workman's comp claim to subsequent tests proved that she is negative so three tests total and she is no longer working. Thank you nurses that long term care facilities develop close relationships with their patients and their families this gut wrenching for them to lose their patients like this when my sister was six. You repeatedly blamed herself and thought that she was a failure so far from the failure just and fighting through possible odds help as many people as she can to be healthy and safe. Everyone needs to support her and her colleagues in arms by staying home and staying healthy this virus not a joke and it should not be taken lightly. My name is Becky and calling for Morris County New Jersey. Tell us your experience working in a nursing home or assisted living facility. You can call us at eight seven seven eight. My take while densely populated states like New York New Jersey have been hit hard by cove. Nineteen the area with the third highest infection rate in the country is the largely rural Navajo nation according to NPR to date the Navajo Department of Health has reported more than twenty three hundred confirmed cases of Corona virus and more than seventy deaths out of nearly twelve thousand tests in order to understand why the Navajo nation has been hit so disproportionately. It's important to look at the broader healthcare picture for the tribe decades of federal underfunding of the Indian Health Service have resulted in understaffed and under resourced medical providers and the US Department of Agriculture considers most of the Navajo nation. A food desert due to a limited number of grocery stores and access to fresh produce on the Navajo nation. We are looking now at a pandemic on top of epidemics that we currently have. We have the highest rates of diabetes and heart related food related diseases and this is something that has been an issue pre-coded that's Denisa Livingston a tribal DNA citizen denies the name that Navajo Nation members used for their tribe. Denisa is a community health advocate with the DNA community advocacy alliance as well as the slow food international indigenous counselor of the global north. I spoke with her to get a better sense of what grassroots efforts to combat covert nineteen look like on the Navajo nation and she began by telling me about the work being done to get food and water to tribal citizens currently in need. We see donations coming in including water supplies. Ppe's and and food And that has been a very challenging ordination of breaching all of our citizens across three states as we're looking at the size of places like West Virginia and trying to channel in and also help those that are greatest need in the remote areas of the denomination and Some projects that have also continued to operate. Is the water project. It's called dig deep and one. Third of our dinette. People do not have a sink or toilet and also one third do not have every day water access and so they're hauling water and even in this case they pay about sixty seven times more for water that they hall versus pipe water. And so when we're looking at the food access and the water access. It is a critical urgency and cry out to to be able to to try to meet the needs of our people Denisa. Are you seeing efforts to build trust between health officials and Navajo nation leaders and members during this pandemic? Of course I cannot speak on behalf of the tribal government and and also the healthcare facilities as a concern tribal member in also community health advocate. It is very concerning that the narratives that we see in the stories and what we're going through and families and what they're experiencing do not match the numbers that we see. We know that there is under testing. We know that there's a lack of transparency even when we're speaking about the eastern dramatic terms So of our folks have called and messaged emailed and see what does that mean. The terminology is also not out of the public health education. That should be of course. Our tribe in community members have been creating culturally sensitive. Psa's and announcements regarding this but really understanding the depth of covert nineteen and how the symptoms operate and also held the virus mutates. And I know that folks are doing what they can but we still need to be able to engage the community at large when it comes to Public Health Education. It tell me more about the Public Health. Messaging particularly in regards to being culturally sensitive. What does the messaging look like to connect to your community members right now so some of the messages are in our language and also? Some of the messages are more geared towards protecting our elders as we know they are very precious to us and as we know that the knowledge holders and wisdom barriers and so there is that question you know. How do we you know our tech them? In a way that the community members of family members know exactly you know how to navigate that process washing hands is also a concern when it comes to the situation because washing hands is also affecting the cultural practice that we have acknowledging each other by shaking hands and finding ways that we don't show disrespect and before we were fist bumping and also elbow bumping. But now you know just allow in our community members to know that it's not out of disrespect that we can't shake hands but let's be mindful and also honor one another's presence in a way that you know that were honoring one. Another without shaking. Hands has also been something that people have been talking about but also Some of the other terms to that we're trying to bring awareness at DCA are the terms of self isolation. They we have to be mindful of what we use these terms of what self isolation myself Corinthian quarantine in remote areas as we know these are just recommendations. And this also goes you know for my grandma. Grandma lives in remote area and I spoke with her the other day and she said you know we're told to stay inside her house and she said I've just been staying inside when my grandma's act if she's outside she's normally planting she's normally taking care of the seeds and at this time doing that effort the second time I called To check on her how you doing. She said we're still staying inside so the messaging. That's coming from the top down as well needs to be in a way where yes it applies in most situations but what about when my grandma or other community members have neighbors that are not you know a few feet away or down to hallway but are you know miles even space in in a way where you know. They don't have that contact with one another so I told her. Grandma is you know it's okay to plant your seeds. It's okay to get outside and so really looking at these terms as we're looking at different cultures and and of course you know here in the US you know. There are mini cultures and many practices as we are heating. You know to the CDC's recommendations or recommendations coming from the top down. But what are those? Messages? What are those things to improve our ways and practices to be proactive rather than being reactive at this time into skill impact from the community members perspective and also in solidarity in Collaboration Partnership With One. Another about overcoming. The place that we are at right now. Denisa Livingston is a tribal deny citizen and community health advocate with the DNA community advocacy alliance Denisa. Thanks very much for being here. Thank you very much. That's all for us today. Thank you so much for joining us. We want to let you know that we'll be staying on a few stories all week long following our conversation today about long term care facilities. We'll look at the effects of extended isolation on the elderly many of whom were battling the health effects of loneliness at this moment and will keep talking about what it means to quote re open the US by zooming in on Georgia's efforts and asking what we can learn from past pandemics to plus we'll hear from you about how you think daily life will have changed when the worst of all of this is behind us. I probably won't go to the grocery store every day. I think one thing will keep is have less structure for kids weekends especially saved a lot of money to share your take on this or anything else by leaving a message at eight seven seven eight might take or by sending us a tweet at the takeaway. Thank you so much for listening. I'm should meet the best sue in for Tanzania Vega and this is the takeaway.

Joe Biden Tara Reid United States assault Georgia Jeremy Sarah Jones MSNBC New York magazine Caitlyn reporter College of Liberal Arts Democrats Movement Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Elaine Godfrey Shumita Basu Denisa Livingston University of Minnesota Duluth
NPR News: 04-14-2019 12AM ET

NPR News Now

04:57 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 04-14-2019 12AM ET

"Support for NPR and the following message. Come from gusto providing payroll benefits and HR services for small businesses. Gusto serves more than sixty thousand businesses nationwide with full service payroll HR, tools and health insurance at gusto dot com slash NPR. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Nora raum. A tornado down in Franklin, Texas. Saturday officials say several people were injured in Lufkin. Texas officials say two children died when strong winds toppled a tree which fell in the family car. This is part of a major storm that swept through the south meteorologist Roger Edwards is with the national weather service. Storm prediction center, he says, the severe weather will likely move northeast Sunday to the Appalachians the Ohio valley and the minute lanting region. He urges people to pay close attention to warnings while we recommend have at least two ways to receive warnings and also have shelter to go too quickly in case the warnings issue. And if you live in a in a structure, such as a mobile or manufactured home that might not withstand severe win. So we recommend that if a tornado watches as you for your area that you position yourself close to sturdier shelter the net. So that you can seek it in just a minute or less. If needed a mandatory curfew is in effect in Franklin, Texas until eight o'clock Sunday morning officials are wrapping up meetings of the one hundred eighty nine nation International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in Washington where they've pledged closer cooperation nor to lift the world economy out of a slowdown. NPR's Shannon, van Sant reports. The IMF steering committee says all of its members are acting quickly to shore up global growth last year's nosedive in the stock market surprised many countries in the IMF steering committee, chairman said every government needs to stand ready to address issues involving financial stability with all available tools. The stock market decline was reversed only when major central banks stopped efforts at tightening credit earlier this week the IMF predicted global growth would be at three point three percent this year, but would regain momentum and advanced to growth of three point six percent in twenty twenty Shannon. Ben sent NPR news Washington protesters in Sudan appear to have one more concessions from the. Military which seized power Thursday NPR's feB Quist arcton reports representatives of the pro democracy protesters have met with sedans new military leaders to present their demands momentous developments continue in Sudan when determined demonstrators insist on the immediate formation of an interim civilian administration. However, they've indicated they may be prepared to accept competent military representatives in the leadership the fed manning charges tonight in as many days is sounding a conciliatory note, new tenant general Abdel Fattah ability Magne Buda on as cold for dialogue, and is promising a return to civilian government within two years. He's also getting a cuff you and says detainees held over a month to street protests into that will be released these concessions full short. With the demands of protesters who'd cold for the ousted president's resignation along with what they described as his entire corrupt. Click of heavy Akwa stopped in NPR news. This is NPR news. House Ways and means chairman Richard Neal says that under the law. Congress has the right to President Trump's tax returns Neal had requested six years of the president's individual and business returns by April tenth the deadline is now April twenty third Neil sent a letter to the IRS Saturday that failure to comply by then would be interpreted as a denial. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he doesn't doesn't tend to fall a law, but the request raises complicated legal issues, the university of Minnesota Duluth men's hockey team defeated the university of Massachusetts three nothing Saturday night in buffalo to win its second straight NCWA championship Andrew Krieger of Minnesota public radio has more from the arena in buffalo two parties back home near the shore of lake superior. Minnesota Duluth fans are celebrating. After the team stayed atop the college hockey pinnacle with its win over UMass. The BULLDOGS narrowly beat Notre Dame last year to win a national title the year before that. They were national runners up that experience showed in the championship game where Minnesota Duluth dominated and put an end to Massachusetts Cinderella season. The minute men were making their first appearance in the title game. Minnesota Duluth is the first team to win back to back titles since Denver in two thousand four and two thousand five for NPR news. I'm Andrew Krieger in Saint Paul the NBA playoffs kicked off Saturday. The Golden State Warriors began their quest for a third consecutive championship. With one hundred twenty one to one four win over the Los Angeles, Clippers Orlando upset Toronto Brooklyn Philadelphia. I'm Nora raum. NPR news.

NPR NPR Roger Edwards Texas Washington Nora raum International Monetary Fund Gusto Minnesota Duluth Franklin president gusto dot chairman Minnesota Duluth Minnesota BULLDOGS Andrew Krieger Sudan Lufkin
157: Jake Tuura on Hypertrophy Work, Cluster Sets and Tendon Training Application | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

Just Fly Performance Podcast

49:47 min | 2 years ago

157: Jake Tuura on Hypertrophy Work, Cluster Sets and Tendon Training Application | Sponsored by SimpliFaster

"So then i stumbled on greg nichols article he talked about bulgarian squatting squatting every single day an he had a small part in there where he said it was something that helped his like nagging qatar tendinitis in this like breathing the small things like i'm gonna try this so i squat it i think this was two months 'em i swatted every single day like the i whatever they he references book squad everyday i think it was called an i would go in like do if you're almost that's max out do like three wraps unimak so maybe my squad went up it was terrible 'cause i never squad maybe two twentyfive to like three fifty or something in the span of two months but it every single day squatting and like after this i would go i went to the court right google play basketball no knee pain like my knee pain is entirely gone after doing squatting everyday so i'm doing the exact opposite of what they told me which was rest geneva three months and i'm like well what if i stress mighty three months and now i understand like i'm stressing it in a very different way than they dynamic explosive type movement which is something that causes a lot of pain this was more like this with a very slow thing because i'm lifting such a heavy load it has to be slow that was coached and jake to a speaking on squatting everyday heavy slow resistance training an effect on tendon health and performance you're listening to the just fly performance podcast and and today's episode is brought to you by simply faster simply faster isn't online athletic performance technology shop distributing items such as the free lap timing system jim aware k box ten eighty sprint in the speed matt i've gotten many of these items from simply faster and can confidently say that they make today's best training technology available to everybody the timing system has revolutionized both my practices emi athlete assessments allowing me to look at the ten meter fly capability of dozens of athletes in a matter of seconds is wireless compact portable incredibly versa tile the k bucks and taste very are fantastic tool any coach looking to build speed agility implement training scenarios they go beyond the traditional weight room the taste brand is being used by great coaches trading some of the fastest sprinters in the world and it truly represents high performance speed trading like it personally attest that simply fasters customer service is second to none christopher at simply faster response quickly took larry's in anyone who makes a purchase from simply faster is in good hands if you want to acquire some of the best high tech training equipment available stop by simply faster dot com that simply within by faster dot com they are the future of coaching technology welcome to episode one fifty seven other just fly performance podcast i'm your host joe smith thanks for being here today an art guess is jake to a he is eight strength coach at youngstown state university if you've been poking around just fly sports slightly 'em either the website of the podcast there's two things that jake has had a profound impact on one he wrote d most popular article of the year for us so far called jacked athletic training wisdom simultaneous muscle performance gain which is an awesome layout of many different training qualities progressions and things revolving around strength side intendant health in this whole athletic performance equation fantastic article i loved it and it's like one of those classics that's really gonna be i think single be around for a long time that i'm constantly going back to people are constantly going back to the other thing is jake is a big reason that i reached out to doctor keith bar of which we had the last podcast one fifty six which wasn't awesome landmark groundbreaking breaking show i can't tell you how many people i've had posted on their story on twitter or instagram or twitter whatever on how impactful that episode was to them and it was incredibly impactful to me and a super information dense to i took a ton notes i hope you guys were able listen to that and check it out i again i've been using those methods myself and i absolutely love it i'll take my kids to the park and i'm sitting there doing isos deceased clients well bush of on the swingers something and a i'm just trying and i'm noticing big differences as well as the it's just an awesome show i'm not gonna get on a huge 'em diatribes here but keith bars work is awesome jake has taken the work of doctor bar and then others as he mentioned the teaser heat is used that in his own training to overcome seriously debilitating knee pain a if you see me on instagram he's dead lifting huge amounts awaits douglas over six hundred squats over five hundred he's dunking i don't think jake's any taller than i am six one i i i'm not sure i should ask jake but i think he's around six feet so guy who's got a ton of athleticism and and is just putting his money whereas mouth is in terms of not just being strong but being functional and athletic an i think it's a young coaches who are really have that huge skin in the game not only in training athletes and end rating and being informed but constantly constantly using their own body is this canvas by which to to test out these means and methods and to refine their system there's never adult conversation that happens when i can get together and talk with one of those coaches so jake also she works at youngstown state university prior to that he was assistant at university of minnesota duluth an today the show jake and i are gonna get into hypertrophy in muscle building so just chatting a little bit more follow up in the article you wrote so this is all things muscle building hypertrophy for athletes on what to make of this thing this hypertrophy phase if you dig out that old to about the textbook what do we make of that and how do we really blend these qualities together for the needs of are athletes who are their sports skill is really the main thing and 'em and everything related to just that blend of muscle building sports performance athleticism spirit of strength and conditioning being excetera he's gonna talk about how utilizes cluster training for athletic performance then we get into and this isn't awesome follow up for episode one fifty six his own experience with ten in training means and methods how he got star without how he is overcome some serious problems said how he is using it to may be healthy end athletic at in addition to strong finally were gonna chat about his recent experience in jumped training in his meat head dunking experience says he calls it which again is this you really tenant in health and vertical jump cindy go hand in hand 'cause people who do be ladder ten have problems with the former so it's always good to have these conversations and it's an awesome chance for all of us just see like some just some applied and practical examples of a doctor bar was talking about last week so i'm super stoked to bring you guys this episode with jake to you guys are gonna love it a young coach who is doing awesome things in his coaching training an making the world of athletic performance an getting jacked a better place let's get onto the show so a in blending the world's you know in in in never trying i'm trying not pull too far any end of the pendulum per say a but i know you've written like awesome stuff recently and just fly sports i getting jacked unathletic so like fundamentally however we what's you're you're take on marrying these two worlds of this the spirit of those those videos like pumping iron blank godson this this spirit of a physicality west the spirit of athletic performance and movement and what to what where do we get started with blending those yeah well i think like first of all like if you have any sport like player sport year round or play some version of some type of sports you maintain some level of like athleticism and you're not just in the weight room living 'em and you kill all coordination and all you're like tactical you're brand new vision 'em you don't train any of that so like in like it's very it's very simple like with the teams i work with is like we could a like go play spike ball for the woman play ball tennis meadow volleyball like these like there's so many variety of movements that you cannot covering the weight room by just doing these motions but the thing is is like the teams like at the college setting like i'm not taking an athlete and being like let's get fricken jack 'em like it is my personal thing that i want but it's for for athletes is like there's so much a there is so much time and energy that would go in supporting on muscle onto you're frame like you could imagine yourself to like how much food would you have to eat and how much like quarter saudi at the minimize like you adopted that could you watch videos of like ronnie coleman back when he was just like sit at home and eat rice and chicken and you'd be doing this is a police job in his car eating rights and chickens like there's so much food that goes into making this amount of progress but you pretty much have deliver a very a very boring life i mean people can do it outside a with with stuff going on but i think that makes it very difficult 'em an end for my story was like i grew up in a country where like my nearest friend was maybe twenty thirty minutes away this very low stimulus nothing ever happened and then i got a weight room in the basement and it's like i just lifted and i ate food and i got good sleep and you do that like over and over and over assuming you could stay a you could you could stay 'em happy with that like that's how you gonna build a bunch of muscle mass but otherwise like it is a very difficult to do it's up to a pair the two because they're very different things 'em but if you can go like a little bit on the face potential patient model and be like i'm gonna focus on gaining muscle mass for whatever this six weeks this eight weeks or something 'em and then really dedicate to that track body wastes 'em eat enough food minimize stress i think you could make like you could make a huge difference but you have to be willing to sacrifice that time and it is definitely not easy by any means and there are going to be like austin we look at only the positives of training or only the positives of intervention there are potentially a lot of negatives doing that so you really have to figure that out and you're had that you would commit to it yeah what's in the scope of doing that like what's your take on and so so and there's some things you mentioned the article you wrote that i'm interested in is is different like the process of just hypertrophy right like like high wraps and we talk about movement patterns so like obviously if you're i i can't imagine anyone who would undertake this is an extreme example but anyone who would undertake a german volume squat program is gonna be a good mover just just the the size and amount required to just stop volume amount required a contrast it with athletic movement patterns so if i'm looking to increase size if i if i'm past and increase little bit aside a man i'm utilizing weights obviously to do that what are some principals to keep in mind will try and stay as athletic as possible yeah so i like i initially tried to figure that out i think my last job in minnesota duluth like you just go on google and you look up like 'em i dunno hyper tree for athletes where you look up face attention and then this this this video came up by jonathan overheated study 'em like awhile ago they were trained subject but i forget the specifics but basically it was one group did force potentially other group date that's a five same exact load up the five arrested one minute the forces ten arrested two 'em and like at the end of this study like twelve weeks at ever like the eight eight five five group so you're doing five wraps rates that instead of doing ten rounds were forced that's on the compound exercises 'em be velocity that they tracked was better the power of the bench press the power of the basketball 'em be hypertrophy gains were were pretty much matched but in the strings gains i believe were better omni eight by five group so basically i am if you like an athlete and you in the weight room like and you're trying to build muscle you should be doing compound exercises like squats dead lifts bench press 'em split squads it's a but it's when you get to that point of like you're doing any number of sets like super close a failure that i don't think that's good i think you you want to accumulate a lot of volume 'em so really just do less wraps do more that's um in you're velocity what's they hire your a you're foremost they go to so it's like if we talk about i know you've talked about like low bar back squats where like people are becoming more of a back a hip extension through the backs of lutes 'em like some stuff with the shingles to and i look at it i'm like if you take someone then let's say i dunno seventy seventy five percent squat and make them do a set of ten like you're gonna see some pretty ugly compensations to get all those reps what did you just said five rapes and then you double the set so you would see a lot less competition so if you're coach if you want someone like all right let's keep v a the shin in the torso more bar like together parallel like you would actually able to keep that vs if you're like no we gotta get ten right so you're gonna force lot of ugly grinding wraps 'em but i think like that will take care of their high perch beside you kinda reid like they'll say oh it's again high perjury you have the train near failure yet the train like very close to failure and all you're sets to really maximize hypertrophy and i'm like well i wrote high parts of the hubbard tree cluster protocols and it's like you're kind of you're china pair so many things and i'm like i'm not going to be like let's maximize hyper to be as much as possible because then were taking away from 'em use staying training at higher velocity training with better form so i mean it's still going to work and it's worked well for me it's worked offer a lot of people i worked at a an you don't have to like this is the issue with researchers at all it's like you're gonna you're gonna you're gonna do this and this is the way to do aperture either way the maximize it but like is that actually practical for athletes in in can you even take yourself to that point if you're an athlete practicing year round you go in and train at that whatever that percentages load 'em for that amount of apps like their days when you can't unlike then where's he oughta regulation and how do you still maintain the volume so i think working with the coach and having just a basic understanding what how quite a bit but yeah i think it comes back to like competing in some form of athletic thing like jumping sprinting playing some like tactical type sports sports like year round every single day that you're training do those things and then you're training should not be like yeah german volume like it should not be like that and if you are going to do things like like a train failure 'em probably like isolation type movements because you were not gonna do like bicep curls isolation and be like this messed up my athletic ability you know it's just not enough of these stimulus to do anything negative like that yeah i think it's either and that's one thing you're writing an article that really did hit home with me this the idea is like okay if i wanna get some a muscle group bigger i it would probably be better even for a squad or something like that and i mean maybe it's it's easier to contrast between arm curls and like a high rep arm curl and that's one of the things yeah you do in the mirror you probably get like a good bye on the bio chemicals stimulus to firm are girls in the mirror the failure and you feel that a bit like like squats failure a deep squats failure or or squads third through the he'll clear it higher ups you know stuff like that i feel like that has a profound effect negatively impact once athleticism perhaps dramatically i i i'd like to get into a little bit as i thought those colombian taken like leg extensions like girls like if i you know if i wanna get i mean i guess i dunno i dunno how many assets say i wanna get bigger legs it's always bigger arms upper body right like they thought for lower body though with that with that idea yeah exactly i mean personally for me like so 'em i base a lot of this again we we we hit me we had talked before about i'm a strength coach and i trained athletes like the way that i trained basically right like i trained things and i'm comfortable with training 'em and then this athlete gets a new strength coach and then they do very different types of training and it's like why is it brings it up and was like well because i interned under cow and a i was at university of minnesota duluth and i do this on my own training training i try not to do that as much as possible but 'em yeah so for me i'm like people are like how do i do chest and back and i'm like i have never had a small chest like it's just grown from training and i've always had a good backup just growing and training so i don't do i don't have back workouts for you i don't have chest workouts 'cause i don't need them so i can't really help you but i have my shoulders i know how to grow shoulders and grow grow up by subtracts up a but my legs have just grown from a squad split squads 'em so i don't do a lot of isolation type stuff and i don't yeah i don't know how much that even even helps i can't really answer that question because i don't have experience with it they just grew from squats like a variation on squads high bar squats lavar squats on dead lift trap are dead lift a not really assume all but like my legs just grew enough from that but i think also were talking we have the there is such a genetic thing of like i genetically responded wealth the training 'em but if people wanna use this doesn't excuse i'll be like well did you manage your stress stress did you eat enough food did you do everything you possibly could have done and you're in the time you train forever tree because no you didn't so don't use the genetics carter excuse unless you maximize absolutely everything but yeah the whole lot the that's what i see to is like people who wants a or do that at least the guy athletes they want big upper body you know maybe they don't really care about their legs 'em another thing with me is like cabs like i've always had decent decent sized cavs i have no clue how to build someone's cavs 'em 'cause i never went through it 'em they just were kind of there so yeah the whole thing is like squat stair lifts i mean if that's not growing legs like a i guess i don't tell you i was gonna say that's a that's i'm glad you like you're you're a humble in like you you get it enough right like you get it mentioned it that like like i have experience with this so i mean to be honest i mean we look at it right like from a like a pure like what white guy is specially is gonna come to you and say man you know my my what college athletes say man my my claude hamstring ratio coaches a little bad how it's a bigger hamstrings on like what athlete ever is gonna say that right i i i look at it look at a couple of things one i really liked the single joined thing you mentioned too and i wanna come back this like i remember the easy strength and talking about even something like like leg press athletes like it's easy it almost is a strength coach to look at like you know these athletes in the eighties doing like leg press as their primary leg exercise i know a lot of track athlete did really good doing that through 'cause like leg press there's less neurologically demanding that squat an it's like if you're sprinting fast and jumping all the time maybe you should do something a little simpler when it comes to strang so it doesn't interfere neurologically and it's like it's not that many steps further to take it to on suddenly singles right now i'm not saying i that leg press it'd be like my primary but i think they were talking about more terms like peaking in when when when you're leg training when you're sprinting jumping is the most intense just let's just keep things simple is we can just do like press like in just a few steps of that and there's little narrow there's very low niro crossover it's good load a so that they wouldn't be that much it's kind of in the same vein or at least that's how i view it it's kind of the same wavelength though a machine a single lay it when you're not around a compromise the nervous system in the athletes pathway yeah yeah i i and i've heard this to like on podcast about training like single joint exercises with athletes and kind of having that argument because they're doing they have they let's say the compound movements on the court sprinting jumping a cutting you and i personally have it taken it that far too like art athletes were gonna do like extensions were like we also have machines like that but i'm like i mean we could just hit those patterns and maybe do a slow temple you know i know a key bars work with the fast the fast movements for the ten like typically attendance very stiff and then let's go do some slower somebody symmetrical it's the kind of balance it out and do the hillside 'em so i think that's kind of how i look at it i'm like with the whole you're saying what they're doing a leg press because of that i'm like well well i that's a wake the kind of like train and maybe counterbalanced that huge neurological load but i'm like well there are so many there's so many like buckets i guess with training like neurological tendon muscle you know like so many things going on at once but it's like if if we do one thing just to justify one area like what about everything else you know a but it is it is interesting though that story you say there yeah yeah i agree i i it's like there's so many buckets look at what the leg press it's like i think they only bucky truly truly justified just pure potentially ation like i wanna get some potentially ation and not like nervous system and not compromise and have little impact on other things are supposed easy get complicated with i and i'm glad you mentioned attendance stuff i wanna get that here soon i could you break down a little bit jacob out more about how you're closer training plays out so when it's time to you you talk about it's a five versus force at the ten 'em what what is your cluster trading kind of looked like forever yeah you're athletes yeah so well i don't actually do like hyper she faces athletes you know my training is very is very general like i it's an athlete came to me like i need to put on average fee i'd be like or any depend on size and it was a sport then he that'd be like okay but i don't work in football i don't work with men's basketball 'em over the woman's like a lot of women's sports and how many women are like i wanna put on muscle you know it's like a very rarely austin they're trying to take it away and they want their apps redefined 'em and you could tell them every day how doing crunches is not gonna give the maps they're still going to believe that it is so why not just throw it in there now you believe it but yeah personally like mike cluster training or athletes a on lineup it's i've worked with in the past lot of basketball players or rugby 'em it's really like every single day start off with something explosive nervous system wise and then you go into instead of like traditional like accomplishment instead of you're traditional like four sets of ten a at a at a load where like you're just grinding it out and it just feels terrible you basically just do double the sat's and you do have the wraps 'em so you're form is is very good a you're you're velocity is good if leaves you feeling good like a my first time experiment to this and this is all this is like basically the jonathan offers a structure i kind of changed it to do different phases throughout time 'em but it's like i would go in a my memories are like back when i was at university minnesota duluth i trained at superior because i had i had worked there the year prior superior you university of wisconsin superior ashley darien bar worked there a long time ago yeah interesting but be a i would go in you do it's a five squad like you're doing hyperactivity stuff and usually you do squat hypertrophy and you just feel like garbage you know like if you sina videos of like maybe john meadows guys like to get in buckets and stuff and that's probably good to do at certain times but i would leave like it's a five with like a minute or ninety seconds arrest of my buddies and you're like you feel like potentially like you're nervous system you feel awesome after doing like forty wraps at a pretty decent intensity which is very cool and end versus be opposite of like i feel absolutely miserable 'em so that's kind of how it goes and then as the program like the day goes on it's like you just go to more isolation type movements 'em enfor lower body there's not much i mean like a i believe i do like back extensions or or a single like stuff a hip through us and then upper body i mean there's just there's so many things you can do to get like an upper body pump but yeah those those like outrageous curls 'em they don't really really matter if you like going to failure unless like are you gonna puke from doing a set of curls there's something you know like is there a body just going to break down like like your body you feel if you really push squats you could feel miserable for but like a weaker you really push dead lifts you're if you really pushing bicep curls you like you feel terrible maybe for like ten minutes and then it's like all right i'm good so it just doesn't have that big global impact so yeah that's kind of the d d a structure of the training like really just high quality training and then when you get to be isolation type movements it's like go the failure really push yourself in kind of i just trying to get the best of both worlds you know like the best of the aperture trained get the best of the athletic ability and keep that athletic ability throughout time because if you're training like you just killing yourself in the weight room with grinding ending wraps like you do not you're not gonna go and perform highquality schoolwork it's just gonna be terrible you know so it's really like all year let's keep let's keep your ability to actually give 'em effort and focus to all of your training you're listening to the dislike performance podcast brought to you by simply faster yeah it's like the rule of thumb is no matter what you should feel pretty good walking out the door like i mean it's at the five i mean imagine you're vertical jump but likely be down in she is low mechanical pie still feel that little buzz being you know especially if you're a dope intercepted and stuff like that and who doesn't feel good doing a nice bicep curl you all these guys right biceps troll delta failure you know you feel good about yourself and so it's not like it's gonna hurt you so a and i totally i totally get that i think it's just a good like reality like i think it's easy to get away from a just i mean yeah like you said the hypertrophy phase is dead i mean that shooter papa that that part of the book like i think we've rip that all out a little while ago but like cereal integrated so you always feel good coming out if we knew how to integrate the size of the goal and that type of thing in the clusters i think it's it's just good stuff man yeah no i i went out to 'em indianapolis see my buddy justin he the gym out there and we're basically like traditional period as asian for like team sports athletes were basketball they're like no like you know like what but you said you go sit in the streets conditioning course and you'll learn about traditional peers asian it's like is this up like annual going apply this and like if you go plied i kind of feel bad for that that you're gonna apply it to like let's do super high volume build up the intensity in like well they're just gonna have really bad skill work and you're gonna risk injury at that time because i in today's day and age like you do not have time i'm just train in the weight room and not do sports skill you know like you're doing it all year round so yeah that whole idea of like oh let's do these phases in like maximize everything like well i think it's probably better to kind of keep everything running at once you know yes yeah and just different empathy is a variety of it even like max eight recent guests used you're working with the national reckitt holders and olympic lifting he's like i've done squat face hoping it transfers and it just doesn't work and that's olympic lifting that's a strike sport like that's not let alone basketball or football or soccer these other things and a it's just reality the reality check i remember even rotten robbie burqa franz va hospitals on robert podcasts nicholas's three years ago and he's talking about nation ingles changing changing in that hypertrophy phase and it's like venue if you didn't do much else like like dynamically or even that phase itself like you have a different muscle in a different coordination the muscle at the end of that face and then how you're skill is nick like you said you're skills negatively impacted and it's like to make that a phase itself it's almost like the stage at the recover from that for a few weeks or months yeah yeah it's like you look at well you say bigger muscle is is better 'cause i mean produce more force well what about other thousand thousand potential negatives that are involved you know like why don't we ever talk about that yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah it's it's just this that robbing peter to pay paul in these pros and cons it is complex but i think ultimately like the more trial and error people go through and the more like the the performance because of the primary goal a i think the clear is to see things and a yeah so i i wanna go too far before we get into the tendon tendon training 'cause i think you've done in austin job both an end you've done it yourself and like that's what i i wanna talk to you 'cause it's easiest talk about research studies this ten in research that ten research and it's good but i mean it's those of us who have gone through it ourselves and found good success i think i tell the best story or if we look at it from a storytelling perspective and so that jake what's yours struggle attendant injuries been like and then how have you overcome it and how is that working itself and you're coaching yeah so i have a like i guess would be called patellar tendon apathy not tendinitis because it's like just recurring over and over but i i so i can't remember back this is my right leg back when i was a kid like in fired class i'd play softball or something let's play softball i hit the ball and i'd sprint first base in my right catholic achilles which is burned like so painful and i think the doctor said is that growth plates or something and go away and it did actually a the pain went away was i like once i got taller i don't know if that was the thing but yeah so then i started doing like jumped training more often jump attack i think i did a i did a lot of jump programs i think i did actually this one is like forty inch vertical or something and after that like my patellar tendon it was just so bad like so much pain an i could say this is probably like one or two years when i was in college i didn't do a sport in college i just kind of play pick up basketball and lifted like i would go the doctors would just say rest for three months i don't know why they said three months like rest you need for three months so i would do my best to rest and not play basketball and then i get to about two months and i'd be like screw this i'm gonna go play basketball so i go play in pain and just be there over and over 'em like an initial so long like i'm saying one or two years where like i was just not getting good advice nothing was working for me so then i i actually stumbled on greg nichols calls article he talked about bulgarian squatting squatting every single day an he had a small part in there where he said it was something that helped his like nagging qatar tendinitis in this like breathing the small things like i'm gonna try try this so i swatted i think this was two months 'em i swat it every single day like the i whatever he referenced this book squad everyday i think it was called an i would go in like do if you're almost that's max out do like three free wraps unimak so maybe my squat went up it was terrible like 'cause i never squad maybe two twentyfive to like three fifty or something in the span of two months but it every single day squatting unlike after this i would go i went to the court by google play basketball no knee pain like my knee pain is entirely gone after doing squatting everyday so i'm doing the exact opposite of what they told me which was rest geneva three months and i'm like well what if i stress mighty three months and now i understand like i'm stressing it in a very different way than they dynamic explosive type movement which is something that causes a lot of pain this what's more like this with a very slow thing because i'm lifting such a heavy load it has to be slow like a centrally am costs and on an cosmetically so yeah that kind of happened and then i kinda lost interest in like even doing any jumping any explosive thing 'cause i got into the bodybuilding building 'em but then i got this job here and i'm like let's let's see if i could transfer all of this stuff back the jumping and then like the tonight's would come up like i can remember even last year i would i would go out one of my buddies we lift and we we dunk it's just it's it's fun to have someone that you you do the same exact things you know and you enjoy them so much 'em so we're like lifted duncan duncan then for the next two or three days sometimes mind you would just be so painful it's like i can't i can't do this 'em so then i think i came across keith bars work a one of my friends call harris actually sent me a video 'cause i i believe i posted on instagram like county it's had something where he talked about the springs of the tendon in the muscle and looking at make you lift you make the tenant of a you lift lift weights you make the spring of the muscle very strong and stuff and you do high speed stuff you make the tendon very strong steph and then kyle is like yeah but here's some low although more information so i watched keith keith bars thing like probably three or four times in what i thought was cool was you could trainer tendon like load you're tendon over and over like loaded in the morning low tomorrow evening he he talked about his this study where they did three sessions per day 'cause they're refractory period of like six hours so yeah i got that an because i work in the weight room and i love lifting i'm like like if you give me an excuse to lift twice a day like i'm going to use it so it was just like and then i i i this is around the time after i read your book speed strength we've kind of talked about the the long duration isos which is still pretty i don't understand what they're doing or or what's going on but they do like they do i i love them like they they i feel so much better i feel so much more sturdy just doing them 'em so yeah basically i go in like it is in the morning and has got done with teams maybe eight o'clock i do like a ten minute iso metro workout out of like hold a squad hold a split squad 'em even like single like stands now sometimes he would go twenty minutes and they were just body weight holds 'em but yeah this a just doing these consistently like by i command is my tire ten in pain so so much like i actually went back i entered the university of minnesota i went back to minneapolis a like a a month and a half ago and i was with my buddy dunking every single day for like ten days and i'm like thinking back to the year prior i'm like i would dunk one day and i'd be all three days whom i needed my time will be hurting but yeah implementing that stuff like and just experimenting with the like i going dunk and then it'd be like all right it's kind of tender the next day so then i go dunk the next day and i go do something like slow east central squats like heavy squats and then the next they had feel better and it's like you i just experiment and play around with it and there is no correct answer for anyone but once you get an understanding of these concepts like if you want if you listened the and i know you had you bar on a farm he'll be on his sylvie released before 'em this episode without yeah so hopefully like people can listen to that and you get the understanding of the concepts in like going apply it in there is no like specific way to do it but if you go play around with the like don't complain about you're you're attendance like don't complain about your issues like you probably have going going experiments like and if you don't experiment and i'm like don't complain like be someone who tries all this stuff you don't need like you don't need a prescription you don't need like here's the exact sets and wraps to do something like no go and try it in the more i try it like even a example is these the split squad i so hold like i i'll do this what's going on hold and sometimes my knee will be like my patella tendon what kind of hurt the next day and i don't know why like my back leg kind of breakfast wars locks up or something but i tried it on any bug bulgarian split squad and i don't have the same pain the next day and it's like small things like that of like there's no correct answer just their concepts in play around him an experiment so yeah the whole understanding a muscle and then and then he a the refractory period all that stuff has been like so huge and dealing with d a the jumpers any to the point now where like if it hurts i know exactly what to do 'em like so you have so much control now vs before and look back two years where i had no control whatsoever 'cause i had no clue what was happening i had no clue what to do instead of just rest which did not help one but that's one of those things where it's like you know i mean rest no doubt rest is absolutely important but it's like when it comes to the tendons connective active tissue all of a sudden the paradigm flips and it's still kills me i mean even like i posted something that i posted on instagram story i don't post that many things like on my story or not reactive on it but i had to is like old it at kaiser permanente physical therapy department a here's what you if you have patellar tendinitis and it's like ice three times a day and this also might be weak and do some stretch i'm just sitting here like you like this is how far we've come in like but but like you said it's like with with things like what doctor heath bar have out a you know i just the podcasts ebony rio a like the long iso whole like ben patrick stuff with stress it's all stressing tissues it's like but it's almost like this old school mentality tell this just rest you know but what you gonna do when you come back like you're just gonna get hurt again if you just rest the nights and arbitrarily kind of stretch the muscles and things like that and when i realized like you said like it's almost like there is no excuse on some level because you just have to put in the time with the slow loading and the biggest thing for me lately in reading your stuff and then just doing this podcast the doctor bars like those those float companion sessions just fine ten extra minutes to do that stuff and it makes it unbelievable difference it's like you know if i have kids even just like standing on one leg and just like trying to like hold my one year old while i'm doing it or like doing extremely the lines like just try and find the tendency that makes and unbelievable difference in like once you know that like loading secret it's there really is so such possibility behind yeah and i and i've well and then i tried to load like a pitch dark you know like change that sessions something more loaded on but i don't know the best way to do that still because like you'll do it and then it will just like fatigue you later on like i just did it the other day and we i mean it was probably stupid we did like super maximum centric so someone stands on it and hops off and it's like 'em i was kind of i was actually kinda sore after that and like i couldn't jump at all like following that like later in the day but i mean that's just the the general like probably super huge a cns are are narrow load on that but yeah i know those those like concepts are just huge in an hopefully people suffering with those tendon issues can take them in and just really it's just that and assault experiment 'em because research like the value of research is like we did this on two thousand subject and that's better than a research study on ten subject but it's like for you each individual athlete what matters is that one subject which is you that's all that matters yeah and so in that show before it closes it out as they go have one more question for finished but like just basically doing as many extra sessions as possible debt is slow like like you like doctor by you've mentioned you're articles it's loafer health and fast for performance and so just really attacking as many slow east centric lightweight higher up or or or isometric 'em movement says you can 'em in the midst of their training in yeah yeah i i think yeah doing though the like the health sessions 'em but i think two it is interesting that if if you it doesn't does that then prepare you to perfect party attendant to perform in the fast way you know like you can't just do go in the weight room and like i'm gonna i'm gonna do all this stuff pretending health and just do everything very slow and i symmetrical heavy and then think you're gonna go like let's say i'm gonna go now on sunday like you did it all week i'm gonna go now play basketball it's like well doesn't really prepare you for perform like to perform 'em and i've i've had experience experience with by when i prepare for a policy meets 'em like all of it it's slow training everything is very slow but i i remember going like play pick up basketball in my elbows would just hurt like crazy like and i don't know if this is like because the movements are so much faster in basketball you know like sweeney arms and you're like pushing off of people like if my like i think tendon issues in my elbows but it's like if 'em if they're just not prepared for that type of fasces contraction that type of performance so i keeping all that in but it's like if you have that pain and you're still experimenting with like jumping or or i dunno sprinting like try out the house sessions like i dunno you could mean a two day load everyone's like yeah but i think a looking at that like the refractory six hour period like do it in the morning you get that the few hours arrest and then do you're second session of the day i've never done three because i just i have been a fixed annuity life to expose the sit around yeah yeah i mean yeah but it it is something to just play around with 'em and the concepts to me i had never heard of these concepts before until i saw keep are so so like a very cool 'em i think there's always like when you find something like new like that type of thing that comes out like it's awesome to realize like it is not all been done before you know yeah and even then it keeps bar episode like you realize that a lot of things that we've thought are held true about tendons connective tissue action maybe less true then we think there i think it's evolving very quickly and there's a lot of excited to see where i mean can you imagine hosted the kaiser permanent day sheet on tendon health rehabilitation it's totally different ten years now will see but at the very least you know those of us who are in the trenches with athletes i think will hopefully be seeing the fruits of all these people's labor as that gets out i do wanna talk jumped training real quick before we part ways here and i know you've done a lot of cool stuff with jumped training like meat head is it meathead dunking at what's what's the hey what's the tape i'm you know i'm sure i thought we were tuner pounce at least to qualify for this but what's the what's the hashtag yeah i think max max mars a strong my science thought i don't know why he thought about where that came from but one day he just was like let's start beat had doug so i'm like all right but yeah i dunno just dudes who are like i mean probably a lot of strength coaches who just left and then it's like art put you're a put your ideas of force production put to the test of actual athletic ability and it's like well doesn't really happen like that but yeah doing a like be just seeing the way that the differences of let's say like squatting or any any weight room exercise besides the defenses of that and then what actually happens in an athletic moment you know where like the knees command you're going inside edge like are you doing this when you're squatting like you you coach this you coach the opposite end squatting you know it's like oh i'm so yeah like that kind of makes a new a new wait a look at a lifting and vietnam and stuff like what's what are we really doing then 'em but yeah that's a so jumped training yeah i mean for me like you talk about having that output right like and i've spent the time to get it back in the day to get my squad to it stays around five hunter douglas stays around six hunting so like there's definitely a lot of that like four slow force output 'em but then actually getting that onto the court in an i could say like from are understanding like force lots of the curve let's just train velocity side of new band assisted jumps but it's like well again that is not the movement of dunking a basketball right like there maybe you're not going inside edge maybe you're not unions coming in maybe you're timing is way off 'em so actually like it's not all just physiology like there are so many components to actual a athletic movements like dumping a baller are playing a sport that you are missing if you're not actually going and doing it seems just live performance podcast brought to you by simply faster yet i couldn't agree more like i mean one of my big there's i like talking one i like talking about stuff like athletic performance says we all do but like i've i've been through the thick and thin of this and the sense of like i remember when i was twenty nine my last meal extra competed in high jumping in what year it didn't go very well i think that i still didn't know a lot of the things that lifting was like how barbells was helping people i didn't know at all how they were hurting me especially the movement patterns inside that stuff being the biggest 'cause that's like you living die by inside as the high jumper a and i think that's why hide jumpers almost like a track and field like almost getting in trouble more than anyone else in track and field when it comes to the added weightlifting allen but they often didn't have in high school and like i remember my first my first on like three months at university job at my current location we we did this thing called jumped city where it was the strength coaches versus the interns in this like basically lifting and jumping competition but all we did was a standing up pretty much in a one step jump and i got my standing up on my list up really high but then one day at the end up three months who went out to to some dunks and i went to dunk and there were literally nothing they're like i couldn't even dumped gives crazy 'cause my standing grows as high as ever but i totally lost inside edge vassal dynamics rotation patient angeles timing and everything else and i got it back when by starting a trained for more specifically but it's like it's amazing how far you can come in just the listing in standing jump world but then you got the dunk and just have literally nothing compared to what you used do 'cause you've lost every other dynamic and a it's fun to see those like that's why like like me had ducks is also jackson athletic it's everything that were a it's all these corners that were trying and mary together and do so in the most effective way possible yeah i look like well if you look at it like we strength coaches we come from like such a powerlifting like background swap and let you know and it's like if that is you're training like it is beneficial for you to be terrible at anything athletic 'cause you're body like you train body to move in one way why would it keep you open to moving any other possible way like that i don't know that would just a i don't know that changed the way the muscles act the way the fashion works everything like it it is a benefit to only be good at squad if you only squad so like why would you then expect like here's the for support tire i'm gonna go dunk it's like well no because like it's like if you wanna do powerlifting maybe it's good to just do the powerless assuming you could say healthy but if you wanna do everything at once like there's gonna be a trade off but it's like going do duty athletic movements and i don't know like there's some arguments were like if you just if you're a powerlifter and maybe you squat five hundred and you just start throwing in like jumps in sprints and you're training maybe that's the stimulus and he did like shoot you're squad up a little bit but yeah the whole thing of like you get good at the movements that you do and why would you body be good at any other movements so like it is a benefit to you just be good at squats if all you're doing squats you're not gonna be good at dunks so if you wanna do both you gotta you gotta they're both at once what on that healthcare reductionist questions like this but here we go on three things you've been thinking about lately that kind of helped you're you're jumping journey in the midst of you know you have huge lifting numbers m three things that have been at emphasis for you and you're you're you're meat head dumping dirty lately wow that's hard to be well you know what like all this stuff that like i love what a dairy impulse like unitarian with see a really you're just posting what athletes are doing you know and then it's like so like just looking at what happens in sport like say basque what actually happens in basketball and then it's like i'm coaching the exact opposite in the weight room you know there's such a huge disconnect here like so just getting there and like doing actual skill because when i first got into like the dunking journey i guess like i would do french contrast of like a whatever split squad hertel hop and there's nothing wrong with this i saw a weighted jumping jumping it's like that doesn't prepare you for these dynamics of dunking or the timing of duncan you know it just it just increasing your like general ability to jump but like it is a skill to get on the court and do that so yeah getting on the court more often 'em and then the whole like i would say the whole time and things like staying trying to stay healthy and just feeling good throughout all that because i'm saying you have to get on the court and do it more often but what if it hurts to do it you know like you have to stay healthy to attribute the practice it so like throwing in those extra sessions 'em but you know what like i started like awhile ago thoughts i would just put thoughts on my website like assaults article and i because i have so many thoughts throughout the day and i just forget them and now you're telling me i need a third thought and i can't think of it because i probably had about twenty today in they're all they're all gone to write them down right i know i i got it like i know on some things that i like like the you're the little arm policy of obviously inside edge and try going to be one of the biggest things i think you've just like the tendons health 'cause it's they have that there's just so much reversing all come together so yeah yeah and you know what like filming it and just watching what happens like and then you could see little small things that like i remember new book you had a part about like opening the mouse right in the clean and i got watch myself dunk and my my mouth opens everytime and i'm like a i forget what exactly were you were referencing there but i'm like a well that's interesting you know these things that just a maybe the biggest thing is like what is happening naturally you know and then should should someone intervene in fix this or like or or maybe we could argue that so many years of heavy lifting has kind of destroyed the natural ability that i have but i think i've i've kept it pretty good 'em end yeah just looking at everything naturally of like there is nothing good or bad it just is the way that is you know and maybe things are working for a reason that we have no clue why yeah it's cool the more we learn about the body especially the more i dig into a dairy and stuff that's like the more you could see a pieces and things and why and the y you know we still haven't learned everything about by the body works the way it does any even like this realization that had a this just a few days ago after this rewire clinic that we made a daring did like almost i realize why low ram dumpster awesome because like you have a pro nate keep prone aiding after you jump because you you're the ducks kind of quicker so you're gonna have to bring your feet up to reorganize everything quicker as apply butchering it is hard to describe it in and i'm talking on the phone but anyway so it's it's cool that were we keep learning and a and yeah it's it's i know you are time's running out today but payment it's been awesome talking to you jake a in on all these concepts jacked athletic a tenant health i think all things that are highly relevant and appreciate the time man yeah no problem doing joe thanks for tuning into another episode one fifty seven is in the books and a i'm signing off of this week if you enjoyed the show as always leave us a rating or review i tune stitcher a i'd love to get us up to a two hundred reviews on i tunes it's definitely a gold mine for this year and you can help push this information out to those people who need it those coaches and athletes and people who are struggling with ten in pain and wanna end and everything that comes with that or people who just wanna get jacked in unathletic way either way it totally be appreciative if you took the time it could review us on i tunes or stitcher or spotify wherever you listen to it would mean a lot to me are sponsor simply fest dot com supplies of high end trey technology

