17 Burst results for "University of California San Diego"

"university california san diego" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

08:04 min | 3 months ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"In the early nineteen nineties an advertisement appeared in local San Diego California newspapers. A doctor sought amputees for clinical studies to an outsider. The text under the headline may have seemed like something out of a horror film it referenced. Missing limbs and the phantom pain that still plagued him. Yet the AD suggested the affliction could be treated. By this time Phantom limb pain or PL P was a recognized medical phenomenon but no one knew what caused it and very few doctors were exploring ways to alleviate it. Aside from the neurologist who place that advertisement Dr v S Ramachandran at the UC San Diego Center for brain cognition. Rama Chandran was famous for investigating subjects. Other medical professionals didn't dare touch. He was one of the first in his field to hypothesize about graphing Kohler a sinister. Or an individual's ability to perceive color as letters and numbers. Ramchandran believed this occurred when normally disconnected? The brain became linked. In this case, the parts that recognized colors and numbers. He also published one of the first studies on Potemkin affiliate, an aspect of body identity integrity disorder. This condition caused a patient to have an overwhelming desire to an potato limb. Ramachandran suggested this was due to damage in the right parietal lobe, the part of the brain that manages handwriting temperature, touch and body position. So Phantom limb pain was right up Roman Chandra's alley and he believed there was a biological explanation for P., l. p. just like there was with sinister easier and body identity integrity disorder. He wanted to discover how these conditions related to the subconscious workings of the brain. He invited candidates to the University California San Diego to test a simple yet innovative technique. He called it mirror visual feedback or MVP F-. Imagine, you took a shoebox and put a mirror in the middle. Then you cover the half of the box that doesn't have a mirror so you can't see what's on that side. If. You put an apple in front of the mirror and look down from the top. It would look like there were two apples in the box. In 'em f the amputee place, they're healthy limb in one side of a wooden box and imagined their lost limb in the other. When they appeared inside and so the mirror reflect their existing limb it gave the illusion that they're lost arm had returned. The patient move their hands and arms and saw the missing limb do the same. The idea was to trick the brain into believing the phantom arm was performing the task. For example, if a patient felt their finger was cramped or clenched, they stretch the existing hand. The brain would see the mirror image and believe the Phantom Limb was unflinching to and for many the pain subsided. This was due to something called mirror neurons. When a neuron or a nerve cell experiences a sensation, it sends a chemical called a neurotransmitter to another neuron. They play a game of telephone all the way up to the brain. The brain responds by sending a new signal back to our nerves and muscles telling them how to react. But New Ron's activate as we perform a task or watch someone else do something we know we can do ourselves meaning they won't kick in when we watch a bird fly because we're not capable of flight. But if you've ever watched someone else yawn and found yourself following suit. That's likely your mirror neurons at work. They also work with empathy. For example, if you see someone fall off their bike and skin their knees, your mirror neurons might make you wince and feel that same stinging pain. Dr Ramchandran believed that mirror neurons also allowed us to empathize with ourselves. He thought that might be why we have introspection and self awareness. He said there is obviously a chicken or eggs question here as to which evolved first. But the main point is that the two co evolved mutually enriching each other to create the mature representation of self that characterises modern humans. Essentially Rama Chandran believe those mirror neurons and our self awareness developed in tandem and that's why he had faith in 'em the F.. His theory went something like this. A patient feels intense discomfort that they cannot see in the phantom limb. Say a clenched fist. The patient knows consciously that the pain shouldn't exist. But that's not enough to convince the subconscious mind or the nervous system. But when a patient looks at their reflected hand, they can trick the brain into realizing there's nothing causing the pain. The Mirror is stretched not clenched. So the mine rejects the signal as falls. And for the most part Ramachandran's theory was right he found that just fifteen minutes of end. The F. led to a significant decrease in Phantom limb pain in most of his patients. and Luckily, it's tools were easily accessible. Patients could use a home mirror anytime. They felt the pain returned to a missing limb. Thanks to Ramadan rinse work in two thousand, eight Stevens Sumner found that the. Alleviated. His Phantom leg pain from the front seat of his car. After that first success sumner practice thome f daily for the following two weeks and his pain disappeared. It didn't come back for a year and a half when the sensations returned sumner pulled out the mirror and repeated his treatment this time the pain vanished for four years in two thousand, ten sumner decided he wanted to help people in less fortunate communities overcome their phantom limb pain with 'em. B. F. He wasn't a doctor or a physical therapist, but he knew what had worked for him. So, he took his methods to Cambodia where many physicians still overlooked the problem of P. They had bigger issues to focus on. Active landmines plagued the dense brush and open fields of Cambodia. The minds had been laid during the civil war between nineteen, sixty, seven and nineteen, seventy five. Many of the bombs were abandoned over time, but these live weapons could stay active for more than fifty years. Between Nineteen, seventy, nine and two thousand eleven more than twenty thousand civilians died in landmine accidents and forty four thousand more were injured requiring amputations. According to the amputee coalition. Eighty percent of people who lose limbs experience pl p one means there's close to thirty five, thousand Cambodians with the condition. So Sumner worked with the Red Cross Center in Button Bong Cambodia. He fitted amputees with free prosthetic limbs and educated them on MVP F. With the help of a translator, Sumner coached a group of forty four people. He found thirty seven of them experienced Phantom limb pain regularly. This came as a.