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05-16-19 Prospect Update

All The Kings Men

25:51 min | 2 years ago

05-16-19 Prospect Update

"Barberry gauges MCI score. The only goal the game my. Is it? You're listening to all the king's men, the official dog cast of the LA kings. Now here's your host, Jesse. Cohen. Well, I was going to record an entire intro. That had nothing to do with the playoff games going on. But I have to get this off my chest or my head is going to explode to repeat myself here for the time. Happiness is measured by expectations. The NHL has created a world where coaches can challenge goal and have them recalled for reasons that sometimes appear to defy logic. So that is the expectation that they have created. They then turn around and say well on this goal we don't need the parallel view explain it away. We don't need multiple camera angles or slow motion. This is an infraction that you all can plainly see with your own two eyes but dash sorry it's not reviewable. So this goal stands, no matter what that's infuriating. That. That's a version of the expectations that they created is infuriating and frankly it's insulting to our collective intelligence. Call the goal back say you know what the refs on the ice missed it. But we see it use it. It's not a goal. I've seen some arguments already online saying, oh well if you do it in the playoffs you have to do it in the regular season. And now you're gonna have all these reviews you're gonna slow the game down. You know what slows the game down waiting five minutes to try and figure out if a guy skate was two inches off side for ninety feet away on a camera angle at a poor location? You know it doesn't take five minutes looking at the review of that goal in saying, hey, that's a hand pass doesn't take any time at all. You just wave no goal. Or you have a guy into Rondo say it's not a goal. I don't blame the refs and frankly it makes me incredibly uncomfortable to see them. Get blamed for this look, they missed it, it happens. Nobody's perfect. People are making mistakes. I was watching it in overtime. The first time through I had an uneasy. Feeling that something was wrong. I thought maybe it might have been a cake or goal tender interference. I couldn't quite tell I didn't recognize it was a hand pass, and I get it. I'm not Aref but the issue again is not that they missed the call. It's the message not reviewable it's I don't know if it's lazy or smug or insane, regardless, it's unacceptable. Get one of the two refs off the ice. If you're going to knowledge, that Rapson linesmen, miss calls, which incidental, you have done by instituting the review process. There's too many bodies on the ice. Anyway, everybody's getting bigger and faster and blah, blah, blah, all those arguments. I haven't saying it for years if you're so committed to getting it, right. Put one of the refs in the stands, the press box an ipad or a buzzer, make every goal reviewable by the people in Toronto any goal that scored just automatically review at no question in the war room, not for things like was this guy's skate two inches off side. You know ninety seconds before the goals scored. But for things like this the hand pass or the puck off the netting king. Game against the train. If the puck goes through the back of the net things like this things that the human, I might not catch in the moment, but that everybody can clearly see forever on replay. It's not that complicated. Just call it back anyway. That's my rant. Now, let's get excited about some young players in the king's future. Joining me now, play by play announcer for the OH L champion Guelleh's storm, Larry Milad. How're you doing today? Larry. I'm great, especially after that win on Sunday. Yeah, I want to congratulate you right off the bat on winning the j Ross Robertson trophy. That is it. And that trophy name for fans in that territory probably wouldn't have a clue j Russ Robertson was the first president of the on -tario hockey association and that one dates back to eighteen ninety nine so a trophy that's been around for a while. Yeah. Quite a while before we get into the currencies, and the current players for kings fans who may not know, Dustin Brown and drew doughty both alums of the Guelleh's storm, you had a chance to watch them. Call them any fond memories of those players. Drew doughty was one of the most dominant players, I've ever had the opportunity to watch and try to describe some of the things that he did with the puck and Dustin Brown, just a hard working character type of player wasn't surprised to see him where the c in Los Angeles there for a long time. So to a pretty good storm contributions to Los Angeles. And I think you're going to love the two that are coming your way out of this team too. So when dean Lombardi was constructing the team that wound up winning the Stanley Cup twice in three years. He did he spent a lot of time getting captains, alternate captains character guys so much so that there was foolishly point where we were wondering if there were too many cooks in the kitchen. What can you say about the character level on this Wellstone storm team that just had what three tremendous comebacks over the course of their playoffs when the the championship they did? So they were behind in three straight series, two games to none in. In the Terio Hockey League, there had never been a team come back and win a championship after trailing two series two games to done much less three in a row tons of character on the team. It's an older team by junior hockey standards, fifteen nineteen and twenty year olds that's the oldest team. They tell me in the terrier Hockey League in the last forty years, and just a lot of leadership eleven and h l drafted players, and there'll be a few more that'll be picked up here in June as well. Sunders was traded to the storm this season. We spoke to the play by play announcer from the Owen sound attack earlier. And he said that he thought that Sean Thursay was the best power play quarterback in the gel does that sound like an accurate statement. Well, one of the very best it's too bad. You couldn't have the other guy that he's been paired up with the he's an Edison draft pick, Dmitri Sam roof off, he endures have been the, the number one unit. The number one power play unit and behind Nick Zouqi who also came from Owen sound who had forty two points. And it was the playoff MVP Sambuc off at twenty eight points dursey had twenty seven Sambu Khanna has a little bit more of a physical presence jerseys, incredibly quick, and really fun. Pair to watch and talk about how many minutes a game does a number one pair defense and play in the HBO. I think I've lost track of how many minutes they would put in it would be an exceptional amount. Although on this particular hockey team, they're gifted with six all defenseman and on that second unit is the other one who's going to wind up with the Los Angeles Kings and Marcus Phelps whose game is a little bit different than Sean dursey. He's more of a guy who gets the job done very effectively. In his own and through the neutral zone has a little bit of an offensive upside. But just a guy in the really tough situations that you want to the ice, how far away before we get to Philips, how far away, would you say dirty is, I know he's, I think he's twenty years old, or will, you just be turning twenty do you expect him to spend a few years developing, or is he right around the corner from cracking, and NHL lineup. As a general rule of thumb, you probably know that when these guys get signed, they get signed to a three year entry level deal. And then they're NHL teams really make up their minds during the course of that three years whether there's going to be a realistic chance for them to make the jump into the NHL. I wouldn't wanna pin number on it for either Phillips. But I'd be extremely surprised if both are not on the LA defense. At some point within the next two to three years. Yeah. I mean dursey was drafted by Toronto and two thousand eighteen so. To your point about the three or entry level. He's had a few seasons, not under contract not on L C. But, but it's been years since he was drafted, obviously a bit of a late bloomer. He wasn't drafted initially in his first year, and then really started to come on strong, and that happens with kids at this age. I see it all the time where you think when they come into the league sixteen and seventeen year olds how are they going to develop and in his case the development Campbell little bit later and does it does a run like this with all those comebacks with an overage team as you said, one of the oldest teams in forty years is that the sort of thing that you think can help at a little bit of edge to a maturing player? Like you said, maybe a guy like dursey who, who was a late bloomer. I think absolutely it can. And, and now the next phase of this is the attempt to go for the memorial Cup is just a tremendous experience. And whereas when? You get if you get to the National Hockey League, you can have quite a few opportunities or you hope you can to win the Stanley Cup. You've got players that have won a couple of cups there in Los Angeles in junior, hockey career it's limited to four or five year. Span to get the really big prize. That's the memorial Cup in the memorial Cup name came after the first World War named in honor of veterans from that war. But it's a turnament where as opposed to a best of seven series, you can't afford too much in the way of comeback. You've gotta come out of the gate, pretty fast and win. So it's a new experience. In part of the process of developing developing these guys and maybe getting cold water running through the veins, by the time, it's all done. There's tons of players. I think that have extended their careers based on the reputation. They gained in the memorial Cup. You know, it'll be eight nine years into their career they won't have panned out quite as well as everybody hoped. But everyone will go but he had that great tournament. Back in ninety four. Whatever it is. Do you think the dirty and Philips have been good enough in their junior career so far, that it sort it doesn't matter how well they do or don't do in the memorial Cup Amir? They cemented as top end prospects moving forward. They are top end prospects moving for. But if you use that phrase that you just use their retiring Gulf storm fans, they'd say hold on just a minute. We want the memorial get it. This is the six time the storm in the last twenty five years of been to the tournament. They've never won and interesting to note as close as they came was in nineteen ninety eight in Spokane. And the current coach George Burnett was coaching for the first time he'd later on coach in the system coach with Anaheim coached the Edmonton Oilers briefly at one point but lost in overtime in the final game there to the Portland winter hawks and it's funny because you run into people, you know from different teams all over the place in this game coaching the. The Spokane chiefs the host team that year was Mike Babcock, and Babcock, and George Burnett went to McGill University in Montreal played hockey together. My McGill is the, the family school for me and my grandmother, a bunch of cousins. My little sister's middle name is, in fact, McGill named after that school. Look, as king's fans we want the you know, we want the best for prospects. We want kids coming in with as much experience as much leadership as much winning in their past as possible. So we're obviously pulling for that. Chandra's e six foot one eighty seven mortgage Phillips listed at six foot one ninety something I think, dirty, a right hander Phillips, a left hander. You mentioned Phillips has more of an upside, but is he more of a I don't want to stay at home defenceman, because that's sort of mold is is moving out of the game these days, but is he less of a scoring threat and more of a support puck moving player? Then. I think that pretty much describes it in a guy who is physically tough and hard to push off the puck when he gets that lucky predict protected extremely, well, you're talking to different games with Sean Thursay he'll fly up the ice with the puck, a Marcus Phillips will protect it through the defensive and neutral zones and make a great first pass. So two players with different styles. But different styles that really work. Chandra's. He traded to the storm Marcus traded the storm. How have they adapted to the room how they incorporated into the into the I don't want to say, community, but into the brother of the locker room the, the can blanking the culture that's for the culture of the team culture chemistry. Absolutely no problem whatsoever. And I think it helped that actually there were four players that came from the own sound attack in the movement. It wasn't only jersey and Phillips, it was Knicks Zouqi who's going to play for the Montreal Canadians as early as next year. I think they away cello. MVP playoff winner m end beyond that sack Roberts. These guys knew a few players on the storm hockey team as it was. In fact, Phillips roommate for Team Canada at the world junior tournament had been MacKenzie an ov- another addition to the lineup and it was one of the things I looked at two because there was a lot of movement here. They brought in seven player. As pro-chian the trade deadline, which in the terrier hike, illegal January the tent, so that was a question. I had are all of these guys going to fit together as a team are they're going to be egos, bumping into each other what's going to happen, and they really came together very rapidly. In the end result is they wanna championship together. What would you say? If you I mean, this is an, an arbitrary scale, but you had to rate dirty Phillips, as far as leadership or locker room presence or that sort of thing. Would you rate them higher or lower extremely high, and people who were going to interview these guys in the future in the pro ranks are going to find two guys that are very good at talking and doing interviews very friendly. Warm personalities, just great people to know on and off the ice. And I know one of the things I did within a few weeks of the trade was contact. You mentioned Fred Wallace. Probably my best friend of mine. The other broadcast. Easters as it turns out in the area hockey but I asked him to pass along a compliment to the Owen sound people, including general manager Dale degree the quality of the young man that they had sent to the storm. Not only on the spinoff, the ICES. Well, well, that's task news for king sans. Larry, I wanna thank you very much for your time. You're welcome. I've gotta go. Catch a plane short yet. I'm really looking forward to good luck in the memorial Cup. And you've got kings fans waiting for you. Thank you very much. Joining me now, play by play announcer for university of Minnesota Duluth, Bruce, isky? How're you doing today? Bruce very good Jeffey. How you doing? I'm excellent. Let me start off by saying, congratulations on calling to NC AA championships in a row. Thank you very much, certainly thrill. I'm sure I'm sure it is kings will be particularly interested to know how Mikey Anderson did before we get into his play in the tournament and his future prospects. He was a fourth round draft pick, not that there's anything wrong with being fourth round draft pick. But what can you see in his development over the last two years, that has seen him go from being a fourth round draft pick to now being one of the higher rated prospects in the king's pool? You go see this as you get to know a Mike is extremely driven. And I think, you know, if you look at the competition that he had growing up with his brother, Joey, and literally about everything that they did. I think that help kind of mobile of them in different ways. But, you know, Mikey is he knew think what he needed to do in college, and he's worked on his skating, tremendous amount. It's made a difference. And you look at the way he defends and I said this in his freshman year, I thought, you know, one on one there weren't a lot of guys that defended better than Mike didn't college hockey. And that's a lot of eighteen year old kid coming in. But, you know, he's got so much experience. You know, not just division, one replaying in the world juniors playing national teams. He has two years of playing the US H L, which is a tremendous junior league. You know, for a guy who's nineteen. Years old. That's a lot, and he certainly has learned a lot in gotten better developed inter into as a result of playing and all those high level situations looking at his career accolades, he's got US H L rookie, second team, USA, second all star team. Under twenty bronze medal at the world juniors. Honorable mention for the all star team this year in the in the tournament. What kind of defense, you say he's a strong defender is he more in the quote unquote, new NHL mold of defensemen, where he's able to move his, his feet and use his stick to the puck out of his own more than he is. You know, the old sort of nineties clog up the middle big lumbering lay the would type defenseman. Absolutely. He is. He's, you know, his stick is always in the right place. You know. And I think where where you saw the improvement as he grew it. You MD was he was able to develop his skating ability to a point where it wasn't just a stick that was in the right place. But now he's fast enough, and he's able to get the those those tight areas quicker and he's now is body position is correct to the point that he was just almost impossible for guys to beat one on one. That's that's great. We've been talking to personal skills coaches sort of exploring the future of the development of the game. And one of the things that fascinates me is the notion of the players are learning to use the top half of their body in the lower halves of their body, almost independent of one another, so the positioning in the skating can take one place, but you're prevision in your stick can can have you effective in two. Areas. Do you see that kind of complete development of his game? Or is there still room to improve? I think anytime you've got a kid thanking years old, there's room to improve. I do think from a vision standpoint, he, he did get a lot better. And keep in mind this college hockey and it's not the headache shell. And, you know, I could I can give you all the superlatives about how much he got better. And he did. And I and I do believe and I said this I said this during radio broadcasts last season. I believe the Anderson's gonna play in the NHL in the twenty nineteen twenty season. And I, I very strongly believe that at some point if not the entire way he's gonna be a Los Angeles king, but, you know, obviously, he's at the show up in chosen things in training camp in one of the things he's going to have to show is that he can handle the speed the intensity level that you'd get at that next level, because it's not what you had in college hockey. And but he did again. Like I said, you looked at his experience rental out. So the compliments he's had in the accolades. He's gotten this two years of college hockey you know, he playing the world juniors. It's not it's a different level in college hockey a higher level. But it's a certainly a higher intensity of those two weeks at tournaments is so tremendous that it's great hockey and it's also a different pace than what you see in college hockey nothing to handle that very well. And that's what makes me think he can make this jump and make that adjustment to the NHL. His grandfather played his father played his sister and his brother both play. How much do you think that'll help him when he finds himself in the NHL environment and INA training camp? Having to do those things that the young players have to do in order to become professional does he have in advantage, given that his family so involved in the sport. I think athletic bloodline, certainly help. The biggest thing, Jesse to me is, is the relationships relationship. He has Joey, and Lisa Dilma. Wrote about this at the Letica here the last week or so, you know, Joey kinda held guide Mikey through his decision making, you know, Wendy, the side of the sign with the kings. And I think you're gonna see hit. You're gonna see Mikey kind of lean on Joey, when it comes to, you know, that experience of the summer what do you have to get ready? Joey signed last year with the devils not long after you NBC's engine devils are still playing 'cause they made the playoffs, and they were in their first round series against Tampa Bay Joey joined the devils and at least got a taste of the, the practice intensity and the game intensity from sitting in the press box and get into a playoff game, but he got around that environment. And I think that helped him get himself ready for his rookie professional season and the things he learned he will pass onto mighty I do believe in, and that's going to help Mikey when he gets the training camp September for the kings being more ready for what he's going to experience there. Maybe he would have been walking the doors a rookie. Obviously, you need every guy on a roster pulling in the same direction. To win a championship let alone too. But where would you place him as far as being a leader or being one of the role players within the UM d program? I think he developed into. And I think Scott Sandelin the head coach of the BULLDOGS would would probably effect. I think he said this. They might the Anderson outside of a goaltender hunter shepherd was the MVP of this team. You know, the work that he and Dylan samba, who was a Winnipeg draft pick data the quote unquote, second, defensive pairing. They were so consistent down the stretch. And they provided the BULLDOGS of so much strong play at both ends of the ice. I think Mikey's offense of game in the second half really developed in part because of that the chemistry he had a Dylan but it was certainly a lot of work that Mike he was doing along the way he was great, especially down the stretch and the BULLDOGS had a couple of injuries including the standout offense and defense got rid of it in the second half of the season. And when Brody was down Mikey. Stepped into that role is, is kind of a pot that a top offense of player, but he was able to step in on the power play and contribute. And in help the BULLDOGS offense tread water rooms able to come back and then once of stick them back. Mike offense of game didn't go away. He was rate down through tournaments, especially the championship game. And he had a couple of it's because I've heard scouts talk about his shot that, that great, he had a couple of, of rockets shots both in in the NC championship game against Saint Cloud state, and then in the national championship game against Massachusetts that were as good as any of seen from them, two years. I've seen a few interviews with him. He seems polished well-spoken intelligent self reflective, etc. How is he in the locker room how is he around the media? And how is he in that McCollum campus as obviously completely different environment than than you're likely to find in most situations? How is he with his peers? And with the older generation and with the fans. I don't think I heard a single bad word about him is two years into low thin that's from fans. That's from the other parents from coaches, that's from teammates. That's one of their media people everyone that that dealt with him. Enjoy dealing with him, whether it be a media person or a teammate, or, or one of the staffers in the in the program. He was great to everybody. The always made time for us in the media of very well-spoken young man. And a guy that was never afraid to relate. The things that he's learned along the way. And again, I go back to all those accolades rattled off, he's learned to Watson, and he's been very open about that. And he's, he's got that humble to them to which is good. And I think you'll fit in very well, in professional environments, comparisons between players are always kind of corny and they're never perfect. But having said that is there any players that you would compare them to currently playing in the NHL? New, you're gonna ask that I've spent a I spent a couple of hours this morning trying to figure that out. And I and I, I you know, a guy likes Jonas Brodine with the wild with stick Stick's always in the right place as body position so good. And maybe he's not gonna wow you with offense of ability, but he has the ability to get the puck up the rink good. I passes which lead the good exits, and that gets the transition game going to get the offense going all those little things might he does really well. And I think he's going to be a great like I said, I think it'll be a great in the locker room because he's such a humble well-spoken young man that and he'll know his role immediately while he sounds like exactly the kind of player kings, fans and kings management need right now. Bruce wanna thank you so much for joining me. You betcha. No problem. The best Alexa, Mikey and the kings. Of course, you guys thirty have a former bulldog Alexai follow. So that's quite a bit of here in Duluth perfect. While best elect you next. Without Mike Anderson and thanks very much for, for letting Abba's leading us Emerson. Him. Got a good luck. Thanks.

hockey National Hockey League ICES Mikey Anderson Marcus Phillips Los Angeles Kings MVP Bruce memorial Cup Los Angeles Joey Sean dursey Toronto Larry Milad Philips Jesse Mike Sean Thursay MCI Owen
Jeff Hammerberg

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

1:03:26 hr | 2 years ago

Jeff Hammerberg

"Hey Queiroz Cami here. My first book save yourself is about growing up super. Were Queer Super Catholic wanting to be a priest dating the captain of the football team finding myself finding standup having an eating disorder having I loves losing losing. I love second loves. You can read this book when it is available March twenty fourth but you can pre order it now. Oh and yes there will be a tour friends pre ordering helps me get on the New York Times bestseller list and that's what I want so head on over to save yourself book book dot Com. Get your copy today. This episode of Query is sponsored sponsored by the audiobook of high school. The new memoir written and read by Musicians Teagan and Sara High School is the revelatory and unique coming age story of Teagan and Sara Quin identical twins this from Calgary Alberta who grew up height of grunge and rave culture in the ninety s well before they became the celebrated musicians and global LGBTQ icons. We know today get high school school today. Wherever audio books are sold this is a show about individual experience and personal identity. There may be times when folks use identifying words or phrases that don't feel right to you. That's part of what we're exploring here. Please listen with an open heart and as always I welcome your polite engage feedback and I encourage you to continue the conversation in your own life in your own community welcome to Hey Queiroz Cami here. I am going to be in Raleigh North Carolina this weekend. You get tickets to Cameron. ESPOSITO DOT com slash tour today on the show. This show show query an awesome interview. This actually like this interview turned out this one turn out great. This is a real good one Jeff Hammarberg from Gay Real Estate Dot Com Alec loved this dude. I love chatting with him. I hope you really enjoy this one. Yeah the feeling still no no no careless. I always have folks folks. Introduce themselves on the podcast would introduce yourself sir go for it. Take it away. Take Hammarberg. I'm the founder and president of Gabriel Estate. Dot Com tom so you or someone that works with you actually pitched me on being on the podcast and I was stoked to hear from you because I think so often on this show. We talked to folks who are in the entertainment industry because that's just sort of the easiest people to a two or folks. Who Have you know an awareness of podcasting and one. That's been really important to me is to make sure to talk about all the ways that queasiness. LGBTQ identity touches our lives and so this was something where I when I heard from from. You always like Oh my yeah. Yes I want to talk to this person because I want to know I want to know about your job and your life and and why you founded Gabriel Estate Dot Com in sort of what your experiences so great job representing yourself. Thank you for making me aware of the work that you do well. Thanks for having me on. I'm excited to talk with you. I love what you're doing on the planet and so I'm really thrilled to be with you today. So thanks for the opportunity yeah. What a good good compliment. I love what you're doing on the planet. Is that's a good one. I'll I'll take that one and put it in my pocket perfect. I love it. So where where are you from. ORIGINALLY MINNESOTA ODA Duluth Minnesota Wow all right on that right on the tip of Lake Superior a few hours north of Minneapolis at the time I grew up it was a city of about about one hundred thousand people and you know it's still there today. It's kind of a tourist yesterday destination for people in Minneapolis as they come up to lake superior in you know there's lots of good food and offense and the lake and the aerial lift bridge and all of that kind of stuff so it's great yes from there. The stand up comic Maria Bamford. I believe is from Duluth. Oh Nice and flab matter. I'll have to we'll have to it'd be introduced connect up. She's got some great jokes about where you're from so you grew up in in Duluth in and how long did you live in that area or where do you live now. You know I grew I so I I left Duluth. When I was seventeen years years old I actually dropped out of high school had a difficult relationship with my father and I joined the navy and I did that the very last day a of the old. Gi Bill which was December thirty first of Nineteen seventy-six. I'm taking us back away revealing my age. Eh but I'm so yes thank you for. Yes thank you for revealing your age. This is important shit. Keep going keep going so so i the the reason why I mentioned that is if you join on or before December thirty first of seventy six you received a full ride through college when you got done serving serving so today there are still some programs or you can contribute and the you know the branch of the military will contribute and you can still get some college benefits but this was back back in the days when you got a full ride so that's why I you know that's why I joined left. Duluth flew to San Diego for boot camp and I can remember remember the plane coming down in San Diego and I saw the palm trees and the beaches in the ocean and my heart just opened. I'm a home so many follow up questions for you on Here's the first one I so you dropped out of school joined the navy and then we're going to get this free ride through college or it's not a free ride. You were going to do the work to earn learn the the money but did you have to then. Did you have to have a college diploma or ged to Did you end up enrolling in college. I did not have to have a ged to to join the navy at that time and I don't you you may have to today. I'm not really sure sure and I I actually enrolled in the University of Minnesota. Duluth ready when I when I dropped out my father was giving me all all sorts of pressure and in a wire you going out on a Friday night. You should be studying all of that kind of stuff. We had this kind of strange relationship that kids do with their parents and I just had had enough and I realized that it was such a struggle to try to find a job even to put gas in my car at that point joint. My Dad was paying for my classes. You know that whole thing so I just decided it was enough and dropped out surprised everyone and boom out of town so it was great while I also I'm just I'm just making some guesses here because you know my folks. I've seen pictures pictures of my. I was born in eighty one so I wasn't a human yet on this planet in seventy six but I have seen folks of my I've. I've seen pictures of my folks during that I know I know it was the bicentennial. which was that big summer? July fourth two hundred years as a country tree all that stuff I just am wondering if there was I mean I'm just guessing there was maybe like some sort of rob patriotism going on but what was what was the vibe like in the country and seventy-six because there was also obviously. I can't believe I'm going to say this but I literally don't even know where we sat in terms of Vietnam like what was going on in the country when you joined I from what you can remember right. I'm not even sure that I know much more than you do. I was a seventeen year old kid that was living in a city that was gray and cold and depressing. I was living under the thumb of my father. Being a tyrant. I was living in an economic situation at the time. People were leaving dilutes because of factories closing in the iron ore industry having a rough time and you know there was one. I can remember one billboard that said last person to leave deludes. Please please turn out the lights and so it was that whole atmosphere that I and and actually I saw you know I think I used to watch football with my dad or whatever so I would see these commercials for the military and some of those were the navy and you know it's so funny because when I was ten I I almost drown one time so when I came home and told my mom I joined the navy. I mean she just about fell out of the water. The ships are big mom. The ships are big exactly so you know I mean it was just I think it was a it was a a changing point in my life and it was the best thing that ever happened to me. Well I WANNA talk about that too because I know from living in. La where I think you're talking talking about reporting for boot camp because I was in San Diego last week for work. When you drive down you pass the I'm like a navy base that is that is it's right on the water and there's some desert mountain stuff around. It's incredibly beautiful and it feels very I mean it. Has that stark sort of undeveloped feeling that a a military Tori based can have where it just. I don't know it always kind of gives me goosebumps to drive past because I I know it's going on there. which is that a lot of young people are? You're taking on some pretty tough jobs but it that particular one in San Diego where I think think you're talking about is. It's it's beautiful. It's like a weird sort of natural beauty. You have this the the the boot camp for the navy and the boot camp for the the marines which has 'em. CRD are both pretty much at the end of the runway in at the San Diego Airport general areas and so but I can remember you know my drill sergeant pulling up in his forest green engy convertible with the top down and getting out in his crisp Khakis and his aviator sunglasses and screaming screaming at us and I was like man. I'm in Love Topgun version of military service. You know there's beach volleyball yeah exactly of course right across the fence or the Marines We didn't have it nearly as rough as they did so oftentimes. I'd look over there. That'd be like glad. I'm not a marine but you know it was great. We're you eventually deployed. I did three WESTPAC so when I finished boot Camp I went to navigators school there in San Diego and served on the USS Enterprise in San Francisco Enciso for a year and then at one point they had I joined the navy on the buddy system with a friend from Duluth and we didn't have have any sort of relationship this was before I even recognized my what my sexuality was and so we went to boot camp together other. We actually both got into the same ace school the navigator a school. I went to San Francisco. He went to San Diego. I was on the USS Enterprise. He was on the Constellation. After a year up there. The Navy had a program or you could cross decks you could find someone that had the same job as you that head roughly the same rate as you that had approximately the same amount of time left in service and you can actually request to switch chefs with them so I found that person and then ended up back in San Diego for my last three years on the USS Constellation so dirt uh-huh during that time I worked in the navigation department on the bridge as a homeless man shooting the Star Stars Celestial Navigation at sunrise and sunset keeping track of the ship's position on the map and that sort of thing so we did ed due to WESTPAC's. You're gone nine months and we always you know left. San Diego through Hawaii via the Malacca Straits into the Indian Ocean there was I was drum in the Middle East as there is today so that's where we spend a majority of our time at one point during my deployment employment the closest I've got any sort of combat was I don't know if you remember in like eighty I think it was we sent a Blackhawk helicopters copters into Iran to rest rescue the hostages that were American hostages being held by Iran and as the helicopters flew through the a desert they were flying low and actually sand got into the rotors of the helicopters and a few of them crashed so it was aborted came back act tensions or high we were actually back in Thailand and turned around steamed all the way back through the Malacca Straits hung out the Indian Ocean in case there was any activity that we needed to be involved in or are fighter planes and we were at sea for one hundred twenty. Today's it's the longest time during peace time period. That ship has remained at sea so I was interesting as well. Well Wow one hundred and twenty i. I just want to thank you for your service. Well thank you for saying that. I appreciate that yeah. It's it's I actually actually am. I mean this is might surprise. Folks who are regular listeners the podcast for people who just know me from have really progressive views views and I think for some reason that has often been paired with a criticism of the military that then is continued onto soldiers and those who serve and I just you know I'm I'm much. I'm actually for me I yeah I really think that there's no there's no way that that makes sense to me to be ignorant of the positioning that that we have as a country in the world and who actually secures that for us. I mean I can individually Julie be a person who is for peace and if I drive my car to work in the morning than I also have to be aware of the folks are putting their life on the line what makes Muslim friend we do that so I just I think that especially as queer folks it's really important to keep in mind all of the folks who were serving that are family members and I mean I am truly. I mean I I. I am a I'm the kind of I cry at parades aides. Try It at our national anthem true Patriot in like a very I think unexpected way for a lot of folks that might know some other things about me standing up at a game high school football game whatever it is that national anthem I have tears in my eyes and I and I really like I really support the troops. It's like a thing that just is very very important to me. Thank you at all that being said I mean I'm sure I would guess that you and I are have very similar views on the endless war in the Middle East and aggression in all of that sort of stuff and I'm there with you and I will say that ninety nine percent of the people that you see that are in the military have nothing to do with any of those decisions. They're just merely serving that you just you just summed it up in a in a much more concise way than I said which is that you know there's the folks making the decisions and then there are the folks who are doing this because they have a strong love of the country the order because they need a job or because they need free college or because they have a special skill and I think it's very easy to forget about that to forget about especially for Queer folks and folks who might be left-leaning as easy to forget that it's a lot of privileged position to be able to be critical of the military and I'm happy to exert that privilege in and carry on that criticism but but also support the individuals who are thanks for saying all of that. That's awesome. I love that. Oh yeah I mean I really like. I believe it so much and seventy-six till you said at least three years. How what was your total time in the Navy Allen's going. It was six years salyers active in two years in active active so I was discharged in March of eighty one. I actually went back drove from San Diego. I had a car at that point. It drove through Colorado where I had an older brother. Living back to Minnesota started back at the University of Minnesota Duluth and the economy then was as bad as it's ever been in eighty one. The economy was horrible across the country and it was terrible and lose. I mean to the point I mentioned this. Earlier couldn't even find a job working at a gas station to keep gas in my truck while going to school so I packed my brother who was living in Denver said hey hey. Why don't you think about coming to Denver and I packed my car and my dad actually drove with me out to Denver I. I didn't have a job setup was going to stay with my brother and I ended up applying for a job as a security thirty guard in a high rise office tower downtown Denver and at that point called my mom and Dad told him you know oh go ahead. This job. Interview went really well they weren't they weren't looking for anyone but by the time I got back to my brothers they had called offered me a job and I needed a blazer blue blazer and grey slacks and a white shirt and a red tie and black shoes and the slurred stuff and I can remember at that time my mom gave me her. Montgomery wards is credit card number that I went down to the Montgomery wards on South Broadway and bought everything I needed just gave them this paper with the number on started waited my job and I ended up actually moving up through that company for six years working for another commercial developer for six years leaving as the director of asset with management for a large national commercial developer twelve years later but there's one piece that will tell you a little bit when I was working. Working has that security guard a few years into the job or a couple of years into the job. There was a high rise office building thirty eight stories. There's a two story retail building next to it and there's a glass roof that comes down from that retail buildings slanted and attaches die reise so this lobby of the building it has this glass roof and it's really beautiful so one day it was running really hard and the water was building up on that glass and it started leaking into the lobby and the cleaning people there were there with their mops and I went out and grabbed a mop. I was mopping up so little dino. Oh at that very moment the owner one of the owners from Canada the love family came through the lobby went upstairs his and his first question was who's the guy in the suit mopping-up water in the lobby and I was in management within in a week and moved up the ladder from there. That's an amazing story. Yeah I always tell people the harder you work. The Luckier Areola gets sure sure that's ooh. That's a good one. I like Jordan Jordan wage notting. I want to ask a couple questions then because so. I know you said earlier that when you start your military service you weren't aware of your sexuality. When did you become aware of your sexuality. It was interesting. I I was raised in a born again Christian family. My Dad wasn't totally on board with that but my mom actually found this Little Bible Church and I think it was her it was like a place where she could go that was safe away from my dad and that he he didn't mind that she went to so it was a safety net for her so I was raised as a boring and Christian so I was you know dealing with all this guilt and all all of that sort of stuff but as I was working in Denver I would date women and it was really convenient because I it was a born again Christian. I didn't believe in premarital sex and I was kind of dating women that kind of felt the same way so it was very handy worked out really well and at one point I was hitting this woman and she said hey do you want to go dancing Friday night. AMAC sure okay. There's this this place called tracks. I WanNa go to and she's like just so you know there's some gay people there and Blah Blah Blah but it's the best place in this and I went there and it was Kinda always like you know we walked through the door and I was like Oh my God I mean this. This dance floor had two hundred people on it and of many of the guys is had their shirts off and there were people all over and it was like this is amazing so what happened after that that was another one of those moments like landing in San Diego where I saw the beaches and trees. I you know something clicked in me. I was like wow this is amazing and I had no idea idea. This was happening. So I ended up going back there alone once or twice and then so at that point I was in touch with my sexuality and I had had a couple of experiences prior just like you know teenage boy stuff and and that sort of thing so I actually fully came out when I was thirty and this month I'll be sixty one so for half of my life. I was not aware of my sexuality and or living in the closet and dealing with all this Christian didn't guilt type stuff right. I mean I was raised. Catholic I can I can totally relate to the the convenience of religious fervor telling you that you should not have sex with this with the person that dating that is that is convenient. I also curious when you were like sedan. You're in the military and then you're a security guard. I mean there's like these are like butch jobs or whatever with a certain I'm maybe patrolled masculinity. I don't know I haven't been in the navy. What were you getting messaging when you were in there a when you were serving about like did. Did you know folks that. were sort of seeing each other on the down low like with anything around you that you felt access. Let's go to or was it like that. Club in Denver is your first time seeing so funny because my husband laughs at me today. Even he's quick. You're just so naive Jeff. How can you possibly think how do you see everything with these rose colored glasses a and then. How do you not recognize? What's you know so oh and I feel like I'm fairly intuitive and fairly aware and that sort of thing but I was pretty clueless. I remember one time when I was in the navy actually using the restroom and I thought the guy was like looking at me or whatever so I can remember one or two instances like that like I said I had a couple of you know experiences so it wasn't like that was totally up to those experiences like if you didn't think that they first of all I also have to say that you literally like when I was in the navy and then as you said that I realized that that is a village take that is amazing but but anyway when you were having those experiences what did you what did you chuck that up up to like as a young man. You're you're in high school or whatever. What did you think was going on well. It's a really good question because I know there there there was some mutual attraction with this unnamed person and and you know sleepovers and wrestling and like the whole thing and lake nothing ever happened nothing ever happened nothing ever happened and then suddenly one time we were on the road together slept overnight in a hotel and his like all all of a sudden. He's like I'm horny. I think I'm GONNA and I'm like all right. Okay all maybe me too so side by two separate beds but just kind of you know to pleasure to ourselves that was about it and I can remember sleeping that night and thinking. Oh my God my life is over what just happened. You know this is like someone super close to me. Da Da all that kind of stuff and then the next morning in the car. This person has like I'm horny ready again and just like dropped his pants highway and it was just like Whoa so I guess that didn't ruin my relationship so that happened happened and then keep in mind like nothing happened for a long time and this was so this was hours that was probably like a in the back of my mind but but you know I had all of this moral duty to live the life that I was taught was the proper growing up. You know so a lot of that stuff I think I just crammed down within me and another another time in San Diego. I can remember going down from San Diego. We walked into the Sparta Beer and sat down at the bar and nobody was in there really a bartender and head a beer her and I was looking around and we were both looking around there like there's like posters of guys all over in this far lake what the hell's going on and at at that point. We were both like Oh my God. This is a gay bar you know sell. I didn't realize that there was this I I knew my own feelings and I knew you my you know my own convictions and all of that sort of stuff but I I was totally blind to the fact that there was this community there was. Is this underground there was this activity going on. Probably all around may not probably for sure it was so and then I so I think you know my awareness was dampened by my convictions and eventually it just got to be too much and the whole dating the women and you know the no sex sex thing and the you know so it was yeah I I do know. Actually I mean again. I can really relate to a lot of that. I think denies is such a is such a powerful thing and and and talking about our bodies and our hormones and the way that we are physically made great as if there's a right and wrong like a moral right and wrong I think for me the as a as a kid it just really divorced me from being in my body a lot and then I think about about myself and getting to realize that I was gay and getting to have thing you know experiences that made more Philip biological sense to me more physical sense to me and sometimes I think about the folks who were like raised right next to me that then turned out to be be straight and how weird they're experienced must be because I got to step outside of that right matrix. You know I got to have some experiences that helped me to see that it was really important to pay attention to how I felt and for folks. What's that had all of those teachings. I just like that actually makes me so sad. Sometimes if I think about it or like troubled because because I especially for women but also for men you know that are raised with this Christian religious fervor that like Whoa Whoa. I mean how are other people surviving. No I mean I feel like so grateful that this was my that my journey was so extreme team such an extreme version of this right. I mean it's such a disservice. SNL I we were just at a family reunion in Minnesota. My husband and I rented a home on the lake so so everybody came down there and all the born agains right so before a meal. It's like who wants to pray and dear heavenly father and thank you lord and all of this kind of stuff and so my sister's like at one morning. She's like who wants to pray and I'm like no nobody. I'm then I'm like you know so I had a conversationalist. I'm on my nieces and nephews. I'm like listen. We now know from science that the earth is poorly five billion years old. You know we we now know that you know one hundred fifty million years ago for a period of fifty to one hundred fifty or one hundred million years that you now reptiles roam the earth these were dinosaurs. You know I mean none of this creation none of the story not we. You Know We br if you've studied. I mean you recognize that you know the Romans kind of invented having an hell to put like some moral boundaries on society that they felt like society was would behave better if they thought they might go to hell in all of that sort of stuff so I don't have any problem with anyone thinking of the way they want. I'm not trying to convert anyone else and what the what bothers me. Particularly with my family is they do do believe that everyone should believe like them. Generals a believe they're the only ones going to have an and that sorta stuff so that ours is like a raw edge edge to me. You know I'm involved still with a spiritual organization. I you know I bless an honor all other face all of the religions knowing everyone's on their perfect pass us but I don't want anything crammed down my throat either yeah and I also think the for young people it. It's important to separate getting to know yourself from just sort of like blind worship of an entity that tells us where you are and that's really where where I go with. It is like yes spirituality -ality no rules that tell me how how I am so. It's just there's a big difference. There and prayer can even be amazing if it's not about shutting yourself off. It's about being affirmative and knowing that at this higher power is within you. I mean you have this ability. I mean we are all created. You know if you believe in this universal oh power. We're all a part of that. It's not something outside of us. The grey bearded guy in the sky is gone dead rate. Yeah I love. I love this opportunity to talk to you because look at where we have gone with this conversation about gay real estate dot com. It's good love it yeah today's episode of Korea's sponsored by high school the upcoming memoir by Teagan and Sara Quin identical twins from Calgary Alberta who grew up at the height of grunge grunge and rave culture in the ninety s well before they became the celebrated musicians and global. LGBTQ icons we know today written in alternating chapters from both Teagan and Sarah's whereas point of view. The book is raw account of the drugs alcohol love music and friendship. They explored in their formative years. The audio book is narrated by both Sarah and Teagan and features rough budget recordings of Sarah and deacons. I St- songs ever written in highschool recorded to cassette tape in the late nineties and rediscovered twenty years later while writing there memoir. You can get high school today. 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Use The exclusive Promo Code Query for fifteen percent off by so tell me about a little bit about the work that you do today. I mean I know the last time so in your life story the last time you were talking about moving your way up getting to management being very high up in that company in and talk to me about bridging that two now and what you're doing today so in nineteen ninety. I was the director of Asset Management for the Lynn Company a large national commercial commercial developer and we had four or five projects that we had developed in Denver. We fee managed Martin Marietta's world headquarters. Here's which is in the foothills in Denver. We had some stuff around centennial airport some office buildings liberty mutual was an anchor tenant that sort of thing so so once again. I keep coming back to these failing. Economies in the economy was horrible at that time in ninety. Oil prices were high. I commercial investments were down. Everybody was batting down the hatches. We ended up laying off about one hundred and fifty people there were there was a partner the controller director and myself that were left in the company. They actually laid me off. gave me a year severance severance package so downstairs was a remax office and I thought all those people are driving nice cars. They must must be making money. So at that point I think I was probably making sixty grand a year with some bonus money and stuff so I went down there and I talked to the broker who had had been paying me his rent for the last five or six years and I said Paul I'm thinking about getting into the real estate business you know becoming a realtor and he he said well. The thing is Jeff. He said Remax is only experienced agents. We don't hire any new agents and I'm like Oh come on you. How long have you know an on me and he said Okay Jeff. Let's do this. He said if you get your real estate license all bring you on and then all meet with you and teach you the business what you need to know. I like you I want to so I went out and got my real estate. License came back to remax. I really didn't know at that point that you really didn't have to apply for a job to be a realtor. You can be a realtor wherever you want in companies are hours looking for you to come in and sell homes and share your commission's so oh. I'm so the very first day I met with Paul at his desk and he said Okay Jeff this lock box and I'm gonNA teach you how to change the Combo so he opened it up and showed showed me. He's like okay so that's it for today and let let me tomorrow again. I'll try to meet with you for like an half hour every day half half hour every day. I never saw him again but what happened. Was I was put into. This remax office with about forty agents in the average salary in that office was eighty to one hundred thousand dollars in a few people making much more than that so my first year in the business. I made one hundred thousand dollars selling homes with no training and that's the other thing that I like to tell my nieces and nephews that you turn earn out like the people you hang around and you know that's even true for us as adults today right. Who are you hanging around. What kind of expectations have have you set for yourself and the people around you mirror that. Are you gonNa you know you're you're not going to outperform anyone that you're hanging around with typically Klay so I I credit that. I mean if I was put into a another real estate office down. The street or the average agent was making thirty grand. I probably would have made thirty grands yeah. It sounds like you have this sort of boldness built into you. I mean you know joining the navy at seventeen and then and then pitching yourself to the person who works downstairs and saying you know training yeah I mean do you have any. How do you account for that in your do you. Do you know that in your personality. DC I do know that and you know so. My belief is is that the road to sustain happiness is through disciplined behavior okay. If you look at any successful person they have routines and I recognize that and I was introduced to that in the navy but even today if you look at successful people they're you know they're up at five running and they're having a light breakfast and they're grabbing their starbucks and they're doing this doing that. Whatever so these are the types of you know if you don't if you're not willing to discipline yourself then be happy with where you're at because nothing is probably going to change change for you so I've recognized that the other pieces that and I'll flip that for a minute is the fact that I think a lot of my success is due to and maybe this is true for others. The fact that I've worked might ass off in large part. I think subconsciously to try to make up for the fact that I was gay. I I can't relate to that at all. I feel relaxed as a person every day because of my quickness. I'm just gonNA write these jokes. I feel the guy who arrived. I feel as if I have nothing to prove no It's a long term process right. I mean and that's not so much true today but but I think where I'm at today my looking back at my whole life yes. I always wanted to Yeah Jeff Gay but he successful. Jeff is gay yeah but he's got a beautiful home. Jeff is gay but he's got. He's driving a Bentley Jeff. Is this jeff as you know that sort of stuff so and also the giving and being in a good person and Jeff. We love him. He does this and that and so a lot of you know I can attribute a lot of that success a lot of that drive a lot of that discipline to that not so much anymore but yes can. I can. I ask you a question about that because I think that that is when you say not so much anymore I relate to this so much and I think that a lot of folks who are from originally communities do it's like you know okay. I will make myself valuable to you. Okay I will prove you wrong all that stuff and then at the end of the day. We have to work to accept ourselves into. Maybe need that a little bit less so seems like what you're saying is that you've gone to place where you need down a little bit less than some of that might be that you did have that success but is there anything else that you could speak to about. You know sort of relaxing that pressure pressure on yourself because I think that's something really important to talk about for our community to you know it's yeah it's great to run the race but but it's also important to like yourself you know because what if you fail at the race that's the thing about it. If you're if you're putting your value in achievement which is something I can really relate to what happens when you stumble right and so what have you done about at that how do you how do you give yourself some permission on the off days on the days where you don't sell something or on the days where something goes to shit yes so. I I think what you know if it's been a process for me and it continues to be a process but you know one of the things that I've done. Is You know I've done a lot of work with a lot of spiritual work. I've done a lot of meditation work. I've done a lot of volunteering I was there is a a religious organization called the centers for spiritual living it was I started by Ernest Holmes a new thought Guru all call him out of L. A. in the fifties and these centers for spiritual living around the country now so there's there's no Bible. There's no hate there's no judgment that sort of thing so I remember going there to the Lgbtq they had an Lgbtq question and answer saying once and I talked to Dr Roger at the time who was a a spiritual leader at the church in Denver which has about twelve thousand family members and friends so it's a large church and I started asking them these questions agenda that I had been taught as a kid you know these Bible verses that talk about you know man shall not live man this not whatever and Roger was really gentle only was really you know open and he said Jeff I mean. We all believe what we've been taught. So I want you to imagine had jim just for a minute. Just just give yourself permission to imagine that there might be another way just just a crack in that eggshell just the tiniest possibility you don't have to give up what you believe in but just the Tiniest Highness possibility that there may be another way and that opened up a door for me that I could then you know so take in some of this teaching. I ended up getting licensed in that church. As a practitioner. I spent fifteen years there. I worked in in death and dying hospital hospice home visitation programs the last year that I volunteered. I assisted in sixty funerals that sort of stuff so you're working around people. You're opening your heart your opening your mind to two people that are not in judgment of anyone in our community in fact there in full support of it so the more actually that I came out out the more that I was embraced by others that I was loved by others which allowed me more and more to love myself and the more that I studied the more that I read the more that I meditated. You know the more that I sat in silence the more that I worked on breathing more workshops that I attended. It was a process yeah I mean. It sounds like sort of in broad strokes. What you're talking about is diversifying some of the places that you get your self esteem absolutely so having a focus on work because that sounds like that's something that's important according to you and you know money and success like that is totally. That's important to me to you know but then then making sure that you had some other avenues to gather self-esteem to take to connect with the community and service but also to have folks tell you that you were okay. That's important we you know we can act like if that success can substitute for that and I really think it doesn't you know it really is important. All our lives to have folks be like okay. Here's a pat on the back. You're doing all right. I mean it's we need that were humid. We need talk. We all want to be loved. Exactly that's exactly right yeah. That's exactly right now. Living in palm springs or forty percent of the population is LGBTQ. I mean I'm Denno. That's what is that like. I mean you and I don't know you know you said earlier that you had a tougher relationship with your dad. was that tough the whole time does that. I don't know if he's still living. He passed asked it was it was just tough as a kid. My Dad was a parole officer for the state of Minnesota and he tend to he was good. When we were kids. The as we got older he attended a treat us more like parolees than you know because always do certain things get in trouble this that whatever and so he just you know had a very negative attitude was very tough guy an interesting piece of that though is at one point. My Dad did the work as well. My Dad used to hit my mom that sort of thing. My Dad put himself through college before getting that job and that physical violence ended but the verbal never did but my dad was our trying to do the work as well in fact one. I was just a teenager. My Dad opened a motivational book and tape shop in Duluth right down from his Karol office and he would sit in there for a couple of hours every night and on the weekends and listen to you know tapes and read books and in you know at that point I was required as a teenager to listen to these titans of the industry's Exhibitor Earl Nightingale Dr Norman Vincent Appeal. You know all of that sort of stuff and then I had to write a book report once per week so at as an adult I recognize that you know for for for my father and really for all of us. Were all doing the best we can do with the skills we have. That's that's just where he was at well. It sounds like you also from those experience. Is I mean I when you were talking about. The UH faith leader Dr Rick was his name Dr Roger. You're talking about you mentioned us there were gentleness and you know so that stands out to me somebody who might have been violent with violence in their household to find that in a in somebody that has something to say about self acceptance to find gentleness their Saudis also as a person who's evolving and looking for okay so what are the things that I got as a child so I got in strictness and I got the ability to follow the tight schedule usual. I'm sure that you were talking about earlier. You know to find her teen and then what am I looking for as an older adult and I'm looking for gentleness and acceptance. We're just kind of trying to parents are doing the best that they can and yeah everybody's generally. I'm doing the best they can the the gaps that leaves in us. It's admirable of that. You sought the ways to balance balance that out in time is that makes sense thank you. I think we're all trying to do that. You find the balance that for the things we may have missed right. I agree you know that's a that's a big part of the journey so now that you are in Palm Springs in talk to me about where you're at right now like both career wise and then I'm GonNa ask you another couple of questions about just living where you live but yeah. Where are you career wise now so let me tell you let me circle back a little bit so at that remax office in one thousand nine hundred eighty three a lot of people don't know this but when you walk into to a real estate office there are agents that take floor duty so if you walk into an office just blindly asking about a property or thinking about buying a home you're actually assigned to that person. That's on floor and the great agents typically. Don't take floor. They're out busy there. You know they've been prospecting acting. They're out with buyers and sellers that sort of thing so you never know what you're going to get so on this particular day. This gay male couple walked in and they were assigned the floor agent. They were interested in buying a home this little in Colorado of very conservative community even today rate just just a half nope half a mile from columbine high school so yes they were assigned to this floor age and and met with him and after the couple left the office there was all this ribbing going on in the back of back broom and all kinds of jokes and you know really you're. GonNa have fun with those. Oh boy all this stuff is like and I was just thinking. Something's not right about this process. I mean what is what is going on on here. So I recognize then and I think it's still even exists somewhat today that there was this quiet homophobia homophobia in my industry and the real estate industry and so what I decided to do was to open a database database of gay and lesbian real tours and at the time the advocate magazine was the only national type publications location side a little classified ad in their thinking about buying or selling your home. Call me so at that point. I started referring now a couple people they want to by home in Minneapolis. I would find a realtor there that was gay or lesbian or gay friendly and refer them out that sort of thing so that has evolved all today into a gay real estate dot com and we close almost a deal a day nationwide and the other other thing we wanna do. I don't want to gloss over. It is the fact that I believe each. One of us. Have a responsibility in whatever area were in you know in real estate for real in the real estate industry it was me. I recognize that I was successful accessible in the industry that I had some authority in the industry that I had some influence in the industry that I had some experience in the industry and all of us have that somewhere somewhere in some place so I thought what could I do and that's what I did so I think all of us can look and say what is it. I could do where I matt and and what what could I do to possibly make a difference and the thing that a real estate dot com has done for years and continues to do today. Is We give back. I recognize that you know it takes a village and it you know even today when our when our rights are threatened threatened under the current administration I mean we cannot give up our guard. I mean I I think it's great that were remembering stonewall after fifty years but are the democracy for LGBTQ people in America is fragile. I mean we can hop in our car in California and as we drive across the United States our rights change at every state line which is totally unacceptable so gay real estate dot. Com Actually Fillet financially supports twenty one. LGBTQ organizations monthly because I know real estate. I don't know how to do that other stuff but lambda illegal does out in equal does glad does you know the national lesbian and Gay Journalist Association does pee flag. Does Family Quality Council does National Center for transgender equality does so we give to those organizations and many others to help give back to the community as we continue to focus on the real estate arena well fantastic job so well set. I I heard you say at the very beginning of when when you were talking about why you started this you're saying this really mattered then and still. I think it does today and I it's. It's funny because sometimes I don't know I only live now but sometimes I think that we so I think we're being pressured by the larger straight forces in our culture to do this sort sort of and still today this matters and I don't mean this as a criticism of of you. I mean it like back. Yes this still matters you know and I think I just I heard you speaking. It was reminded of my own self consciousness sometimes in in my field or for you know what I hear from other folks where it's like yeah and it still weird to be you know of lesbian competing with straight men first stage time or something like that and you know that we have to use the word still so often when something like a house it matters so much you know whether the person that you're working with or that's representing you to a seller or you know that's representing you to buyers or knows. The neighborhood knows whether you'd be safe there of course this matters and I think it's like we're we're taught to sort of even kind of diminish that this type of thing might matter and when I got this email from you I was. I was literally like yeah like yes. This matters it matters. I think about it as a renter. You know I think about it. When I'm introducing myself to neighbors I live in Los Angeles. I live in the east side of Los Angeles which is a very very progressive area right and I think about this all the time and not where I live now but where I lived previously and I I just have moved within the last year I was. I was called a dike by a neighbor of mine on my street street right and this is here now you know so. I just think I think it does really matter matter and the reason that I say this is because it's important to support folks who are out and doing these kinds of jobs because because it you know if you continue to do your job then like Queer folks can continue to be supported. It's like this is why it matters to sort of. Put Your dollars back into queer owned businesses because shaef absolutely right. I mean I mean I. I WanNa know personally that the person that I'm potentially GonNa buy home from that's going to earn ten or twenty twenty thousand dollars. Commission is not writing a check to trump's reelection campaign now and I it's hard for me to say that because it sounds self serving being right but the chances of you using a realtor from Gabriel estate dot com are slim. You can find in cities where you live cities where I live many cities city like particularly here in Palm Springs. You can swing a cat and hit a real gay realtor. You know so there are plenty of them around but there are plenty of cities where there are not you know there are more difficult to find and circling back to the whole where we're at today compared to where we were at in nineteen ninety one when when I became a residential realtor my partner and I before we became husbands went to San Diego and looking at a town home community and I walked in introduced myself snipe partner Merlin guys like Oh guys are in business together yeah and I was like Oh. This is so awkward I mean today. This is so awkward you know and the the other important point is home ownership provides economic stability in our lives right now about less than fifty percent of LGBTQ households are likely to own a home which is less than the current national rate of sixty five percent for heterosexual couples. You know so I think it's one of the biggest challenges that we find. Is You know what the rising wrens. You know it makes it almost almost impossible to save for a down payment a recent survey that we did though showed that most people believe you need twenty percent down to buy a home and you don't there are. FHA programs where you can buy a home for three to five percent down so we're always trying to educate our community. We have a booklet that we've written which is available on the website and it's available in almost all of the LGBTQ centers across the country and it's tips for the first time LGBTQ house fire so that's that's available. We do that sort of stuff but yeah. There's a lot more. There are so many there are so many how is it that we've been talking for fifty seven minutes because now there's so many there are so many things to ask about that literally from everything from like the housing crisis subprime mortgage. I mean we could really I could book for another seventy two hours but I feel very very satisfied with the conversation. We've had up until till this point and thank you again for your time. Yeah and I WANNA ask you before I send you back to your day to shout out Queiro. which is a person place in order thing that made you feel like you can be who you are today? Dr Roger The centers for spiritual living who taught let me to just imagine give yourself that slight possibility well. It's been a real pleasure talking to you and I hope you don't burn up into a small ash heap in palm springs right now. The the hundred and ten is gone. It's one hundred degrees here today percent humidity so you should come out here and we'll by the pool and continue our conversation. I I always like to come when it's that full hundred ten because there is nobody in town and I've got the whole place yes I will see you out in palm springs soon and thanks again for your time today yeah congratulations on your recent article in the New York. Thank you Matt I. I love everything you're doing and I so appreciate your time. I'm today thanks to you and Jordan both nice chatting with you. It really was you take care

San Diego navy Denver Duluth Minnesota Jeff Gabriel Estate Dot Com Minneapolis Palm Springs football New York Times Calgary Colorado Remax Teagan Raleigh North Carolina Queiroz Cami partner
"Black Sheep" Pt. 2 - Marjorie Congdon

Female Criminals

39:59 min | 2 years ago

"Black Sheep" Pt. 2 - Marjorie Congdon

"Due to the graphic nature of this woman's crimes listener discretion is advised. This episode includes discussions of suicide domestic violence arson and murder later that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children under the age of thirteen around eleven eleven o'clock on the night of march twenty fourth nineteen ninety one mark in vic lay awake unable to sleep when he heard a noise he glanced out his window to see his next door neighbor marjorie congdon hagan cutting through his backyard with her dog on a leash seeing her in the yard made mark suspicious he waited until she was gone then went outside to retrace her steps he found a kerosene soaked rag jammed under his window immediately. Mark called the police soon after he got the call. Billy ned of the pima county sheriff's department drove to mark's house house in the two years since marjorie moved to the tiny town of a ho arizona about fifteen mysterious fires had broken out in the area. If if marjorie really was trying to burn down mark's house then ned might finally have his arsonist ned ordered several of his police officers to park up and down mark street in unmarked cars mark two watched from his bedroom with the lights off so marjorie with think he was asleep sleep three hours later marjorie emerged from her house once more she lit a match and ignited the rag still lodged in mark's marks window from his vantage point in an unmarked police car ned snapped four photos of marjorie in the act inside ride. Mark took more pictures but he forgot to turn off his cameras flash. The light startled marjorie and she ran away. The police pursued food and in a matter of minutes marjorie was under arrest and yet officer ned barely had an inkling of what marjorie jury was capable of he'd soon discover that marjorie khandan hagen was not only a serial arsonist. She was an alleged serial l. murderer picture a murderer a gangster a thief. Did you picture a woman. We didn't think so- society associates men with dangerous chris crimes but what happens when the perpetrator is female every wednesday we examined the psychology motivations and atrocities of female email criminals hi i'm sammy ni- and i'm vanessa richardson and you're listening to female criminals a podcast original. This is our second episode on marjorie marjorie congdon whose life was dotted with a series of suspicious deaths and fires. She was a suspect in five separate murders crimes for which she's likely to never be convicted of even to this day at par cast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help is to leave a five star our review wherever you're listening it really does help we also have merchandise had to podcast dot com slash merch for more information so last week we covered the early life of marjorie congdon at sixteen she she was diagnosed with an antisocial personality disorder but never treated as an adult. She allegedly conspired with her husband roger caldwell to to murder her mother. Elizabeth congdon roger was sentenced to two lifetimes in prison. Marjorie was acquitted after merger is trial. She struck up affair with the married wally hagen. Wali's wife was living in an assisted care facility. Marjorie allegedly poisoned poisoned her during a visit within days while his wife was dead. This week will discuss marjorie life after she avoided conviction in three mysterious deaths prosecutors have never been able to prove marjorie had anything to do with killing her mother and her nurse likewise. She's never ever stood trial for the death of her third husband his first wife or her late elderly friend but marjorie is widely suspected to be a serial serial murderer at the age of forty seven marjorie was acquitted of all charges related to the death of her mother on july twenty first nineteen seventy-nine but her legal troubles were far from over for the past three years. She'd been locked in a civil suit with her sister and her own children. They believed marjorie murdered her mother elizabeth and sued to ensure that marjorie would never receive her inheritance. Marjorie injury was also making enemies within her new husband's family. She'd been in an ongoing affair with the married walter hagen but after his wife mysteriously he died on march thirtieth nineteen eighty. Marjorie made an enemy in his daughter. Nancy nancy believed that marjorie killed her mother while lee's first wife helen hagen but with only her suspicions to go by she didn't notify the police. There was no investigation and no charges were ever pressed crest. If marjorie had indeed killed helen she faced no consequences whatsoever. This was especially dangerous as marjorie. I was diagnosed with antisocial personality. Disorder at the age of sixteen. Vanessa is going to take over the psychology from here. Please note vanessa is not a licensed a psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks sammy clinical psychologist. Margarita tarkovsky explained in an article that people with a._p._d. Can learn to abide by societal rules when their actions consistently return appropriate consequences a criminal with a._p._d. A d is less likely to commit another crime if he or she receives a sentence but if that person gets away with their transgression they'll have no reason to to change their behavior a week. After his wife's death while he dropped by nancy's home unexpectedly he announced that he could only stay for a brief time he was dating margery now and she was waiting for him out in the car while he spoke with nancy. Nancy remembered how her mother had suspected an affair between wally and and marjorie at the time. Nancy dismissed her mother's suspicions thinking they were a paranoid symptom of alzheimer's disease now that it was too late. Nancy regretted not giving more weight to helen's claims soon. Marjorie drove a wedge between nancy and wally. He'd previously had a warm relationship with his children but for months while he grew distant nancy believed marjorie was turning him against her then nancy noticed that many of her mother's valuables including her wedding ring were missing. She was confident that marjorie had taken them. Nancy also discovered that wally he gave large amounts of money to marjorie. This was troubling as nancy worked multiple jobs to support her father. She was shocked to find that. Many of his bills were past. Do while marjorie enjoyed the fruits of nancy's labor according to the merck manual entry on antisocial personality disorder people with a._p._d. Not often bad with money. Their lack of impulse control means that they often make decisions without considering the long term impacts but nancy could never proved that marjorie was manipulating wally and stealing from him and even when she did occasionally catch margarine ally wally never wanted to hear about it it. He'd put his full trust in her. He couldn't be reasoned with even when his family was convinced. That marjorie was ruining his life. Wally married marjorie in valley city north dakota on august seventh nineteen eighty one a year and a half after helen's this death marjorie was forty nine years old twenty three years younger than her third husband. The couple told no one of their wedding plans until after they returned from their interstate road trip soon afterward the state of north dakota charged her with bigamy. She still hadn't filed for for divorce from roger her second husband who was serving two life sentences for murder. The bigamy charges weren't a big concern for marjorie. She and wally ali live together in minnesota and bigamy wasn't a serious enough crime for north dakota to have her extradited. The pair were content to ignore the charges and continue living their lives. Marjorie still remained legally married to roger while her marriage to wally wasn't recognized marjorie saen on no immediate issues with this psychiatrist. Roxanne dryden edwards explained that people with a._p._d. Often fail to plan ahead or to take responsibility responsibility for their own actions. This is a major factor in why so many people with untreated a._p._d. Commit crimes repeatedly. It's probably also part of the reason marjorie never bothered to sort out her legal marital issues in the summer of nineteen eighty two fifty year old marjorie and seventy three year old wally decided to move to a lovely lakeside house in order to afford it. They sold their current residence. On september first the buyers a family called the larson's wanted to move in right away but marjorie and wally convinced them to wait so they could finish some last minute renovations and on september twelve. The larson's entered their new home to review the renovations. They noted that the work was incomplete and shoddily don on in some cases. Marjorie walis changes had actually damaged the house strangely. The kitchen smelled strongly of gasoline on the morning of september fifteenth. The day that the larson's plan to move in the structure caught fire a neighbor. I spotted the smoke at six thirty thirty a._m. By that point the house was already engulfed in flames. He said it was damp and rainy. I remember and i thought gee that's kind of funny. Within fifteen minutes firefighters arrived at the scene as they fought the flames. They noticed how quickly the fire air spread typically an empty house takes longer to burn because it lacks furniture and other flammable materials that serve as kindling but on this wet rainy day the empty house soon became an inferno in spite of the firefighters best efforts. They were unable to save the structure structure that afternoon. After the fire was finally extinguished the fire marshall's investigators found crumple newspapers near the fireplace where or the blaze had originated when the larson's reported on the gasoline date smelled earlier. It was clear to investigators what had happened. Someone intentionally intentionally burned down the larson's house coming up next. We'll discuss marjorie arson charges. True crime is my passion but even i need the occasional break so when i feel like i need a mental pallet cleanser i pull out my phone and play. Ah best fiends best. Fiends is a really fun puzzle game. It's been a lot more challenging recently. I'm up to level one seventy five. I used to breeze through through levels pretty easily but it took me quite a while to clear level one sixty five idyllic island but that's what makes it so rewarding when you finally solve the puzzle right not only is best fiends fun to play but it's also accessible. You don't need an internet connection to play. I'll play it when i'm on an airplane or waiting to meet a friend i i think what i like. Most about best scenes is how relaxing it is. It brings me a sense of calm as i play it. Best fiends has one hundred million downloads globally and i can see why so if you have tried best means give it a try. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters to five star rated mobile game on the apple app store and google play download free on the apple app store or google play. That's friends without the our best. Veen's birthdays anniversaries holidays holidays. These are the important dates that most people tend to remember but the podcast network remembers important dates in true crime history every day my show today in true crime takes you back to the biggest events true crime that happened each day in history whether the crime is infamous or or just plain interesting. There's a crime story for every day of the year. September third two thousand twelve griselda blanco cocaine godmother mother was gunned down in columbia october ninth two thousand and two serial killer aileen wore knows declined her final meal and was executed ed november twenty ninth nineteen eighty-one natalie wood drowned on a weekend boat trip today and true crime is podcasts. I daily true crime podcast. You no longer have to wait for weeks to get your true crime fix with new episodes every day. You'll never run out of true. Crime content again and crime never takes a day off and now neither does podcast follow today in true crime for free on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts <music> now back to the story in september nineteen eighty two fifty year old marjorie congdon hagan sold her her home the same day the new homeowners were supposed to move in the house burned to the ground. It appeared to be a case of arson and police police immediately zeroed in on marjorie as their top suspect an article titled fire setting arson pyro mania and the forensic mental health health expert said that serial arsonists are often diagnosed with a._p._d. A separate study titled arson a disorder of impulse control noted that arson is often associated with poor impulse control one of the main symptoms of a p._d. In the weeks after the fire marjorie coundon hagan repeatedly called her insurance company to try to claim the payout from the fire however when the house burned down it already belonged to the the new buyers the larson's marjorie had no valid claim and her calls to the insurance company only made her look more suspicious to police the arson investigation wasn't marjorie is only legal problem. Her second husband roger was focused on getting out of prison. He had a team of of lawyers building a case that it was marjorie not roger who murdered elizabeth khandan the key to rogers original conviction was a fingerprint point that police pulled from an envelope whoever murdered elizabeth also stole a rare coin from her then mailed the coin from duluth minnesota to rogers roger home in colorado in nineteen seventy seven police pulled rogers thumbprint from the envelope as evidence that he'd stolen the coin and mailed that to himself but in nineteen eighty two five years after roger went to prison a fingerprint expert came forward and claimed that the print on on the envelope did not belong to roger. It's hard to say whether the original fingerprint expert lied or simply made a mistake but his testimony from the original trial was thrown out on september second nineteen eighty. Two roger was granted a retrial. This was disastrous for john. Santo the chief prosecutor in elizabeth's murder case the state had already seen their top suspect marjorie condon's acquitted. If raja was released as well they be oh for two convictions and even if roger proved marjorie had killed elizabeth she she couldn't be charged again. Due to double jeopardy laws plus desanto didn't wanna see rogers appeal go to court as cases like this were expensive so he offered a plea bargain in exchange for a confession roger would be released immediately having already served five years in prison this this way at least to santo could keep the successful conviction on the books roger accepted the deal but continued to maintain his innocence outside of court. He said what he had to to get out of prison. After his release roger moved to his hometown of latrobe pennsylvania and attempted to pick up the pieces says of his life he began dating but his alcohol fueled bouts of rage spurred him to beat his girlfriend he soon had several counts of domestic violence on his record in addition roger struggled to find employment and felt like the local people scorned him. It's hard to find ended job or make friends when you're a convicted murderer. Desperate for cash roger reached out to marjorie sister jennifer. He knew marjorie was still embroiled oiled in the lawsuit with her family. He told jennifer that he had key evidence. That would win the suit. He could prove that marjorie killed elizabeth breath. Khandan jennifer was intrigued but cautious she wanted to settle the lawsuit once and for all but on the other hand roger was drunk. Franck elizabeth's confessed killer and he'd recently been charged with beating up his girlfriend. Jennifer wasn't convinced that she should trust what roger had to say eh. She asked roger what kind of evidence he had but he refused to answer. His information wasn't free jennifer offered fifty thousand thousand dollars. If roger could guarantee that his evidence was convicted roger countered asking for at least one hundred thousand at this point ain't jennifer balked roger walked away from the negotiation table with nothing to this day. We still don't know what has persuasive evidence was does or if it even actually existed. Roger eventually committed suicide a few years later in the note found by police he wrote wrote. I didn't kill those girls or to my knowledge ever harm a soul in my life. It was strange for roger to claim he'd never harmed anyone one so soon after his domestic violence arrests but police didn't question the circumstances too closely his untimely death proved to be a boon for marjorie archery who no longer had to deal with charges of bigamy in another ongoing investigation on january fifteenth nineteen eighty-three police lisa obtained a warrant to search marjorie wali's house for any evidence connecting them to the larson's house fire four months before police soon found a flammable varnish that matched what was used inside the house then they uncovered records of numerous correspondences between marjorie and her insurance company three hours after the search began fifty one year old marjorie condon's hagen was arrested and charged with second in degree arson and insurance fraud marjorie arson trial began on december twelfth nineteen eighty-three her trial lasted through christmas this and new year's on january thirteenth nineteen eighty-four the jurors gave their verdict marjorie refused to look at the jury as they announced. They'd found her guilty. She was sentenced to two and a half years in prison and fined ten thousand dollars. Her lawyer tried to to protest at fifty. One years old. Marjorie had never been convicted of a previous crime. She was no threat to the community and didn't belong behind bars bars. This was technically true. Marjorie had been tried for murder but never convicted but the judge familiar with marjorie is history upheld the sentence marjorie spent twenty. One months in shock copy women's prison. She was fifty four when she was released early. For good behavior in addition marjorie finally settled her six year lawsuit over her mother's estate in nineteen eighty-four of her mother's eight eight million dollar fortune half went to marjorie sister jennifer two and a half million were split between marjorie children and the remaining one and a half million billion went to marjorie but it didn't go far as she had spent more than that in lawyer's fees after her released from prison surgery and wally hagen moved to arizona soon local firefighters saw sharp uptick in the number of fires in the area the the evidence pointed to arson but investigators had no leads about the identity of the fire starter then on march twenty fourth nineteen ninety-one and marjorie neighbor mark in vic broke the case wide open. He caught marjorie trying to burn down his house while he was inside when she was arrested. Police found matches in marjorie pocket. The next day police searched marjorie home and found kerosene lanterns and rags that were identical to the one jammed in mark's window once again fifty nine year old marjorie was charged with arson in light of how many of marjorie other neighbors had been victims of recent fires. Police believed marjorie was a pyromaniac. The minds is behind the fire by journalist melanie ben cosmai identified numerous possible motives for serial arson in addition to arson for profit other motives include revenge and pyro mania a psychological fascination with fire burning down marks home wouldn't benefit marjorie financially centrally but given her incendiary pattern of behavior. She may well have grown obsessed with the thrill of committing arson when the case eventually went to trial. Marjorie tried to explain away her behavior. She claimed she was only in mark's backyard because her dog needed to be walked and she didn't didn't want to be on a public street so late at night. Marjorie said that marks house was already on fire when she took the shortcut through his yard. She ran away away because she was scared. Marjorie insisted that she was the victim of a frame up. She claimed the police knew about her past history and planted the matches on her. She also repeatedly referenced her poor. Health arthritis made it impossible for her to light matches failing eyesight men she. We needed kerosene lamps to see in her dark home. She was far too infirm to open marks window and shove. A kerosene soaked claiming rag inside eight years earlier. During elizabeth condon's murder trial merger we had learned how to manipulate a jury sympathy now fourteen years later. She wasn't so successful on october. Twenty ninth nineteen ninety two the court found the sixty year old guilty of attempted did arson as a repeat offender marjorie stood to receive a much lengthier sentence and then there was the fact that homeowner mark indyk was inside the house when marjorie lit the fire the attempted murder bumped her charges up to a class two felony that to mend the judge would would be harsh with her. Marjorie was sentenced to fifteen years in prison. She countered that her husband wally was in poor health and needed a full time time caretaker. The judge granted marjorie a twenty four hour reprieve before the start of her sentence at one o'clock that afternoon. A police officer smelled gas as he walked past marjorie is home. He checked in with marjorie to see if everything was okay and she explained that she just uncooking lunch on her gas stove three hours later. Marjorie called wally son wally had passed away say earlier that day wally had complained. He was feeling fatigued and lay down for a nap when marjorie went to check on him a few hours later she she discovered that he was dead. Wally son asked if marjorie had called the police yet. Marjorie said nothing in reply. Her refusal used to answer left a pit in wally son stomach. After their conversation ended he immediately called the tucson police department to inform them of the suspicious circumstances of his father's death. Investigators arrived at the scene to find marjorie ready with supposed suicide note from wally. The police entered the note into evidence but they weren't ready to accept. It was real. Her behavior was all too suspicious and suicide didn't match that's the story. Marjorie reported to wally son. They still needed to review the scene of wali's death. Their investigation returned to cut hose coiled up outside the house. Police brought the hose inside and found it was the perfect length to connect from the gas stove to her bedroom investigators then questioned marjorie friends and neighbors one witness testified that they'd seen marjorie bring the hose inside her house earlier earlier that day the evidence was clear marjorie had intentionally asphyxiated wally with gas but marjorie tried to explain explain it all away per usual. She told the police that she couldn't handle life in prison and her husband couldn't live without her so they'd made you too mutual suicide pact according to marjorie she and wally. We're both supposed to officiate on the gas while he killed himself according according to their plan but when it was marjorie turn. She changed her mind at the last minute. The police didn't by marjorie story. One bit the same day wally died marjorie was arrested and charged with second degree murder but the state didn't have any concrete evidence to prove wally hadn't killed himself as marjorie claimed ad that marjorie was about to go to prison for different charges anyway and the police department didn't see any point in extending time and resources to prosecute marjorie. They dropped their charges on november nineteenth nineteen ninety three wall. All these murder case never made it to trial not only did marjorie allegedly get away with murder but the crime paid off financially wali's will left everything to his dear wife next we'll discuss marjorie time in prison and how she remained aimed legally entangled with walis family even after his death now the conclusion of our story on october thirtieth thirtieth nineteen ninety-two one day before sixty year old marjorie coundon hagan was supposed to begin a fifteen year prison sentence for arson arson her husband wally hagen died under highly suspicious circumstances while these children and the police all believed that marjorie the jury had murdered her husband but a lack of evidence and marjorie is looming prison sentence led police to drop the charges against her marjorie. We received her inheritance and got away. Scot-free nancy and walis other children didn't contest as well but they did sue for control control of walis body. They wanted him buried in the same plot as his first wife helen behind bars. Marjorie hired a lawyer to counter their suit. She insisted that she had a greater claim to walis body as his widow. Nancy's lawyer countered that because of anti bigamy laws marjorie and wally were never legally married while the civil trial was going on while he's children took their fight the press in an interview with the saint paul pioneer press they suggested that marjorie was complicit in the deaths of both of their parents but ultimately the lawsuit was was long expensive wall. His family was forced to settle marjorie agreed to receive half of walis body. He was cremated and his ashes were split. Nancy and the other children buried their half of the ashes with their mother while mercury fought with the outside world. She seemed to find peace behind bars. She got along well with her fellow inmates in fact she was an ideal prisoner. According to harvard medical medical school people with antisocial personality disorder don't see much value in following rules however if they're incentivized say oh by fear of punishment people with a._p._d. Can adapt and behave according to societal norms it seems that marjorie determined that the best way to coke with her sentence was to get through it as cleanly and quickly as possible on january fifth two thousand four after serving twelve years. There's of her fifteen year sentence. Marjorie was released. She was seventy two ordinarily a woman her age would put her criminal past behind winter and attempt to build a new life but marjorie never was an ordinary woman dr saba mater and psychiatrist faruk khan han studied elderly patients with personality disorders including a p._d. In their paper personality disorders in older adults diagnosis basis and management they found that often society expects older patients to grow out of their personality disorders but in actuality symptoms symptoms can actually become more severe as patients age in two thousand and four seventy two year old marjorie move to tucson's coronado uh-huh place condo community there. She met roger psomas. A septuagenarian who resided in a nearby assisted living facility. The two formed a fast friendship bonding over their love of marjorie is new pet greyhound blueberry. She eventually convinced sameth's to grant her power of attorney. Any over his finances by early. Two thousand seven marjorie handled all of roger's personal affairs including managing in his bank account weeks later on march first two thousand seven semis passed away. Suddenly margerie rushed to have his body eddie cremated before an autopsy could be performed. Her power of attorney privileges allowed her to legally make this determination without consulting his family. No cause of death was ever determined four days after sarah's death marjorie tried to transfer eleven thousand thousand dollars in funds to her own personal account but the transaction raised a red flag. It's hammas bank and was halted. Marjorie claimed named that she didn't realize she lost her legal authority over sampras finances after his death. She believes she still had the right to transfer his money to her. Account went on march twenty second two thousand seven police arrested seventy-four-year-old marjorie on charges of fraud and forgery when marjory was charged the greyhound adoption agency took back. Marjorie is beloved blueberry. She tried to sue the group for custody of the dog but a the judge threw out her case that was probably better for marjorie who had a higher stakes trial to prepare for her long and storied criminal history three meant that marjorie could no longer convincingly play the part of a kindly housewife unable to rely on juries sympathy. Marjorie accepted did a plea bargain in november two thousand eight. The seventy six year old was sentenced to three years of probation for the forgery and fraud charges because has police were unable to determine a cause of death for roger. Sammy's no charges were ever filed related to his demise. As she resumed her normal life marjorie was quiet and kept to herself accounts from friends and neighbors suggested that she avoided telling people her full name and never mentioned her colorful history but as much as marjorie wanted to disappear her past kept up with her the people of coronado place anonymously shared books and new stories with one another that detailed margaretha alleged crimes soon they all knew the story of elizabeth condon's is murder and marjorie suspected role in it according to marjorie neighbors after she lost blueberry marjorie adopted a new greyhound named raja which she doted on marjorie would take rajon daily walks ignoring the communities leash laws. None of her neighbors pressed the issue you they'd read all the newspapers and books and knew what happened to people. Marjorie didn't like but marjorie wasn't entirely scorned. She made friends with a few neighbors who would go on shopping. Expeditions meet for coffee and take long walks around the neighborhood with her. Few of these friends allowed their names is to be published as they wanted to avoid the media attention that came with knowing marjorie according to a list afford writing for artful living march talk probation officers required all of her friends to sign a legal release acknowledging that they understood and accepted the danger of getting close to a woman like marjorie in two thousand ten marjorie informed the courts that she'd begun to suffer from unspecified health problems. She was seventy eight. The terms of marjorie probation kept her from moving into an assisted living facility in november of two thousand ten. She filed for a reduction in her sentence so she could live in a nursing home. The judge declined her request by now. March manipulative behaviour was well known and well documented. He wasn't going to let himself be played. After the judge's refusal marjorie health took a sudden turn for the better her her health conditions disappeared almost overnight at the time of this recording. Marjorie is eighty seven years old. It's been nearly a decade since the end of her. Probation and mercury has never resided in an assisted living facility according to her friends and neighbors the eighty-seven-year-old is very independent went and in good health and spirits. She still lives in coronado place today. Marjorie childhood home glenn she mansion is owned owned by the university of minnesota duluth. The university opened the mansion two tours so guests can see the finery that the condon's families surrounded themselves within if in life and questioned tour guides about the murders that took place there marjorie condon's life has been chronicled in numerous books on onstage saint paul's history theater in saint paul minnesota ran the comedy glenshane for many years ringing music and laughs out of the dark true story today. Te marjorie has never been formally convicted of any murders nor has she served prison time for anything other within her to arson convictions. Marjorie lived her life without ever receiving treatment for antisocial personality disorder. If of her mother elizabeth had gotten marjorie the help she needed perhaps nearly half a dozen murders could have been prevented elizabeth congdon velma piazzolla ella walter and helen hagen and roger psomas all might have had very different fates instead elizabeth's desire to avoid scandal scandal led to as many as five debts plus countless fires and instances of fraud mental illness creates a ripple that travels outward award from the person who's diagnosed not only does it harm the afflicted person but its effects can change the lives of the friends family and everyone around the sufferer and so long as mental health issues are treated shameful secrets those who are flouted their friends and families and society as a whole suffer from the silent secret and thanks again for tuning into female criminals. We'll be back wednesday with a new episode. You can find more episodes besides of female criminals as well as all podcasts other shows on spotify or your favorite podcast directory. Several of you have asked how to help us if you enjoy the show. The best way to help is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll we'll see you next time. Female criminals was created by max. Cutler is a production of cutler media is part of the podcast network. It is produced by max jackson ron cutler with sound design by russell nash production assistance by ron shapiro and paul molitor additional production assistance by maggie admire and freddie beckley. This episode of female criminals was written by angela jorgensen and stars sammy ni- and vanessa richardson to be sure to check out my podcast today in true crime every day it covers a different true crime event it from history search and subscribed today and true crime on spotify and anywhere you listen to podcasts.