Stevens Sumner S Ramachandran Rama Chandran Dr Ramchandran leg pain MVP San Diego Cambodia California UC San Diego Center University California San Dieg Roman Chandra amputee coalition Potemkin Kohler apple Ron
"university california san diego" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:13 min | 5 months ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Have tried to shoot to you know bounce a check or or whatever they were supposed to call there and he'd maybe you had a few pops as far as breaking dawn and it you know that's what some people say it was a new breed or whatever and they go from that to their on his knees one officer in particular for nine minutes he goes into distress and he dies it's all on video and then you find out there's several other angles of it their whole thought well he was rich he was resisting anything people should be in our people should be pissed off people should probably show social distancing just put it out there but you have a right to be pissed loosely but then it becomes something that it shouldn't become we don't need to nobody wants to see it in the community and that's a lot of times what happens is a lot of people come from other parts of communities and they come there to raise hell to cause chaos to do something absolutely ridiculous because not interested in anything other than themselves as self serving and see what I can do and data and then they do something stupid it ignites something next thing you know you're burning down buildings attacking people all the stuff happens and then you go back to wherever your community is and you leave a message for those people who want justice who knew him who want this thing to be seen all the way to the end of the conclusion in a right way and having their voice heard to clean up the mess we don't need that nobody wants that and you don't know what's to come I urge all protesters be safe doing the right thing and make sure that Mr Lloyd remains the center of this and we don't get distracted by somebody's momentary outrage it is it would not be what it will not uphold Mr Floyd's dignity to do something like that no it doesn't it doesn't everybody should be pissed now right everybody everybody should should look at the situation and be upset and frustrated and at the same time seeing this thing through in the right way without the kind of stuff that we saw last night is is what we need to have happen three two three five three twenty four twenty three at Chad Benson shows your Twitter you tweet as you could text the program as well yes two point one million people filed for unemployment last week down a little bit from the week before overall though since the pandemic started forty million people have lost their jobs some have well their jobs may never come back some they've been furloughed and they'll probably have the opportunity come back a good portion of people but what comes next right like that's the big worry at this point now where are we in the middle of the the I. are we getting to the point where the eye of the storm right so the big storms coming there was some but there's either storm that calm in between are we going to have a second wave or is going to dissipate and break up that's you know we're hearing all of us the second wave it's this that the other I don't know could disappear altogether these absolutely there is a possibility that that that you know bracing for a second way we don't get a second way and there is a possibility the second wave could be coming because it could get to the point where we see the saying slowly but surely go away and then we have some calm and then the second wave isn't much if there is one we don't know what the future holds but obviously something is going to have to come out of this and everybody's doing the best they can and that's guessing you know we often talk about the possibility of a second wave or of an outbreak when you re opening we don't have to accept that as an inevitability I'm particularly when people starting thinking about the fall and I want people to really appreciate that this could happen but it is not inevitable and that's that's good it's not inevitable it's not inevitable it's a possibility thank it may come back but not as bad it may come back but the instead of saying you know it comes back more like a flu as far as the the rate of in fact I mean these are all things that are possible remember we we thought we're gonna have viewed two million dead and yes we passed a hundred thousand mark and you know trump save we can keep it under a hundred thousand that's good I don't think we get past sixty thousand but we have but I know that we're gonna get that two million so it's not inevitable but we still need to figure out how we get to the point we have a therapeutic that we can really really rely on it while we find a vaccine and that is who knows when but we take the right steps and this is the problem with the right what is the right steps that's the problem right like you hear about you talk about you know Hey we can do a lot of things if we do the kinds of things that we're putting in place now to have the work force the system and the will to do the kinds of things that are the clear and effective identification isolation and contact tracing we can prevent this second wave that we're talking about if we do it correctly but here's the problem with that there it's a novel virus they know more than we do but they're also in the same situation that they don't understand it completely without you said that over number I'm not the expert in this I'm not an expert in this I in this particular virus and there's a lot of things that that that he's learning and that all the other doctors and scientists across the globe are learning experts now say what six feet may not be enough what yeah six feet six feet so we've been told six feet six feet six feet increasing evidence for sars cove dash to cover nineteen suggested six feet which the who recommends is probably not enough so we've been told six three six three six three now that may not be enough she on one of the national sun Yat sen university Taiwan committee Prather and Dr Robert Schooley of university California San Diego said a large portion of the cover nineteen spread appears to be occurring through airborne transmission of aerosols end of the six feet it just may not be enough so now you're like okay so you told me this now it's this and there's over here it's the frustrating side of things of we're finding things out kind of as they do and then we hear one thing and we go with that we think we're doing a right only finance and and that's the frustrating thing I think the best thing we can do and every doctor will tell you whether it's the flu or its scope in nineteen washing your hands trying not to touch your face in particular all eyes and your nose is going to what is going to really eliminate probably ninety five percent of what could infect you and that that's it good hygiene goes a super long way but six straight mmhm good god that was not wanting to really tell me was it twenty feet and how we get a social distance at a hundred feet at this point in time three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three that's events and shows your Twitter tweet at me wouldn't pop project all of them talking Ernesto tomorrow they are it's weird because times are people are struggling a a you know we were talking about you know giving and people still giving doing all they possibly can but they're the focus of giving stuff is changed to a lot of what's going on with with Kobe but oddly enough is that we're so busy because we have so many first responders or helping with it with with the dogs and he's got a new dog she's trying to you know he's got a foster is they just finished out their thing out here in Phoenix and it's it's it's a really interesting situation at but they need your help if you can give it's it's an amazing organization these animals are are are out there and they're helping our first responders our veterans who come home wounded and struggling with PTSD to to rejoin society in such a way and have that that part of them that is with them always you can give in so many ways cash is great you go to smiled on Amazon dot com the supporting group but if you have.

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"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:55 min | 9 months ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"If you're here there there was nothing really there are no limitations speech on the left but to destroy people you differ with it's to see in print but I am quoted as saying that slavery was that bad by this vice provost for inclusion and diversity his public email address is J. F. gates at Purdue dot E. D. U. on the tweet out his comment I mean I fight they they shouldn't lie about me to its credit news weaker let me change the article the life that we thought about dates here what yeah G. A. T. S. J. F. G. ATS JFK to produce thirty deal what did you say the Dennis Prager said slavery was not bad is Lorene problem for you I mean don't don't curse him out but he's got to get feedback the that nobody takes these people on sort of like gods of universities false gods idols and the and yes I think his position is absurd vice provost for diversity and inclusion it is a total thorough waste of of the money that people middle class people spend on a place like Purdue you know how much money in universities now goes to people who don't teach anything or or or or who I'm not saying he's one of them I don't know maybe he also teaches most of them they are very it's just did you see heather McDonald data listed university of budgets San Diego State University California San Diego millions upon millions upon millions of dollars all of these on these positions on left wing positions the vice provost wow you're the vice provost of of inclusion we don't have provost Prager you throw we do have inclusion because we just want the best period we don't need a vice provost or even a non vice provost for diversity inclusion JFK to produce dot EDU you attended a lecture Sir with Dennis Prager said slavery was not bad was.

vice provost Purdue dot E. D. U. JFK Purdue provost Prager J. F. gates G. A. T. S. J. F. G. Lorene heather McDonald San Diego State University San Diego
"university california san diego" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"They're using the map out more accurately they the size and scope of the fires they have a a good pen on the acreage but also their ability to see hot spots not only using floor which is forward looking infrared radar on the aircraft but also using spy satellites that are basically looking down for hot spot specifically and able to give us about a better glimpse even through clouds and smoke and everything else and just as I say all this the wind picks up a little bit and they're able to pinpoint exactly where they want to attack and where they want to draw lines and really coordinate the air attack with the ground attack to make the fire fighting as efficient as possible because that's one thing but sometimes a a think folks maybe get lost on in this thing we we spent a lot of time talking about their power but most of the really heavy lifting is having on the ground and you want to make sure that that these ground crews are in as effective a spot as possible the because they're living on human energy and it only goes so far yeah you know the H. is one of the satellite just in the last four five years the whole process has been revolutionized he I think that's a I think that the safe thing to say that that they have taken massive technological leaps in the last few years and the other thing that has allowed for this to happen is the access to a lot of shared information so there's you know it's in down in university California San Diego they have all an entire fire program that they end up sharing with not only the fire departments but also the utility companies because the utility companies have been under a.