Te marjorie marjorie marjorie marjorie congdon marjorie wali marjorie condon marjorie khandan hagen marjorie congdon hagan marjorie congdon marjorie jury Marjorie walis marjorie health arson marjorie pocket marjorie saen wally roger helen hagen antisocial personality disorde
Miromatrix CEO Jeff Ross Shares the Bold Plan to Eliminate the Organ Transplant Waiting List

MedTech Talk Podcast

31:21 min | 2 years ago

Miromatrix CEO Jeff Ross Shares the Bold Plan to Eliminate the Organ Transplant Waiting List

"Don't. Hey, Tom salami. Welcome back to med tech talk episode number one twenty two it's great to have you back. Happy new year. It's great to be back on the podcast. I had a wonderful break. I hope you did the same made a brief stop at Jp Morgan earlier this week saw some of you there. We could have spent more time to see more. But we'll see you on may thirtieth at our med tech conference in Minneapolis, more news on that in a minute. I our guest today is Jeff Ross he is the CEO very cool regenerative medicine company called Miro matrix. Let Jeff tell you about it's technology, but it's a fabulous story in. Jeff's Scott, an interesting path to the CEO office. But before we get into the story. I wanted to tell you a little bit more about the mental conference again, it's happening on may thirtieth day of the conference. If you recall, though, will be starting on may twenty ninth with an opening reception. It's going to be open to everyone in attendance. So it'll be a great night of networking. That way you can hit the ground running on may circus at meta conference. Make sure you go to meta conference dot com to register. There is a code. I usually save these little buggers for the end of the podcast as of sort of Easter egg for folks. But if you type in med tech talk as you register you'll save two hundred dollars off the current discount rate of ninety five you'll basically get into the conference for half price. This is only good until the end of January. So would love to get you on our list of attendees, the list is growing by the day with love to have you on that list? So please register sooner make sure you get to it before the end of this month. I also want to announce a keynote speaker let you know who that is during the break, but it's a great name. Very proud to have them up on the Genta and up on the stage. So please do join us on may thirtieth at dmed tech conference. Now, let's get into this podcast with Jeff Ross of mirrow matrix. Jeff Ross welcome to the midtech talk podcast, Tom. It's a pleasure to be here. So I know you're matrix Yukon yourself, a biotech company on your website. But this is the med tech talk podcast than you are in Minnesota. So for all those reasons and much more. I'd like to claim you as a company for the day is that. Okay. That's okay. With me. And you were to guidance. So you got that lineage as well. It's actually pretty common. I mean, this this topic comes up more than you think from the standpoint in we'll get into the technology little bit later, the ideal creating transplantable Oregon because unlike straight biotech where you may be given an injection or something now we're dealing with something that wants to be implanted. So I think it's very fair that we kind of straddle both of those fields. That's great. Great. I'm going you. You're so well normally I start off with learning but about guest, but because you're mineral matrix may not be known by some tell us a bit about what the company does. And what your technology is? So our mission is to eliminate the organ transplant waiting list in the way that we really do that is our technology that's called perfusion desalinization in resellers ation. And that's the notion of being able to take a solid organ in our case one that's going to be naturally discarded anyways from a pig, and we refuse a mild detergent through it, which removes all the cellular material leaving you with this. Perfect. Scaffold kind of say, it's analogous to remodeling your house. If you think about the drywall as cells, we essentially able to go in and take that out, but just like your house architectures left there. So kitchen still a kitchen the plumbing still intact? It's now we've got this perfect scaffold overhaul Oregon, and the next step is to reanimate that by fusing human cells into it. And our goal is to be able to use technology to create every type of organ inside the body whether that sell liver along kidney heart to really solve this chronic shortage of organs that exists today. The biologist the mode didn't go past his cO biology. But what is left it? Once you remove the salesman. That sounds like pretty much everything. Yeah. There's actually a lot more than you think that remains there, and it's it's really the proteins, and it's termed extra cellular matrix. It's a lot of college in to get technical. You know, pro glide cans other types of proteins in substrates that really make it up, but it's kind of amazing process. Right. I mean, if you think about all the way back to development, we all came from essentially one cell, and as at cells, the cell divides, it needs to create proteins and matrix around it to give structure to the whole organism and more specifically are organs. So the cells actually secrete and make this perfect matrix that they wanna live in. And I'd say twenty years ago. Everyone thought that the seller matrix was just this kind of product it. It didn't have any activity in with the last twenty years really taught us is there's a there's enormous activity with that matrix. And to be able to keep that in its pristine state really allows you to get the function of cells back to the level that you'd need to bio engineer, functional tissue. So if you would work through the process, but you say the organism selves come from animals that have pigs at have been already part of the food system. Have already been slaughtered for food. Is that correct? That's that's absolutely correct. Our technology. We could use human cadaver organs as well. But the challenge with those is that you get you would source every age range in every disease state associated with it. And as I just mentioned, the cells, really interact with the matrix the matrix is damaged that has an effect on the cells that are actually put back in and you can't get that same level of functionality with it. So we prefer to use forcing our? Our pig organs as the starting point as you pointed out, I mean every day in America, there's thousands and thousands of organs that are primarily discarded. And in our process, we want to reuse those in the way that it works is we source orients from various slaughter houses. Those in are sent to us in able to profuse a mild detergent through them, which again, just kind of goes into solves all this other material, but leaves that matrix perfectly intact mini of kind of called it a ghost, Oregon. If you see him, they're all white, but you're able to still voca Kanye late them are profusely solution through the vascular. And and you can see the Oregon in all the vessels actually still completely intact. Images on your website are pretty stark in it's a mural matrix dot com in my RO matrix. So what is the origin of the technology with windows? The company was founded in two thousand nine what what happened before that. That's right. So this technology actually came out at the university of Minnesota. The two inventors were Doris Taylor. And Harold dot was actually endorsed Taylor's lab at that point. And they were really trying to look at this notion of regenerative. Medicine in this notion of how do you create viable tissue in what regenerative medicine is really about is is how do we move from treating diseases to now curing diseases and in what they were. Specifically looking at is as we discussed before the body creates these proteins gaffe alled, and and how do you how can you take advantage of up to that point? People have tried to take advantage of that. And they use a process called immersion. Deceleration? That's where you take tissue. You'd put it in a deceleration solution in it would essentially diffused from the outside end. So it kind of diffuse him, but it limited to really thin substrates have just a couple couple millimeters thick what Doris and Harold decided to do as what if we went from the inside out. So what if we used a vascular her and a cavity to profuse detergent in try to dissolve that Celio material? Could we keep the perfect scaffold in place? And what they found is they were successful in that really launched tissue engineering from these south straits to something that was clinically relevant something that could start to hold that promise to really solve this large on med clinical need. So they published on that in nature medicine in two thousand eight and that's where they actually took a hard out of a rat. Profusion decelerating it put it in a bio reactor, and what a bio reactor is is just kind of a fancy word for a sterile environment where you can control the inputs and outputs of it. And they perfumed at pumped a mild solution through at a cell culture solution through it to keep the cells alive seated it with cardio Myocytes, our heart cells in eight days later started beaten, again, this really shocked the whole tissue engineering field because as I mentioned, it took something from thin substrates or thin sheets to suddenly whole organs demonstrated. The ability of put cells Bank in there and get some level of function. Backout? So we license that technology in two thousand nine spun out mural matrix from the university of Minnesota and have been raising funds and advancing the technology towards the clinic ever since I mean, what is the origin of the name euro metrics. Yeah, interesting story there. So the inventor, Doris Taylor her favorite painters Moreau. So when we when we first were in discussions with her and kind of looking at. You know, what a good name would be. She wanted something that kind of had that abstract feel and something that was different in revolutionary, and that's how we came up with Miro or Miro and then added matrix. And as as it would be to found later Moreau are Miro is Latin for wonder as well. So we kind of has to meets both from that, you know, the painter standpoint, but also that Latin so if you think about Miro or wonder matrix, you know, it's really about the power of the matrix that were able to harness to be able to create these regenerative medicine solutions is your approach to superiority, mud be more effective than efforts to to grow these organisms grow these tissues using obviously very Burs attempts to do that. I mean, I could see the benefits of working with organ that's already created. But then you get into supply and things like that. But what is your what is your advantage in versus other regenerative medicine companies? Chair share? If you really look at the space, I'll tell you. There's two other kind of viable technologies that have really looked at how do we solve this need? And I think it's healthy for the field that there's so many people looking at this because it is a huge unmet need the first is three D printing. So we hear a lot about three d printing, I think it has a lot of appeal in the sense of of how the technology can be used and utilize that visualization, but you know, the challenges is that when we talk about decelerating a whole organ, if we break that down there's over one hundred different proteins at existence the Oregon itself, so one is spatially how'd you print those in the appropriate spatial orientation? But then you also have to look at the vascular, which is really key is at vascular system because most cells are very close proximity to capillary bed, and if you're not able to print that level of definition, you're never able to feed the Salvator able to put back into it. So again, I think three D printing has great appeal and in his working well for you know, simpler. Or structures. But really when I think about how it goes into a whole Oregon in the complex city in the micro structure in how cells are responding to those micro environments. There's really a long way to go in my opinion before three D print he'll be ready to to print whole organs. And then the other approach is genetic modification. So the notion is instead of taking an organ that was going to be discarded out of a pay. What if we genetically modified that pig? So now, we're able to transplant that directly into a patient, and there's multiple groups working on this pro-choice well from the standpoint of trying to identify the appropriate genes we need to knock out. So that when you try to place it back into a human. There won't be an immune response is really Gino transplantation, really looking at it over the last twenty years. I'd say some great advancement in the fields like crisper and other things have really pushed this to the forefront. And they're making good progress. But they're still not there today in terms of knocking out our denting the number of genes, you really need to knock out to make that available to take that directly from a pig. Place at into a human. And if you look at this at the end of the day, let's say we're both successful. A really don't see the day that genetic modification can get to the point where you're able to take that Oregon out of a pig place. It back into a human and have no immunosuppression. I think ultimately, you know, our advantage of our technology. Profusion deceleration is that promise of one day of deceleration, a whole Oregon, and then placing a patient's own cells back into that Oregon. So now, you can have that Oregon that suited primarily just for that patient Noam, you know, suppression. Now, we're years away from that still. But that is the end goal and the end promise is to not only solve the transplant need. But also solvent in a way that we can eliminate immunosuppression in Mira. Major surprisingly close to to working in human surprising to me. Noted in an article I read about but read about you talked about as if we're ten or fifteen years away from being able to create these organs, but but you're certainly lock closer than that. Give us an update on your on your pipeline. Absolutely. You I get this question a lot. And it's you know, this technology looks really needed. It's almost I fi. But to your point that you just said, you know, it's twenty years out or Salvin inequitably remind people know we're much closer than that. In the way, that we did this is we kinda of wristed in in the steps along the way with the notion of our end goal is to create transplantable organs. But we looked at what was what what's the first step that we need to prove out. The first step was really, can we take an organ out of a pig decelerating it and will that be tolerated by by humans without any immune responses or any issues associated with it. So for that we actually created our first two commercial products that we already commercialized called bureau mash, which is for soft tissue reinforcement mural Derm, which is used for wound care now at the same time, we saw large market needs. We just didn't go after these to solve that question. We saw market need and the ability to demonstrate that our technology is viable in that, you know, we're not gonna have an immune related response. So by commercializing, those we demonstrated that we can control the source we can bring Oregon's into our facility, we can affectively profusion decelerating those create products today. And now thousands of patients have implant. Did with profusion decelerated hold livers. With great success associated with it. So we directed to that point. So we're comfortable starting with that sub starting with that material. And now the next step is how do you demonstrate that you can get functional vascular what I mean by that is if we're not able to Revaz colorized, I talked about those vascular conduits that remain in their essentially the plumbing of the Oregon if we can't put the endothelial cells back on the surface of those in basically place that back into a large animal model in anastomosis in that means sewing it back in and then having the native blood profuse through it. There's really no way to ever engineer an Oregon because the vascular is really our supply train, it it brings nutrients to ourselves in takes waste away. So that was really a key feature as well. So we demonstrate that we can we can successfully Revaz realize it now, we're in the middle of adding in livers are lead Oregon with over forty thousand patients annually who die of end stage liver failure without any other types of therapies that are. There. There's no other drugs. There's no dialysis there's no devices. So essentially, there's no alternatives for those patients. You know that notion of of developing liver first, and then our next step with that is adding in Pata sites in the liver specific cells to prove out that we have functionality in that's going to lead us into submitting that to the FDA, hopefully, human clinical studies, and what's the timeline on the Unical sodas is twenty twenty what I read. Yes. So right now, it's towards the what we're targeting as early as the end of twenty twenty. So if things continue to go is as well as they have we should be in a position by the end of twenty twenty to initiate, human clinical studies. Now, it's still depends on the agency and other things along the way. But I think what it does demonstrate is just how close we are. And how fast moving towards the clinic earlier quick break from this podcast for an update on the conference. I am extremely proud and pleased to announce but actually McEvoy executive vice president worldwide chairman of mental devices for Johnson Johnson is agreed to give the keynote talker. It'd be the guest of keynote interview. The mental conference on may thirtieth over excited to have actually McEvoy there. I've had the opportunities to interview her a few times at our ophthalmology events, and she just brings so much the conversation so very excited to have actually McEvoy up onstage. Please do join us at midtech conference again at the conference is taking place in may thirtieth. But on may twenty nine we will have an opening networking -ception reception that that you won't want so go to med tech conference dot com. Use the midtech talk code as I mentioned up top. You'll save a whole lot of now. Let's get back into this conversation. Like any other good, meta cure likely engaging earlier with payers to understand how their new, oh, they've your technology. Can you give us some insights on those conversations? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, that's a critical question. I think with any type of midtech product is is reimbursement. We are fortunate from the standpoint that there's an existing DR G code associated with transplants. But the challenge with that is that's a cat of Eric transplant. So there's still a little on known of of exactly how it is going to be treated by the payer in the end. I think we are in a very fortunate situation in some of the payers, I've talked to is the fact of the organs that were going after again livers are lead Oregon. Today, they have programs in trying to look at how they get more living donors because of the cost savings benefits associated with providing these solutions to patients as opposed you know, to ICU treatment, and in long term care as at patient, unfortunately, slowly declines, so I think we're in a good position in terms of the health benefits and the cost savings to the healthcare system as we look at these organs to new problem, obviously proving move there's value in what you do thirty being done in Tony valued. Yeah. And I think the other area. So our second lead Oregon is actually kidney. So today, there's almost a half a million patients on dialysis, and you know, the great thing about dialysis is therapy. That keeps the patients alive the downside of dialysis is if you look at the five year survivability of dialysis it's about thirty five percent. If you look at the five year survivability of a transplant of a patient with. Who got received a transplantable kidney? You know, the five-year survive abilities over ninety percent. So it's just a star contrast over you know, what these organs could do if we're able to achieve that same level of function as a cat of Eric Oregon paternity mentioned earlier working with or the issues with human organs donated organs. But if you had a healthy organiser an opportunity few in the future to to clear, those organs out of the cells in basically, reconstruct them away in a create an organ that would be accepted by more acceptable by a person's body in by by host yet. You know, certainly, it's an open question. But I think what we've demonstrated by commercializing our first products, mirrow mashing marrow. Derm is that ability of once you decelerating that Oregon you've really pulled away from you know, you've you've extracted out those cross species antigens are things that the immune system is going to react to. So I think we have good. Good. Preliminary clinical data to demonstrate that does not really gonna be an issue there. So I I don't think there's a big need to try to find a human source because again what we don't want to compete with is categoric human supply today. I mean, we, you know, the the number of patients who are able to receive Oregon today while limited we want that to continue to go on we want to be able to serve those patients who can't receive a transplant or can't even make the list today to provide a new source of group point. Let's talk a bit about about financing how much money heavy rain investors, and can you identify some of your investors. I know you raised around recently that included or strategic that has at least at the point of the report did not want to be dented. You knew shed any light on that. Yeah. So today, we've raised about forty seven million dollars and with that we've any able to commercialize those two products. So got a good track record on on. What we've been able to do with the funds that we've raised just recently closed up around as you mentioned last summer, which is really dedicated towards advancing our whole organ programs transplantable liver and transplantable kidney. And with that we did have a large strategic multibillion dollar company that came in. But unfortunate at this point. I can't they still want to remain confidential. At this point. I think they'll come a day where where we'll be able to release that information. But for the time being we have to keep that confidential. I was gonna say I think what that does is it does further validate the technology though. Oh to start to see some of these strategic come in and just that interest, which I think highlights, you know, the level of data that we've generated and how much we continue to derail the technology journal agree point. What does the company's long-term future look like, and I want to get into your background too. But I'm just curious to this point you're raising money from strategic. She don't say who it is. But I don't know if it's a mental company or a pharma company is a is is do see an acquisition being likley Oakham from one of those two types of players or how does a mural matrix play out or or end up where does it end up five years from now. Right. I think we're fortunate in the fact of as in the intro, you talked about, you know, Mantech biotech. I think we're suitors for both of those rights certainly have interest from tech companies in certainly have interest as well. From biotech companies. You know, if I look forward, and you never really can totally predict where you get to. But I would say it, you know, in five years, we're in the cloud. It's either going to be an acquisition or an IPO was what had looked like for the likely scenarios of exit. There would be welcome. Sure. So let's talk a bit about you. I mean, how did you end up in? Well, you're in the med tech industry. But now you're in the biotech slash Mantech industry. What what brought you into this into this deal? You know, Tom, I've always been dedicated towards helping people. So I think as I look at my studies as I look at my jobs, and my career Pat was really driven by how do you have an impact? How are you able to create therapies in how people long term, I think that's really driven me to where I am today. And where did your your career star? Would you go to college? And how did you enter the tech industry? Yeah. So I if I undergraduate was in at the university of Minnesota Duluth, you imagine. How cold it is up there except tunnels up there to stay out of the snow in the winter. But great undergrad great exposure to research, and I was really when I came out of. Undergrad I was kind of torn again driven by that fact of wanting to help people and in didn't know if I wanted to go to med school or staying research, I had done research all throw my undergrad was really intrigued by it and decide to take a couple of years and just do research and try to flush this out. And at the end of it would my piffle kinda came at the end after I had at followed or watched a couple of doctors and interacted with them was that was really driven me about medicine in my appeal for is how can you create therapy? So really alternately have your highest impact and help people is not necessarily a face to face interaction, which is great for the physicians who do that every day, but it's pretty powerful to think about the ability to create new therapies that can impact, you know, not just hundreds or thousands of patients, but potentially millions of patients so that then led me into graduate school as a masters for biomedical engineering. Once I got my masters. I went and worked at guidance. And was very fortunate early on lead up a biologic division for a for a device company really looking at stem cell therapy for heart failure in different techniques. You know, because we had access to all devices and other things can you start to change things using devices that may help stem cells in graft. Phenomenal couple years there as it was great. I give a lot of people advice that you know, if you're able to work for a large company early on in your career. It's actually a great exercise 'cause you can learn about culture, you learn about structure a lot of really good things. So I was there for a couple years decided to go back and get my doctorate in genetics cell biology and molecular biology and really studied stem cells a little bit further in a further deep dive into regenerative medicine in that ability to engineer new living tissue out say his is really what my doctorate was about worked for Athens for a while which was a stem cell company in instill is on kind of looking at various tweaks on the technology for different applications in also kind of scale up after athritis in graduate school went on and worked at cer- Motic says the director of RND, which was a great time as well. Another mid stage public company at this point, but really focused on how could you? Change using chemistry in different types of biologic processes, the surface of devices to get them more biologic in nature, and then what what mural matrix really brought together as both sides of brought together device side. If you think about extra seller matrix it brought together the stem cell side from all my research and studies and other things in kind of brought all that together as the perfect fit. So very fortunate to have found that career path that led me in the direction that it did, you know, you didn't come aboard as joined the vice president of product development. What was what went into that decision to to join a company that was on an exciting. I'm sure there was a lot of risk involved at the time, sir medics as you mentioned as a as a good company stable company. Absolutely know surmise was going really well had a great career path there as well. There's kind of funny story. I got I got a call one day from a head hunter. And basically said, you know, I keep bumping into your name in regenerative medicine. Would you be interested in talking? No, I'm really happy in the position that at. And then basically said by this you got to hear about this technologist. All right. What what exactly is this technology in describe the technology coming out of the university of Minnesota with Doris and in Harold tour, which I was familiar with said. All right. You're right. We absolutely need to talk. And in what it came down to in Tom to your point. There was certainly risk. I mean, when I joined I think we had two hundred thousand dollars that was raised by the CEO at that point. You know, you're you're less than six months, you know, from being cash out when I thought about an thought about core values. I thought about what really drives me while patients and talked obviously my wife about this as well. And would it came down to was this simple question or statement in? That is someday when they transplanted the first organ into a patient to save them using this technology could you live with yourself if you weren't part of that journey and the answer was no way. So the next day kind of signed up, and it's been a great journey ever since two point of view, and you became. CEO last year. What was the transition? Like, you're you're you're not a sales guy. You're not a marketing person this is a non of a unprecedented route, but but an unusual route to to the CEO's office. It's been great. It's been a great learning experience of surrounded by really strong people all the way around to learn areas, you know, that that haven't either had exposure to in the past are needed more experience at say, most of my career has really built up to this point, though, if you look at a lot of my roles men of put in management, very early on the exposed to different aspects of company in early on mural matrix, two I took on many of those roles and in commercializing our first products from the regulatory side of the manufacturing side to the quality side. So I think that really grew up in into really allowing me to fit that position while we'll find question, let's talk just a bit about the transition to COO role. Do you have any advice for folks to becoming CEO any books that you read any workshops, you attended any great? Conferences, you you visited that that helps you do your job better. I like to read up on a lot of things, I think in terms of management management style. I think there's always more things to learn. I think what intrigues you about CEO is kind of like being a scientist in the fact that you're always looking for new techniques new ways to learn new ways to analyze a great book that I read recently was mastering leadership, just great dynamics in terms of management management structure, and using some tools to be able to really, you know, how do you maximize your performance only you? But also, how do you grow great team? So I think that some of the keys to being a CEO is knowing that you can't do everything you've got to put a solid team in place to really be able to execute and be accountable to growth story. Can't wait to hear more about it. And thanks for joining us today. Just thank you, Tom. I appreciate the conversation. Rubs up our very first podcast with two thousand nine hundred. And thank you for returning. It's great to have you here. She wouldn't mind doing a few favors telling a colleague about the podcast describing to the podcast giving a review of the podcast or just reaching out to me. I am at midtech, Tom that's on Twitter or you can Email me, Tom at health dot com. That's where it health followed by letters EEG, Y dot com. Health G produces this podcast. And of course, the med tech conference really hope to see you there on may twenty ninth slash may thirtieth as I mentioned during the break, we're very pleased to have Ashley McEvoy of Johnson and Johnson as our first she note guest will likely have more now for you in the very near future about panels and other discussion. So it's going to be a great day are co chairs, Leslie Trig, and Kirk Nielsen have been working tremendously hard on this program. And I know you will enjoy it. So make sure you use the code mentioned, the top med tech talk. It'll save you. One hundred dollars off off an already discounted price, and you can get into meta conference for nearly half price or go to midtech conference dot com. Register now before the end of the month and save yourself a whole lot of money. And of course, tune in next time for another great tale of innovation on, the med tech talk. August.

Oregon Oregon Tom salami CEO university of Minnesota Jeff Ross Harold dot engineer Doris Taylor Ashley McEvoy Minneapolis immunosuppression nature medicine Jp Morgan Minnesota Genta Johnson Johnson America
WJC Preview w/ Dave Starman

All The Kings Men

30:44 min | 10 months ago

WJC Preview w/ Dave Starman

"You're listening to an la kings podcast for more episodes of this and every other kings program visit la kings dot com slash podcast process. Whatever score a power. Play goal in an already party for team. Usa it's one. You're listening to all the king's men the official podcast of the la kings. Arthur kelly of throws it trickling through. These thirty party continues. Its three nothing erica. Now here's your host jesse cohen. Welcome at king's fans jesse cohen. This is all the king's men presented by manscaping an official partner of the la kings thanks to this revolutionary company manscaping accidents or a thing of the past. Just get yourself manscaping. Perfect package three point inside. You'll find products like their lawnmower. Three point which is advanced skin safe technology. So this won't cut you everything you need to keep trimmed and smelling nice as in the perfect package three point. Oh and you can get twenty percents off plus free shipping with the code kingsman at manscaping dot com. That's manscaping dot com and use the code kingsman now. The twenty twenty one world. Junior championship is less than two weeks away. The kings have plenty of high pri- profile prospects appearing in the tournament. The actual network has the exclusive home for the tournament. Here in the good ole usa. And dave starman will be on the mike calling those games and he joins us on the episode today. The world junior tournament is just a few weeks away and to discuss it. He's not just a man. He's dave starman. How're you doing today. dave. I am doing great jesse how you doing. I'm excellent thank you. The nhl network is the exclusive home for the world juniors tournament here in the us. Dave you're going to be on the call for all the team. Usa games so you obviously have experienced not only with the world junior championship but also with team usa. It's been it's been a great run. I remember when we did our first tournament in two thousand nine any network just acquired the exclusive rights to do original programming regarding the production of the road. Junior tournament always been picked up by different entities but it never really had been carried by any any of the united states and nhl network picked it up just for team. Usa's games and i was on that first group along with matt. Mcconnell who play by plays play by play voice to the arizona. Coyotes and fred clutches doing ringside for us and that was a tournament where canada won the tournament in ottawa. It was it was a lot of fun and we thought to ourselves. Where would it be cool to do one or two of these things. What are unique experience. Because we've all grown up hearing about it and now this is year thirteen. I'm the last man standing from that original crew from any aspect whether it be production or broadcast or whatever and it's been awesome to go through. I've seen the growth of usa hockey and its players and its programs through how well this program at the u. Twenty level has matured during the world junior championships in gold medal. Silver medals bronze medals the amount of players that have gone to play in the nhl. It has been an absolute whirlwind. And i i can do this forever. It's it's the greatest tournament the world. So obviously it's a huge tournament and gets a lot of attention but out here in southern california. This is king's podcast out here. In southern california usually the king season is underway right. The tournament happens in the midst of the nhl season. It happens over the holidays ending the past the kings of not had a ton of high ranked you know premium prospects that have appeared in this tournament at least certainly not a in recent history during the sort of lombardi era they were trading away a lot of first round picks and young talent To make those cup runs and obviously guys like Are not having an opportunity to appear in that tournament this season and last season or say last year and this year The kings find themselves with a number of prospects appearing in this tournament and last year for team. Usa there was a lot of hype for arthur. Kelly of and alex turcott. And i don't consider myself even a novice when it comes to talking about miro junior championships so i'm just taking taking taking completely for granted that everything i read in every complaint i see is correct in one of the complaints was that alexander got in arthur. Kelly were not deployed correctly. We're not used correctly Is that the sort of thing that can disrupt us a teams tournament at the at the wjc. And what can we expect from the to those young men this timer. Let's let's start with question. One is too big questions. That's all good. Let's let's go the first part of that you might have to revive. The second part of that is here. On the potted omaha my brain's getting a little but when it starts to employing people properly what the world junior tournament is is a lot of really good players. A lot of really good teams in you can make a case that every player on that world junior team might be the best player on the team that is coming trump. There's only so many pox for all those great egg is and the biggest thing that has to happen for the world. Junior team of any country be successful especially the big ones with all that high end skill is everybody's gonna buy into their role so if you're a top line center your junior team or your college team you come to the world junior team and now you're going to be the number. Three senators kill penalties. If you don't buy in it might as well go home because it's just not gonna work. And that is the biggest challenge for the for the player. Development staffed biggest for the personnel staff for the coaching staff is to get these players that come in that are so high end guys on their respective teams to understand the role that they're gonna play if you look back to the two thousand fourteen that first gold medal team. The fourth line of that team was made up. First liners on their respective teams guys. Like jake gala wisconsin and david booth at at michigan state and greg moore at main. I mean those are all high end. Guys that accepted their role played them and the us came home with their first gold medal. Ever at the world juniors and that's been the story of all of our world junior teams that have been really successful. Now take another side of the story in two thousand fifteen. The only time that i wasn't in the booth there was actually ringside wasn't a role. I was thrilled with but it gave me a great opportunity to hear a couple of things. That maybe i shouldn't have but there were times where players would be coming off. The ice walked right past towards addressing. Your and i'd hear guys grumbling about their ice time. That doesn't fly at the road. Juniors the and has got to be complete or doesn't work. that fifteen was a train wreck. So i think that if if you hear those things and a lot of fan bases may say hey. Our guys aren't getting used properly or or whatever the case is i. I don't like to hear that stuff. Here's the deal. The coaching staff has got really five or six days to put the team together. Then you get a couple of exhibition games and then you play seven games in twelve days. It's upon the players to buy in. Its upon the coaching staff to get the players understand. What their roles are if the players don't want to buy in on them because that tournament can be a career launcher for a lot of young players read under the career launching aspect. Let's focus in a little bit more on the coaching. Because as you mentioned what did you say. Seven games in twelve days or seven games at eleven twelve days. Yep that's an incredibly short amount of time to play an incredibly important amount of games. How much control does a coaching staff have on the the mood and the buying of a team i mean it's it's an incredibly high stakes period with not a lot of time to prepare execute. The i think they have a ton because all starts during the summer development camp where you're bringing in forty players in your starting to take luck and starting to whittle down to what could be last twenty eight or twenty nine that you might bring back for the evil camp or maybe even less number than that where you might make two or three cuts and then pick your team. And i think that the core of the team is known. Probably when he gets to at summer camp they they. They'll probably have identified their top line. Forward our top five d and more than likely goalies. And then it's a matter of where you're feeling the depth of the roster and i don't know a coach out there that's not going to be incredibly honest with the players coming in to explain jim. What is expected of where they might fit now. There have been great stories about players that have moved up in the lineup. At different tournaments they might have been slotted in one way jason zacher who play the job for a long time like i remember him on on his first world unity when he was just a kid and he was a guy that just played his way up through the lineup into a bigger role. Danny kristo is the same way. Who was a star at the university of north dakota who and his first junior team is a pretty young kid so so there are times where it were guys. Give me much more versatile and playthrough tyler johnson's another great example in tampa bay is tremendous any junk career. I mean he came in as a pretty undersize guy The first time around and he became a real key component in a gold. Win saskatoon in two thousand ten for dean blais so. I think that the players have to have that great understanding of what's going on. The coaches has a huge influence on making these players. Understand what their role is like. I said if if you offer to spot of the world junior team and you told listen you're probably a bottom six guy penalty kill guy and a depth guy who can play your way up if for some reason guys are holding their spots and you are resigned to that depth. Throw it. you don't buy new it. That's your issue but it's it's certainly laid out for you before you get there. We talked to alex turcott a few days ago and we asked him. You know obviously one player only has so much impact on the performance of the entire team. We know what happened last season so we asked him for him. What does a successful tournament. Look like what does he have to do. Personally to to feel like the entire enterprise was a success and gave exactly the kind of answer. You'd want right. Take it one game at a time. Two hundred foot games minutes of effort etcetera. But i'm curious after last season's Surprisingly disappointing turnout for team usa. I guess i would say what what to you. Looks like a successful tournament for alec. Circa i think for him. It's a matter of playing his game. I the cliches are all good and they all matter. The reason cliche becomes a cliche is because there's a lot of truth to it right and but i think for turcott. It's a matter of plane. His game he's a good two hundred foot player. Who i think has gotten better at his own is a guy that can score like. I was in baltimore in the early nineties doing some some video work and color on the radio with kenny albert and alfred turcott. His dad was there and alfie was a tremendous player. A great hands really smart good speed. This is a guy that can score from almost anywhere the offensive zone and make plays to create his own scoring chances. There's a little bit of that in the young cod as well and there are times where i see him. Grab a pocket digging on edges and crossover real quick and go and it reminds me of alfie and the one thing that the lineage there is the fact that they have great hands and great vision. And i think for him. It's just a matter of using his skills to make himself not only factor with the park but making self a factor without the puck. He's a kid that can play fast and when he is getting the places i when he is getting into scoring opportunities quickly when he is defending well on his own zone defending hard disown zone which was always a mantra of coach in college. Twenty granada wisconsin and tony. Granato a great defender that that played hard his own end and created offense. Chances i think for her got. That's a big part of the evolution of him as a player is learning how to defend hard his own ending really good down below the dots in his own at having those good defense or seguin translate for him to offense segments and some more scoring. Let's go to his partner. Arthur kelly of another forward from the from the king's prospect ranks is going to be playing for team. Usa to knock on kelly of and it's not much of a knock at grant us taking early in the second round but the non that he's basically just a shooter right. He doesn't have a great work ethic he doesn't play defense he can't pass every time. I see clips of this kid. It runs completely counter to everything. I've heard about him. It'll be a highlight where he sets an incredible pass or he makes a great defensive play. Or he's hustling to finish a player. Finish check or something so in what is what is a guy like arthur callie of who has a very specific set of expectations on him. Right where whereas. Alex cod is a a more well rounded player. I suppose the they call. Excuse me they call them. The party and he does create some scoring fun. That's for darn sure he is a. I always great kid and he's a real exciting player. Made is up way up through the ranks within usa hockey program with a lot of really good performances of the national camps. And the thing. I like about him is he. He is a scorer and he's not afraid to shoot the puck and there's a. There's a coach who's that assistant coach for a long time. Michigan state university was a good college player in his own. Right named tom. newton. And i was one timing a discussion with him about players who have a shoot first mentality and thomson to me he goes. I've told so many of our players that if you've got a great shot you're being selfish the team when you don't use it don't think you're being selfish when you shoot the puck. If you have an opportunity. And i can't tell you how many games i've watched. Were good players leave great shots on the table because they want to look more like team players and distributing the And tally has got a great ability to get himself into gray scoring chances and get shots at the net. His shot the puck on his stick and he's a great area. He should be shooting the puck so he winds up with like to call the cy young line. Seventeen in three during the course of receives. Seventeen goals three assists if you over the line looking like that. I don't think anybody's gonna play because goals are hard to come by and the world tournament goes on ice. Gets a little tighter. Things get little tighter. Gets to score a guy that kim could be a game-breaker with just the fact that he has got an incredible knack for being in the right spot with the puck on his stick and using his shot as a lethal weapon for his team offensive advantage across above across the border team. Canada the kings also have clinton by field and it was just released before we started recording today that By field in jordan spence have officially made the roster. I don't think anybody's terribly surprised. The quinton by field is visually dean candidates. Roger last year akil. Thomas scores one goal in the tournament. But it's the tournament winning goal as you mentioned earlier a you know a highlight moment or a strong tournament can make a guy's career right. I mean guys can dine out off of a good showing the world junior championship so by field finds himself in the same boat. I think is turcott and kelly of in that he played last season or last year. I should say but had limited minutes. He was playing in the bottom six of of the forward core is he going to dominate this year. The wjc or are there still other young players for team canada. That might eat up those big minutes. I can has got a really good team. And and i think minutes for them are going to be hard to come by for a lot of players and but i do think by got a chance to make an impact on his tournament and play more minutes. He is a really skilled. Two hundred foot kid who plays all tenacity bite to his game and and he's incredibly skilled. And but you know. Canada is is one of those teams that every year. They seem to get a bottom six guy or two that moves up the roster and really plays while i think of guys again. He's torelli had a great tournament that he played he. Was you played throughout the lineup. And it was a big impact on their roster. And if you look back at all candidates teams and it is amazing how their guys provide so much when they win. They tend to win with four line efforts and when they haven't done well it's because either a they haven't had gaps or be. There just didn't do very much for him by fields. A guy that. I think you know if you wind up with the bottom six again which i doubt will provide them some some important minutes but this is a nineteen year old tournament. You rely on your veterans. He's a veteran player. With a bolo to skill and leadership. And i can't envision him playing a role when he's in ails flyer goodness or kings fans. He's still only eighteen. I think he's a veteran but because he's so young he's still think he's only eighteen. We're going gonna ask you a couple of questions now if you don't mind about some players who have played in previous world juniors but won't be appearing this year one of while they're all kings prospects. Obviously but one of them. At mike anderson. If you ask anybody about the la kings prospect pool. You say who's gonna wear letter for the king someday the before you can finish asking the question. The answer is mike anderson and then when you turn around there's five people running down the street to tell you. It's mike anderson like the it is just sort of taken his gospel that this kid is made of leadership in your experience watching him. Is that true. And how important is it for a player with that kind of pedigree to have experiences in a tournament. The rojas mikey aniston's leadership skills and the kid that he starts with his dad jerry. Who was a lifetime coach. He's a friend of mine. And and you can see the influence that jerry has had on both mike von josh and both of those kids just absolutely ooh leadership and and they played in a program with the university of minnesota duluth that cultivates leadership. And when you look at some of the great players that have kind of and especially in their recent running back to back national championships. You look at some of their leadership group carson. Cooman is a guy that earned himself a fourth line spot with the boston. Bruins parker mci was there a year ago in their last national championship. Run before last season got cancelled and mci is a kid who was a tremendous leader in anderson was sort of a sub leader in an among that group. What does he have. He's got tremendous composure. That's number one. He's really well spoken. He's not a guy that's going to be our runny over but when he speaks it matters and you see on the ice almost like an extra coach out there. He's compose moves pucks smart. He's got great vision on the ice. He could be good offensively. He's got the kind of upside escaped through while a physical game with all of us sandpaper in it. But you just talk to him. And he's not a guy that waste a whole lot of words he is. You might not be the most incredibly vocal guide. It might not be the most verbose dinero. Josh's got a little bit more of that in his demeanor by. Just look at the kid what he says. He means any backs it up. His foundation is really really good in terms of the personality is and how that translates to the player that he is on. The ice in the dressing is an expression that i'm fond of a probably going to ruin it but it goes something like adversity doesn't forges character. It reveals something like that. I think it's probably a little over-simplistic. I think you can refine it through adversity but for a kid like mike anderson. I know you've got a background and coaching and lots of experience with how how old you start to see something like that. Develop in a kid because he can't come from completely from nowhere but by the time you reach the nhl presumably. It's shown itself in. Like i said been refined established. So how do you. How do you create a mikey anderson. A that's a good question known to really a question and i've coached all different levels. They've been at the minor league level. I've been at the junior level. And and i've been in youth hockey too and right now coach you fifteen aaa team on long island. And one of the coaches on that team and y- the one thing that we talked about with our coaching staff in of one. We're trying to look to name guys either. Be captains are alternates is who can run the room. And who's the guy that can hold on the players accountable. I think for a fifteen year old. That's that's hard. I mean in all my years in youth hockey. I've seen one guy. I my time. There's really been able to do it back home on the island but when it comes to developing leadership that is something that's cultivated in a lot to do with the people that you play under when you were younger player. And when mike anderson got to you. Md the leadership core there was so well established and the culture of that program was so well established that he walked into a leadership factory and for that reason he was able develop into the leader that he is now i know got his older brother who is a tremendous influence on him. He got the data's got coaching background. Who was a tremendous influence on him. And then he's in the locker room where the older players that room held the younger players accountable. When you go through situations like that really helps to cultivate your ability to leave because you're learning from players who not only can do that stuff but they can also walk the walk in and it here to what they're preaching to the team and that has been the beauty of minnesota duluth in the last few years under scott sandal and his staff. They're going to go a little bit about out of order here. Because i'm now i ask the question i didn't know i was gonna ask and now made me think about the last guy on our list. Which is leisure anderson famously tossed his silver medal into the crowd at being disappointed that they won silver and not gold. Now if you get me on any given day and asked me. If i liked that move it'll change right on day one. Could i totally accept the argument. That he's a passionate young man who only cares about winning. And he was so disappointed that he didn't get gold that he didn't even want this over male. And my gosh what a testament to his competitive spirit. You give me on another day. And i buy into the argument that poor sportsmanship and you know and it's not great and you should be happy with the silver she proud of it cetera et cetera. I give it all a pass. Because they're all just kids and we all do stupid things. I've done far worse things than that in my life. But i'm curious. What would your personal opinion. And if you don't wanna share it that's fine or if you share mine which is that. It depends on what day you get. But his leash anderson a leader cut from the same cloth. As a guy. Like mike anderson who just had a bad moment Or was that just an you know what's your spin on that whole moment. Land policies through putting you on spot. There no no. That's why i would say this. I wish tremendously shocked. When i saw that happen at it. Really outrage me. Because that tournament is a right not a privilege and you gotta you have to earn your way there and that is a special tournament and to disgrace that tournament the way he did still bothers me and it might not be the worst thing that's ever happened there. I mean obviously the punch out and peace. Any and eighty seven between the soviet union and canada was certainly the source on the world junior tournament but but from an individual standpoint that bothered me real. I can't tell you that it didn't and y- i had a player coming to me that just on that. That would be a little hard for me from a hockey up standpoint organizationally to look at that player quite in the same way but on the other hand eighteen and nineteen year olds with you know under the influence of passionate emotion can do the dumbest things ever right. We all can so on that note maybe take a step back and say it was just a bad moment at a bad time in front of a world stage at every hockey person watching side and that didn't help plus the age of social media. Where that moment will live forever. You can certainly grow up and get past that and own. It and i don't know list as well as the anderson. I can't tell you this. I do think he's a really good player. I do think he brings a lot to team in terms of of his compete level in terms of his passion for the game in terms of his offensive skill. And i really hope it works out both for him and the kings In this they now have together but that is a moment that to me really put a little bit of a state on his career. And i don't know if you ever erase something like that. It's a shame because in order for a mistake. Like i mean if you want to call it a mistake. In order for mistake like that to happen he had to do so again. To be the captain of a of a team with title contention at the world junior champion. The had a good enough tournament to get to the gold medal. Get like so many good things that could be praised. And then you just have that one woman in here we are talking about it but i then i wanna talk about tyler madden. He was acquired in a trade near the end of last season. And because the kings have so many other chip. Big-name prospects He i think he gets forgotten. Sometimes maybe not forgotten but there's just there's only so many words you can put an article or how many minutes you can devote in a podcast talking about the process. And you've got kelly evans turcott. By field velocity. And mikey anderson and cal peterson et cetera et cetera et cetera. But vancouver fans were pretty upset when he was included in that trade and we spoke into a number of people from northeastern and from other programs. Who rave about this kid. So i'll simply ask you. What was his showing at the world junior championship. And do you think he's an nhl player. Moving forward i you what when people ask you about bad and i usually ask them. How much time do you have. Because i i think the world of this kid and there's one thing that stands out for me when it comes to him and that is for undersized forward who's really skilled. This kid loves to play in the soup. I mean you look at hard areas and you'll get fifty fifty bucks keys on them. You look increase battles. He's in there. You'll going to defensive zone. Where a hard podcast to get one. He's part of that battle and he's got good enough hands that he can play in traffic and he's not afraid to take a hit to make a play on a tough area to get himself a goal. I i love the way. This kid plays the game. I think he sees the game. Well i think processes the game while he's obviously a good pedigree and players that have that have gone through this before tend to have a little bit of a leg up. Somebody's situations in terms of knowing how the process works and how to assimilate into a system in a situation better but i. I love the way this plays. I think he's at great speed. He's great hands. He can score as hockey. Iq is really good. And he's a two hundred foot three zone player that no matter where the cameras focused on the ice he somewhere in the frame so he really connects to his other teammates and to the other zones at a very dynamic fashion. And i just think he's a guy that can drive your engine now. The undersized forward sometimes getting enough shake at the next level when you look at a lot of teams rousers. There is an emphasis on a bigger player. But we're in an era where it's skating game of skill game puck possession game and he checks a lot of boxes when it comes to being able to do the things that make a successful. Nhl player that's five nine five ten. We hope to see him in a kings uniform as we said at the top of the nfl network is the exclusive home for the wjc. Dave you will be on the call for team. Usa so i think we have what team usa versus russia. Right off the hopper on christmas day. If i'm not mistaken start. It's not quite match overused but still pretty darn good. So what does team. Usa half to do to have a good showing the tournament and where you put their odds at coming home with the gold. There's there's always the big five there's sweden finland russia the us candidate. You always slot them in as the teams that finish one through five and obviously three of those five teams metal and then every once in a while you of get one of the bumper teams that i kind of call. That second wave will crack that top. Such important upset once we get past january. First that usually is you the czechs slovaks swest and and they could factor into this as well. It just seems like an alternate years. Me they can have a strong term. I think the united states it starts in gold spencer night spencer has been dubbed the best amateur prospect. Come out of the. The youth ranks the or the college or junior ranks carey price. That's high praise. I think he's earned it. He is dynamic. He plays at boston college right now. And he's got a tremendous golden coach. Mike ayers who who has worked with him and then you can really influence that mike has had on spencer's he continues to evolve into a top goalie last year. I thought it was good. I think it was great. But i thought he was good enough to win. And when you lose a playoff game one. Nothing which the. Us loss on the goal. So i think that. I think he is going to be a huge catalyst for this team. They've got a really good young core. Defenseman it can move the team. Usa as is built with a mindset of going to score and i joke sometimes with guys that usa hockey you know the atm program about. Hey why don't we just think best twenty-three twenty-three offensive players whether positionally and go play and hockey since a game of numbers now are the defense solved in a rush. Take defensive who could really move the pocket. Go overwhelm teams right. I mean that's always a a theory. But i think that this is a tournament that can become a war of attrition and you need some bigger bodies there that can handle the grime seven games and eleven nights and the emotional maturity to handle the ups and downs of world junior tournament. Which can happen. I look back to two thousand and thirteen team that won gold and that was a team that went into the medal round at two and two with losses to canada and russia. And i'm not so sure. They knew what footing they were on but they handle the adversity of that tournament. And that's a big part it for the us. You know you're going to lose a game somewhere more than likely and if you lose it in the in the preliminary round good you lose it you move on and you take it over the big key for me as always been as long as you win two things number one is don't finish third division. If you're in three of the big five and this year the us is in with three of the big five. So you don't want to finish to into and wind up third because then you cross over you're going to probably play the second place team in the other division which is going to be one of the big two that is where the big dynamic in every world junior comes in. If you're in with the big three don't finish third. You get the two seat on the other side. That's asking for trouble. So i think the you asha finish first or second. You got a january second matchup that propels you to the semifinals on january fourth merits. By the best team win. This is going to be a totally obvious question. But is it a good thing or a bad thing for a team to have eleven kids potentially appearing in a world junior tournament. I think a great thing because you get a chance to when. I was in ocoee often toronto montreal. I loved it when all of our guys were. Were the road juniors. I thought it was awesome. Because you get a chance for two things. Firstly you get a chance to watch them on. The biggest stage of amateur hockey that to me is a big deal because it's more than just the games. It's it's how you're handling the game. You're handling fatigue at your body language during the ups and downs. You're in a very abnormal schedule. That regular team so you are constantly trying to find comfort in a situation which is built on. Not being comfortable right. And that's that's big deal and player. Evaluation number two is this i think it should be able to dominate your age group and the world unit tournament is an area. Where how are you. As an eighteen year old against the other eighteen year olds can you dominate the nineteen group and is a nineteen year old high in prospect. If you're not dominating your group that can open up some questions as to. What's the next step on the development of that player. What needs to be done by organization to do so. I think the more prospects you have in this better because this is the best amateur turner in the world and added prepares you for the next level because it only gets harder from here. Well the time of this recording. We are two weeks away from versus russia christmas day. Nhl network with dave starman on the call. Thank you so much for joining dave. We appreciate it. Jesse has been great. Really appreciate you having me on.

us jesse cohen dave starman nhl Arthur kelly alex turcott mike anderson la kings la kings Two hundred foot hockey kings wjc twenty percents two hundred foot jake gala jason zacher Danny kristo tyler johnson alfie
Hour 2: 9/27/19

The Paul Finebaum Show

36:35 min | 2 years ago

Hour 2: 9/27/19

"No one's been part of more first days of Work Than Car Harper and in the same way rookies have to keep earning respect Carl Hart never stops earning the respect of hardworking people like you since eighteen eighteen eighty nine cohorts got your back twenty. Four seven visit carshield dot com forward slash. CFP The Paul Finebaum show podcast has been brought to you by the capital on sabre card earned four percent cash back on dining and entertainment two percent of grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms terms apply the cried packing then patron tree of college football leaves. Here is the Paul Finebaum show our one podcast we welcome you back to the second hour is live and I'll tell you what when you come to the Auburn campus you talk about the present and the future but one of my favorite parts and I've been coming here since my first days in journalism is the history of this school. It did not begin behind me a couple of years ago with Chris Davis Davis nor did it begin with Bo Jackson. Ralph shook Jordan was the coach for many many years and coached Jordan. had one of the great runs. He just had the worst timing of any great coach. SEC history he was he was running concurrently with coach Paul Brian Anyway that is not my main thesis. My main thesis is introduce canton Ringer to you. He was the sports editor of the campus. Newspaper was still called the planes back then or that was a different name placement in in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven when Auburn won a national championship under coach Jordan and went on to become a very successful sales executive that three three M for more than forty years your good friend David houses who wrote the forward to a book whereabouts talk about told me you were such a good salesman. You even tried to sell this book at her funeral. We'll talk what about that later. You're at Grad your salesman and the obvious question that I have for you you love Auburn some time ago you decided I'm going to write a book about a coach that the young people who have no earthly idea but quite frankly I didn't. I mean me my of my old boss Can you talk about his friendship with Jean Laurindo but I never met coach and I don't know anything about him until this book is I. I'm assuming I'm halfway halfway through the story of how you decided to write this book. Well yes a little bit. Bill Lufkin wrote an article. They had a the Lindo Day in Birmingham Birmingham. We're always former players came back and Bill Lumpkin wrote his column about him that day and he said he said Love Rando is legendary you coach. He's one of a kind. They don't make them like that anymore. He's tough as an annual up still and he was right Marando came here and fifty one what coast Jordan they had lost every game in nineteen fifty six years they want a national championship like gave up seven points in the southeastern southeastern conference in Nineteen fifty seven and nineteen fifty-eight they were undefeated but tied with Georgia tech and Lsu on Halloween following night with billy cannon or story random plot back and that and that that's the reason that they weren't considered the nicer championship and fifty eight but anyway Lorenzo Costa receivers here coats guys like rich Jimmy Red Phillips and Terry Beasley requires and enough Christian goes on and on with all the great players that he coached here and he was named offensive coordinator and nineteen in sixty eight he recruited PEPs Audubon who won the Heisman Award Nineteen seventy-one but as they offense coordinator here for six years three years he led the southeastern conference in offense and he retired what coach Jordan and nineteen seventy five now. That's football part of coach. Let's let's go back to coach. Lauren do as a young player. you mentioned like so many people in Auburn history. He wants to Georgia yeah yeah well first of all he was born up in northern Minnesota in Gilbert Minnesota which us up in the iron range and his father was the lumberjack initially and lighter later he was dry man of dray is a big industrial wagon that he drove and he did. UPS moving people all all kinds of things that net day and he was strong as a Knox but he had an outstanding high school career in Gilbert and then he went down Dan and played one year at the University of Minnesota Duluth and he got it badly injured he was going to play basketball too but he had to set out and he ended up transferring to junior college close to his home. He broke all kinds of records. They're both both in football basketball football and track well the basketball coach was from that area Georgia and he signed him and then bus found out about him while it butts and when he Ashley said football was keenly and he said I want him football so if one hundred years or football in Georgia you you definitely play football so he played at Georgia a lead the comforts and nineteen forty nine as a pass receiver and he came down in Georgia and forty two now Georgia and forty two went to the Rose Bowl and that's a real trivia question for today. Play the Rosebowl in forty two probably Arthur rose bowl because of the war Jerem North Carolina right so anyway he got down at Georgia and they had fred sake wish who asthma asman war. He's pretty good and then they had come back to it. Yeah we'll come back to have suck it. It's only six seventy eight years ago. I'm truly trippy L. The guy he was an all American and all pro Laurindo layoff and he went went up to northern Iowa and he was a star running back at northern Iowa and he played six ballgames and then again he left one night and wanted to believe he went over to sign a contract and professional basketball in the National Basketball League with amazing and he played in a national basketball league mainly mainly because he loved basketball and then they did drop was chasing him because of the War World War Two and he joined the coastguard ended up up in Pearl Harbor in nineteen forty four years after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and then he then he was on a ship that went to Iwo Jima Okinawa and he was at this surrender of Japan General Macarthur. That's that's a story to tell your grandchildren yeah so he came back from that from World War Two and made his wife Jane up in Minnesota she was Minnesota graduate got married and buts were still trying to get him to come back to Georgia George so he went down to Georgia and there he he basically led the southeastern conference in nineteen forty nine in pass receiving he and buts were very close. The unusual thing about Miranda was he graduated in nineteen forty nine. He was twenty nine years old. Oh my goodness US twenty one years old and so he he got drafted by the Green Bay packers and I asked I asked Jean Jean. Why didn't you sound but Greenberg but he said they own ahead three guys over thirty years old and I was thirty years old when I got there. They said I saw that wasn't gonNA work. PLUS APAC his contract with five thousand dollars hours and he said I didn't go and he said if you didn't make the team they gave you five hundred dollars on a greyhound bus ticket home man. I'm so interested because because I mean we're we're going way back in Auburn history but I mean coach and he goes without saying his name on the stadium and he wasn't the only great coach on that staff. Oh no you're right but why I mean for all Auburn grads and Fan. I mean this was this was an idyllic period. What made it so special. I don't know to me it just seemed like Ah Coast Jordan was he was a real student. as well as a man and now most coached your served in two different theaters and more windows orange was he was in. Italy he was at Normandy and he was in Okinawa. So did you ask anybody yeah yeah and he was he was a land coach at the University of Georgia and he was head basketball coach. That's amazing. Berendo course was touted end and he played the football team and he played on the basketball team and whatever they played an away game he rode with shook in his Buick. He would take about five of the house with him or four album with him. The board biggest he'd take him in his car and so he had an interesting career playing even in Madison Square Garden and Lorenzo when he was there. He had a great game. It was kind of unusual he had like six or seven goes in Madison Square Garden. No file shots in a different time at a different place and they got run out the place by Saint John's was a powerhouse in in. I want to ask you about because I I was. I was alive during part of this but I wasn't covering sports but there's no way you can remove Paul Bryant from the equation but if if coaches Jordan had coached somewhere else in wasn't in the same state with Paul Bryant how different do do you think this conversation would be today. Well I think coach. Bear Bryant was a great great coach but I have to tell you Laurindo offensive coordinator Nineteen seventy-two anybody that knows anything about Auburn. History knows in nineteen seventy two. That's Bama Punt Alabama is number number two in the nation. They're leading Auburn Sixteen to nothing with eight minutes to go auburn won that ballgame bald seventeen to sixteen and I might add they were picked last in the SEC sports writers when the year started and they beat Tennessee number five in a nation and they'd beat number two Alabama slow. Oh Shit Shug was a great coach and Gene Laurindo was offensive coordinator then as we wrap up here you'd think back on this era and and when you when you finish this this had to be a labor of love talking to people that were part of this era because we're not got Alabama in in in the early eighties to my boss and my dear friend day but Bill Lumpkin always talked about this talked about around all these talked about coach during and I'm not taking anything away from Pat Dies there which is fabulous or whatever has happened since then but I mean this is this is a special time in Auburn history special a special time for people like me at graduated in the fifties and of course in the sixties we had another guy here. Tucker Fredricks who possibly they could have won the heisman if Auburn One more game he was taking the draft player taken an nfl draft and the guy that won the heisman and was like the seventy Phil player from Notre Dame. Notre Dame always added instead. movement had an inside on a lot of things that had a lot of power a lot of influence but anyway he had some great players to thank you for a couple of things number one. You're you're you in my long dear. David House will corner the back table every Monday at at Delhi which Tony Barnhart reference and you brought you brought us some some great food from there which is we will be in your debt. I there probably won't be any left in that bus from Marcus Spears but when you finish when I just WANNA. Ask a final question. If someone who's written a book or two what will for you as as a as a writer writer in your salad days but someone who went on to other things what was this like to publish and to see people enjoy it was a labor of love is all all I can tell you and I learned a lot about the Lindo added no and I promise you if you read the book you'll learn a lot about and and finally because house will mention so you really did try to sell this this copy of book at a funeral well. That's so true still hate to admit it but it's true and I did sell the book Paul's all well. I gotta say that's the funniest thing I've heard a long time. Ken Rank the name of the book is is Lorenzo the rough and tough right hand man for sugar and if you come down down here and talk to anyone who is of a certain age shook Jordan still to this day commands absolute reverence and respect so vital Amazon and Auburn Bookstores by it. Make it a bestseller again all right. Thank you Paul Thank you we are in your debt and join it. I'd fantastic ethic conversation. The Great Canon Regular Cat Pat Dot will be here a little while another tough coach who has a little bit about football. We're back with more after this you listening the Paul Finebaum. Show podcast and we welcome you back so appreciative of Kim Ringer coming by Tim. Tebow a little bit later. Pat Dye not N- just around the corner more of your phone calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five as we continue here live from Auburn. The dog is up next in South Carolina. Good afternoon to you doug. Hey Doug. Thank you good afternoon. How you doing in Alabama. It's always great to be out in Alabama on a Salteri September day where I understand. It's pretty warm and South Carolina too yeah. It's a national day up here but it's the other problem having in Texas. We we not getting enough water fear well route well. Paul on here's I'm on something and then I'm going to ask you a question Christian first of all I've been watching college football for sixty years so I've seen the landscape of college football change up and down but they wanted unwanted callers called yesterday in talking about the South Carolina Fan base how they would react. You know certain manner. He wasn't killing you they they they have been known to act like that. What got me about him. You had to pick out of them. The fact that he was the Clemson Fan you're never had to pick that out of me. I am Clemson mm San at Clemson devils sweney hired because the alumni and the booster decided they were gonNA walk out of some games or stay out of some gains because they wanted Tommy Bowden down. They forced they forced the terrier down. Phillips his hand. You think that's going to happen in South Carolina or you think they'll they'll ride with with their athletic director. I tell they would it depends and when I mean by that Doug is couple. I think Saturdays is a is a tipping point type of game. What I mean by hi that is this a loss to Kentucky means. The season is literally going down the drain and then you have some twitter games like like the APP state game. I'm like Tennessee Games that you thought were automatic wins and if the season implodes then would ray tanner said the other day it really is no longer operational because let's say let's just for the sake of argument say. Kentucky beat South Carolina Georgia next week in Florida if you could possibly lose it Tennessee probably would lose at Tennessee and then you lose APP state taxonomic Clemson I mean. Do you think there's going to be an appetite after that. I realized I gave you a worst case scenario area yeah. I don't think that I know this fan base like I said I've been watching this game for fifty years and I've been following South Carolina Alana football's longer have clips and it's good to know yeah adversary you know and I can tell you they've had two successful coaches there Joe Marston who passed away with with a heart attack and of course they spurrier now. They've tasted the good life and they're not gonNA want to go back and you just being a mediocre football team so my answer there is they probably GonNa Force his hand and make him react and if he don't that he might be gone with with much Jim and Abby Administration dining nine yeah listen i. I have respect for Ray Tanner. I've known him. I think he's a tremendous coach and athletic director but he's put in a situation. He's you know the state better than I do do but he's he's. He's a monthly guest on this show and if he says anything but posit positively he creates headlines across the state. I think I think another another problem is for for South Carolina's Clemson right now. Clemson is so good so elite that it it has to make if Clemson was eight and four. Maybe they could say well. Let's get another year or two but Clemson is going to go undefeated in the regular season. They'll be in the college. Football playoff got a legitimate shot at winning the championship and that's just makes things even worse the outlaw. We got that through hard work. I mean Clinton. Get that and back into it. They worked ED south. Carolina was like four and a half years behind on building their facility. Daboh had already three years ago and when you get behind him Creighton Creighton I'd add and get behind him facilities. It's hard to catch up. No I agree with you. A lot of schools have missed a moment and I mean if you're not working on new facilities agility as soon as you build the latest and you're you're going to be in trouble and Clemson's facilities are world class and I mean now Carolina's are but they they've got to turn this around and I am really My hunches are probably win tomorrow night but if they don't then the the conversation will continue to be very negative on T. Right now when they go down to the hedges. That's going to be a real real. KS says will they go down there and play them to fly. They played Alabama. They might be some hope that they might get some of those teams like Tennessee and APP state and Dan. I don't know I don't I am. I don't think they got a prayer because Kyle Leo is a tough place to play. I know that they're not playing really great now but Jimbo Fisher is not the Kinda coach to lay down. He'll have them ready to play very soon and as far as Clemson's concern yeah we we. We've got a good team but on any given afternoon I've seen cupcakes beat the best. I mean look at APP state beat. Michigan just two years ago look at it looking at Syracuse and Pittsburgh beating Yeah Clemson look at NC state nearly beating them for years ago. Yeah set a little Bayton your Ortega. I know Georgia tech to rebuilding year but so little shifting to beat them so yeah it's it's it's like the landscape of college football has changed and and and and South Carolina's landscape it's changed some but they still count in this whole and like you had a gentleman yesterday and he was talking about how Carolina had had spent so many years having losing seasons and Kinda got used to it and then all of Cerdan. They get a guy like spurrier in there and he turns it around fact spurrier. I took over as coach in South Carolina. They walked in the locker room down there in Colombia and the first thing you saw on the wall was a big sign baked clemes well. He made them take that down. He told element valid only go they had was to be Clemson. They were in trouble. Well said I agreed with Clemson fan here s what he's saying. He's not listening. spurrier always talked about even at Florida. He didn't talk about beating Florida Florida State. He talked about getting to the conference championship game. We are going to continue with your phone. Calls Pat died at the top of the next hour but plenty of time for you to get in here and you can do it now at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. You're listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast back. We are live in Auburn Alabama and as you you as we do every week we meet some friends along the highway and we have found in your name is Parker Right Parker what Vr my mouthful Auburn fans and my whole side of the family or Florida State Fan so we're pretty much house divided my dad's in my dad cannot make it here. He's in Dallas when you if you're watching this in Dallas. What Alabama in Parker where do you live. We came down here for the Auburn. Mississippi state game fans in the building. I the sound oh well okay okay Parker. Have you ever thought Parker slowdown. I I I gotta get back to the show but you you are a big fan of the Taylor Hicks Song call so I am going to say Parker. The stages yours sing the song all the dogs are counting down to put the anchor down tiny. WHO's GonNa be cowbells rock band right the yes see out here guys scenes from the best being make sense of it all makes sense. Okay you win. Thank you parker glad to be here. Dropped Mike the by the name of Tammy. Thank you very much here. Take the microwave well until you get over there when they steal it from you. Can I keep this since me. The Greg is up next. I didn't know we were going to get a full show. At the same time we're getting sports information and that was great ruin. Any sounds like he's about six years old but he he's got some. He's not shy of very rather for coaches young man well. That's good. That's a Oh good good time to be precocious. speaking of that. I walked into work this morning and a CO worker came in and he said Greg said Do you listen to the Finebaum show. I said I do and he said Have you ever called the Finebaum show. I certainly have said well. Did you call him yesterday about a father clock and I said Yeah and he said you and I've been France for owner. Then you realize it says what do you mean he said well you call. Finebaum Balm for about two or three years now and I appreciate the conversation you guys have if you have real conversations and I'm a fan and then I said well. At least I have one in I give a shout out to his name is Davis Seagal and eat the math teacher and a fan of years Paul and you just never know who you're gonNA run into in life based on the fact that you call into a radio show that is fantastic that it really is. I'm extremely glad to hear that and I'm I run into people all the time as you do and people want to take shots and say whatever they want about us and maybe the show was this or that but it's still brings a Lotta people together Greg and you and I have had this conversation before yes and there there are many many fans who will never call in for various reasons but who appreciate what you do every day and I hope hope everybody has a great weekend and the Games are competitive and the best teams win have a great day Paul. Thank you thank you very much greg. Poor Greg had to follow Parker Parker. That would not anyway. Let's get back to the calls right now at eight five five two four to seven to eight is it is up next. Isaac how are you. Hey Hey Paul is going right. Thank you that's. It's really interesting that Greg just called in math in Val Obama originally moved down here the college but I wanted to see what you thought about Lsu Defense Repent this year given up thirty eight points vanderbilt and their only notable NBA at the scene that I believe both then they'd be overrated although L. I think it's a concern I remember last year. Remember when Alabama was gashed. I think it was by Arkansas in a lot of try to look past it but there were some there were some cracks and and and I think there are some cracks. Are they fixable yes would would. David Randa is is supreme and they've had a couple of injuries so I'm not making excuses. I'm just stating reality but I think it's potentially going to be at least a conversation piece with Florida in a couple of weeks with Auburn coming up and obviously Alabama that is a very difficult three-game the game stretch for sure not speaking of crack on Defense Alabama injuries this year and the fact that they've only played one form of Texas. A&M anyways ever in tech thing in on the roster and a a difficult stretch for me as well what what's your take on Alabama's crack on extremely concerned you're talking about starting with Moseley in working your way down now. No one of the players is expected to come back but you're talking about four or five starters potentially gone gone and listen. Young players are great and they're talented you're you're always going to get that but you just to win the championship chip you need you need you need some rotation you need some depth and I have serious concerns about Alabama against the three or four elite teams on their schedule which are obviously. Lsu Lsu Auburn potentially Georgia and the College Football playoff. Thank you very much. Thank you really really nice. You need to call up against the break. Parker has left the building. He has dropped the MIC. We're going to take a break right now at eight and take your your phone calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five pat dye around the corner. We also have Tim Tebow Gus Malzahn among the many remaining guess right here human listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. No one's been part of more first days of work in-car heart and in the same way rookies have to keep earning respect car heart never stops earning the respect of hardworking people like you from building rugged dear. That's tougher than any. I are worst day of work to reengineering the classics to outward the Future. Trust your car hearts to keep doing their job long after you begin doing yours since eighteen eighty nine car hurts got your back twenty four seven visit car heart dot com forward slash. CFP welcome back we are glad to be at Auburn and coach. Pat Diana's Ondeck and that is always a love coming here for a lot of reasons but seeing coach. Maybe number one. Let's get back to the calls at eight. Five I five to four to seven to eight five and frank is in Georgia and frank. Go right ahead. Hey Paul. Thanks for taking my call. Thank thank you got a couple of comments and the question to hear from you on the Alabama football so one of the things that I'm a little bit concerned about out is I'm seeing three people behind the camera for Alabama football but not in the venue that I'm accustomed to seeing them soon saving on athlete Commercials Strange Coach on Regions Bank commercials into on the Dan Patrick. Show Oh and Mardian McGee beats our three people. I believe that has with the exception of two fulltime jobs that don't involve active or interviews outside the program. I'm a little concerned that maybe we're not paying saving enough to coach that he needs to run a dealership selling cars that he needs to be an actor on TV. which is the same thing less mild used to do before he got back into coaching and unconcerned? Our strength coach is doing something very similar and I really didn't like seem to in these interviews basically talking about the fact that he was getting ready to leave the program is it worries me that these these guys are being drawn away from what their job is what they're paid to do from what to needs to be on the field improving or in the film room learning more strength coach needs to be getting the players ready to play conditioned appropriately minimizing injuries which were plagued with. Maybe not his fault. I don't know in saving needs to be spending time with the players. The coaches getting them ready to execute not running television commercials. I couldn't do it in my job. No one else would be allowed to do it in their air job. Most likely the man's a multimillionaire put paid to coach and run a program. It doesn't line up for me especially with some of the things that I'm seeing around execution with the team say he wasn't doing this ten years ago. He it was hungry for the job that he was hired to do. Frank Franklin me only the only thing I can. I can't address two of the three I don't know anything about out the strength coach but Sabin taped that interview during media days when things were are fairly quiet it was a it was an all day deal I do a friend of mine helped produce it so I'm cognizant of what happened. It took about ten twelve hours and I'm sure he was paid handsomely. Ford word but I'm just offering that it wasn't like he he took off the week of the the the South Carolina game to tape a commercial. It was done in mid-july. Let let me go. Let's go to Jim next. Jim Go right ahead. Well I tell you what ah nothing wrong with. The radio and I hit the sweet foot tall midget and I I doubt I don't know it's it's tough but he might be able to keep me and Tammy any both for bigger. They will talk. I enjoyed that. Thank you kid I mean he he equal Sammy in me. As far as the loud mouth else like I mean he he's guy he's got talk show host written all over him and ask him if he'll let me talk about a belief all canny any was smiling on that I agree. What did you think of the guy who thinks thinks savings doing too. Many commercials even just. Oh Yeah I I. I don't know about the rest of the stuff. He said I'm excited. It's GONNA be commercial owners to go what to do and and people wind leave and win the show up and how long to stay and and that's new hypo you ain't you ain't hitting me up. I don't I don't care for that really. Don't do you think you know me. I have never liked when he lectured students and now he's trying trying to. I thought it was interesting the other day where he's coming down on the TV people say you guys don't realize what it's like to be here on a hot day where you're the same guy who lectured students because they they left early and put ankle bracelets on them. I might as well go and say this. Paul sincerely may not think you know I do all I firmly believe that savings go ransom some major problems with LSU and Auburn and maybe one more and I believe this is behind you here. This is Auburn year he in the win about three years ago when you you and Lane Little Lane Lane kiffin telling me I was crazy and they beat him. I'll meet them at weekend had nailed it so I believe that year. That Auburn has got a good chance to all the way if if it does it mess up the bus listen I think Auburn Auburn is is in that category. I WANNA see Auburn Against Lsu. That's the game that will tell me off but what I saw what I saw last week. There compare pretty complete. Chemo demow lead a great quote about well. I mean Bo Bo Knicks is good enough right now. Well he needs to be. He could take the next on the half the patches along passing two. Does they run away. They really be that. I really believe that I am going to see if I can find parker her and bring him back Jim. What do you mean tall he. He probably would hang up on Jim. He's a pretty much. He's gotta be midget. I can't be a real kid. No He's a real kid. I can't remember how do you think Parker would six told me about seven or eight okay well that did not like. I said he was eighty. Six and you said he was seven or eight anyway. Jim always great to have you on. We're heading to a memorable our that was with Parker literally stealing the entire show well. He can't steal the second half the show because we have pat dye. I coming up Tim Tebow and Gus Malzahn. We are heading to a break.

football Auburn Alabama Georgia Auburn South Carolina Paul Finebaum Parker Parker Paul Clemson Jim Go LSU basketball Tim Tebow Lorenzo Costa Tennessee Jordan Dan Patrick Florida Pat Dye
Le Show For The Week Of August 18, 2019