"university california san diego" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on WTVN

"It again was. I don't really care for free beer but. this works better for me as it because it's a sour it because I don't know why that is do you do you get that kind of feedback as well to me it just something fruity taste better under the guise of sour verses I I just you know just a straight a beer I don't like fruit my beer yeah I think I think a lot of it has to how we treat the fruit we do when we add the for to the beer we let every for men so a lot of sugar that he says he was rude gets consumed by the east so that's nice dry product on the answer that's the reason people like lawyers and other types of years because they're they're dry is not a lot of sugar left and you know that ice acidic bitter kind of dry components that I I don't know if you said this prior I apologize if you did but again just tasting this it I mean it's almost it reminds me of wine okay I mean the the beer is wonderful age so there's gonna be some of that like French character some of the some of the wind character left over that we get out of the barrel but yeah I often sorry beer consumers aren't you know quote unquote beer drinkers a lot of him there I go I think mine know stuff don't really like beer quote unquote they try the sars like actually really enjoy this you know is experiencing yeah definitely. a small well did you did you do home brewing at all because I I I know that I mean you're you're a chemist by Trevor white trade or I mean that's what you went to school for right yeah absolutely I said chemistry at the university California San Diego I used to work in pharmaceuticals for a long time I'll be I I sort of number and when I was in college because we found out that you could make beer when you're either by the need to make your in your eighteen and I was like what now yeah yeah make it really need your eighteen like okay the my roommates and I like let's do this immediately so yes of started out with just a way to get beer and then in a living in San Diego such a big your town just like wow how to end up in Columbus. because man I I would I would vote San Diego but reaches out yeah my mom my wife I so for love I guess so my wife she started her her career as a physician she's at Ohio state she moves out of the Midwest perfect in your role at the company you're the you're the head brewer and and owner or a part owner yeah I'm the founder and owner and I consider myself more of a blunder than ever I mean we do I mean I I now understand the I guess the chemistry of it and you know how it works I can you know mash and stuff like that but we do most of that at north high one of our partners they produce our recipes for us so what I really do is in the back and worry free fermented our word and then be blended back together from barrels and your process because it's beryl age just takes a lot longer in general is that is that correct yeah and we've done some be made some changes over the last two years have actually made it take longer several different kind of a so easy for him with L. east and we used to get products available after six months in barrels and then we switched to logger east and now things are more in the eight to nine month range before they're ready so taste wise any does that impacted or or not yeah absolutely I think we get a a cleaner cleaner final product I feel like when we're using at least the beer was a little on this I feel like it was calm here it was just like it wasn't quite as clean as the the proper begin now with the longer fermentation. let's move on to the the second beer that you brought in for us to check out yes so this is rebbe Sante it's a sour blonde that's agent kilo barrels for nine months and we add some citrus components to it on the back and so we'll do some orange zest some lime zest in a little bit of habanero. slow I think this will be outstanding with seafood or a big crab boil something like that yeah or even just some you know anything you pair margaritas and tacos and like that. your motto is making sour beers on purpose so you know you've been on the on the show before I I I know I asked you this question last time but I'm pretty confident that our people are listening tonight that might not have been listening that night so. describe a sour beer is it really sour and why you chose to make sour is your specialty yeah so sour so is a kind of missed or for a city or sick so I Starrcade he's just like citric acid like the big component that so acid makes our. for us it's lactic acid and it takes part the fermentation I decided to you Sarah beer exclusively because it's very difficult to do it takes a long time and there is when I started doing this there was a whole lot of knowledge out there available there is just like a few people are doing it and wasn't very widespread so it was it was like interesting to me I was like well how does this house is made you know I started trying to do it announcer what did you model it on I mean is since since since there wasn't a lot out there how did how did you even know where to go I want to go down this road and I want to do it because I liked what yeah for me was a new Belgium a like I I tried a couple their starters I never had her before and that like blew my mind I was like what is this and like most people when you try for sorry I couldn't finish the sample had is all too much for me but then when I got into the car could stay for a couple other American producers that I was getting their beer distributed out in California and then actually modeled our business after ticket's Dave they didn't have a brew house for like the first six years of operation so that they will the way we partner with another Burry to make our work I was kind of based on inspired by them. so do you have people now coming to you going help me and how do I do this and and you know where where the bodies buried cut. yeah it's it's been really weird I don't really think of myself this way but I guess I'm kind of a local expert on this our beer production and I've had people reach out for you know asking questions of how we do it and you know what you know bacteria and yeast we use is like that and you know I tell everyone of my Gasol early we get it from you know the slab and use as much of it in in these yeah under these conditions is there a is there a special like sour specific competition scene or when you go to a beer competition is is it all just under this is the such and such and and maybe they have a sour category but is is there anything that is specific to summers yeah absolutely it's actually involving a lot more now that is becoming a bigger thing just kind of like I. P. A. so there used to be like for I. T. A. categories and now there's like twelve because there's so many different outside the ace of Sauber's kind of the same way where they're like Sarah beer you know with fruits RB without for you you know barely satire not barely age that kind of thing or you know sorry beer in aged in specific specialty barrels expiry barrels and stuff like that so I I read in as I was doing some prep it was it was an article and I I can't remember if it was and I don't know six one four or perhaps in the dispatcher Columbus like. you were quoted as saying we're not a brewing company were a fermentation and maturation lab so you know being a brewer probably sounds more romantic and cool and hip but when you strip it down to where a fermentation and maturation lab pull pull the curtain away from that and kind of yeah so it's it's always really funny to me to explain to people that my brewery is kind of a big experiment for me me for you know when you start making sorry beer you're on a small scale you don't understand you know what kind of wine barrels you like what kind of character I mean I didn't know if I want if I like French oak American oak or red wine or white wine or what was going to affect my beard positive way you know two years later I have a pretty good handle on and you can tell the difference if if somebody slid two beers underneath you and one came from what did you say a red oak and one was French and American and you you could spot that difference absolutely nine day nowadays I prefer American okay personally so our seller has it's amazing it's skewed heavily towards American accounts so if you like a beer now more than you did you know your ago might it might have to do with our American character gotcha.