Le Show

56:34 min | 2 years ago

Le Show For The Week Of August 18, 2019

"From all you divide so ladies gentlemen. It's <hes> it's a hot day. It's summer so of course it is in new orleans but it's also raining in and when it rains new new orleans it doesn't sprinkle it doesn't drizzle. It's like the city is being driven through a car wash and and it's when you fought when one finds oneself driving through driving rain and it's called driving rain 'cause you're not supposed to be driving through it but that's not what it's call that <hes> one starts thinking this thought at least i did you may have noticed noticed certainly hasn't escaped my notice that this program usually originates more often than not from one of two places california just having emerged from five years of drought and looking at predictions of more drought type conditions to come. If this climate hoax thing works out already the colorado river which supplies some water are to southern california as well as two seven other states and mexico and by law by treaty. Sorry the water order is divided up. Each arizona gets certain amount in mexico gets a certain amount nevada gets a certain amount which i believe they gamble with but anyway there's not enough water in the river to satisfy all of those allotments tom ostlund that's correct sir so basically not enough if water california on the other hand here in louisiana wins this progress southeast louisiana south of the i ten point out <hes> winces program often originates as well. We got way too much water. Just i would invite you to look outside but you're not in the building. Count your blessings so as i say the thought occurs louisiana's got too much water california's gonna if not already not have enough. Wouldn't you build a pipeline connecting the two places. There's not even a mountain range in between and you know ship louise charge them arm and a leg sure but <hes> you know the economics of water in california so strange anyway <hes> federally assisted water has been given away to farmers in the central valley so they could grow cotton and rice in the driest part of the country the hottest driest part of the country so you know the economics can be worked out so that's that's one thought that occurs and the second which is occurred more than once to me. I have to admit but i haven't. I'm shared with you before you know the the brightest minds of our generation ladies and gentlemen are being devoted solving most trivial problems. I mean people are making major bank. Remember him on figuring <music> out how to get groceries delivered to you now. I wasn't around for this really but i've read enough to know oh that before the widespread appearance of supermarkets your neighborhood grocery store used to deliver your groceries so the br some of the brightest minds of our generation are literally reinventing the wheel we spend getting incredibly rich god bless him for doing it but and of course he line musk is going to populate mars but we're not solving the big problems by like world hunger or anything like that these these great brains i would suggest and i'm not going to put them on that assignment because i know how so much good that would do but <hes> i would suggest that <hes> these these marvelous tech guys and gals this would be the next frontier make a smart machine. That's really smart in the sense that when something goes wrong it can tell you what it is. A self diagnosing thing machine can't be that hard can it hello welcome to the show <music> king palm child of god. He was walking the row <music> him. Where're you going in this. She told the goin' down to yeahs. Gu's form gonna jain back. Throw get back to <music> buys so we i go and we back aw tam. We got them for half. A million-strong was a song bray. <music> bomb shot sky <music>. We are ah a <music> cotton ball and we gotta get back to aw yes. We got back to the aw yes we got to back to <hes> aw you know the thing is you may not have to explain to the kids. Woodstock woodstock was but you might have to explain to them. What a butterfly was from new orleans louisiana. I'm harry shearer. Welcome to this edition of show now news on the olympic movement produced by jim ebersol junior. Well two guesses what the name of the new hockey stadium this would not be ice hockey of course you know in in tokyo for the olympics is it's the roy takis take the oil hockey stadium and they're complaining about the heat and humidity there so they're literally early saying hockey teams from countries including india and australia join japan and a series of matches to test out facilities and gained some experience in dealing with tokyo's tricky summer climate temperatures yesterday reached ninety eight point six degrees. Hey ninety eight point six but there were no reports of heatstroke on the opening day that's to come the teams benefited from a range of heat countermeasures including water mist sprays and large large fans on the field and players moving inside and away from the sun during water breaks. Oh yes it was really rather hot said the indian women's this captain ronnie ron paul. I think every player was getting tired very quickly but in india we're used to this in india. It's really hot nowadays unquote. That's because of the hoax japanese player so the conditions could prove tricky for european teams next year. I've played in the netherlands. She said this is completely different from european climate. It's very difficult. Unquote just wait. The tokyo governor cut the ribbon and praised the heat countermeasures. Today we use some this various ways of misting have water hoses. Normally try agriculture use for irrigation gatien so we're trying various ways of cooling. The water hoses yeah. We'll use the best method to tokyo two thousand twenty two test those countermeasures he said i think test events are very important. Jordan unquote tests are the key to testing the l._a. Times reports that was reuters report to l._a. Times also oh points out the concerns about toward weather at the possible olympics next year officials cut short one test event the international triathlon union then had to abbreviate the running portion of women's test event as conditions reached an extreme level unquote japan times times reported twenty three people died and more than twelve thousand were hospitalized for heat related condition japan during the week that ended august fifth roadways along the marathon course will be paved with a heat shielding material and curbside trees will be allowed to grow larger for shade heat alert will be distributed by cell phone this challenge we call on the best of japanese expertise said takeo harada a professor enlisted for help in olympic preparations and a worker at a tokyo olympics construction site died few days ago after being found unconscious while working working outside media said heatstroke with suspected soaring temperatures have killed at least fifty seven people across japan since since late july temperatures in tokyo have clung above of eight fahrenheit since july twenty fourth with the heat intensifying in august the month of the olympics to daily high average of ninety four fahrenheit but don't worry. It's the olympics. It's a movement and we all need one every day. They say how are things going in the new iraq. One might ask ask if one were inclined to <hes> bay at the moon from time to time <hes> and here is one answer that new iraq you know that we <hes> we're helping to build as a bulwark of freedom and democracy in the middle east or what happened to that to a united nations consumer rights expert this week called on the french government to repatriate and try seven french nationals who were sentenced to death in iraq on terror charges arches off from that is a <hes> a wire service run by run by the french in a statement agnes. Calamar is u n special rapporteur reporter on extrajudicial summary or arbitrary executions expressed serious concerns over the fate of the men. There are serious allegations. She wrote that the sentences were handed down following unfair trials with accused having no adequate legal representation or effective consular assistance. She said iraq's legal system was quote marred art by very serious structural problems unquote. You're welcome. Hundreds of foreigners have been sentenced to death or life imprisonment in iraq for belonging to the islamic comic state european governments have long debated whether and how to take back former fighters and their supporters amid a host of security political and legal issues the seven french nationals were arrested by the syrian democratic forces when would limit the last election they held and subsequently transferred to iraq in february allegedly the request of the french government it or with it suspected involvement once in iraq. They were reportedly subjected to torture or other. Ill treatment treatment according to the u._n. Special ron paul tired toward in these circumstances. The transfer persons who iraq for prosecution is illegal. She said i'm particularly disturbed by allegations. That france may have had had a role in this transfer given the risk involved of torture and unfair trials that they would likely face the death penalty. She added. She's written to the french prime minister with their concerns concerns france as well as other european countries have strongly resisted repatriating their nationals to speculative having joined i._s. But francis also staunchly dontrelle posted capital punishment. It's a it's a contest of values for the french the french but that's that's the new iraq latest german. That's that's that's the model we <hes> we donated out of the goodness of our heart and do they thank us. Are they grateful. Oh and now we've got the deepest taste crack so the boys slashing the while many protests against the oil and gas industry focus on the effects of fracking on the environment scientists now say that as far as groundwater is concerned conventional oil and gas wells could affect the underground water supply much more than fracking good. This is from oil price dot com trade of the industry according to a recent study by hydro geologists from the university of arizona and university of saskatchewan. The amount of water injected and produced in the ground during fracking operations is smaller than the amounts injected by conventional oil and gas production the amount of water injected and produced for conventional oil and gas ask exceeds that associated with fracking by well over a factor of ten and said one of the researchers fracking receives most of the attention they say the most of the bigger picture is associated with conventional drilling. There's a critical need for long-term years. Two decades monitoring for potential contamination of drinking water resources not only from fracking but from conventional oil and gas production said they researcher analyzed information about water injection in western canada canada the permian basin and the state of oklahoma california and ohio as well as the amount of water produced by volume fracking throughout the u._s. What what was surprising was the amount of water that's being produced and re injected by conventional oil and gas production said the researcher in most of the locations. We looked at with the exception of california. There's more water now in the subsurface than before there is a net gain of saline water. You know well. That's gotta be good because you could. You can float in it if they could. The researchers found that due to enhanced oil recovery conventional wells. That's called e._r. Advanced oil recovery. You know if you don't have initials you don't have a thing there's likely more water underground at oil oil sites and this could change the behavior of all liquids in the ground. It would increase the possibility of contamination of the water in underground freshwater freshwater formations all but that's the least of our problems with the water. I got to say it's you know if i if if i could avoid at all consuming water the waterless died i think i i think it's in our future and i think if we were smart it would be in our present but now the warm you go to drink any water while i do this for you. I promise you that off to the aw i lied speaking water the gulf stream and is the warm current that brings the east coast of florida the mixed blessings of abundant swordfish mild winters struggle hurricanes but now maybe weakening because of the hoax this according to the lauderdale sun-sentinel gulfstream is visible from the air as a ribbon of cobalt fault bluewater a few miles off the florida coast it forms part of a clockwise system occurrence that transport warm water from the tropics up to east coast across the atlantic where it komo moderates the climate in north western europe in the frigid climate near greenland about which more later the water cool sinks and flows south again rolling through the deep ocean toward the tropics topics. It's kind of like a cycle and that cycle is reached. Its weakest point in sixteen hundred years. According to recent studies having lost about fifteen fifteen percent of its strength since the mid twentieth century mo who didn't sign just disagree on whether climate change your natural cycles account for the slowdown but a consensus has emerged the climate change will lead to a slower gulfstream system in the future so don't count on floating your boats that way in the future as melting ice sheets in greenland about which more later disrupt the system with discharges of cold freshwater being a witch going to have me some of that right now allied to a weaker gulfstream would mean higher sea levels for florida's east coast could lead to colder winters in northern europe. That's one reason scientists now. Prefer the term climate change global warming. Where's your warming. It's slowing and it could mean a lot of heat. That would have gone to europe. We'll stay along the u._s. East coast coast and in florida you have a pile up of waters along the eastern seaboard of the united states and the gulf of mexico says the <unk> climate science for the union of concerned scientists assists and means you have increased regional sea level rise just from that ocean circulation change. That's not good for new york city norfolk or along florida. She says you're slow your your cooling mechanism to get that water to the north is slowing down the slowing down of your natural air conditioning by getting that hot water from the gulf stream flowing northward means. You have that hotter water sticking around and not getting out of your refund as fast. It's not clear how any weakening has reached the system southern leg off florida known as the florida current one of the things that makes fishing so good there the ability of the gulfstream to bring in migratory fish. They'll the gulfstream helps summers summer in florida from getting too hot and winters from getting too cold to warm rotter provides a ready supply of fuel for hurricanes crossing its path but it's weakening. Maybe some weight training for the gulfstream is that pot. Is that a is that a thing and now also news warm. I don't know how much you followed. The new president of brazil and i don't mean literally followed. That's costly but <hes> what he's up to. He's is a i guess known as the trump of of latin america because he ran on a pseudo populist platform and <hes> <hes> has been deregulating and <hes> the regulations. He's especially fond of are the ones that have tried to keep further deforestation from happening in the amazon rainforest. He don't like that he wants. He wants deforesting he wants to he. He wants to reclaim the forest and now he has a suggestion for his fellow countrymen. According to the bbc presented president zaire more scenario scenario bhosle naro voicing as suggested the people should quote poop every other day unquote as a way to save the planet. His comment came in an answer to a journalist who asked asked him how to combine agriculture development and protecting the environment. He's been under fire. Official data showed an increase in amazon was on deforestation. He fired the head of the agency that reported the increase accusing it of lying about the problem scale. His comment came after the journalists quoted reports saying that deforestation agricultural responsible for a quarter of the planet's greenhouse effect and his response was quote. It's enough to eat a little less. You talk about environmental pollution. It's enough to poop every other day. That will be better for the whole world. Unquote scientists do say the amazon suffered losses and an accelerated rate since bush took office january its policies favor development over conservation brazil's space agency data showed an eighty eight percent increase in deforestation in june compared with the same month a year ago the amazon rainforest not the river is a vital carbon sink that slows down the pace of global warming official figures suggest the biggest reason for felling trees in the amazon rainforest. It's great new pastures for cattle well. I'll tell you what this gives me an idea. Let's make sure if if he goes ahead with that that those cattle poop only every other day news of the warm ladies and gentlemen copyright feature this broadcast <music> and he's been afraid of cuisinart art ninety seventy our c._e._o. All uh home anna can he never gave out a proper respect. Respect agreed to space yeah yeah <music> teamed shoplifting was the only game forty four she this about it can be the days and she got from. We say indra the this is the show and now ladies gentlemen with the aid of ralph the talking computer news of dominion lists awesome god said the food motif lie lanny see her and so do it over the fish of the sea over the fowl of the air and over every living eh. We're subduing it alright. Yes sir. We are just like you said. Have you noticed you haven't seen any cave bear around recently antibi- recently. I mean the last twenty thousand years a steady a genetic study that is has revealed that the extinction of the k. bears were prehistoric but that's not. I mean you yeah no not their fault. Nobody was writing history then they tried. Those damn pause got underway anyway. In the decline of that <hes> prehistoric bear coincided with the arrival of gas who homo sapiens in eastern europe. The research is published in scientific reports. It blamed human activities rather than ice age cooling for the extinction of the herb avarice species yeah. They wouldn't even eat us and we got rhythm. I hate those k- bear they're much leaves. Researchers reconstructed the past population dynamics of the cave bear by obtaining data from fifty nine bear caves well of course the gabeira lived in bear caves where else at <hes> fourteen sites in france germany italy poland serbia spain and switzerland where the most neutral bears lived the data revealed that the cave bear population saw decline around fifty thousand years ago. That's at the same time when we homo sapiens arrived in europe. A major population declined began about forty thousand years ago as homo sapiens spread across the continent. The cave bear eventually went extinct. We got finally finally subdued that sucker about twenty thousand years ago he and he the cave bear that is inhabited avid europe and the ice age alongside the cave lion woolly rhino the woolly mammoth. He's seeing a pattern here during during the ice age and the steppe bison with a second p in the ne- not advice you know had dainty steps or anything the bear was as is bigger a polar bear and was depicted in prehistoric cave paintings so they tried to make some history but the cape patters. You know they didn't write history. They <unk> cave paintings. There's more and more evidence in modern humans have played a determinant role in the decline and extinction of large mammals once they spread around the planet they us starting around fifty thousand years ago said bio geologist. Every motion of the university of tuebingen has happened not just by hunting these animals to extinction thanks bye causing demographic decline of keystone species such as very large urban wars herbivores that led ecosystem collapse and cascade of further extinctions. Thank god nothing like that. It's going to happen again because scientists have long debated whether the extinction of the cave bear result of cooling climate reduced vegetation or or of human hunting and encroachment but the latest study discovered the cave bears declined predated cooling associated with the most recent ice age and he lives in caves. What's the problem go inside is one of the researchers of the bears population had remained stable during to long cold stretches and multiple other cooling periods and you know what the it's it's not just bipeds. It's not just intelligent bipeds. It's really the us. Science scientists say the before the arrival of homo sapiens the cave bears population had remained robust even though it shared his territory with neanderthals and they went extinct at their home and say homo sapiens invaded your asia if he says subdue he he means sub frigging do dominion jumped we they he it was given to was we. We didn't ask for it. We didn't go down to the store and say i'll have <hes> i'll have <hes> i have two pounds of dominion nyan pleased that wasn't us. It was like in a book in the thing and the thing right now we come to the weekend. The president trump's world. It seems like it's this world but it's really not <hes> <hes> first of all before we get to that it should be noted in the interests of journalistic accuracy which you know. I'm crazy about now that <hes> former vice president. Joe biden delivered no gaffes this week. He didn't call any city by the wrong name. He didn't call all any british prime minister by the wrong name so good on your joe. Keep it up now for trump <hes> he in the same in the same vein of giving credit where credit's due this week. He did not call anyplace. Replace toledo not even toledo he did call in twitter terms messaged. The prime minister of israel be netanyahu who is in the middle of a very <hes> <hes> probably his roughest election campaign because he's already old also at the same time under indictment for several <hes> corruption type things so he's got. He's having not the not the easiest way <hes> easiest route to victory at the ballot box. The president president trump called on netanyahu to avoid looking weak by banning to american congresswomen who had to be muslims omar and received two leib from visiting israel. <hes> the basis for that was <hes> trump president trump said they hate israel and all jews he didn't call for the banning of the guys who marched in charlottesville and said jews will not replace us but i don't think they wanted to go israel so there you go anyway. The to congresswoman were were had scheduled a fact finding visit they have supported the divestment estimate divestiture movement against israel the the boycott movement that is to say <hes> because of israel's continued treatment of the palestinians in the occupied territories and then one of the congresswoman rec- to leave said she <hes> one of the purposes is a additional purposes of her visit was to visit her grandmother and then the israeli government backtracked and issued a <hes> and okay for her to visit her grandmother lives in the west bank on humanitarian grounds but she had to sign a thing saying that she wouldn't advocate the <hes> <hes> the boycott of israel while she was on the trip and she accepted the offer and then thought thought about it and then said this is a by the way the only democracy in the middle east and stand for free speech last. I looked but they just i would have to say no not not i. I'm not gonna talk about this at the present time. Thank you very much now. Maybe as okay <hes> you know. It's hard to know <hes> when the president is president trump is engaged in projection or misdirection in his tweeting activities <hes> but certainly it seemed like <hes> a change of subject to put it mildly when it was reported reported later in the week that he had discussed with his staff the idea of you the united states buying greenland. I said buying greenland well. It's it's not as messy as puerto rico right and that <hes> aroused a certain amount of rizza -bility in the public media and so <hes> late in the week the word was issued forth from the resonance of the occupant that he was just joking in short this week for the first time that teams look beyond our borders and for the businessman through chief executive. It's becoming clear clear that foreign policy could be a game changer or at least a rain delay. Mike my greatest secretary. Are you stayed well. I'm proud to be the second sir and i hope i won't be the last. I know now people are saying you want to quit and run for the the senate wherever you from getting some pressure from the kansas g._o._p.'s but frankly i'd much rather stay on your dame same. That's good. That's loyal. Loyal is good. You and i agree on that. You know what important don't mike was that i agree and and now look some very smart people have been briefing me on resources in geopolitics geo everything else i can tell you that this these there's people from john bolton shop at the n._s._a. Actually they happen to be interns at breitbart but look here's the deal yes sir green land the the one reverted one that they are looking for candidates shoulder. You know it's bigger than south america right. That's right right there. Actually it's not bigger it just all right right. He just looks that way. You don't believe my lying eyes get. The projections are interesting. That's what kellyanne husband says about my tweets anyway. Look the breitbart kids say it's got all this oil. Timber rubber knows what denmark's donate anything with it. I mean until breitbart even heard of it well. It's definitely an interesting piece. Look mike. I'm incredibly stable genius about a lot of things but but i really know something about real estate i mean this place is an island. What if our property ran the whole damn thing against the danish forgot to get maps or something. Sir klay played but we could spend a couple of minutes on this brexit thing. Here's your story. We make a trade deal with boras the likes of which the chinese spin heads at but this greenland you think so here's your task for this week. When you want me to talk to the danish foreign minister about selling greenland show dame sharp mike. I don't know where i'd be without you. Eh and those breitbart kids so right talk to the danes. Put them at ease with a couple of ikea's jokes then tell them we know that greenland's adrain if they don't sell it the whole economy and he goes down the tubes. Tell them we'd be glad to take it off their hands if they just spend a little more nato betty at a lot more so i'm going right off. The danish government the opportunity to give us greenland and exchange. They'll pay more on defense. Now you thinking like a diplomat not like that stupid rex tillerson yeah. You could tell him an idea like this. He died she and a rally that bit gets big laughs serve as probably <hes> <hes> project best caridad closer to the time when i decide whether or not to run for the senate in kansas. I thought we made that decision in a way. I guess we did show can you do it sure if not me who i didn't have the heart to tell him that <hes> i swedish. Maybe he really knew that. I'd like to thank baby great connection mr president. I don't want to boast but we have the best tech people in my country. Of course you don't have the immigrants taking up all the good tech jobs jobs. It's a disgrace. Volition did a great job following my advice about banning the to disaster congresswoman from your your wonderful country there. I was getting similar advice from my own item though i don't have the people that check but i'm sure you're number's going through the roof through the roof like on fire right. We're not out of the woods yet. Had this is a tough campaign. Okay his story just for the sake of you avoiding looking weak he was more of the disgusting people in my country should banned from coming into your pelosi rachel maddow megan kelly. I didn't know megan kelly was still in the air. She isn't like my son. John junior says in the frigate jungle when you're down. They kick you so you don't get up again. That's all you get detail aim <music> and he is the big one oprah was the president i have literally zero objection to you thinking of me as part of your team but over seems a little too uncontroversial to drag a doll. She's not uncontroversial when i get through with her. I'm just saying you look weak. If you don't tell all these leftist women we stuff on their heads or stuff in their noses stuff in there wherever that they're not welcome to they come in the country trying to stir things up. You know donald honestly. I'm not sure banning. These women is going to do much to help. My campaign use usually members of my team. Don't turn down my tasks. If anybody found out it might make me look weak. Maybe after i win another term kellyanne mr president tough week. Hey your husband doesn't help nothing i can do. Stir lifetime is already talking to us about a series lifetime that illusion. I wasn't president. I could call my friends at n._b._c. n._b._c. It's okay so you said on the phone be special. Counter communication staff is ready. Did i do too big for the press secretary too big for the communications director. It's the same person bingo so did his you. The story we leaked about might be interested in buying greenland's sure we all worked very hard to redirect attention away from the tweet about the congresswoman and that certainly don't be mike pompeo found in from copenhagen open haganah haymond haven. They're not interested show. Obviously there's major face to be saved here. Kellyanne you the benched gnashed you read my mind like a frigging mind reader so we do a super league and revealed the joking hala von kinda throws bike pompeii but just between you and me i get and she's going to get up and run away before the bus even gets you. The new team new tasks sane mission. We're gonna make making america great again great again now. The world is his boardroom <music> this week. It hurts even more not to watch uh-huh. Ah ah ah manmade made me just say <music> to ensure and down down the person new kitchen the way due to dr seuss <music> do <music> set me and that's why a mess with hey. John clay scared scare them. I've got go skiing and now that i just want to say one way or just one yes sir. I listening micro-plastics <hes>. Do you think about guess what will come said lot to think about this week. Rain water samples collected across ross colorado and analyzed under a microscope contained a rainbow of plastic fibres as well as beads and charged findings shocked u._s. Geological survey researcher gregory wetherby who'd been collecting the samples in order to study nitrogen pollution. My results purely accidentally said to the guardian consistent with another recent study that found micro-plastics in the pyrenees suggesting plastic particles travel with by the wind for hundreds if not thousands of miles the studies. You know we'll talk about this. Other studies in a minute major contributor is trash to researcher at penn state more than ninety eighty percent plastic waste is recycled and it breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces plastic fibers also break off your clothes every time you wash them says this researcher and i wonder if you don't plastic close with her then still true of course there's leisure suits sure looking plastic particles a byproduct of a number of industrial processes as well. It's impossible to trace the tiny pieces back to their sources but almost anything that's made a plastic could be shedding particles into the atmosphere masirah. Those particles get incorporated into water droplets. When it rains then washed into rivers lakes basin oceans and filter into groundwater sources scientists have been studying plastic pollution in in the ocean for more than a decade. They can only account for one percent of it. They know even less about the amount of plastic in freshwater but wait. There's more new contaminant turned up in western in lake superior. I guess it'll be lake inferior pretty soon. Tiny snarls tangles in shreds of plastic period by the hundreds of thousands mystifying scientists and minnesota. Uh pollution regulators. The level of debris doesn't approach the soup found near hawaii the pacific garbage patch it does exceed what's been found in the north atlantic though the discovery prompted researchers at the university of minnesota duluth to expand testing to other minnesota lakes and the fish that inhabit them exact source again of the micro-plastics remains a puzzle. It's not clear yet how to gauge their impact on people aquatic life on the environment and when it does become clear it'll be too late. It's on the earliest slope of emerging as an environmental issue says a manager at the minnesota mike <hes> pollution control agency and of course we know they could survive indefinitely because plastic known degrade don't do nothing but stay there tiny pieces of plastic and found an ice cores drilled in the arctic by a u._s. Led team of scientists underscoring the threat micro-plastics found an ice core samples. The researchers used a helicopter to land on ice floes and retrieve the samples apples during an eighteen day icebreaker expedition through the north northwest packet passage when we look at closys. It's all very very visibly contaminated when you look at it with the right tools. It felt a little bit like a punch. In the gut said a graduate student researcher at the university of rhode island rhode island who conducted the initial onboard analysis of the cores the plastic just jumped out in both its abundance and it scale said bruce liu bryce loose an oceanographer at the university of rhode island and and what's one of the major sources of plastic pollution cigarette butts erode as they are disposed of not really dispose of just thrown into smaller and smaller plastic plastic bits according to the york dispatch the micro shards in cigarette butts join the rest of the stuff for over twenty years cigarette butts have been the number one debris item reported in virginia during coastal cleanups according to the executive director of clean virginia waterways and <hes>. That's been borne out by beach cleanup in less than a mile. I love shoreline over less than an hour. Volunteers can pick up more than three thousand cigarette butts far outpacing the number of plastic food wrappers from recent cleanup as well as packaging and bottles so there's the good news oh you missed it and now the apologies the week <music> kittens puppies getting hobbies getting some good news the family of the gunman in dayton ohio known as toledo wpro who killed nine people including his sister have removed his glowing obituary from a local funeral home website and apologized this week for being intentive and not acknowledging the terrible tragedy. He created in their grief that presented the sun. They knew which inouye reduces the horror of his last act. We are deeply. Sorry said the family the original obituary not going to mention the guy's name described him as a funny articulate and intelligent man was striking blue eyes and a kind smile while i guess you'd be star texas. Police have apologized after image of two white overseers on horseback leading handcuffed black man by a rope caused an outcry online galveston police chief vernon hail to the technique was acceptable in some scenarios officers showed poor judgment there was no malicious content and he's changed department policy to prevent the use of this technique coach and givenchy both <unk> this week for selling t shirts that mischaracterized chinese territories territories as independent countries just one day after research took heat for a similar design. The luxury labels each issued apologies on chinese networking platform waybill all following criticism from netizens and their chinese brand ambassadors. If you can't be an influence or you got to be a brand ambassador lassiter selling t shirts were coaching givenchy that presented taiwan and hong kong as independent nations. Oh no not that supermodel model when a coach embassador distanced herself from the brand in a statement posted the way both at all times china's sovereignty and territorial integrity must not be violated well of course supermodels talk like that norway's public broadcaster at apologize for area cartoon which scrabbled player forms the word quote jewish jewish swine. It's one word in norwegian nine. Children with disabilities were stranded overnight in north carolina airport art prompting american airlines to apologize. They were flying home from summer camp when their plane had mechanical issue in charlotte who hasn't crystal jewelry makers far off skied he joined the foreign brand apologizing to china from plying hong kong was an independent country so our off ski takes full responsibility and sincerely apologizes to the people of china and as well as to our collaborative partners and brand ambassador ms jiang shuqing deeply disappointed due to misleading communication on china's national sovereignty company also apologize on way bo in chinese pair of instagram influencers have come under fire after video surfaced of the couple playing with holy water at a balanese temple in indonesia sabina dolezelova and then soukous luca from the czech republic alex. They didn't know they were at holy temple when she playfully slap water from a fountain onto his butt and they shared the video the moment with some eighty five thousand and followers bali senator condemned the pair in reposted the clip valley senator accused the instagram famous couple of harassing the temple located in the ubud monkey forest. We're so sorry about the video from yesterday we dishonored the holy temple and holy water newborn and we didn't know it so we are so sorry about what happened in apologized to you said s- luca video response if allah terry contribution was proposed to the local local village according to the manager of the influencers. Yes influencers have managers. I think they can get ripped off to see and denmark's prime minister issued an official apology this week to victims who suffered abusing care homes during the country's post world war two period period politics to the victims on behalf denmark for which he can described as one of the darkest chapters in the country's history. I would like to look each of you. In the i say the only right thing. Sorry sorry for the injustice done to you you and your loved ones. Those are here in those who were those who will follow on behalf denmark sorry. She didn't look him in the eye. She just had to press conference. The apologies the week later this gentleman copyrighted feature this broadcast <music> <music> <music> yeah just slow down. We'll be hot for long ladies gentlemen. That's going to be glued this week's edition show the program returns next week week the same time on these radio stations and at the time of your choosing on your audio device choice. Hey google tell alexa alexa. She's ugly and just like telling alexa. She's ugly if you'd agree to join with them which is already. Thank you very much. Attila shosha po to the san india go pittsburgh chicago in hawaii desk. Sachs's always depend paul said and thomas wall shared w._w. New orleans for help with the day's program the e-mail address to send feedback to me emmy. The playlist of the music heard here on this program and your chance to get karzai ars. I talk t shirts who else where else all at harry shared dot com or engage me on twitter at the harry shearer. It's all about engagement ban <music> <music> own facebook apologize freezing a local man's account free posted an air force lewis's cover photo in denver north carolina near charlotte facebook apology the weight the show come see from century of progress producton originates through the facilities of w._w. Ano- new orleans flagship activation of the changes easy radio network so long from the crescent city.

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Life Lessons From Al Roker; Climate Expert On Shifting Policy

Here & Now

42:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Life Lessons From Al Roker; Climate Expert On Shifting Policy

"From npr in wbz. You are i'm tanya moseley. I'm scott tong. It's here in now. This will cain either took the lives of at least sixty people across eight states and that includes eleven new yorkers in basement apartments in queens who died from horrific flash flooding in louisiana. Some may have to wait. Six weeks for power raised a lot of pressing questions about climate change unpredictability of our weather. And how to plan for it. Let's alice hill. Senior fellow for energy and the environment at the council on foreign relations. She worked climate resilience in the obama. White house in her book is the fight for climate after cove. Nineteen alice welcome. Thank you so glad to join. You know we're seeing extreme events across the map just in the us. We have flooding in new york and we headed in michigan earlier this year. Power and water out in the south on the gulf coast and fires across the western part of the country with all these fancy climate and weather tools. we have. why are these specific events in specific places. Still so hard to forecast well. It's very hard to model specific events. That's one of the challenges. We have with our understanding the climate. We have a much better understanding of the broader trends. But when you get down to the specific will storm. Hit this location on this date with this much rain. It's really hard to predict and it takes a lot of computing power and we just haven't invested as deeply in that yet now in towns and cities across the country. I mean we're learning big questions about how we live in and who lives aware right. I mean we. We have an idea who might live in a low cut rate basement apartment in queens so often this seems to strike those who are. The least well-off yeah absolutely This hits the poor because they often are living in accommodations for people of color have been in areas that have been redlined which it turns out are more prone to disasters those particular areas and then of course the disabled have a harder time evacuating during a event as to the elderly children and sometimes many countries women also have a harder time during these really extreme weather events that cause harm Now in your book you write about being more resilient going forward in specific places not just the broad climate models. How did to policymakers to all of us. Even start to tackle this question of being being more. Resilient given our cities have kind of grown up over hundreds of years and we kinda live where we live. Well you point out a excellent point because our cities have been developed but they've been developed on an assumption that the climate will remain stable. Climate is no longer stable. And is that changes some of the choices we've already made. Don't look good and it's very important. That is we make choices about where and how we live going. Forward we account for this risk but right now we have more americans moving into areas of risk than not and we need to change that for us to be safe. And what's on your top of your list. Ideas for policy prescriptions to address this. I mean this is a long-term challenger. Absolutely and i think the place we need to start which is Very basic is we need a national adaptation plan. We don't have one in. That means that we have a sort of a piecemeal or a sprinkling of projects designed to address these risks but overall if you step back and you think well this really add up to making united states safer in the future. It's a real risk that it won't on the government accountability office which is the watchdog for the federal government has pointed out repeatedly without a national plan. We are risk of not prioritizing the right investments and continuing to see communities being bailed out after disaster rather than investing in risk reduction in advance for for for a lot of money in your writing. Your new book. You have drawn a parallel to cova. Nineteen that the same way. We fought the pandemic to protect vulnerable people. We need to look at climate change impacts kind of the same way. What are the connections here. Well it's a catastrophic risk of that is the pandemic but it's shown the rest of the world and all of us would catastrophic risk can do. It's also taught us what we can do about it. So that would be weaken create safety nets that allow for the most vulnerable to be better prepared for these events we can stockpile goods and and be prepared to surge as we see compounding consecutive very damaging events occurring at once. You know a friend of mine at fema told me they just never planned to have to respond to all fifty states six territories at once with the pandemic much less wildfires and other things. Okay well that is alice hill. Senior fellow for energy and environment at the council on foreign relations. Alice thanks for taking the time. Thank you what a pleasure. Let's look more closely at another signal of climate change in the great lakes toxic. Algae is a problem in some of the lakes it's usually caused by warm. Temperatures and agricultural runoff but lake superior is cold and deep and surrounded by forests not fields. This summer scientists are trying to figure out why sporadic blooms have appeared on the lake's southern shore and whether they can keep the blooms from growing from member station w. w. m. Susan bents has the story. It's a calm clear. Morning and ashland wisconsin along lake superior southern shore scientists hudson and a couple of his northland college. Students are heading out to gather samples. Shawarma gin bay. They'll sample each site six times over the summer to try to figure out what makes for a welcoming environment for toxic blue-green algae. One of hudson's tools is a long tube-like instrument stocked with sensors. We just lower this thing with this cable. Down into the water from the surface to the bottom to the west off the shore of cornucopia university of wisconsin milwaukee researcher todd miller's lending his expertise to the lake superior research lab does that toxin analysis. But we also do real time monitoring using data and. That's what we're out here to do. Today miller and two students designed the system. He's deploying off. Meyer speech one of the most popular spots within the apostle islands national lakeshore. That's where i meet national park service aquatic ecologist rental francois. She points to todd miller's buoy bobbing in the bay. It's kind of a little yellow guy right out there. The real Great attribute of this new buoy. That's been deployed in kobe. Is that It is generating data in real time. In fact i just checked my phone right before We chatted and the water temperatures are. They're running around. Eighteen plus degrees centigrade with recording also Chlorophyll and cyanobacteria pigment so those are indicators of how much allergies in the water and how much santa bacterias in the water. So we can look at that in real time and i could for example if those numbers were starting to climb i could go up and you know. Tell the ranger at the ranger. Kiosk there Maybe it's a good day to keep an eye out for any kind of surface gum. Love soi is an upbeat type. But she's dead serious about harmful. Algae cyanobacteria commonly called blue-green algae have a variety of looks including resembling pea soup. Some types not all can produce toxins dangerous to fish wildlife pets and people. Meyer speech is a favourite launch for lake superior kayakers but lefrancois says. No one would've wanted to paddle here three years ago after a huge storm hit people down here throughout the day on the first day of the bloom. Where reporting you know. Green colored water surface comes on the water all the way from here at the meyer. Speech launched point over toward the sea caves area east but it lasted probably seven to ten days and it stretched over probably almost one hundred miles of lake shore. Six years earlier a bloom popped up and quickly. Dissipated lafrance was says she was among the scientists who wrote it off as a fluke but the two thousand eighteen events. She says set off a wave of sampling research. Scientists no nutrients especially phosphorus feed blue-green algae allowing it to grow but law. Francois says they haven't yet figured out what would make the harmful. Algae fountain lake superior switch on its toxin production. It differs a little bit for different species. And unfortunately we don't know what the what makes this one Go boom yet bob. Sterner slab at the university of minnesota duluth pivoted nearly all of its research energy to lake superior's blue-green algae issue in twenty eighteen right now. Latex gloved students are analyzing matt hudson samples from shawarma megan bay next l. head out to gather samples from other streams shoreline areas and rivers sterner says scientists concur. Climate change is driving lake superior's blooms. We just have a higher likelihood of really really big storms now than we did and so if all of this is right the lake was sort of on the edge and then it warmed up enough and we got these big storms and that just kicked it over the edge and now we're seeing these phenomena that's what we think though sterner hopes building a body of scientific data can help pinpoint areas where conservation programs can reduce the risk of algae feeling run on though we. We just can't shy away from affected if climate is an important driver. That's a global problem. And we're not gonna fix it here in duluth or milwaukee or you know only as part of the earth system for hearing now. I'm susan vance longtime today. Show weatherman in co anchor. Al roker recently turned sixty seven but he shows no sign of slowing down. He was in new orleans covering hurricane ida this week and haters on twitter. Who said he was too old to be doing that kind of thing he had this to say on. Msnbc's the sunday show with jonathan kaye. Part screw you up up okay. Talker to them. I will drop them like a bag of dirt. That fighting spirit is all over l. Wrokers latest book along with a few life lessons. He's learned over four decades of telling us the weather. It's called you look so much better. In person. true stories of absurdity and success. I spoke with al roker about the book on skype when it was published in two thousand. Twenty as you right. You weren't always confident. Tv personality that we know now. In fact you were a nerdy highschool av club kind of guy and you write that while in college. You got your first job as a weekend weather forecaster in syracuse new york. And tell us the story from there by department chairman. Dr luo donald the late dr laura. Donald decided it worked at the station w. h. Anyway he put me up for the job and You know i went down. I did the audition and they said okay. We'll let you know. And i just kept calling the news director and back in the day. You gotta remember this. One thousand nine seventy four. There were actually switchboard. Operators and the switchboard operators name was rosy. And you got to the point where she knew my name. I kept calling to ask the news director. Well oh dear. He's not in right now but tell him he called and finally there's one time she put me through and he said look i i gotta get you off my ass. You've got the job. And i said okay. I didn't ask if one i started. What do i do yes. Yes yes and but that was my start in television. That is the theme of this. Entire book is really taking a step and saying yes to so much I wanna to talk with you. Though about the emotion and the book. I mean you cried at work out. I mean they tell us that is like the number one. Cardinal rule is not to cry at work. tv nbc so cutthroat. I mean what lessons do you want people to take away from this story. This you bring heart to your work. I think it's about passion and being able to tell people it's okay to be passionate. It's okay to show emotion. I had a very good role model in my dad and that he was a very emotional demonstrative person and so i learned from him that you know as a man you. It's okay to cry. So cain show emotion. Yeah one of the great love. Stories of our time on television is really you and legendary weather caster and personality willard. Scott learned about the power of mentor ship. Just by watching youtube interact with each other on the today show. It's a small but really powerful part of your book. Well he's just a terrific human being. he's he literally is like my second dad. In fact he's the same age now that my dad would have been at. He was still alive. Most people in business are not generous enough to reach out to to akali little on a total stranger as he did that. Out of the blue called me invited me to dinner. And from that day on we've had this we didn't work together. We worked at different stations in washington. Dc and then. He got plucked from dc to go to the today show and i went to. Cleveland worked at the nbc station and we kept in touch and then i moved to new york To work at w. nbc and he was the one in Said look you know. It's time for me to step back a little bit. You ought to put out there Ed so the generosity and the just the sharing is something. That's always stayed with it. Yeah i want to ask you about something else. Oh we're in a moment. Where so many media. People are sharing their stories of experiencing racism in the workplace or or racist remarks from co workers. You tell the story in this book an anchor. You worked with early in your career. Who said something racist to you on air on air not even in the newsroom Can you tell that story and what you want readers to learn from that story at the time i was working in cleveland and our station was in downtown in downtown. Wasn't great spot at that point and there was a homeless gentleman. Who's african happen to be african. american and one night are anchorman. Doug was going to his car. And this guy ran up vitamin bopped. Him on the back of the head and ran off and there was no harm. No foul It's basically something that all of us wanted to do to doug at one time or another. Well it's now six o'clock in world news and his wife slash kgo anchor. Mona starts to introduce me and doug interruptions mona before you introduce ow ow i if you heard but last night after the eleven o'clock news one of your people attacked me. And that's one of those time standstills moments. You're not quite sure what to say. And i just looked at him. And i said doug. Why would a weatherman attack you and then just turned to. My single cameron went off into the forecast at what i did know. Of course the switchboard was flooded. People are outraged and he was suspended demoted to a reporter and then eventually within six or seven months left the station. I could have gotten really angry on air. And i felt that it was better and the point was made by kind of pointing out the ridiculousness of the statement not everything requires a sledgehammer sometimes a chisel at a small hammer could create more impact than brute force and a quick wit because al. I don't even know if i would have come up with that. Line that quickly. Well look every now. And then like i say a broken clocks right twice a day. You mentioned your father quite a few times He was a bus driver in queens new york and he gave you advice so many parents of color give their kids that you have to work twice as hard and be twice as good as the kid next to you. Our kids are experiencing such a different life than we did. A lesson that you impart on your your kids today. I still do even before. George floyd as we've become more aware of different standards of policing and especially because i have a a black sun with all the kids i look. You can't act the way your white friends do they. Like son takes the subway. And you know kids sometimes just for final. Jump the turnstile. Well you know you. It's okay if you're white friends do it. But if it's a group of you you'll be the one that's picked out. And of course he should be in any case but especially dealing with the police. It's yes sir no sir. You don't try to think funnier show off and it wasn't until all of this that i i was able to crystalize what i feel every day. And that is i involuntarily breath aside relief when my son comes home every day. And he's a kid who's got some special needs and he. He's a big kid. He's got a deep voice he sometimes. He's not aware of the space that he takes. Could bump somebody. i just worry. yeah. I wanna talk with you about way. Most of us know your journey and this book is called. You look so much better in person which. I chuckled because as a former television reporter. I've heard this so many times. I also heard i wanna know you've heard this. I've also heard you're not as big as i thought you were. When people seem the opposite. I thought you were a lot taller and i gave the book that title because it literally. I hear it every day. I would go out to the plaza shake hands. Somebody will say every day someone will say. Oh my gosh you look so much better in person and and you know they don't need it as an insult and so your thank you but do about really a compliment. I make my living on tv. Yeah is it true that despite having to get up at three forty five every morning for decades. You've only overslept. Once yes technically. I did oversleep at the time. I was doing a two hour morning show before the today show on the weather channel. Wake up without so. The show was on at five. I woke up at five twenty. G's so i called in. I said all right. I'll be. I'll be there by six and i made it by six o'clock and no no offense the weather channel but that was the weather channel the big show the today show. I was on time for. So i don't quite understand why people were like it was in usa today for gosh sake. I mean we're gonna end it right here you've answered and we are moving on. I know it actually is a testament to have to get up that early every day and never wake up so i think it's why people really just admire it. You know well thank you l. You know ultimately. This book is about optimism. I mean is that right and and if so how do you hold onto that through all your decades of broadcasting a believer in the best parts of people until they show me those other sides. And i think that especially today we have to be optimistic. We have to be realistic. Going to be optimistic. And i considered such an honor and a privilege one of if not the last interview with john lewis. I got to talk with him. I asked him. I said you were out there in the trenches does what you're seeing today. Give you up. And he said it gave him such great hope for this country so all those young people of all colors genders out there. He said as he says we've gone too far. We aren't going back at those young people out there. Give me hope. Here's a man who is seen triumphs and tragedies is still optimistic was till the very end and to me. That's the lesson today. Show weatherman in anchor. Al roker speaking with me in july of twenty twenty about his book. You look so much better person true stories of absurdity and success over this last year and a half the world's been through a lot so on this season the story or podcast will hear stories. Reminding us that even when times are hard we can still begin again. Listen to our new season wherever you get your podcast. We're seeing signs of a slowing. Us economy today. After a summer of frenetic hiring employers added just two hundred and thirty five thousand jobs in august as from the labor department this morning and to economists. This is a disappointing surprise. what happened. Let's go to scott horsely. Npr's chief economics correspondent and scott. Cova kovic dacoven. That was one economist. Tweet upon seeing these luke. Coal job numbers. Today is the pandemic the story here. Yes the pandemic is definitely the story here and not entirely a surprise. I think economists expected to see some slowdown but maybe not as much of a slowdown as we actually saw in august. You know there's been a real spike. In corona virus infections hospitalizations and deaths in recent week and that that spike has taken some of the air out of the tires of jobs recovery. And and we see that in this in this labor department report now. Where does this report suggests. The jobs actually fell off now in the summer hiring really picked up and leisure and hospitality and retailing a lot of kind of went back out of the house to to buy these services where they fall off right throughout the pandemic Restaurants and retailers have been Sort of the canary in the coal mine For good and for bad they've been the indicator and that was the story here as well Restaurants after adding a quarter million jobs in july lost forty. Two thousand jobs in august retailers also lost jobs in august whenever The case counts have spiked during this pandemic. People have gotten more cautious about going out to eat or going out to shop in person. Travel those kinds of things and and we definitely see that in the august jobs numbers now. Let's step back a little from just august which we look back across the pandemic. We're still five million jobs short of where we were before. Covert where longer term do we jobs growing in this economy. Well we we continue to see a job gains in august for example in warehousing transportation Because people are still shopping and they're doing a lot more shopping online these days that's been a boon for people who work in amazon warehouses and dr. ups vans and that sort of thing. That's in fact. The only industry where employment totals right now are higher than they were pre pan-demic but we're seeing gains in other industries as well factories for example have done a lot of hiring. They actually hired more people in august than they did in july and they would have hired moore still if they could've found more workers. We got a survey of factory managers this week that showed Demand for factory products is going gangbusters. Right now But they're having trouble keeping up with both parts and workers and finally scott. You often tell us this is just one month's number here right. We had gang buster job numbers in the summer. August was was quite disappointing. What do we make of this one. Apparently dramatic month. Well sometimes there is statistical. noise In in these reports. And you have to keep that in mind so some of this may be noise but i think this is also a strong signal that This economic recovery still depends very much on gaining control of the pandemic August we lost some control. Were not doing as well. Getting people vaccinate is we need to. And it's those case counts go up and the hospitalizations go up. Adesco up has taken a toll on the economy. And we're seeing that very clearly in this report this morning. yeah. I i recall talking to economists who said the leading economic indicator is the virus. Sydney seem to be suggesting that much as well scott horsely. Npr's chief economic correspondent. Thanks for the time. Good wicked the who. Much of the country from the deep south to the northeast is trying to recover from a raging hurricane ida more than sixty people are dead across eight states at least forty eight in the northeast which saw record rainfall. Some were swept away in flooded. Cars others drowned in basement apartments in new york. We're going to go to several spots. Beginning with new york. And jen chung is executive editor editor at gotha missed gender people trapped in their basement apartments. This is heartbreaking. Is this an economic reality of life in new york that so many people have to live in these spaces. Absolutely new york is one of the most expensive housing markets in the world and for many people the most vulnerable immigrants people who are working gig jobs basement. Apartments are sometimes the only places they live and many of the landlords of these apartments are just middle class homeowners many immigrants themselves who want to give these people who are looking for opportunity a chance to so it is a very at this point unregulated housing stock. And this morning. The mayor was talking about new initiatives to try to formalize evacuation procedures in order to make sure that people who live in basement dwellings aren't forgotten about now. I don't know if these these tenants knew about any emergency warnings. I understand. there's a system for new yorkers to to try to provide. Some kind of you know this is coming. Is this the kind of warning dad. Most or all new yorkers really pay to so this is the real issue that a lot of people are asking the mayor and governor about was city and state adequately warning residents about this threat of ida and things you know newer here about flash flood warnings a lot but they don't really know what that means. It could only happen in a certain specific neighborhood. I was pretty unusual because it was a storm. Not coming from the coast. I think a lot of people in their heads might think of storm like superstorm. Sandy coming from the ocean as being more impactful versus something coming across the country but ida hit a weather front which then push more cold air up into the up in the atmosphere and then all this moisture came down and the other big issue with. Ida's that so much rain came in in one hour or two hours making it really sudden for people to react and okay you know sorry in very can ask you briefly about the subway system. How did it fare what what happens now on a good day. The mta is pumping out. Thirteen million gallons of water. And when it's dry so for it to be hit with this historic rainfall it had to suspend service pretty much across the city and then spend the next day pumping out inspecting all the tracks making sure the electricity working and you know yesterday morning. There were conductors waiting for trains to get out of those train yards because some of those train yards are in queens areas that can get flooded and the mta's currently trying to continue. Its resiliency work from sandy. Okay thank you. That is jen. Chung executive editor at gotham missed tanya. Let's bring in. Kenneth burns he's south jersey reporter for whyy and kin. There were a couple of tornadoes that were brought on by the storm. Tell us about those in the damage. They've caused tiger. they were actually seven tornadoes. Four pensive yes. Seven four in pennsylvania to new jersey and then there was one that started in new jersey and then lifted in pennsylvania when it was finally done the two biggest ones one is south jersey. This is a local hill new jersey. No fatalities that with that one. But two people were injured but this was a pretty strong twister estimated peak winds about one hundred fifty miles per hour. The tornado was on the ground for about twenty minutes for a nearly thirteen mile. Path destroyed in a couple of farms were flattened as well and then on the pennsylvania side this this Tornado actually hit north of center city philadelphia and montgomery county It was on the ground for about fifteen minutes that peak moments were about one thirty miles per hour. One person was killed during that particular tornado. And there was at least a few minor. Injuries overall four storm-related deaths in the pennsylvania suburbs and then there's the flooding in philly the schuylkill river flooded its banks cresting at more than sixteen feet. What kind of flood damage are. Are you seeing there right now. The let me back up a second because There's another expressway. That was still flooded out. This is called the vine street expressway and for those not familiar with philadelphia. This is the highway that connects. I ninety five with the schuylkill expressway which runs along the schuylkill river So those are flooded parts of the vice street heading towards ninety five have open but the majority of the road is still closed. The schuylkill river peak late yesterday morning or late thursday morning. It's now below fled steaks. And it's a case of pumping water out and then the water returning to its normal flow on its own. The video of those highways that are flooded it's just astounding. I mean some parts of them look like rivers exactly and and all of my years of even coming to the philly area. Even before i moved here. I've never seen a highway flooded out like that. Especially one in the middle of what is essentially a downtown area. Yeah so you're saying that They many of them are now reopening today. But there's probably still lots of cleanup underway and the days and weeks to come lots of cleanup a still. You still have at least a dozen roads. Closed particularly in pennsylvania But for right now the main one of the major highways in philadelphia is still being pumped out. That's whyy reporter. Kenneth burns thank you so much. Thank you thank you all right. And let's go to new orleans where teagan wenlin is with member station w. w. n. o. In new orleans hurricane item made landfall sunday as one of the most powerful category four storms. The president is visiting the region today and taking. Just tell us. What is your neighborhood. Look like right now. Yeah so. I'm in the seventh ward which is right next to the tra may and we're still without power here and more than seven hundred thousand people but sixty percent of the city are without well. That's for the entire region but sixty percent of the city is without power. So you know. The city's really hobbled at a time that you know. It's the hottest time of the year. And many of the folks who stayed instead of evacuating people who couldn't afford to evacuate so there's a lot of elderly and infirm. People in my neighborhood who are really struggling to keep cool right now. One of my neighbors just wedding down rags and laying them on his disabled father in order to keep him cool so it's pretty devastating. Wow and how about water supply gasoline. That's really the big issue right now. It's a resource issue. There's long lines at the gas stations. You know we have some damage refineries here so there's tons of gas nearby but the problem is getting it to new orleans because the systems are so hobbled in the gas stations. Don't have power so they're running off generators so there's only a few gas stations that are that are set up with generators. There's longlines lines. Some folks told me there are waiting for upwards of seven hours fulfil up gas and then they're taking those cans back to power generators that are in some cases keeping you know many neighbors cool who have pulled in together and air conditioned one room in order to keep their most vulnerable. You know family members and neighbors cool now. You went this week to a place called la place and found people trapped in their homes. Tell me what you saw. Yeah it's pronounced the it's just up river new orleans. Yep it's it's along the mississippi river kind of a lower income working class area. A lot of the folks there work at local refineries and we met with some folks. You know that that was the place. New orleans hasn't had didn't have so much devastating structural damage but the places where the eye the storm really passed over did and so. The applause was just decimated. Their just trees ripped up at the roots. And how does that have lost. Their lives have been completely destroyed. A lot of trailer homes and we talked within an old old man named melvin. Caesar who's eighty two years old and he was stuck in his house. He couldn't afford to evacuate. Like i've heard over and over and over again here and the storm passed over ripped his roof off. No one found him for new days and he was in there in the heat and he uses a walker to get around and he said we talked to him just two days ago and he said nobody had come by with tarp food water and they had nothing can when lynn is reporter for ww. No in the orleans. Teagan thank you for having me and elsewhere on the show. We're taking a closer look at climate change and how we respond to more unpredictable weather you can find it at here now dot org About forty two million of us will be traveling this labor day weekend and your plans might include flying or driving but how about a train ride amtrak's california zephyr passenger train travels nearly twenty five hundred miles between chicago and the san francisco bay area and right in the middle is colorado passenger. Service has been returning to normal schedules after the worst of the pandemic. so let's take another ride across the state and back with colorado public radio's stena sieg. The plan is to take the california zephyr from the small high desert city of grand junction the farthest western stop and colorado to the farthest eastern. Stop in the state. fort morgan. A little town beyond him around the upstairs and put your tag over your seat. Okay okay thank you so much. I immediately head to the viewing car the most popular party train by a mile. Everyone isn't masks. But i can tell jessica tyson smiling. She's going to denver after spending her birthday in utah. Yeah it would've been faster by car but because it was my twenty first dollars. Like i really want to take the train. I haven't been on the train since i was seven. This when tyson's grandmother took her on this train to the resort town of glenwood springs. She did that with each of her grandkids. All thirty of them. Her grandma love trains. And i'm on the chain. It's like she's she's she's watching me. We continue east. A conveyor belt of sunbaked mesa's floating past glenwood springs is coming up next from small towns station head into a series of canyons that plunged into the colorado river rushing below unbelievable. It's i've never seen anything like it. Vicky bretton was knitting and looking at craggy walls. Hundreds of feet high looks like a cathedral at the top of a mountain just beautiful stone formations as we move along. Breton says a prayer to herself. She hopes that when she returns home to oakland reciting it again. We'll take her right back here. Everyone i meet talks about the beauty of the trip. Obviously seeing these like brand sites in the mountains now and tesla herron concede dramatic snowcapped peaks often the distance but she's also into the trains more ordinary views. Like the back of people's houses like backyards. Just kind of little bars. Little towns little junkyards graffiti and intimate window and communities along the tracks which herron has enjoyed from months as she slowly makes her way home to iowa stopping in various places and working remotely. The train is not everyone's probably the biggest complaint is at this long haul routes are often late also. Most don't have wifi. It can go for hours without even any cell service but people who love trains. Keep coming back train attendant to new well. I crossed colorado by train as a kid. What was then known as the rio grande saffir. And i remember telling my folk. Oh i describe all the toilets on this brain just work work out here but be careful what you ask. Republicans to one of his less glamorous duties but new well says he gives. Thanks every morning for this. John mark twain said if you love your job never workaday in your life. I mean twenty years. I've worked the get to denver by evening. Crowd gets off and on about eighty miles of flatland. Later we arrive at the americana streets of fort morgan more than ten hours after leaving. Grand junction. a head back home around sunrise the next morning a same stunning trip in reverse city mountains desert as we travel along the colorado river were treated to an unofficial california zephyr tradition. Being moved by voters the train is a pause between the notes. One of the few spaces where you get hours. Free of obligation time to just be nevada and maggie. Tracy is delighting in thi- brought books along. I brought work along. And i didn't haven't done any of it. All they do is sit and look out the window patients. They choose an amtrak here. We go grand junction. We're about an hour late but no-one here in the viewing car seems worried. That is not what taking the california zephyr is all about for here. And now i'm steve ac- you can keep the conversation going with us on twitter you can find me at tanya. Moseley and robin is at here now. Robin and i'm at tong. Scott and you can also get to know the remarkable team that puts this show together every day. Hardest warkentin radio. You'll find all of them at here and now dot. Org and click on meet the staff here now is the production of npr in wvu. Are i'm tanya mostly. I'm scott tong. It's here and now.

alice hill todd miller al roker new york queens hurricane ida council on foreign relations scott tong wbz tanya moseley Susan bents lake superior southern shore Shawarma gin bay scott horsely cornucopia university of wisco lake superior research lab nbc lefrancois Algae fountain lake matt hudson
EP 44: Indigenous Environmentalism

Breaking Green Ceilings

1:02:37 hr | 7 months ago

EP 44: Indigenous Environmentalism

"Welcome to breaking green ceilings. The podcasts that amplifies the diverse voices of those who committed protecting and sustainably managing our natural environment. I'm your host sup no mulkey. Let's get started today where he talking to deondraye smiles who is a phd candidate and the department of geography and citizen of the leech lake band of way. I reached out to d andre because he tweeted a few months back that he was going to byu teaching a course a string on indigenous environments activism at the ohio state university in addition he is pursuing an interesting dissertation research focus on historical and contemporary disrespect and disturbances of deceased indigenous bodies and indigenous burial grounds in his home state of minnesota. So those are the two topics. We focused on in this conversation. The indigenous environmental activism course that he's teaching and his dissertation on indigenous bodies and indigenous burial grounds in minnesota. This was an especially challenging interview. Because i had so many questions. De'andre andre and so it was really hard for me to pick and choose what i wanted to ask him and it's not just the situation where i have a challenge really myself in. Its with many of our guests as well. So i've decided that. From time to time i will invite a former guest to check-in continue the conversation and see what's changed in their lives. Since the last time we spoke. I think this will be fun because it allows us to follow our change makers on their journey and to build connection to whatever extent possible. All right well. I hope you enjoy the story. I'm really excited to have you on the podcast to talk to us about your post. Doc research as an indigenous geographer and also about of course that you'll be teaching and spring twenty twenty one that's on shenice environmental activism. But i i wanted to start off with asking you how did you develop your passion for the nutter environments but is a really root question stems from my childhood happened to grow up with a mother who was constantly shoeing me outside to go play and i would go outside and kind of explore in one of the things that we would do. Growing up in. Minneapolis is go to one of our local parks in around. Be outside and be close to the water at next to one of the many lakes in the city. And that's something that's always kinda stuck with me. I remember from my fifteenth birthday of having a birthday party or anything. That's kind of a traditional seeing that you would do in a birthday. My mom took me camping. We went up to the north shore lake superior. We spent a week camping out next to the lake shore and doing exploring and so that sets way stuck with me but i think another kind of background that describes my passion for the natural environment is based upon my own tribal identity initiative and in our creation story. We talk about the ways that are more than human like the animals are. Relatives have come together to create what we call turtle island and it comes with this lesson that we are intrinsically tied into nature that humans are not separate from it that were better than are more than human tin but we are interconnected with them and that we need to continue to work together in order to create a better future for all of us. And so that's been something that's been a really guiding force in my own. Academic work is gone through graduate school now. Transitioning to being a post doc and hopefully one day becoming a tenure track academic and so those things altogether have really kinda field. My passion for the natural environment Somebody that i'm really happy when i'm outside and out about which is pandemic has made it really tough because you're trying to stay away from people and trying to stay away from large crowds and it makes it tough to go down to the park here in the santa mile here in columbus and the makes it tough to go travel to try to go exploring did absolutely kills me that i'm an hour away from the foothills of the appalachians and i can truly tough to goldsboro because you don't know the risks that you put yourself through so i'm this somebody that's always really glad in really the happiest when i'm outside in in the environments and so with that kind of a background this kind of work that i do is natural no pun intended. It's allowed. Puns are lavished here. So you mentioned that you would go up to lake superior. I've never been there. And i'm just curious to know. What does it feel like. So it's really hard to describe feeling This might be kind of feel by a little bit homesickness for being home in minnesota but the things that are remember the most because i lived in a city called duluth for a number of years when i was in my master's degree which is on the far western end of the lake and so the scenic north shore was just outside of town. I found myself going up a lot when i was in graduate school. And one of the things that i really really remember Feeling really kinda cool like stiff breeze coming off. The lake. A lake has is really interesting. Moderating effect called the lake effect where during the summer. It'll be really really cool by the lake. Shore and then in the wintertime is actually warner next to the lake. Bennett is like further inland. For some reason but wow may not notice it in the really cold northern minnesota winters. But i just remember like the cool air and depending on what time of year. You're up there like the fall is absolutely gorgeous because the leaves turn colors up. They're usually about late september early october. So there's about a week and a half two weeks where is just as brilliant display of like changing colors on the trees in it. Sometimes it'll be really cloudy up there and overcast but it's still really pretty but other days it's released sunny up there at night time. If you're lucky enough and some parts of the north shore you can see. Aurora borealis really nighttime from northern minnesota is really good viewing spot for that. I mean outside of the cities of course spots the north shore is extremely rural between duluth in thunder bay ontario. Which is i kind of the next city on the lake do have like a little towns of like a few hundred to a couple of thousand people so it's it's very rural in nature when you get further up the lakeshore getting close to the canadian border. In minnesota the hills that kind of run alongside the lakeshore give a lot tregear a lot rockier and they kind of resemble like small mountains and so it really kind of enhances this wild feeling that you get when you're out there and it's just really great it so easy to unplug up. There has a matter of fact and a lot of places on the north shore. Closer to the canadian border. You'll lose cell phone reception. So you're kind of like forced to just kind of unplugging just kind of be present in the moment and so it's a really really great place. I i hope that you get the opportunity to go one day because it's absolutely my favorite place in the world. I feel like i was there with you. As you were describing the landscaping. I just felt like i could feel the breeze and smell the air it just despite first time living in the midwest in the us. And so it's so different from anything else that i'm familiar with and i'm really excited to explore the nature and these parts of the country and i absolutely loved the fall here in columbus ohio kids. Every moment i'm stopping to take pictures of the cheese changing or the leaves changing color. And as i i lived in the northeast. I just don't remember it being. So i dunno moving and something just so enigmatic about the light and the colors it's just every single angle is better know a whole other story in my mind. It feels like it. But now that you're describing the fall colors at lake superior i'm like. Oh now that's somewhere. I'd love to see the fall. Well thank you for sharing that. I really appreciate it of course. So how has your transition geographically been from growing up in minnesota to now being in columbus ohio. So when i was growing up i didn't set foot in the state of ohio until i was twenty years old now was happened to be passing through to something on the east coast and so passing through you go through the northern part of the state on interstate ninety two toledo and cleveland. And so i kind of had. This view of ohio is just very rust belt e states. Where it's you know a lot of factories gray and just kind of run down and when i applied to graduate school are applying to my phd program. When i was at the university of minnesota duluth doing my master's degree. Couple of my friends said will you should really apply to the program at ohio state. It's a really really top geography program. And they do the kind of work that you're looking to do. And i was like. Oh you know they'd be really interesting and on one hand. I was like ohio. I don't know about moving to a high on the other hand. I was like whoa higher states. Top five departments in the country right like be nearly good enough to get into a program like that. So i apply and of course i ended up getting in and solely invited me to retributed weakened that they do every year for the incoming graduate students to try to show you around the departments in help. You kinda better inform yourself to make a commitment to the program. And so on at that time i was deciding between ohio state university of british columbia up in vancouver and then the university of kansas down near kansas city. And so i was like well. I'd been on a visit to kansas very lovely place I wasn't able to make it up to vancouver. But i was going to go to columbus and i was like well once i visit ohio state and i c- columbia salvageable to make an informed decision on where i want to go and i drove. It was a thirteen hour. Drive from minneapolis to ohio. So i didn't get to columbus until like a one or two in the morning. And i was just driving and i entered the city. And it just struck me even nighttime. It struck me as an extremely beautiful place. Like i was like. This looks really really nice. Even though i can't see a lot of it. I can't wait to see what it looks like in the daylight and so the next morning i went with my graduate student hosts and we drove to campus. And i got to walk around. I got to see a bit of the city and it really kind of changed my conceptions of what ohio was. I was thinking like. Oh every place in ohio is gonna look like toledo are looked like. This stereotypical rust belt like fleas. And i saw columbus knows. This is almost as beautiful as minneapolis. I see myself being extremely happy being here in so the day that i went on the official campus visit i committed to joining the geography program at osu. And so i was really looking forward to it. The interesting thing is the transition. When i moved down to start my program. It was probably one of the most tumultuous times my life for a variety of reasons. I had ended up for year relationship like a couple of weeks before i moved down to ohio for various reasons that i was like well. I'm i'm moving away from home for the first time. For like a long distance a long period of time like i lived in duluth. But that's two and a half hours away from the twin cities and now i'm getting ready to move eight hundred miles away in like a half a day's drive and so it was like it was super tumultuous and just like it was felt like a whirlwind like i went from packing up my car full of stuff and driving down till like a week later starting school and it was quite a transition. I think at times it was really kinda tough but columbus has a weird way of growing on people. I think i see a lot of people have move here and really kind of fall in the city. At first i was like i hate it. Here is having trouble adjusting to my graduate program. I miss home. I just started seeing the woman. That's now by wife. And she was in minnesota. So i was like i just really wish i was back and i went back for the summer after the first year and halfway through the summer i found myself missing columbus. I found wrestling partners. Victorian village my first year. I was like. I really miss a little coffee shop that i would go walk to when i miss walking meal avenue to go to campus and i miss going on drives out to newark passing through the appalachian foothills and so i came back for my second year and i really kind of embraced the city and so like you know if you ask me now i love columbus. I think that my wife. And i are really happy here and although the chances are extremely likely that one day i'll have to leave the city. It's always going to have a place in my heart. Is like one of my favorite places that have ever lived so at a very very long winded kind of marriage of the geographies of relocating. We need to send that part of the conversation to the city of columbus so that they can use it been their marketing material. Lake that was heartfelt. I can totally relate to that. Because i had a love for a city in a similar way but when you said that when you left for the summer you realized how much you really enjoy columbus and i felt kind of that way with austin when i was there as a call man. This is not. Dc which is where. I moved from and i really missed. dc when. I was in austin. And austin over time did grow on me and i really enjoyed it towards the end and now that i'm in columbus my call. I just missed the green belts in austin and i miss barton creek can just all of the places that we would go hiking. It's really geographically like a hill country is nothing like what i imagine texas to be. I'd never set foot in texas. Until i moved to austin for work and flying into the austin airports like why are there like cliffs and hills lake is thought it would be. I don't know just like the dry flatland. Which like tumbleweed just like passing by can the same perceptions or similar perceptions that you had about ohio but it just then coming to columbus realizing that it's not what you thought it was but better known definitely i When it came time by wife finished her masters degree and we started talking about moving in together and she came up to columbus visit for a few times in the she got it it was actually living in duluth and she decided that she wanted to just move cross country to move in with me so she's really enjoyed it here in columbus to like we have nothing but good things to say about the city. That's the best part i just all. You have moved so many times in my life that with every city you just really wanted to feel like home a home away from home in a way right so i'm glad that you found that here in columbus. I'm in the process of doing that. But i'm so proud of the diversity that we have here. It's amazing and osu i'd never heard of issue are never thought about it. Until i moved to columbus. And i'm just like it's everywhere not only because i'm in columbus but even beyond ohio and it's really coincidental that you're from. Osu when i reached out to you it was over twitter. And you mentioned that you are going. Be teaching the industry's environmental activism course and later on i found your like what a small world it is but then it also another coincidences that like earlier in season one. I interviewed michael t charles. Who is currently completing his phd also at osu. And he's also part of the native american indigenous initiatives and in his interview he talks about his involvement and indigenous environmental activism. Which again is what we're going to be talking about. But before we get into that. I want to share about your experiences in your post. Doc of being an indigenous scholar. So what does that mean. So i feel like in order to fully accurately answer that. We almost need another episode. Happy to do our best. Give you the short answer. And what i think it really means is that geography is disciplined that we are intrinsically interested with the concept of space and how humans interact with space space interacts with humans. In how the earth is thought of his space and all the different aspects of the earth's spheres like the atmosphere nearest itself. And it's such a very broad discipline. Actually one of the biggest tensions. I think in our discipline is trying to define what exactly what we are because a lot of people are like well. Everything could be geography so if everything's geography than is possible at nothing really in geography and one of those things that we have seminars about this kind of stuff. We tweak grapple with these kinds of questions. But i think that when i define myself as an indigenous geographer i am chiefly really interested. In the way that indigenous people engage with space in all of its different kinds of definitions riot like earth space like political space cultural space in. I mean i just wrote an article about indigenous engagement with outer space. And so that's really the chief. Core identity that i have is an digits geographer and that really kinda helps to grow myself and to be able to define the work that i do in a really robust incomplete way. Yeah i really did like that article and all lincoln and the show notes as well all the articles. Say you're just very thought provoking. And i guess i never thought about it from that perspective indigenous perspective and outer space. But i'm reading right now. Rustling the pairs book about visible and invisible stories and she does mention how an indigenous storytelling or in beliefs that there is like an outer space. Where like the higher powers that be kinda quote unquote live and you can move between those two realms. It's not like at least like with hinduism. We believe that. When you go from earth you'll go to heaven and you can't come back. But the way she describes it in the way. I understand it is that you can be a living being moved between those realms. Anyway i'm going down the rabbit hole. I just like it's really fascinating to compare those kind of perceptions around like spirituality or like omnipresent energies and how like mortal human beings. I guess interact with those spaces is what i'm trying to get so your research. Interest focuses on indigenous remains burial grounds. How did you come to develop your research interests in that sure. So it really dates back to my master's degree of and i came into my master's degree and i was really interested kind of in this. Really broad question of what are the intersections of geography in indigenous sovereignty and being first year masters student. I obviously by. There's going to be too broad of a project. And i had to kind of think of ways to cut a narrow that down and it was during my second semester that there was a series of controversies that happened in the duluth region where a couple of indigenous tribal members had passed away in a separate unrelated car accidents but what really tied them together. Was that the medical examiner of the region wanted to conduct autopsies on the bodies as he was empowered to do under state law that deals with death investigations and in both cases the families had very legitimate religious concerns about autopsy and they didn't want them carried out because he didn't want the bodies being desecrated by being cut open as it's usually happened with an autopsy until the families took these really creative really resilient ways of resistance that from an outsider's point of view i happen to be actually outta town that we can and so when i came back i heard Some native american families were protesting outside of the medical school and outside of this courthouse nearby and as well. That's really interesting. I think that i kind of want to focus on. That is kind of my masters project in interviews and really interesting thing was is that i talked to somebody who is involved with it and i use protests that they stopped me. They said well. That wasn't a protest that one of the families were doing or the other family. They weren't protesting. What they were doing is they were trying to do actions that were based in their cultural teachings in their cultural knowledge. Trying to get the bodies back in to try to honor them was funeral rites and so that really got me thinking and i wrote my feces and i went onto issue and my advisers like. Why don't you trigger thesis into an article. I really kinda started to focus on that angle of everyday resistance in centering around the that offense of the dead and is constituted. Now as i talked about it in my dissertation there's kind of this idea in kind of indigenous circles that when somebody dies that's the end of kind of any political agency or any kind of political power that the might hole but if we take a look at the ways that indigenous communities in north america taken very robust action to protect burial grounds to protect remains from desecration. You'll see that these actions really are very unique form of resistance. Where they're doing it super base do everyday actions that we might not necessarily understand as resistance. But as a result of the state. In what i call the settler colonial state kinda runs into this quandary. Where they're like well can punish them for doing these. Everyday things right they're not giving us the legitimacy of these rowdy indigenous people that we can oppress be can put down because we can paint a picture of them. Threatening people are being violent. They're not doing that. So what do we do. And so it's an area that really hasn't had a lot of scholarship in its especially in geography and so i kinda viewed this as a kind of a new direction to take in geography that helps further indigenous sovereignty in be because like my own family background in some of the things that some of my family members have gone to be related to death. I kind of you it as personally important work as well so that at the very least my family will understand kind of what to do if somebody passes away in their family and they want a traditional burial but a corner doesn't want to go along with the tenants of that then we have a resource that we can use to help it out so really. It's about helping indigenous people on really kind of making sure that we understand that the dead have political power like bear not just inert in just useless just because they passed away and have khulekile power. Tell us more about that. Will there's other kinds of forms political power that are animated death right like one of the early alerts that i read through was this idea phenomena politics or the idea of like for example in this effort suicide bomber blows themselves up. That's an active political power and killing themselves and taking their own biased and that kind of runs counter to this idea of nacro politics. Which is the idea that the state can decide to take right from people as it chooses. And i kind of provide an alternative that both of those rhyme saying will the indigenous persons not just dying as an active political defiance right. And they're not really being directly killed by the settlers state or maybe they are but it's a very broad kind of spectrum of causes of death but the idea then. Let's say that the person passes away and a autopsy center says will we want to take the body to use to train. Our residents held a to do an autopsy families. Have the right to say. No if they don't have the right in the state to do that they should definitely have the right to object to an autopsy. As far as burial grounds when road construction projects are infrastructural projects go on and they accidentally dig up bones. Most of the time people are actually really good about it and they make sure that they stop and they consult with local tribes or local agencies. But there's always like those instances where they just don't do that in either try to cover it up or they're like oh well maybe let's try to russia's projects through not consult with anybody so that we can cover it up in i say we'll buy indigenous nations saying hey hold on you need to a. You need to stop doing that if you've done it or b. We're going to make sure that you know damn well. What's in the ground before you put a shovel in it so let you. Don't disturb any burial ground culturally significant places. That's another former resistance in kind of political power. That's being exerted by the dead because of all the dead in up you. Physically exerting themselves are animating kind of certain forms of political resistance by indigenous nations. The living yes. Yes as you were talking. I was curious to know you mentioned that now. The subtler state has gotten good about consulting with the local tribes indigenous tribes if they come across bones in the ground. Do you know historically what the treatment has been off indigenous brio grounds prior to the current practices from the historical archival research. So they don especially in the context of minnesota. There was just no respect. Paid to them at all at best they reviewed as kind of minor inconveniences in the way of construction and in the way of like adding to do projects or is like. Oh well and we're going to have to consult with the natives because they're gonna get mad if we dig up the remains. That was the best case scenario that i usually found the worst case scenario like oh well we dug it up and we made a mistake but oh award is going to keep digging up this road and we're gonna keep doing this all the way to the point where especially in the nineteenth century in this happened was black bodies love indigenous bodies and indigenous grains were viewed as fair game for anthropologists in it for these gentlemen scholars to go in and say well. I'm going to dig up the remains in for example. I don't have the book here in the office. Unfortunately otherwise i'd show to you. There's this book by this man. Samuel morton called trainee americana. I believe or. He sought out to measure intelligence in this junk science. Feel called phonology where it's the idea of wallet. You can measure. Somebody's intelligence by measuring the size of the skulls and so she got hold of a bunch of different indigenous skulls and he measured their skulls made judgment calls on their on their intelligence and he compared them to european white skulls. Which of course no surprise were judge should be bigger and therefore had the capacity for more intelligence than indigenous people and so it was really kind of this free for all that happens when one of the case studies are talk about is the formation of the male clinic creation was kind of field very indirectly through the grave robbing of dakota man's body after a mass execution that happened. Dr william w mayo dug up the bones and brought them to his frontier medical practice need. He taught his sons anatomy with the skeleton and in the remains in those remains and get returned to the man's descendants for almost one hundred and forty years. The male clinic just held onto him in this eighteen. Sixty two in this happened. And it was like nineteen ninety eight before they were able to get those remains repatriated. and so. there's just kind of this. This long history of just kind of enduring disrespecting the kind of viewing indigenous remains of burial grounds is kind of being particularly useful in some ways but also you know maybe being obstacles in another way but the net result was just still like disrespect for indigenous sovereignty indigenous remains. Yeah wow it's so disgusted right now and i'm not laughing because it's i don't think it's funny. I laugh because. I'm just appalled. And i almost like have no words to just express. How offensive about is. I imagine if that happened to like my ancestors how would i feel. It just also makes me think of a book read. It's about the hilo cells pose henrietta lacks and how a lot of the the medical advancements that we've been able to make around like salary generation cell division has been because of these cancer cells that they took from henrietta lacks and they have been propagating her sells for decades and her family hasn't got any kind of communication from it and even worse. Is that the acknowledged that they stole it from her without her knowledge and they still like the medical community's still won't recognize the contribution that her and so many other black and indigenous folks have given towards medical like west and medical advancement with each story or each fact that i hear it just aggravates me even more each time and i did share. It was a webinar. I can't remember where the speaker did mention that. Like you said. Some of the policies would from grey to indigenous scrape oriole grounds and take the bones for because it was like a collection items or something of in some cases. And i'm just like you have no ethics. No just i can't have no whereas i can't. I can cause really tough. It's really tough by some friends that are kind of it were in medical school or where in the medical field and then i saw them. Almost they were talking about there. I feel fortunate to get to work. At all the cells i come from henrietta lacks and i was like if you wanted to the history of that like you wouldn't be bragging about on social media right like that's just kind of par for the course me like american history is at non white bodies have found themselves being kinda made to be of use to the state these very destructive very disrespectful ways for the advancements of the state. Right like in my dissertation. You know the central point is trying to make indigenous bodies were made to make white bodies healthy into make white lands healthier into pass control of land over into the hands of the settler colonial state in that chapter my dissertation the really overarching big impact is trying to make it. Legal of minnesota's essentially built figuratively and in some cases literally on the bones of indigenous. People like this. Modern state has kind of very bloody legacy that recently that we've started to kind of really address that is a broader state. I mean for indigenous communities been dealing with this for generations right but this is like within the last few years. The mayo clinic started to apologize for the usage of that man's remains in as like well. It took you that long to apologize and to say well. We want to do better but at the same time. It's kind of that hopefulness. That has like maybe we might turn a corner and we can continue this. Legacy is so that we can leave it behind. Never have to return to something like that again. When i'm thinking is apologies grade but give back a significant percentage of the profits that you've made out of exploitation of these people's back to them. That's what like really kinda grinding. My gears is that you feel like just a policy enough to think that okay. We recognize what was stunning. Let's kind of move on and quote unquote. Do better one of the things that i wanted to ask. You is grant your research on burial grounds but as it relates to ohio. And i don't know if you do some of that if you do book and brio grunts in ohio. I read somewhere around the government website. That ohio has the most number of native burial grounds preserved. Is that correct. I'm not familiar with that exact statistic but it would be something that i would want to believe that that's correct right like the really interesting thing in ohio. Is that as you may know. There are no federally recognized tribes in the state but there are a lot of kind of remnants of tribal presences in one of those kind of areas of presences at at that have been left behind are burial mounds. For example on really reminded of the burial mounds earthworks out in newark. Just about thirty five minutes east of here. Our always has like an earthwork center. That is dedicated to doing research with that. But i mean even there there's adult chorus that owns the land. That one of the mountains is on end. They basically allow one day year for people to come and actually tour the mount otherwise. It's off limits because it's an active adult. I'm like you're playing golf on the remained. In burials of people that live theralac. It's absolutely crazy. We were actually my wife. And i were just driving through newark. And then he's which is a city right next to it. I think there's like a road named athletic indian now road letting through might be like an indian mellon mall or something like that. This is a good name. That adorns shopping centers initials like well. That's just par for the course right like you kind of build over. These lands that belonged to indigenous people. Then you kind of take a name. That's really probably deeply significant in you. Use it for you know these capitalistic purposes. And that's just kind of really frustrating. The see you gosh. I can just imagine how witnessing this on a daily basis is just sort of by an affront on your individual existence presence in the space. How do you manage with that kind of more than offensive acts of capitalism on like your culture like your people so as far as like ohio goes is really frustrating. A really support the work of the earthworks center in like the work of people that are really trying to push back against that in the context of the states you know like people at the shawnee in yami people earned the original inhabitants of the states. I think that's one reason why i've taken step back from trying to engage because i is initially. I don't want to speak over those people's voices when it comes to the slums we see this in the twin cities as well. There's a part called mounts. Arken saint paul that was named because they were very barrio. Mountains there and there's been very well documented cases of burial mounds in the north of the state that had been dug in two or that were used that were like in state parks or people could literally go like climb on top of them and things like that and so in those cases you know since that's a little bit closer to home for me. That's definitely like. I feel very comfortable being more vocal and seeing like hey like cut that stuff out. That's not your playground right. Those are people in there that we buried with care and was loud and we want to make sure that they're being honored right even in death like they're not just your playground to have fun on I recently did. Come across the which. I'm so glad i did. Because it was during an indigenous peoples. Stay celebration that. The native american stern initiative at was happening and they were talking about earthworks as like. That's really cool. I would really like to go there. They went to the website. But it didn't see any mention of the golf course which another thing. That's in boiling my blood or like making enraged. But it's something. I have on my list to check out that place as well as the other burial grounds around ohio. Because i had no idea. It's part of like learning at an anti cook putting the word here but to learn about the geography of where i live right though. It's very true. So i wanted to talk to you about indigenous resistance throughout many of the articles you've read. There's this consistent theme around resistance in the work that you do and thank you for referencing. The book as we have always done sorry by leeann. Simpson bend in that. She calls for an unapologetic place based indigenous alternatives to the destructive logics of the settler colonial state including your patriarchy white supremacy and capitalist exploitation. I really felt that the to read that because it just really encapsulates to be think what indigenous resistance is but on the basis of your work and that description. How has your research have been inspired by simpson's work 'cause you also describe your work as everyday resistance against the second colonial state. So what does that look like. Sure so leeann. Simpson's book has been one of the most formative pieces of writing that i've ever read. I bought it back in twenty seventeen when i was i kind of trying to conceive of my dissertation project and it's really really spoke to me and interpreted their writing is that they talk about that. In order to return to this kind of radical resurgent politics of land in space and indigenous sovereignty and space that. We really need to make sure that. We're reclaiming our ceremonies in reclaiming our everyday practices. That have been handed down by our ancestors before us. Right like the tools in order to try to resilient against settler colonialism into envision a better future like. We don't need to go searching for those tools like they've been here the entire time in all we need to do is to reclaim them into practice them. And so that's really kind of come through in my work. Is that when. I've talked about these acts of governance that have really pushed back against settler colonial miss usage of indigenous remains or mistreatment of burial grounds. I try to point out that these kinds of acts are not super performance of and they're not like these big spectacular things that are meant to grab attention what they're really are just like cultural practices that have been handed down in that art taken new forms obviously with with different periods of time but are still rooted in kind of the same kind of set of teachings have been handed down through generations since he generations and really what that means that through these everyday practices. They people would do any ways. There are really taking these robust actions to defend the debt in ways that the settler colonial state really can't contend with very well like i was talking about earlier when tribes says are very presence as a indigenous sovereign nation and the the nature of the government to government relationship that we have with the united states and with the state of minnesota for example dictates that we have a right to oversee any kind of construction work that is going on on a reservation in overseeing it what we want you to do is we want you to get a survey of the proposed area of impact in then will approve it in. If there's nothing wrong with what's going on then you can go ahead and do the construction. That's a very serious in various effective former resistance that the settler colonial state really. They find themselves like well. They're not supposed to be doing that but they have the right to do that. So we have to respect it and it really refrains power dynamic being one where the state in settlers can come in and do whatever they want to one where they have to play by the rules of the tribal nation that they need to make sure that they're paying very close attention to what they're doing because the tribal nation is keeping an eye on them and they're letting them know that we will protect our community in our community is not just living trouble members. But it's more than human. Tim like the animals fish. Water plants in our deceased relatives right. That's all those are all important parts of our try our heritage and our culture and we're going to make sure that those are well taken care of or you're going to get to do what you're wanting to do here and so that's kind of where i've really taken on kind of were simpson. Talks about these radical resurgence of politics related to land in really ran. Was it in the area of tribal cultural resource by preservation and protection. Yeah there's something that you said which made me tomlinson's radio strike as you were describing simpson's work as it applies to your own resistance. It made me think that this wouldn't necessarily be resistance. If it was the nor great it wouldn't be as radical quote unquote radical if it was just the way of doing things in a respectful and inclusive manner and recognizing the indigenous way of doing things or we are being when i read that particular definition of indigenous resistance. It made me think about like decolonizing oneself. And that's a concept that i have recently blurred about when i say recently this past year and i'm learning about what that looks like in my own way of doing things i guess. So how do you. And if i'm like making the right connections show with it being decolonizing right like do you decolonize. Your research as an indigenous geographers scholar. Sure so. I really like to think about the term. Decolonization is nowadays. Kind of a bit of a buzzword for good and bad in the academy that. I think that you know. Obviously it's leaning towards a very positive process where we can take a look at different possibilities of what might be in kind of deconstructing candidates settler. Colonial capitalists white supremacists kind of structures that we find ourselves within but also tends to get co opted a bit and i think that people kind of throw the word decolonization on the things. That may be d- colonial and so really. When when i approach like the idea of decolonization. I kind of you. Decolonization is kind of this overarching journey. That i'm taking myself upon and really what consisted. The colonization are d colonial. Actions like acts that are meant to subvert. These systems that were within in. So that's kind of how i. Viewed the idea of decolonization like decolonization has cut. Its overarching journey in. It is a far off goal because we are definitely not area. But in the meantime you there. I have to take these concrete stops right and i have to make sure that if i am going to say that. My actions are d- colonial that they are really meant subversion they are meant to really push back against the settler colonial structure that i signed myself within one of the big debates that i found myself in as i can. You decolonize the academy. And it's like well. I think we can but i think it may take a very radical reshaping of what the academy looks like right. You can't decolonize a a white settler colonial structure but if you dismantle that structure maybe you might be able to build something in his place. There's a term. The master's house will never be dismantled with the master's tools masters tools will never dismantle the master's house other lords said that i tend to agree with her so i say in that case. Then let's pull out in indigenous tool kit with we can't dismantle it with a master's settler colonial chosen we pull out indigenous tool kit and we start dismantling it that way and then they'll get us a lot further down the road of where we need to go yes. I'm realizing that the word is still are. The concept is still kinda ambiguous to sit an extent for me like not that. I don't understand what the concept is but like for me personally would. Does it mean in terms of like how. I grew up where i grew up. What school did i go to. What did i learn and in. What context did i learned history. So those are i think for me. It's more like an under learning or learning like the full are the other story. I guess i like that can break the master's house with the master's tools. Yuck the master's tools will not dismantle the master's house. I think there was a of a reading that moore road back in the eighties. I believe actually even had that to my meeting this. I want to switch gears here a little bit. But we're still sort of in the theme of indigenous resistance and i wanted to talk about the indigenous environmental activism. Course got. You're teaching whenever this comes up in spring twenty twenty one and it's one of the main reasons that i did reach out to you and so i see a direct connection between your work and the score so i'm curious to know i guess we've kind of talked a little bit about this but if you have anything else to add a did have this. Question of does the resistance. Manifest in the course readings and structure definitely. That's a great question. I think that one of the ways that i really kinda try to manifest resistance in the course curricula is that. I've really tried to make sure that the reading lists and the readings things that do are heavily digitized riot like even now my syllabus is like about ninety nine percent complete that i'm going to go back through and i'm gonna take a look at the reading list and i'm like well. Here's a piece written. By non indigenous scholar that can be easily replaced with justice is targeting piece written by an indigenous scholar and taking a look at maybe different kind of forms of media dissemination rights of beyond just reading dr journal articles or book chapters. I think i'm going to add a graphic novel. That was written about an indigenous. Use it to of the land to the reading list. And actually in the middle of reading this kind of book on botany that i just thought that i think would be a really really good fit for that and so i really wanted to push back in that regard. I think another way that i pushed back. Is that too often in academia. We kind of have this idea. That is a very individualistic culture. Where like you know so. And so is the expert on abyan. Steve and i really wanted to point out that well. I'm the one teaching. A course. And this is my research expertise but there are people on the ground that are actually doing this kind of work right now and i want to uplift their voices because it typically gets locked out of academia. Unless there's nothing that we can take from them in an attractive manner. And i really kinda wanna bring these people in a non non-extractive wait almost make them co teachers and so i've kind of curious. Did this list of guest speakers that are coming. In that are indigenous. Environmental activists and environmental scientists in tribal employees do work on environmental resource management. And we're going to. They're going to talk to the class about a lot of the different topics that we're gonna be talking about in the overall class. And what i really want to do with that his show in. Let's say we're reading about tribal fishing rights. Well i'm going to bring in a lawyer that actually went to the supreme court and help fight for one tribes right to be able to respect their treaty rights related to fishing. And you'll be there to answer questions and to talk to you. And i think that's going to be really effective because it brings in these topics and the very real everyday kind of manner right where it's not your does not just reading about it anymore. You're seeing the people who are actually making it happen It sounds like a really well rounded approach. Because you're looking at like activism from different perspectives from the government to grassroots. As well so. I see that as a common themes are there other common themes that you're going to be exploring in this course i think it's a geography history. Course it gets cold lists are being that wanted kind of. I spent half the class speaking in president terms already. I think i'm already teaching mode where i'm going to spend half this class. Really painting this history of the settler colonial state in the environmental destruction that it's wrought then i bring us into the president with geography and i say let's take a look at the spatial patterns that are going on in the every day as we approach climate crisis how the usage in destruction of indigenous land is contributing to that and we spend the last couple of weeks taking a look at different literatures that are related to indigenous future. Instead of saying well what might a more environmentally just future for indigenous people look like in an era climate crisis because the answer preceding. It's coming in. It's almost to a point now where we can't reverse it anymore so we have to take a look at will how are digitisation going to continue to be resilience into the future but at the center of all these things is just going to be this idea of everyday resistance but also you know maybe some kind of more spectacular resistance as well and is kind of these ideas that people are not sitting here and just taking this kind of stuff lying down right that there are taking actions that are based in cultural frameworks to make sure that their nations do have a future and that their next generations of tribal citizens will have n- opportunities who still live within the environments that they're into them And so what does the future look like in this context so the beauty of it is that there are a multitude of different futures. That are there because of biking the multitude of tribal voices. I'm really think was the wins book. What does justice look like. And she talks about dakota. What environmental justice might look like for dakota people in minnesota and there's a number of other books that i'm reading right now by nick estes and deleo whitaker and people that are really kind of engaging with this in a really robust way and kind of pointing at using their kind of conceptions saying well here's what potential futures might look like but kind of the fun thing is i think that is i conceive of Now we might leave the question slightly unanswered. Because it's like well these are the future. 'isms that were. We're taking a look at right now with who knows what it might look like in another ten years right like me. Young indigenous people out there like autumn peltier water protectors that are really doing amazing work and who knows they may come up with even more robust and exciting future for their communities in their nations going up so instead of trying to define like. This is what it's going to look like. Let's take a look at the possibilities. Let's allow ourselves to dream a little bit and knows maybe of those dreams come into reality. I like that. You said that you kind of checked me. 'cause i went to the future look lake only because of my mindset is a win of being uncomfortable with the unknown or just like having a definition of it but i think your perspective is just adding a i guess a different perspective for the lack of a better term and it doesn't sound as scary like let's just see what it looks like with us working collective be like we don't have to have that answer right now as time goes by our ideas will evolve in our intentions will also also. Let's see what it looks like. Then so thank you for that. So i'm glad that you mentioned awesome pill cr about how indigenous youth activists are kind of like taking like one of the front seats. It's not necessarily their responsibility but they've really stepped up like it's amazing and i wanted to give a shout to michael t charles who was on the podcast and the primary focus of our conversation was around his guests indigenous youth environmental activists and he talked about throughout his experiences in that position and especially being in community around the time of standing brock key observed that mainstream environmental organizations to the efforts and messaging of anita community from like social and environmental injustices and the physical violence that they were being brought upon their communities on their bodies as a result it was being taken away from them taking away from like the environmental crisis from like a social justice perspective. As well so in your research around the course. Have you found something. Similar where mainstream activism is like having a detrimental impact on indigenous environmental activism. Yes really a lot of it. Centers around the idea of treaty rights and in part of that is like hunting and fishing and gathering rights at are things that we may not always abuse environmental behaviors kind of this dominant subtler framework and what that's meant that when indigenous nations try to assert those treaty rights their view this over. You're going to fish to an extent that all the fissure going to take out of this lake or you're going to take up all these plans to take all of these resources and these are kind of things that have been. I actually think one of the more famous ones has been the kind of shaming of arctic peoples for like seal hunting and people like on the west coast for whale hunting and kennedy's environmental groups kind of going in there saying well. They're doing these really bad things in it's problematic. Because that kind of a viewpoint rob's indigenous people are agency and their sovereignty it also assumes that settlers are willing to newport about stewardship in indigenous people. Do i do not know. A single indigenous personnel out. There that understands our treaty rights those about greed. And with an idea of what i'm going to take all these resources right that tribes understand that with these rights comes in important role of environmental stewardship. And so when you kind of get this kind of anti-indigenous behavior in mainstream environmental activism it's really shocking and saddening because it's like well. Are you really down for helping indigenous people. Are you only down when your voices are. Being centered in when indigenous sovereignty is being pushed down in their own self determination as being kind of pushed to the side. And so that's kind of one of the things that i'm gonna be talking about in this course. We need to understand that indigenous peoples life ways in the ways of gathering and hunting and fishing date long before colonisation right they may be using more modern techniques in order to do it. But it's still based in these long standing ideas and without fetishizes Indigenous connection with the environment but still pretty apparent that indigenous communities kind of what needs to be done in order to make sure they protect their environments. And i think that in cases where like in the navajo nation or like more think of the northern cheyenne people that have had a lot of controversy about coal mining. When they do these extractor resources team people are going. Will you see native. People can't protect the environment and it's like well. That's not a question of being environmentally damaging. The question of capitalism right. that's a question of settler colonial capitalism pushing tribal nations to do this because they have to make sure that people have jobs in that they can feed themselves and take care of themselves right and these tribal nations that are drawn his reservations. They are often drawn up in places that were usually viewed as like economically unproductive right so tried for finding ways to make productive use of the land. The immediate jumping. We should plan them as like well. No we shouldn't blame them what we need to reckon with a system that has put them in that kind of physician and you look at things like maybe giving land back right. Maybe if they weren't in a position where they needed to do that they wouldn't do it. So you can get really victim. Lamey sometimes in very kind of anti-indigenous and that's really frustrating. And we're going to talk about that. The course yeah. I can just hear it like the energy and the power i i wish i could take a quart. Serbia fly on the wall. There's this moment where the other side is. Always saying like. Gotcha there just waiting for that. And it's problematic like you said and what other choices have you left for us in a sense. If we had better off we would do better. But you mentioned land back. Talks about what land back is with. that movement is about sure. Selene back in thing and indigenous. Oracle's now i think that it's a rallying cry and it really means a lot of different things to different people. Some people kind of you land back as a very logical while the land should be returned to indigenous people. And i tend to agree with that but i think that a lot of people also kind of say will land back means. That people need to recognize indigenous. People have long standing connections with spaces that they've been dispossessed from that. We should recognize the relationships that they have with the land and the rights to be able to be in conversation in to be in those spaces that they were historically dispossessed from as kind of how i've approached the idea of land back Yeah i think like the reactions that i've seen in maine again on. Social media is a fear for those who are receiving nonindigenous folks or receiving the message of like. Oh well what's that gonna look like what's going to happen to us kind of situation. I'm in agreement with you. Like yes give back lands. That were originally. There's an let's find a way to collaborate that for me is what i understand about like. One buck definitely. There's this fear. I've gotten into a couple of debates on twitter where people acquainted with ethno-nationalism that will native people are going to create an indigenous majority state. And it's like well that misunderstands a fundamental nature of indigenous people in north america. Right there's over. Five hundred recognized tries in the united states. There's hundreds of first nations in canada so it wouldn't be just someone big indigenous state right in. I think that it comes out of this kind of fear. There's always this weird anxiety settler colonialism that oh if we give non white people power. They're going to do what we did to that right. This is kind of fear of vengeance. And i think that it's really really kind of misplaced. A lot of ways. There might be some indigenous people. Say well yes. Settlers need to go back to europe. A lot of people are just kind of saying as i said it's like it's really about reshaping. The fundamental narratives are on these lands and then who they belong to in it. What should be awesome. I guess in the vein of the future. I feel like. I would love to see that kind of future. I want to be mindful of the time. I know that we've gone above an hour but so interesting. So we'll go to the lightning round afar conversation. Which is kinetically. End it typically. It's i ask you a series of four questions and whatever comes to steal mind you can answer it so the first question here is what if you read heard or watch that has influenced you. The most really enjoyed seeing the work. That's being done. By a lot of indigenous activists in in the academy outside the the academy the whether that's books journal articles or song dance other kinds of because i really think that it's really pushed indigenous issues to the forefront and it's kind of to the forefronts in a way that makes it extremely hard to ignore so i'm always constantly whenever i see a book that's written by an awesome indigenous scholar. I buy it. I'm always constantly contacting with people in twitter in and getting an idea of what they're doing. So that's that's really helped influence me right like i view myself as being in communities these people and really. They've helped to shape me into the scholar that i am today. And thank you for sharing. Your reading lists If i can share that it's fascinating. Next question is what's a personal habit that has helped significantly in your work a personal habit that has helped me significantly in. My work has been whenever i've been writing something and i tend to probably to my own detriment. I tend to write in time crunches because it just seems to be how i do it. I really liked to just go some place where i can be myself and that i can just kind of be at peace and just kinda take my time in the writing process so when i wrote my dissertation i kinda shut myself off in my office for like three months in basically just kind of powered through it but i really helps because it helps me to just kind of being a good thinking space also be it helps me to appreciate people like my wife and things like that when i do actually go out and like talk to people and kind of interact with people. It really helps me to appreciate them a little bit more as well. And so i'm a solo writer. I do right in groups. I'm part of a writing group right now in that. That really really does help when it comes time to like kinda collaborating on ideas but generally like what. It's like a really big project on my own. I just like to kind of sit up on myself in hammered out I can relate to that. What's the best piece of advice you've received there was a mentor of mine. At the university of minnesota duluth that he's retired and he's moved on now but he always told me like when i was first starting graduate school. He was always like remember that. You're doing this for your people right like never forget like who. You're seeking to help it who you're doing this for when you do that work. And that's been the single most guiding factor in my work right like trying to make sure that i'm giving back to my tribe and that i'm doing wars that they can be proud of in that we can use at the time arises finally. What is your superpower all. That is a good one. What is not superpower. I think my superpower as of late Networking and talking with people on especially through twitter. I had twitter a long time ago. And i stopped using it and i started up this current twitter that i have in twenty seventeen and i thought. Oh maybe i'll tweet a little bit about academic stuff and talk with people i know and now based on twitter alone i've been brought in contact with people like yourself in and other people that i've given talks to in done podcast interviews. I've done job opportunities through my twitter connections and things like that. And i just saw when people make contact with me on there like i never turn them away right. I always wanted to talk with someone. I try my best to always be available. And i always genuinely interested in what people have to stay in kind of what people are looking for. I can't promise that. I can always fill every kind of request of what people are looking for as far as health but i was happy to just open lines of communication because who knows where those lead in the future right. Yeah and thank you for making space from. I appreciate and work enjoyed following you on twitter. I learning so much. And i really enjoyed the conversations that you're having on there so in addition to twitter. How can people follow you and your journey also beyond twitter. I have a website. Which i make sure i can get you. The link to the website did so little barebones. But that's where i published. A lot of my work also really asked people to follow. The work of an organization called the red nation. That i'm a proud comrade of and it's a group of really awesome indigenous feminists socialist revolutionaries who are really trying to do work to help to promote indigenous sovereignty and the freedom and well-being of indigenous people in the americas any aunt to be a member of the great lakes council of the red nation. And they're just amazing people. And i've been doing a lot of work outside of academia and so give their twitter account to follow give their facebook page of follow and keep up with some of the were doing there. Yeah it's really amazing. How many indigenous scholars are on twitter. It's just. I feel like i hit a by or something of that sort. It's really nice to see so as this conversation comes to close there. Anything else he would like to add. I think for indigenous scholars out there. Just keep your head. High like keep working hard. They know and understand that. If your experience and i'm done seeking to the scholars here is anything like mine. You might find yourself spaces that are hostile to you. But keep your head up because you belong in academia you deserve to be doing great work and also for the people that are doing amazing work outside of academic structures. Keep it right like your work is just as valid if not more valid in ordinance regardless if you letters after your name you have academic credentials right up together. Role doing work to help promote indigenous resiliency and sovereignty into the future. So let's just keep working together and make it happen. Awesome amen to that. Well thank you again. So much for your time deondraye. It's been an absolute pleasure and an honor. And i wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors to takeover academia. So thank you. Thank you so much for having me on. Thanks for listening to breaking green ceilings. If you'd like to hear more episodes were change. Making environmentalists on over to water savvy solutions dot com slash podcast. You can find me online on instagram and twitter and as always if you will love the show. Please don't forget to subscribe rate and like on. I tunes you can also sign up for my newsletter to find out when you episodes are available and please do share the podcast with your family friends colleagues and wherever you think will be inspired by the wisdom of far change makers i welcome feedback so please do feel free to reach out to me. My contact information is also on water savvy solutions dot com until next. Keep breaking through those green ceilings.