two years nine months nine month six months six years nine day
"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Even if you have a map you only know where you are the purpose of the ultimate issues our is to help you know where to go. and that unfortunately is not nearly as much as where we are. by I I could I tended to say back by popular demand and I think that would be accurate actually is a professor of astrophysics. UC university California San Diego Brian Keating. his book losing the Nobel Prize a story of cosmology ambition and the perils of sciences highest honor. is that out in paperback he also presents a very popular Prager you video what's a greater leap of faith gogue. all the multi verse so the whole issue of scientists science garb. the V. related subjects. yes Sir Keating welcome back to the Dennis Prager show. it's a pleasure to be back at the Dennis how are you. I am very well thank you. so I was discussing an issue in the last hour my let me too good a renewed actually the enter. are you by any chance I don't expect you to be familiar with caught in the astronomers a book by Robert Jastrow. yes I am planning an update god in the cosmologists to that book. really is that right. well it may in part I mean I think it's impossible to not think about the the question of god's existence or lack there of and discuss cosmology and astronomy is mostly concerned with you know property the stars and perhaps exoplanets and really fascinating things I hope we can touch upon today but but cosmology is really you know the story of what happened you know perhaps before there was a history of the universe you know the ultimate map makers in the universe are cosmologist and that gives us a certain sense you know maybe perhaps hubris but it should in sometimes give us some humility and I I hope we can discuss why that is so cosmology is the study of that you know you're very acquainted with that hair and make up and now no it's not if it's the study of the universe the cosmos a shirt that same prefix cosmos with cosmetology and that's because that prefix means beauty and it means state and the universe presents a face to us that we can reveal into some that might reveal the presence of god. so the Jastrow book offered and he I knew him very well as by sheer coincidence that I I really adore him he's a very special man anyway he who was the the the head of the Goddard Space Center at NASA. the problem with the strong member of his time so he wrote the bat he was shocked to find out how many astronomers. were upset by the news that there was probably a Big Bang because they had full or not full on old put many of them had really bank. psychologically on the proposition that there was no beginning that the universe always was because to be giving suggests of course our creator where is no beginning suggests no creator so we said well they didn't really they weren't neutral scientists they had a bias so my question to you is do you agree with that thesis and Pete is it still true. well those are those are two really good questions all answer the second one first and the first one not at all knowledge but the questions the usually you impose a one question policy on your on your call. in case the you know the question of whether it's true is perhaps the most interesting question I claim and all signs of my colleagues would disagree because it is so intimately connected to whether or not the universe had a beginning is intimately connected to this prospect of the existence or lack there of of the multiverse in the multiverse you know kind of hypothesis if you will that is sort of a modern day incarnation if if you will of the previous generations in the fifties and sixties the original opponents to the to the Big Bang theory were devout atheist as you say and particular Fred Hoyle who coined the term Big Bang apparently as a pejorative euphemism for a certain type of that act that I won't say on the radio it is more appropriate for the male female our but but any event this this pejorative was March because he was a devout atheist and he actually claim that one point that scientists believed in the Big Bang because they are overwhelmed by genesis one one and nowadays you know I don't think you quote this particular character in that rational Bible but but that's laughable right no scientists we think of trying to today is as the brightly so as I say in my Prager you video yeah seventy percent or more of the National Academy of sciences do not affirm or actively seder atheist so nowadays that's completely you know and they'll be a laughable opinion to hold in the case of whether or not the universe had a singular beginning that question is extremely hotly debated and in fact there's evidence that some of the greatest in a proponent of the original theory Madonna's inflation that protected the multiverse are now coming back to try to kill off that theory enter meeting incredibly fierce resistance not the least of which comes from Nobel Prize winners who are you know held up you know rightfully in some cases not so much in others perhaps but as having a halo the fact that really bestows upon the more credit credulity in their. opposition to the theories that are presented that conflict with the multiverse so it's extremely hotly contested question and it couldn't be more relevant to today's sciences I discussed in in my book. right so that that again raises the question about I'm not looking for a certain answer I I'm just curious. is all put even more directly than is science affected. by non scientific biopsies. that's that all over even with that now you you've got to be joking yeah course trying to thank this do themselves a disservice when they purport to perpetuate or this mythology that were somehow you know walking wikipedia's that just have a tremendous amount of knowledge but you know I would point out you know wikipedia has a lot of knowledge but it has your wisdom and the fact that scientists are sometimes the least aware of these blind spots and this goes back to ancient times too as I always talk about my hero Galileo in the book he was notorious for strain after what his eyes and his heart wanted to show mainly in his case a correct theory which is the current can model that the sun is the center of our solar system which over through thousands of years of orthodoxy going back to Aristotle but this question of whether or not we are the center of the universe that was deeply ingrained upon him as being wrong in a prima facie show on it you know absolutely incorrect so everything he did was seen from that perspective and he even went to such great lengths as to you know have an in correcting explanation for house that's prosaic affect on earth such as the tide that we see at the ocean or how the Milky Way appears the galaxy our galaxy and that was biased by his desire call confirmation bias to appeal to what he wanted to be true so I absolutely and it still holds true the court I gave you from Fred Hoyle and it holds true in the modern incarnation of the multiverse and if you could kind comments on policy logically with something else that maybe we'll get into called authority by which we tend to look up to an associate and almost impenetrable halo around fine since when we scientists are mere humans and I think that that an important thing for listeners to keep in mind scientists tell humans and we have the same prejudices biases and proclivities as any other human being and to say we don't does a disservice to science because it prevents people from going into our field that have the capability to be fine because you know people say I'm not as smart as that's. I into some negative nine never I make mistakes but scientists don't so I think it's it's important to disabuse people of that notion. I raise the V. well it's very important your answer and I raised that issue you don't even have to come with all this additional explain to you because you've been here at and to those who might not have heard I raised it in conjunction with the issue of of global warming and that there's no doubt in my mind in this regard that the pressure of any climatologist any any scientist involved with the climate the pressure to sustain the notion that we are in on an irreversible journey toward extinction is tremendous because to say over what he's is is to risk reputation and livelihood. very unfortunate and I would say the thing I love about cosmology is that there's no Republican constellation there's no democratic comments out there and it's mostly a political but you're right my colleagues to complain about this you know off the record.

Dennis Prager scientist Nobel Prize professor UC university California San D Sir Keating Brian Keating. seventy percent
"university california san diego" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"He was pressed on the impacts of the tariffs on the U. S. so if there's any consumer impact is very very small I'm Terry Moore NBC news radio fired FBI agent Peter struck is suing the government over his termination struck was fired over anti trump text messages he wrote with an ex lover a now former FBI attorney your listening to the latest from NBC news radio job openings in hiring across the U. S. are falling the labor department reports job openings fell thirty six thousand in June to a seasonally adjusted seven point three million the job opening rate fell one tenth of a percent to four point six percent hiring also decreased by fifty eight thousand to five point seven million in June and the hiring rate was unchanged at three point eight percent Nobel winning author twenty Marcin has died at the age of eighty eight Morrison died last night surrounded by family and friends at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx following a bout with pneumonia she is best known for her novel beloved which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in nineteen ninety three Morrison became the first African American woman to win a Nobel Prize for literature in twenty twelve former president Obama presented her with the presidential medal of freedom the highest award for civilian and the U. S. Morrison was also a long time creative writing professor at Princeton University Kristin marks NBC news radio New York a new genetic studies using information from an unprecedented number of U. S. veterans to try and learn why posttraumatic stress disorder affects only some vets it's an urgent question because suicide rates are higher among veterans have ring from PTSD the study of more than one hundred sixty five thousand people is the first PTSD analysis of genetic information collected by the V. A.'s million veterans program researchers from Yale and the university California San Diego I'm looking for patterns of genetic variables that can guide future treatment of many diseases Lisa Carter NBC news radio nearly eighty years after disappeared beneath the Pacific Ocean part of a World War two submarine has been discovered the USS grunion the ballot has been found twenty seven hundred feet under water off the coast of Alaska's Aleutian Islands the rest of the sub was discovered over a decade ago but the bow is missing searchers recently found that the bow has slipped on a volcanic embankment and settled about a quarter mile away from the.

New York Pacific Ocean Lisa Carter Princeton University NBC FBI Terry Moore Aleutian Islands Alaska university California San Dieg Yale V. A. PTSD Peter professor U. S. Morrison Obama president
"university california san diego" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Lower the risk the federal government by people actually engaging engaging in training programs that would have a high enough return on investment that income share agreement would make sense and so we've seen this evolution in the market and now with <hes> you know I I thought when Andy Andros Sirkin front page Article Article The New York Times about it <hes> we sort of arrived but now you know we've got a great bipartisan bill and the Senate <hes> Marco Rubio <hes> and senator young on from the inside and Senators Warren and coons on the Democratic side where this is really a this income share agreement has the potential to remake student finance in this country and so it's really exciting period of time in list of the state of is as a today and more so what are the biggest bottlenecks preventing them from from taking offer becoming even more mainstream Whitney stop it <hes> the first most important thing is we need a legislative framework for what an I say is right right now I essays have been crafted by responsible institutions as Andy said like Purdue University Utah Like University California San Diego and that is great but you know it's really important as you think about the future this industry that we create some guardrails and some consumer protections and that's that's why was important <hes>. I think that the Democrats and Republicans got together and said you know this is a really interesting free market experiment but there needs to be guardrails to to protect consumers. The second thing is the evolution of the capital markets right today and I think we should really talk about the role of philanthropy in that but let me just start by saying the way you lower. The cost of a good is just to get it to scale <hes> we all know this and so we need to develop <hes> the capital markets at scale that can support this and I think what's really driving that is your income share agreement sort of really originated in the coding bootcamp space and it's interesting because when I say hit the scene I one co first a couple coding BOOT camps make school APP Academy Developed Income Share Agreements and pretty soon. It was if you didn't have an income come share agreement. You couldn't run over couldn't good because everyone say okay well. Where's your essay? Do you believe in your students right. Do you believe in their program enough that the return on investment is high enough that you know I I should go to your your school and so schools all started to get is as once one school got an. I say everybody needed. I say and you got to the situation where if you didn't have an icee admit you weren't really competitive in the market. That's GonNa start happening at the higher education levels that's going to happen increasingly skill development on areas like the Andes focused on <hes> and so you know if you if you show up with your parents in five years right and and the school you're visiting for your college trip doesn't have an I say it means that maybe you're not gonNA get the economic return you want from that education so I say has become a real <hes> competitive tool for schools in attracting students so <hes> I think it's really three things one is the legislative infrastructure as clearly most important to sort of capital markets in three the making getting <hes> universities and more mainstream institutions to start leveraging is as and a responsible manner such that it becomes a real way to demonstrate the value of what they're doing to choose their incoming students and I would just briefly at I think I think for leaders of different higher education's petitions and <hes> workforce training organizations like ours. I think we're GONNA continue to to offer a her. Our core services and I think essays are really important tool to have to solve really specific problems and I'll give you gamble so there's an application and Colorado with Colorado Mountain in college where they're using I._S._A.'s <hes> with a small cohort of Dhaka recipients who otherwise they're not eligible for federal federal aid in that state so they're Kinda get children people working in service industry opportunity that the other is wouldn't for us us. We are GONNA give federal grant to individuals with no requirement to repay through some of federal funding for <hes> individuals or experiencing homelessness <hes> individuals coming out of <hes> the criminal justice system which we have what the programming and <hes> and we're gonNA continue to do that but but the big challenge that we've found is I mentioned we serve about twenty five thousand people a year who are unemployed or have just been laid off and are making a career change. We've traditionally provided training scholarships for twenty five hundred of the twenty thousand so someone might have been construction worker they were laid off and we paid a short term scholarship essentially with mobile federal funding teach them how to do uh-huh software development and then played them in coding well over the last ten years our federal funding for that activity has been creep in decreased by about fifty percent now out of every five people who need that type of scholarship we we only have federal grant a federal grant to to pay for them for every one of five people so twenty percent or turning away for out of the five people who need to upgrade their skills to stay competitive market. We're just saying you know what maybe come back next year and we'll see if we have more money and for me kind of overseeing the system. That's just a completely unacceptable answer. I suppose we could also point them to private student loans and other ways to finance it but we don't think think we don't think that was responsible. Either so we were Kinda stuck and in fact when I reviewed some of our customers action data increasingly people who were unbound by the services that they received at our career centers in about fifteen percent of them were majority Jordy of them were unsatisfied because they had all the things that we told them to do. They took a career assessment to understand the growing jobs in San Diego and where they might need to upskill to get those jobs they identified specific high quality schools that are on like a preapproved list that we put together gather and they created their career plan and they're all excited and then we didn't have money to finance their next step and that is crushing for the family for businesses that need the talent and so we say we have to find another way and that's when we stumbled on actually with an article enforce <hes> from Michael Horn and he called it <hes> a renewable learning fun and he wrote about how theoretically renewable learning fun CA transform transform workforce development for a couple of reasons one it would give us an option for those four out of every five people we were turning away to finance their higher education through some short-term skills training to it would kind of the more successfully worthy more your money would have to continue to do what we're doing though it would be this virtuous cycle where you know loans are not in our federal job. Training programs are not structured that way and free will give us radical visibility into the outcomes of our training investments because goes through the structure we the workforce for would be able to understand the employment outcomes over the three four five year term day get for specific training providers in those that fall to the bottom of the list on the outcomes over a long time we would no longer finance them. It would be a market solution to driving high folly in the higher education the kind of skill based training space which is something sorely needed especially as as kind of workforce boards go oh because we have we don't have a ton of visibility into some of that performance after a year so it was incredibly exciting for us to to us is as this all about specific problem on actually wrote Michael Back and I said <hes> Hey you know the article you wrote in two thousand sixteen hundred weather or something <hes> we actually raise the money and we we did it so thanks and <hes> we're just starting out and we'll see how out the results come in and they're coming in shortly but it is transformational for US solving that specific problem that we have more more and more people need these training investments and more often than not. We're turning them away and thing you know maybe come back next year. Maybe it'll be different in again that that's just unacceptable from our standpoint though I represented a solution to if I could jump in there like I think that what would andy and is pioneering is a model across the entire educationally 'cause system when you give someone grant when you make a donation for scholarship right now and you say hey. I'M GONNA pay for one kid to go to school. That's a one shot deal. You know I think about like the gates. Foundation Bill Gates gave a billion dollars for <hes> to to encourage first-generation people to go to school and that's great for the people they saw but after that billion dollars was gone there was no corpus. There was nothing left what if he had said. I'M GONNA give a billion dollars and if you're unsuccessful you know what you know. I I gave you a shot but if you're successful you're gonNA pay back some percentage of your income back into this pool that will create a perpetual <hes> endowment for future people from similar backgrounds to go to school. You know that billion dollars could've been a perpetual endowment to give students from disadvantaged backgrounds a an opportunity at at either college or workforce development for the next you know for generations you know and instead instead you know. I don't think we're GONNA give scholarship money anymore in five years like if we're still doing scholarships the way we've been doing it for the last hundred years or two hundred years after five years of this icee experimentation shame on us because we're we're we're we're wasting this renewable resource of people's talent and the ability of people to give back if their success I I totally agree Daniel and I think in we haven't been calling it is as but there's a lot of example gambles of I._S._I.. Like similar pooled funding and that look a lot like I._S.. As for example unions have humping called union do than when you're on a job you know you're training generally the free to become an electrician through an apprenticeship model to a journeyman <hes> and then when you get placed on a construction site you have union dues and a big portion of the Union do actually go back into the training funds for the people coming behind you and if you're or not a job you're not paying meaning do that pretty good mom and so it's you know it's not full that different than the idea of win. Your training is accessible. When you are making good money you pay portion forward another example? Is You know I get called every couple of months for my I actually went to U._C.. San Diego for my undergraduate degree and I got a lot of value for my education. So we get calls asking us to give back for Scholarship Fund for people coming behind us and the more more value you got out of from your amount of the more likely to be back and so this idea of if the program yield value you pay something forward is having been called is a but it's not necessarily the training in higher education drinks babe if not a completely foreign concept <unk> philanthropy is something you think a lot about when we zoom out in what you talk about what you're talking about innovating on on philanthropy frantically glad to be artistry and if we were billionaires what would be the biggest leverage points by which we could solve some of the problems you've been outlining. Aren't we all billionaires Eric. I thought that was that was naked. On next next podcast topping philanthropy hanthropy in the United States is one of our great inventions as a country and the largest single philanthropic grant in history up to that day occurred when a gentle names Mr Johns Hopkins donate money to what became the Johns Hopkins University and the time it was an unprecedented amount of money about five million dollars and he pioneered research universities United States and the tech barons of the late nineteenth century. We now call them. Robber barons in retrospect the tech barons of the nineteenth century were the people who started America's great research universities universities like M._I._T.. Carnegie Mellon University Stanford University Right Leland Leland Stanford Dale Carnegie Mellon Families <hes> University of Chicago with the Rockefeller family..