columbus ohio minnesota duluth austin osu mulkey department of geography and ci andre andre north shore lake scenic north shore thunder bay ontario north shore ohio state university of briti toledo hills lake michael t charles henrietta minneapolis
09-26-19 Book of the Month: The Forever Sky by Thomas Peacock and Annette S. Lee

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 2 years ago

09-26-19 Book of the Month: The Forever Sky by Thomas Peacock and Annette S. Lee

"Welcome welcome to native America calling from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. Teaching younger generations about their native heritage is one way to keep heats the story's going this month were cracking into the children's book before ever sky but author Thomas Peacock and illustrator Annette lead the story follows two young brothers as they learn how close the stars can bring them to their ancestors including thoroughly grandmother. Stay tuned soon bursts of Timber Book of the month program it kicks off right after National Native News This is national native news on Tony Gonzalez Jurors in the federal trial again. Stanley Patrick Weber heard testimony Wednesday from two you men from Montana. They say the former. IHS pediatrician sexually assaulted them when they were boys. In Browning Weber now faces similar charges in South Dakota oughta one of the Montana men was transported to rapid city by Federal Prison officials from Kentucky. The other did not answer his subpoena but his Montana testimony was was read into evidence. Victoria wicks has more the seven accusers called in to testify or now grown men at the end of each man's testimony prosecutors project a picture picture of the witness as he looked when he was a boy the biggest difference between then and now has been on the face of a man called Joe when the jury has shown the picture of him at the end of his testimony ammonia they see a handsome eleven year old child with a full head of black hair clear skin and bright smile but jurors I see Joe Shuffling into the courtroom wearing shackles goals and the red and white striped jumpsuit that indicates these federal prisoner held at the Pennington County Jail Joe's face now obscured by tattooed words and a circle design under his left eye his neck and arms are also covered in ink and his eyes reveal the mental illness. He says he counters with prescriptions to stop the voices and hallucinations. The nation's Joe grew up Browning Montana where Stanley Weber served as a doctor with Indian health services by now jurors have heard a litany of stories with the same elements elements Weber befriended native boys gave the money and food and let them hang out at his house in exchange he asked them for sex and if they weren't compliant he'd give them pills or alcohol to end the resistance. Weber is on trial in South Dakota for crimes alleged at Pine Ridge but the Montana witnesses can help the jurors to determine if if Webber has a propensity the stories of the boys are finished now. The People Weber worked with at Pine Ridge. You're up next parties hoped to send the question to the jury by Friday ready for National Native News. I'm Victoria Wicks in rapid city South Dakota Montana Attorney General Tim Fox announced his agency will host a second missing persons training this time for people in Eastern. Montana Olivia wrangled has more law enforcement and community members will have a chance to learn about how to help find missing people on October sixteenth in billings. It'll be the second time Montana's Department of Justice has hosted a public training session on things like how to file a missing persons report and the role role of different databases like the last session held in Helena this June the upcoming training will focus on cases of missing indigenous people native people in Montana tend to go missing at rates that outpace their share of the State Population Holly Mackie northern Shan Education Professor at North Dakota State University was the keynote Speaker Speaker at Helena training. She says an even split of about one hundred twenty law enforcement agents and community members attended when we have these two groups is two sides coming together there to learn from one another you know we're hoping to develop a better understanding of one another but then really heal a lot of wounds. She says the parties hardly mingled not even on breaks and hopes that there's more crossover this time a spokesperson from the Montana Department of Justice says that law enforcement and the public will attend separate events they get to share meals and breaks for National Native News. I'm Olivia wrangled in billings Montana. The mayor of Redding California apologized to native Americans for for past maltreatment including the taking of land and Genocide Mayor Julie Winter made the apology this week at the state of the city address which was attended by local tribal leaders the redding record reports if follows California Governor Gavin NEWSOM 's apology in June two native Americans in the state for pass violence maltreatment and neglect. I'm Tony Gonzalez. The National Native News is produced by Broadcast Corporation and with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Support for law and justice related aided programming provided by Hans Strauss Dean and Walker L. l. p. a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for more than thirty years more information formation available at Hans Strauss Dot Com support might be SF railway moving our economy for over one hundred sixty five years at NSF. We move a ton of freight five hundred miles on one gallon of fuel be. NSF is proud to be a leader in protecting the environment more at Bien SF DOT com slash trial double death relations native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm your host terror. Gatewood through artistic interpretations of the Dancing Northern Lights two siblings pay tribute to the star knowledge of their ancestors. It's a story that was passed onto them by hi. There and that's what you find in this month's book feature. It's called the forever sky by author Thomas Peacock and native illustrator. You're an IT Lee through the pages in this children's book readers are not only introduced to the NFL Nabi understanding of the stars but also the role that family place even one relatives have walked on today. We're connecting you with the author of this book and when you are one of the first ten callers to do so and make it on air you will receive a complimentary implementary copy of the book courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society Press and right now. We're going to go to the MSCI MINNESOTA to say hello to Thomas. Peacock offer also an educator a retired professor of education at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He is a member of the fund elect band of Lake Superior Ojibway and also in his retirement time he and his wife run a small publishing company titled Black Bears in Blueberries. It's our pleasure to have Thomas here with us today. Welcome to native America calling thank you in Thomas Boy. There is a lot in this book in in the illustrations I think dance with the words so nicely and for listeners who haven't had a chance to take a look at it. Um Tom tell us a little bit about what we find. In really what you were opening up for readers well I think from what I tried to set a set out to do as a writer was truly introduced young people to to grieving and and to look at where in from the perspective shabby perspective where where we go with me pass and and and in also then in the process keeps them bigger a bit of a star knowledge a bit of the constellations uh-huh. That's what I said to do when I thought about mapping audible quite else in Thomas when we think of our star knowledge a lot of times we don't don't come across it to word dolts or you know somebody read something about our nation's and then they start looking into it. a lot of times are star knowledge is influenced. I winced by another set to the Greeks and talk to me a little bit about your hopes of maybe changing some of this where a young person star knowledge alleged starts from their own tribe the initial be typically you know for most of us we went to school systems where we're work hot degree sky and so you know if you asked many native people tell me about this guy and so they'll look up at the sky and begin describing you know the sky that they learned in in their school system even in of course in most systems you know they'll be able to point to the big dipper and maybe if you're lucky northstar maybe they'll play to Orion spell that kind of thing and that's typically the Constellation you know shot that that that young people will learn we carry that into adulthood and and many people native people people included have have not been taught you know they're they're they're native sky and so so you know so we set l. to to do that to introduce sat and and also introduced fact that a different seasons are different constellations that bad data pure of the sky and that each of them has a stories that go along with that so so that's that's one of the things we're trying to do there in Thomas. I think think something really changes when you have had this kind of upbringing and then you're brought into your tribe zone star knowledge and then when you look up every night in see you know these different formations of stars and then you can tell the native story it connects you in a different way. Talk to me a little bit. What about that you know it's interesting because because in this part of the country of course there are two in Minnesota in particular there to try to different tribes because many tribes living but they're additionally there the job way who came in later and ended the Kota very different barely different constellation mm so you know I it just goes to show that that you know there are very different things that people when they when they look up in the sky is so let's say for example one of the things that that we would be able to say people would notice looking style is unusual chill wind up resume would be our teacher and often a trickster figure so well that would would you figure wouldn't wouldn't be seeing what you're in other tribes because he showed me the amish knobby so that it may be these are things that you have talk to your little ones in your life? Maybe even just your relatives your favorite cousin you can call in and share your thoughts one eight hundred nine nine six two eight eight four eight Thomas. I got a caller who would like to chat with you. We have corey in Kyle South Dakota tuned in today on Kfi key Radio Corey. Thank you for giving US serene year on air. Hi my name's Corey Stover. I'm calling in from Glo coat to college in Kyle South Dakota Oda I work here at the College Bookstore and the topic of your book really caught my interest because we offer Likud to start knowledge book look to our students in the studies and so I just found your topic very interesting and kind of want it to you know fear not your view on that as we use the stars to map out the black heels in our state sites. Does your ojibway people also correlate correlate that to their sacred sites as well gory. Thanks for calling hang tight go ahead Thomas sure well not not really it really it really doesn't correlate with ticket sites that it correlates to different animal figures and and and different spirits at that live in the sky and so I'm I'm vaguely familiar with the Dakota Skye because because Lee who illustrated for this for this particular book for Forever Sky she also has that that the quota sky knowledge background so she not only has jubilee style she has a Coda as well and and I think she came up with with a booklet with several other authors they they do on one part they do the the British guy of them and another little bit difficult to start inquiry. Are you still there. What do you think about something something like this? That is geared to really young readers. What do you think about giving star knowledge to them? I think that's extremely important especially for younger native dipped generations because this is an ancient knowledge that Ben passed down and I think it's really a fundamental part of carrying on our traditions and moving into to the future and maybe adopting that into our modern society you know for instance like what if we had a a APP on iphone that our kids could learn the knowledge of our ancestors through the star maps be pretty interesting corey. Thank you for reaching out great to hear from you out of Kyle South Dakota today today you can join us to Corey just earned book by calling in sharing his thoughts asking questions you can do the same to we have ten books to share with you today. Hey all you gotta do is dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight in share your thoughts on air and so Thomas let's talk a little bit about the specialness of the knowledge that is being put into this book mentioned illustrator a net Lee not only does she have experienced a knowledge with Dakota and orgy subway star knowledge. She is also got a view of astronomy in general in talked me a little bit about all of her knowledge is going into some of the images that we see. I think it's pretty amazing that the Minnesota Society Press Week was able to secure her to do the station quality manuscript that I submitted because she is and acknowledged expert on on you know native skype Guy if she's the head of Native style-watchers and and they've produce the the Constellation maps again you know Florida Dakota the debris and also to books they do training all over the over Indian country really to teachers. I have no other people are interested in and you know passing this knowledge John so our teachers astrophysics. It's Jason Astronomer She's just looking at the stations that that she did for this book. She's a phenomenal a nominal phenomenal artist so yeah. It's just to me just they just pick the perfect person to do you have you know just to Bensimon a knowledge of of our native sky and something I think that's exciting with this is just hearing how much you disciplined. She has in in understanding this and we know I know that a lot of people who are in astronomy or even you know as she is. She is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Saint Cloud State University and there is a lot of specific exact calculations to understand distance to the stars their function and so it's really exciting to see this book in no that somebody who hold that kind of knowledge and images that we see throughout this book there's sometimes there are abstract figures and in it looks like she just kind of let loose in creating this or dancing dancing around your words and so there's really interesting and unique relationship that I think we have tapped into today after hearing all that something you you wanNA share. Give us a ring one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and coming up after the break Thomas Peacocke the author of the forever sky. Hi is also going to read us a section of the book so it's story time right after the break but were also inviting you to join us to give us a ring one eight hundred nine in six to eight four eight is a number we have nine books to share with you today. Go Head in dial in hang tight boy scouts insist on using native terminology ceremonies and Regalia. We'll talk about a new profile of boy scout practices that also include native sacred dances. We'll also hear about a groundbreaking tribal. LGBTQ hate crime law and tribal efforts efforts to help bats. That's on the next native American call eight smoking gave me. COPD which makes it harder and are for me to breathe. I have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live spend it talking with your grandchildren and children explained to him that your ground personnel can be around anymore to share his wisdom and his love. I haven't figured out how to do that yet. I'm running out Qatar. COPD makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death. You can quit for free help. Call one eight hundred quit now a message from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mm-hmm uh-huh mm-hmm Thank you for joining us for our September book of the month Tara Gatewood in a visiting with Thomas Peacocke the author of the forever sky and if you'd like to join US dialing right now one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number Thomas is joining us out of Bemidji Minnesota today and and again if you'd like to talk with Him Dallas Right now we're also giving away copies of this book. Let's go ahead and give another copy of the book away to Candida who is tuned in in Albuquerque New Mexico Mexico on K. UNM thanks giving us a ring ear on here. Make let's make for your book. I look forward to reading it and learn learn more about because Mollie of the way people because starting with the cosmos quite literally expecting to learn and appreciate affair another worldview well. Thanks for reaching out Thomas Anything you WanNa tell her color well has this would probably levy a good introduction. Even though it's a children's book would be a good stepping off place. I think and like I say I I I actually you know wrote the book They teach young people of our region but but you know the the path that we follow in for a good way people in Tripoli worldview wouldn't be passed. is is into the stars and and so the only way to tell that story with the also introduced you know our class biology so the story itself is actually yeah. Grieving story and there are so few good books out there for children on raising and so I initially I developed story to talk about you know two young boys overshirt roundup he would tell us. Let's go deeper into the story in some of it for us. In in you're GonNa read from it sure yeah I mean you know in you know thinking we have some our soul spirit traveled surpass don't away and and ends up in the land of souls and and then late in the fall and winter the northern lights in the northern lights dancing. We we see that this spirit of our ancestors dancing until essentially the story story. That's a two young boys particularly I neon the older boy his uncle peaches that story because he sees that she's at the young man is missing has his grandma and then so the two boys for no matter of megani teaches is younger brother Initi- the same story and so you know you begin that traditional passing story down so the story will be remember them and told you know what's he succeeded generation in so we get to a point we're the two are looking up at the sky and then they have a conversation l. to go ahead and read them mm-hmm. I will do that. I'll begin at that point that the two boys later quietly for a long time looking up at the sky four dollars didn't they got me spoke with stars and Human Nature Column in the sky is so big that goes on forever. That's why we call it the forever sky gone and he told the nation more of what they had learned how the stars ars forum shapes of different spirits animals and things that live in the sky during each of the seasons of Moose Panther a Fisher of crane a sweat lodge obeys her and sweating stones spirit of winter maker the hole the guy who was a great teacher of the Agip Way you see the path of Scott Stars across the sky that is the path of souls the Milky Way that is the past new pool followed in the spirit world. The past leads to the land of foles that is where local Oh spirit is everyone who has passed its. They're all were there are happy so many nights the boys return the metal and one special night. They stayed very late that night. A Beautiful Show lights fill the Stein the northern lights again Madani by the spirit of all relatives were passed on. Do you see them. He asked do said Benishi. Then what are they doing. I mean I see their dad saying said the nation and that is what they would do. In in that is part of the forever sky are September book of the month Thomas Peacocke. The author is here with us today from the Fund Dulack Band. Would you boy if you'd like to talk with him. Give us ring and you know the story. That's taking a look and giving tools for grieving any thoughts one eight hundred nine nine six to eat four eight. Thank you you for sharing that Thomas. I got a caller would like to talk with you. We're GONNA see how to Josh in leapt way. IDAHO TUNED IN ON K. I Y Josh thinks are giving us a ring. You're on here good morning. I just wanted to share a little bit about our own people here. We have a creation story based on the the big dipper but with us as the seasons change so does the gipper and it represents a sign of which most people know it looks like like a swastika but to us it's supplus and then that creation story talks about the five Wolf brothers which also to us as representation tation of Luca see my which defender so you know I'm really interested in your book and look forward to hearing some more the creation stories based on the star nation. Thank you so much Josh great to hear from you there in left way we now go to don in Albuquerque New Mexico listening in Hunky. UNM thanks for giving us a ring on your on air. Well thank you yeah. I remember a long time ago. Ron Goodman was teaching at Saint Francis Indian school cool in South Dakota. He can Greek constellations and he thought you know there must be coach constellations so you interviewed eighty five ninety year old people and developed a book a book could call the Star Knowledge which is available from the Synthetic Alaska University bookstore and perhaps other outlets and it's a wonderful wonderful beautiful way of reflecting changing astronomy based on the ovoid travel people from Nebraska area the Black Hills and back so so for example when you're at the June at Harney's peak you can look up and see I told teepee La the bears teepee and but but I think the beauty the of it is that the Constellation basically change based on the time and location of people rather than being more fixed constellations wow. I have to look that one up don. Thank you for giving us a ring. and you know what there's room for you to in this conversation. Give us a call one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We now go to Arbil in Eagle. Butte South Dakota tuned in on K. I. P. I. Arvo. Thank you for giving us a ring. Go ahead. You're on air. Yes a good day. Thank you to Newport Wanka the sacred pipe and when I was twelve years old I became the bundle keeper and the elders talk to me about the we talked about crime and star knowledge which in because we came from the star nation and that's a new was brought by a spirit woman and and so the red still under the blood of our people and the in our our life no be a cool everything's sacred than so everything starts with. WR like chocolate and we descend so the star knowledge and what you know we have life here in our has iron and redstone pipes don't has that I've read iron because a study was done by the people are scientifically typically anyway everything that our way of life here is about the the sacred sites and no we do serve when you throughout the whole year and a World Peace Day on June twenty first I in March twenty first welcome ceremony and these are all. It's a way of life that it's not a religion so I want to say that no I grew up like that. Then we did a book Early Nineteen Seventy but since college so I was quite young and then more at the time about the which look Oh west and thank you to you to our great to hear from you sending good thoughts. Let's you WANNA join us to one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We now go to Melvyn in rapid city South Dakota Melvin. Thank you for giving us a ring. You're on air. Hello Good Morning. Hello I would like to comment on. Is I appreciate your niece. This creation of stories and the star knowledge would men just talk about their retreive has hugh stories. There's a lot of tribes out there that have even the Polynesians you know they travelled by the stars everybody Freddie travels by their stars and they're so great to hear it creation stories and then their star now it's and it's I hope we get if some time to other people were calling in. They learn something. It's always a great thing Melvin. Thank you for giving us a ring there in rapid city. looks looks like we got about four books left. You WanNa join us one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. Let's take one call got met insecure New Mexico tuned in on not. UNM thanks for giving us a ring Matt. You're on here hi thanks for talking to me. I just wanted to say I'm I'm a recent graduate from the studies studies department at UNM and when I was a kid me and my mom used to go look at the stars along shoot Kinda told me stories and everything so hearing about the book was really I I thought it was really great and I kind of want a copy of the book so I can share that with my mom again. We haven't been able to go out and look as much as we used to but I kind of think it would be nice for us to be able to do that again. So thank you for sharing that with all of us right. I met things were reaching out there. In Sapporo. We now go to ball club Minnesota to say hello to Andrea tuned in on k. the OJ Be Andrea. Thank you for giving us a ring. You're on you're just wanted to say to me glitch for writing this book and you noticed what is being a busy mom raising my children trying to teach them their culture. I'm really excited to get a hold of this book and read it. You Might Children Komo understand their culture and as much as it wants to think you will injury a thank you for giving us a ring in Thomas Maternity back to you in thinking about just all of the knowledge that you're opening up here and even relationship to the stars and there you go you have provided this pathway for understanding in grieving and we know those times are really hard when somebody walks on in we're trying to understand Dan this even as adults and then as young people you know having those thoughts or missing somebody who has walked on and talk to me a little bit about where you've kind of given that pathway to say when you miss them most they're right there in the sky go head Thomas bad you know the the the story actually really emphasizes them because because Zimba story eventually you know they they the the two boys from below into the metal night after night and and wait until they could could see the spirits of their ancestors dancing and and then comes a special night when they look up in the sky and they imagine that they can see of their grab my new pool and and the new pool it's just like she she talks talks to them and she said he said you know she says i. I know that you miss new but but I'm happy here you know I I my my mother and father are here my my brothers and sisters my cousins my aunties uncles and so she tells she's in a play. It's an insult to young boy and say they still miss her but they're happy for her because they realized the job she's at a good place so so that's where we we take this particular story towards the end of that intimate. Let's talk to me a little bit about you know addressing this in in a kids book because not everyone you open talks about this and and why it's also important to be on their platform I'm to talk about things that they may be facing. Well you know one of the things that I thought of in thinking of doing like this slows was that there are very few good outlets for for young people to read or to to know about when they're when they have to deal with grieving even all too often young people are sort of shunted off into into another room like we're going to protect him from from grieving and and of course many of our native families you know all too often after deal with with squeezing with loosens loved ones and and you know this happens way too often in many of our families and many of our communities use them and and and this site saw aw a raise to to kind of bring front front and center and and this'll this'll be a way where you know we're hoping with with this particular boats else have that when it's red on that we just don't leave it like that that that we use a book like this as a way to to talk about because because young people like they say they aren't they aren't on the we want to protect them and so you know we try to keep I am from from issues degreasing but but they believe just like adults Jill and they have to have an outlet for that Greece and and so oh you know that's that's really the whole Lewis actually behind this but you know I did it and in the process you know presented start on which but in actuality yeah the whole idea for the book to you know to introduce at old topic of going fast so intimacy know that use she had shared to that your thought of this also came from your time as educator in things that you witnessed within our communities in this need for dialogue and to even see how much you've opened up to which is connecting people to culture in this way something that's also featured in the book is a lot of the ojibway language even down to the character's names and as you make the journey through the book in the end it wraps up with a glossary that tells you the meanings of of some of those words that are used throughout the story and Thomas WanNa hear a little bit about that too of introducing people to any Schnabel words and maybe even ones that they might even see as they navigate through Minnesota or even your neighbors two neighbors indigenous communities there too. You can give us a ring one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number will look forward to your calls and it looks like we got two books left. Don't wait till the end call right now. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight support by Seneca Niagara Resort and Casino in Niagara Falls New York presenting the nineteenth annual native American music awards hosted by West duty and Mickie James James on Saturday November second at seven pm with live performances including special guests John Gourley Zachary carruthers from Portugal the man and many more four tickets to the gala honoring the achievements of today's native American artists are available now at Seneca Niagara Casino Dot Com and ticketmaster locations Jay uh I'm Tara Gate with this is native America calling in every month. We take a moment to dive into a book by native author this month we have chosen Rosen the forever sky by Thomas Peacock and a net Lee and we have learned a little bit about star knowledge as well as supporting our our young ones in our community even opening up this dialogue on grieving and even that invitation to see some of these things were faced with with with in life through Culture Thomas. Thank you for being here with us. He joins US today out of Bemidji Minnesota and someone is you to talk a little bit about the part of Culture Culture that you're inviting readers to through the language words you chose and even in the end given glossary of what some of the words mean talk to me a little bit about incorporating feeling which I think it's important that that we that we use bits of our own language not only to introduced on non native readers to you know to work tomorrow language full L. for young people that because they they can they can have one ship in both like this because does your own words represented in the story and so I thought it was important because the the two young boys and a story but she the and and Amish Nabi which name so and and of course and then introduce them to are the same because we talk about how the warriors offered tobacco on when they when they on the evening as they got to sleep with the spirit of their family after statement tobacco the name of the Sky we had been scheduled the easiest Komo cool which is of course a certain kind of person in for your Gebran word for grandmother Nokomis So and also that character was you you know in our teacher I human the tricks are you know all the different roles that you know whenever you have so those I you know I decided to do we'll give it a lot of those words for the tar yeah and even the boy's name some say that translation of their names sure on the economy would translate to something like to lead and and you know Rene issue would be a translation to like the bird so that's that's all that would translate. I'm with those with those chill. If go ahead I I was gonna say that you know we we uh it's so amazing the people should find amazing that you know our ancestors possessed a such complex knowledge complex starting all them and they were able to describe it in so much detail and be able to describe using yeah the complexity of their of their star knowledge of you know for people who you know many Westerners considered to be you don't primitive people so but they Abdessalam and thank goodness say passed it down on so that we can sit down you know so that'll continue forever sure there was a reason communities where thriving and even just the indigenous knowledge there were scientists people with our own accurate understandings of the world in. I'm glad you brought that up and the page that you were referring to Thomas when the do when the two boys offer sema or tobacco I like the way you ended that page reason after that night they were happy for their grandmother even though they still missed her very very much in those are words that when we do talk about healing and grieving sometimes you know we don't speak this way with their children in to know no that something like this is in the book and then all of these comforting images of these entities that are reaching up into the sky it's. It's really exciting to know that may be some young person may be reading something like this and especially after they've gone through some hard times anything you WANNA share Thomas call us right now one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We are also giving away copies of the book the forever sky. We're going to give away one right now which means they'll be. One left left if you'd like to join us one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight we're going to say hi Allison in Albuquerque New Mexico tuned in on K. UNM Alison thank you for giving giving us a ring. Go ahead here connected to Thomas. Thank you I'm really interested in allergens especially if the is especially if it's it's things like the stars and I even notice on why are we not only they just gave something about the circle holder constellation the Avi but I'm wondering if there are any other plans for other books like maybe especially the planes people and I'll take my answer off the air. Thank you all right allison. Thanks for giving us a ring and if any moment you missed something or you just tuned in today you can and find this program inner archives. All you gotTa do is go to our website native America calling Dot Com and Thomas Anything you want to tell allison well. you know whether reasons why my wife and I retired faculty from Europe was the Minnesota Duluth we when we retired tired of course we didn't get we were ready to close up shop right away we we eventually decided to start nonprofits for our with our black players in blueberries publishing and and so we've been in operation for just a couple of years it's a nonprofit prophet of course and and wears even soliciting native books and native illustrators Slur Children's books is just aren't enough I would children's books out there written by native writers and so and the and the and and of course those stated by native develops status and so we shut out begin to fill that gap so using social media and of course how it was like this is say hey you know you have an ideal there will be somebody who wants to to write a book about their our own Dr Cosmetology and and maybe there's an illustrator native illustrated out there who wants to wants to you know also that project so I'm so we're looking for ideas like that with our with our effort in if anybody does Wanna read you Thomas. Where can they find you? You can find me as the gun on our webpage which would be fares and blueberries dot com. I'm all one word of course or they can reach crew by email so and I. I don't know if it's still saved that email address. Not You're gonNA give me an email address. You'd like very rich mean to again getting all one word Thomas they'll peacock he h Abney sp L. E. KI as C. O. C. K. AT GMAIL DOT com all right well. Thank you for that end. You know what we're going to give away another book here in just a moment Thomas but there is so so much wealth in this book to be able to share with young people and maybe even our cultural advocates to in are are there other books that you know are opening up something that may be you want passed onto other generations. You can always reach out to us by email to you can send the two comments at native America Calling Dot Com. Let's go ahead and give this last book away to Monte who's in Fort Wingate New Mexico tuned in on key. Gop Monte thanks are given ring year on here. Well I just want to say thanks for the wonderful program. We appreciate that I'm I'm I'm breaking up because I'm emotional. It's not a bad connection. I'm very emotional thing you in Monte. You know what I think. I'm hearing who is the power what you heard. There's some really great things that get shared in this hour into here all the work that's gone into this and inviting people to understand more than I even appreciate all the callers who called in and shared a part of their own cultural knowledge. This is some very special so so I I hear you Monte anything anything else you WANNA leave us with amazing. It's amazingly special. I have a hobby with astronomy and so this this program today has been extremely inspirational extremely meaningful and I would love to learn more and I thought that I was. I was hesitant to call and ask for a book I thought they would all be gone sooner than this. I'm glad that one is left because I will really cherish it. I am I'm looking forward to learning a great deal more than I already. We know from reading the book but yes I did learn a lot today. Your programs are just chuck full of wonderful wisdom and wonderful information that I have really really enjoyed. I've I've lived in Gallup for twenty two years and you're one of the programs that I tuned into because I like local K. GOP The NPR station so I thank you immensely i. I can't thank you enough. I'm sorry that I became a little hyper emotional but that's me that's who I am. Hey monty that's how you know. It's live radio in you know connecting in this way and also yeah big ups to that community station that is bringing you due to this conversation to K- gop in Gallup New Mexico things are giving us a ring Monty and Thomas a lot of times people who are listening in they want to they they want to right. They want to get some of these stories out and anything you want to share about your process because I understand you even do outlines no I don't I I think you know that many writers specs particularly fiction writers and because the Piccolo Book you know is a is in some sense fiction are for me needed processes. I I come up with an idea Maybe a very kind the general idea I I had this thing about you know stars and breathing in front of me I wrote them down characters the main characters kind of appear in my head in this in this case these character and I said well you know all Helm your story and you know it sounds crazy but but the the imagery in my had is very vivid it's like that character tells me the story and I open my computer and I type of Sassoon's assumes I am as they held a story and the character and the character introducing the other character helps me at the scene who's and when they're done with the story they tell me when they're done and then I know it sounds crazy but really that's what that's what's going on in my head learn I write fiction and you've also done nonfiction is well and what is it like to just was kind of let loose in be in this realm of freedom. I wish academic you know I spent years twenty some odd odd years teaching and academia where you have to produce these boring academic scholarly articles and site and do all of that and in and once they made it through that process where I didn't have to do that anymore and particularly when I retired I made the switch over immediately fiction because like I have a head full of stories and and I spend incredibly friend in so Thomas any encouragement to our artists out there to to go ahead. Don't don't put any borders just keep creating. Let imagination flow anything you want to tell him to tell her stories and and there are people who have out there who have that interest in writing and and who have have that incredible the cultural knowledge combined with the ability to write put those now Atmel instrumental words on paper Y- to create it realizations we need to do that so so that you know our stories will live long after we do. They'll they'll continue on forever and and that Schlegel responsibility if we have that knowledge if we have that scale then we've been telling the story in Thomas any reminders about opening our ears wider because all of these things that you know about Ojibway Cultures Because you listed listened and got those from people who who raised you or you're around with any thoughts on them. I think they are we we we are stories so passed down for for two thousand seventeen imposes a year you know orally and and now you know certain stories. Are there any stories that cannot be written cannot be told you know during certain kinds of the year but there are stories like this you know like the forever sky that that that are you you know we were able to Ballard and still you know not only the you know sharing that cultural but having cultural knowledge or so that we we know which stories are appropriate to share publicly well big ups to all of our story creators innkeepers in in Thomas A. Really appreciate your joining us here today and sharing your book the four ever sky with us and we do have a link on our website directly to the book Doc but you can also connect to a Thomas as well again you miss anything in this hour. Go back listen to it. in our podcast you can find it on Itunes soundcloud and stitcher and you can even connect with us on facebook. We're even twitter. Handle is at one eight hundred nine nine native thanks again Thomas Peacock for joining us today or September book of the month author also so thanks to the work of a net Lee your partner in this and of course thank you to the Minnesota Historical Society press for providing copies of the book to our listeners today and tomorrow we are inviting you back to our monthly news round up you can tune in to hear about events that have gone on across our or need of nations and maybe there's a news item you wanted to bring to our attention. You can always share your thoughts or even articles links to things you think think we should be reading you can reach out twitter or on Instagram to or you can post directly on facebook as well and you can post on our website like native America calling dot Com. That's going to do it for today. I'm your host Terra Gatewood support for law and justice justice related programming provided by Hobbs Strauss Dean and Walker L. l. p. a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for more than thirty years more information available at Hobbs Strauss dot com support by prairie edge dot com proud to provide traditional and contemporary American Indian crafts supplies is from feathers furs and hides conscience fringe shells and beads in rapid city or online at prairie edge DOT COM won't be native Americans affected by domestic violence can call the strong hearts native helpline offering free confidential support and resources strong hearts takes calls from anyone hurting in their relationship or who may be concerned for someone else available seven. AM TO TEN PM central time seven days a week at eight four four seven native that's eight four four seven native more at strong hearts helpline dot org program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center native America calling just produce the birds national native boy studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Broadcasting with support from the Public Radio Satellite Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native

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