Andy Andros Sirkin US San Diego Purdue University Utah Like Un Union Marco Rubio Andes Bill Gates Jordy senator The New York Times Michael Back Johns Hopkins University Senate Carnegie Mellon University Sta Whitney Mr Johns Hopkins
"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Gives me an opportunity to thank Zimmer. Who has composed this music, which we have used since nine eleven. That has been the theme of my show. It's from gladiator that great, Phil. Because in fact, we are in an existential fight. Not not against carbon emissions. The existential fight is between western civilization and leftism. Every day. I bring few examples of it. And they don't even deny except when you confront them with. Then what are you talking about? That's ridiculous. But of course, it's not ridiculous. Virtually every university now regards great literature as as a foolish concept. Great art foolish concept. It's just the white male concept even objective truth is now dismissed as white male. That's why the university California, San Diego can say that we our greatest aim in the parliament of physics is for diversity. The aim of any science department should be scientific truth. Not diversity. So yes, there is an existential existential fight. Yesterday. At this hour was the male female our was on the attempt to get rid of cheerleaders in pro football. How many sports writers and others are writing about how demeaning of women? The number of emails was fascinating people who were related to cheerleaders. And so the idea that it is demeaning is so absurd. Why would people eight intelligent people aim to do something that was demeaning for free? If you know if you people will do demeaning things like for for example, teach gender studies, but they get paid for it. So. And as I said yesterday by. Daughter who was choosing between a cheerleader and gender. Studies. My heart would break if she went into gender studies. The most moronic field of study in the western world today where they where they teach the opposite of truth there based on the opposite of truth. One more time. I will tell you yesterday. I noted that Don January first two days ago in New York City a law went into effect that when your child was born you can list on the. On the birth certificate x where it says sex, or maybe they say now, gender male female or x so it's not even a matter of accepting people who say that they are the opposite sex of their biological sex. This is a parent saying I will not state the sex of my child, even though my child is of Baylor female sex. I will not say so am I will not raise the child was male or female if that is not a form of child abuse. I do not know what child abuse constitutes. Is the sickness the sickness that pervades the left? New York City, California. They these people are the fools of our age, destructive fools, and yet I mentioned this, and it it doesn't do anything to what leftist. I don't know. How you live with you cognitive dissonance of the damage you people do your side does. And you still stay on the left. What do you have to do? What does the left half to do for you to realize is Alan Dershowitz a lifelong liberal does? He's far more afraid of the left and the right? What does the left have to do? What chaos does it have to? So what destruction does it after week? For you to realize that the enemy of all that you hold and cherish. That is good. It's not the right. It is the left. That moral fraud called progressivism. I don't know if there was a clear, nothing if this if this law in New York City does not motivate you to be anti left. If you are a liberal, nothing will nothing. It is legalized child abuse. Right. That's clear. One air another another sick. Leftist idea that pervades leftist cities like Seattle and San Francisco. In in the great city journal crimes of survival new trend in criminal Justice reform rationalize is stealing the latest fan and criminal Justice activism is the concept of survival crime the theory holds that the homeless the poor and people of color commit property crime and low level infractions in order to secure their basic survival. Any enforcement of these laws is thus violation of their basic human rights, and should be relaxed. That is local government should stop enforcing any laws that criminalize quote, criminalize, homelessness and criminalize poverty. That's sick understand that. So, you know, you realize that in California, for example, if you steal under thousand dollars, it's a misdemeanor. It's like jaywalking. How many stores are now? Suffering massive losses. As a result. Doesn't matter though. The enemy of the left. This is the little storekeeper piece of capitalist crap in their view. Survival prying theories, the flip side of broken windows theory. They deal with the same class effects mainly property crime drug possession and public nuisances in precisely the opposite way broken windows theory argues that everyone is responsible for their own behavior. And that if we permit low level crime, it will lead to a general breakdown in law and order survival crime theory by contrast argues that local governments should decriminalize these offenses because vulnerable individuals have been compelled by social conditions to commit them. That's right. So if you are poor black or homeless, and you steal. You are exonerated normal. Moral rules, do not apply to you. That's that's classic left-wing theory. The idea of survival crime is not new and it's been floating around in academic circles for decades ago, you how much college damage is done. How much damage college has done and for people living in a slum in Caracas, pa-, shower or Khartoum? There might be a moral argument that stealing food for oneself or one's family is justified survival crime, but the United States is not Venezuela, Pakistan or Sudan. The federal government currently spends more than one trillion dollars a year on anti-poverty programs, including general assistance, food stamps. Housing vouchers SSI and WNYC every city in America has a network of churches, food banks and charities that offer direct assistance and more broadly. We're living in an era of record low unemployment and in cities like San Francisco, New York and Seattle record high minimum wage. The problem is that cities like Seattle and San Francisco have dot just decriminalized homelessness or decriminalized poverty. They have increasingly decriminalized crime. It's a leftist idea to be criminalised crime over the past five years the classification of survival crime is expanded well beyond stealing the proverbial loaf of bread in California proposition, forty seven downgraded I was just telling you this downgraded theft of property valued at less than nine hundred fifty dollars. To a misdemeanor. Meaning that the police are unlikely to pursue even habitual shoplifters and thieves the predictable result a statewide rise in petty theft, Seattle and King County that's the county in which then recently released new guidelines calling on police officers to stop arresting individuals for all homelessness related crimes with the goal of quote, eliminating racial disproportionality and ensuring that policies quote, do not penalize homelessness and poverty. Get it. You're so it's not the crime that's penalized. If you arrest somebody. Who is poor and robs. A store. The European allies. Ing poverty. Meantime, city and county. Prosecutors have dropped thousands of misdemeanor cases against quote vulnerable populations. All this is caused widespread. Frustration among residents and law enforcement officers. As one veteran Seattle Cup told me. We have basically stopped enforcing the law against the homeless population political leaders don't want it and prosecutors.

New York City Seattle California San Francisco property crime Zimmer Phil university California Alan Dershowitz Don January Seattle Cup football theft Caracas San Diego Baylor federal government
"university california san diego" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on This Week in Science

"But the new papers that have just come out about the battle that's waging the evolutionary pressures that are on these systems to to change and adapt are super strong. So the us researchers at the university university of Exeter, have determined that phases according to the lead or one of the co authors of the of this, one of the papers shows that Phages can work together to disabled bacterial immune systems, and it has important implications for using phases to treat human infections. Since the dose of phase that is used can determine whether the phase is able to. Kill the bacteria. So what these two papers together have found is that sometimes it's just one group of phases they come in, they attack the bacteria, the bacteria attack back with crisper cast nine. And if there's enough of the phases producing a particular protein a molecule to combat the crisper caste system that's called now. So originally by the researchers anti crisper proteins otherwise known as a CR proteins, these AC are proteins breakdown, the crisper cast nine system so that the bacteria, no longer can defend themselves and then the phases takeover, if there aren't enough ages, not making enough of the pro team, they can't take over the bacteria win. However, a first wave of attack the phases. Juicing even a small amount of this protein. It can do damage to the bacterial defenses so that they're not strong anymore. It's just like weakening the defences for the second wave of attack. So researchers are thinking that there may be because of this dose effect of the anti crisper proteins of the viruses that there's almost like an altruistic affect of the first viruses that go in sacrifice themselves for the good of the viruses that come later because once the bacteria are weakened, the viruses will prevail. Yeah. So it's amazing battle system that is ongoing at a very small level around us constantly. But understanding how it works. We could potentially make use of it to be able to to help ourselves heal from infections. Discussed many times for the show. It is sort of the underpinnings of our initial immune system. We start not with a a healthy, thriving, gut microbial system. We start with a with a really heavy viral load that eventually trims down our our 'Bacterial low to that which is right for human some. That's what it seems like these are the is also be, should. Be the viruses that we're using phases. We should just go back and steal viruses Ren fence or borrow had I. Not taking candy from babies. You taking viruses virus load that you need for your immune system. Well, so I don't know how you did, but, but it seems like these are the viruses you'd want us to focus on for. For doing these sorts of things. Things that were that hold your your immune system in your gut microbial system, its natural habitat at some point. Yeah, I love. I've always loved this idea. This is always seemed like this is this is the way nature does antibiotics. You know, we should always tried to follow nature's lead. I think, yeah, I. Antibiotics are, you know, natural have have been naturally sourced for years. We usually do find the molecules that we use for antibiotics. Different families of compounds have come from watching 'Bacterial attack each other, taking the compounds that seem to work in that bacteria us to to fight each other that has been what we've used. But at the same time they've only lasted so far on, we need other methods. And this phase method bite might be another way in their use the phases, figure out exactly how this system would work. No, no, no. Here we'll give you a round of antibiotics that doesn't work. We're gonna throw in a few viruses as well. What viruses? No, no, not viruses for you. Viruses for the bacteria. We're gonna make the bacteria sick. Yes, I'm in. But. If if we really had this is our our plan to counterattack, we should probably stop talking about it. Why? Why? What. The bacteria catch wind of it. They may tell other Baxter because it turns out microbiologist at the university. California's San Diego can now explain how communities of bacteria talk to each other. They can effectively relay signals a cross, what would seem to them at least perspective to be really long distance. So. This is a biofilms is what they're looking at here..

us university university of Exete Phages California San Diego Baxter
"university california san diego" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"At barracuda dot com slash firewalls monetize sabotage some some summertime summertime summertime summertime summertime summertime like dark like short days darkness that make me weird maybe there's some kind of lapland in the assumption i like when days ended four o'clock and i have to go indoors i don't know there's too much light provoking the censored you have to be doing something so late till nine o'clock at night why is human being required to be up at six and keep doing something till nine o'clock at night if it was dark and cold i mean i wouldn't have to be out there it can be watching television do you think supreme court justices should have shorter terms it's it's actually a good question we wanted to go with it nato is in the news right should we bring our troops home from germany yes they were sent there after world war two what are they doing there the german troops can defend their own nation using broomsticks can't they did you see that article on my website markle the anti german german chancellor has sold the ball demilitary in germany that they're practicing with broomsticks now not guns and so i would say they should defend their country against russia with broomsticks as tanks come in from the east i would think the broomsticks worker they they could throw brought worst at the at the tanks but it's really not my problem because i don't think russia's going to invade germany and so the us spent six hundred eighty five billion dollars on nato in two thousand seventeen germany spent forty five bill france fortyfive bill uk fifty five bill trump's a thousand percent right the socalled a you is not paying their fair share to protect themselves and i say it's time for us to bring our troops home from germany what if what if russia had a couple of hundred thousand troops let us say in mexico what would you say about that you'd say what are they doing there but don't you understand with a threat this poses to russia us troops armed to the teeth airplanes delays airplanes the latest ground equipment in germany for what reason russia has enough trouble on its hands trying to hold on to russia the are not going to invade germany and yet our troops are still there and so trump is a thousand percent right for saying first of all nato should pay more for their defense they're on the membership pay more for their own defense right if you can't a sound off on that one go ahead make my day in fact trump is they're attacking them and he talks about we're supposed to protect you while germany's sends the russians and it uses the word very sad i can play it for you but i think it'll be lost on the average guy listening today are you smoking marijuana because of false hopes i this article today and i posted it on michaelsavage dot com where you can go on at any time and go on the poll you can get a free newsletter as an interesting article about the marijuana issue because a lot of people are starting to hear miracles about marijuana that all false everywhere you turn there is propaganda from the drug peddlers with claims that cannabis cures everything from cancer foul breath and the online world is the worst of all scientists and physicians are screaming and yelling at the marijuana peddlers to hit the brakes joseph califano the third director of the head and neck cancer center at the university california's san diego a very smart man said well we all know that a component in cannabis cbd might be useful in treating cancer but we don't know of marijuana can stop a cure it in some cases cannabis might make things worse it's going to take time to find out and he says what's happening right now with marijuana reminds me of tobacco at the world war two there was an explosion in its use but little science to let people know what we're dealing with but it's falling on deaf ears because the marijuana industry is so great that the senators have jumped in on the game join the savage nation call now eight five five four hundred savage eight five five four hundred seven two eight two savage there are a lot of warnings you don't wanna miss like a sign saying bridge out ahead or the life got announcing there's a shock in the water but in the digital world they may be.

thousand percent six hundred eighty five billio
"university california san diego" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"That great at eveybody throwing a party now you can bring aired wavier uh you know back in the nineties these with the boom box is on their shoulders not anymore you got to roll away has going i also saw photo someone posted you had this what looked like a headband that's supposed to help with weight loss was not all tvs at the cbs there's other things that are to oh yeah there's a lot of wacky f i actually tried it out last night and unfortunately i looked in the mirror and i think devin changed mart yes sir yeah i spoke with the guy who pompeo he used to he was a researcher at university california's san diego uh originally i believe he's from ireland and he's a doctor and he had found that he originally he was really skeptical and um what happened went that he started looking into it and there's a part of our brain that controls you know the the kind of how much uh how much fat is burnt and when i how often your fat is actually added to your body right there's a point where apparently you can your body gets a signal hey i have enough fat which i guess mine hasn't earth that yet and so the um what happens is that by stimulating it with a olovo a trusted the a very low of out um he believes that it will actually solve the end he said on average um people who've used is already out there you could buy one today uh that people who have used it had news about uh seven pounds over seven weeks and he lost 20 pounds on it um uh since he's been testing it which is pretty cool and you know it's an interesting idea rate on the fda he's going through fda approval so we're gonna see what they think eventually but uh no it it's your credit crazy the believe that you can put this thing on your head and it would help you lose way grabbed by the ultimate promise of the future right you know if if richard simmons dozen endorse it i don't believe in the soft away half what happened today or oprah all right moreover i look at you can eat all your favorite breads again oprah's got a going larry what what's going on with.

researcher university california ireland oprah devin pompeo san diego fda richard simmons seven pounds seven weeks 20 pounds
"university california san diego" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Fifteen years and i was i thought this this kind of those and self driving carson of the self driving thing scares the be jesus that to me that scares me and in tell you why coming up but there's a guy it in out in california at the university california san diego there is the can text you will robotics institute and it's being rumba danish boring professor named high henrik christiansen and he said he made a protection too that children born today will never get to drive a car that they won't know how did you have a core that they will never have to drive a core that everything will be self driving i don't like that it all and i told him i'm maybe have my my tim fall had out in college but i don't like that because then people can to stop your core anybody dizzle six or easy to interfere what's supposedly is it interfere with with self driving cars i don't like not having that control that bothers me and i'm old so i'm probably never going to do that let's go to pat i was one and had thank you so much for hanging on an things are listening to news radio we forty w ha yes how are you okay although would yeah john that sounds good when i'm sure thank you were in a well i put about the days when horse the man alone ten will monitor the border going an the indians aaron bigger room no you're gonna you're gonna say every operated carson you don't see solos as the nickel and it is the you'll see great interstate highway is our where they will be like the red will have the who's calling marlon so it really you don't see more nuclear thank you very much well.

carson california university california san dieg professor henrik christiansen marlon john Fifteen years forty w
"university california san diego" Discussed on KBNP Radio

KBNP Radio

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on KBNP Radio

"Of talk about the back game that would leave and by the that would just be said meetly filled by china well it will join especially in it with its regional comprehensive he could on the partnership but clearly see i know you it out of you run so at leading the you know open toward a take assume readership hot at the top and said good you know you were a slippery super lateral trade agreement so it's not good you want to be one overall around you and stop but international trade he much they're not trade is a good winning you know but it needs to be a or an instructor and so but i do see that you are the ones who have the he'd multiple adults format gone it didn't there is a tight ends please is going to happen one also want to ask you about the you want to whether we might see of free slowed on it so we had a couple of researchers pretty influential researchers by the way writing ninja in the chinese papers this morning we all set a common to outta victor she into university california san diego saying qualities capital controls don't where we might see afloat and why would not be interesting i understand that you on has been pretty stable game to asking we can against us some more coming up with two condon from today history when you're opening a new office location deadlines don't let up you need to make sure your team can start working fast which means all of a sudden you're looking to binding conference tables ayers laptops whiteboard weekly business card from american express open can giving you have to helpers over the big purchases you need to make when you need to make.

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"university california san diego" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"In nineteen thirty how about this susan sir ranted came in and endorsed no it's not him earlier this week she said that the fear of donald trump is not enough for her to support hillary clinton at the she is going to be doors jill it's time to is uncertain for sure muerto yeah yeah and there's no rises but yeah so it was really with that where it surprises me that can return away kirk yeah i know you kind of like the board now but it's pride comedic you make a little judgment enough time right for somebody started do is throwaway her vote tweets that was you start to think i said what i said and that when i said what i guess the biggest usually summer and then listen the real world and he was at the convention fighting for the end sanders to to get the righty sanders forced of heard i saw curry there and we fought fight but not gil stein i don't think it's met the task of presidential candidate i didn't fair i didn't i figure out there mired early this year right i'm used in overtime on facebook not from a brutal good for business perfect this is good this is good because there's a new study published in the journal feet in a have saying that using facebook could actually given him a longer white felt when i hit when you're here's what here i'd rather to be you know i don't i was a or the andrews everybody's mind that much is the opposite but here's what they say they say the deliver happy healthy long life you should be social great connection twenty two in the real world get how well and they say that facebook by doing this virtually creates the same impression on your brain and watched as outer cowling day like i said did no facebook belief with the bills by the way no yeah it to the people you weren't a it's been a asked was done at the university california san diego defense to on our medical for the key word there was he'll world face focus not to real world i'm not saying agree with note for a no hitter cb into the national cat is over there's that you're green feels like its virtual.

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"university california san diego" Discussed on Radio Monterey

Radio Monterey

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on Radio Monterey

"Shula june and those living in world areas eight scaring treatment in africa they brought eight scared treatment over seven hundred and fifty thousands of people living with hiv aids around the world they've it goes needed the cost of these drugs which we could surely use here in america you know one of the failing points of obamacare was the republicans in this depth that we put into obama care the inability with government it goes gaa with big farm the prices for drugs sold in america now the good foundation of exactly how to do that because they brought low cost age jobs hiv jobs two we're left almost a million people in africa all that's horrible into their lives in two thousand eleven more than twelve million individually our subsidized with eight team ohl aerial with two outs twelve million to fight mole area with it knew what is the good thing in miami in pregnant women are afraid to leave their i say it's a that you know club might not have do stuff that about that i'm just saying i mean that the work that they have done that is cg i university which expanded the model of the clich global initiative to students university's a nationals youth organizations com you've got but three they had their inaugural meeting in two thousand david tulane in new orleans six hundred people came together to inspire action on college campus is in two thousand and nine the meeting was not at the university of texas at boston in two thousand and ten the meeting was healthy april with the university of miami in coral gables two thousand and eleven of the university california san diego thousand individuals attended a two thousand and twelve george washington university washington dc palace included battling all bright sean still hurt oh well seeing now jon stewart had access to that whoa hillary clinton second to that and then there cgy america that focuses every year they haven't event this just started two thousand thirteen president clinton hold posted the third meeting of cgy america and chicago all about eighty out of beating now with all.

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"university california san diego" Discussed on KGO News Radio 810

KGO News Radio 810

03:21 min | 4 years ago

"university california san diego" Discussed on KGO News Radio 810

"It's hard issues in everything you need to know start here yourself we hope he could join a sweep in mornings sixth man on the mighty kg oh eight ten i like the one armstrong ag oh wait it's clear is alex they were just learning at the gymnastics guys you know much size going right right right and feel assumed he got it right now he's red white let it americans last sticking their landing and i feel very patriotic on top of you well that's right we were going to bought mountain social one that's not the conversation with tracks weeknights from seven to ten on the next generation of kg elevate them kg elevate to add this country on the verge of considering the person as to the united states and thing that's pretty exciting it really goes if you like that butler it'll refrain from named kobe the conversations with ran all eight three days to teddy did on the next generation of games el mi we armstrong and hitting shone earned morning news on kmj away ten once the news of the day it's our calm and secure opinions into laugh or two maybe it's here and someone a flop to fill it's hard issues vs in everything you need to know to start here yourself we hope he can join a sweep game mornings sixth man on the mighty kg oh eight ten one one great relations wants to do lindor more winning the tickets to the softly to art festival getting injured contest that's right to graduations i love giving away tickets i am ethan bear men's studio number four one five zero zero eight one zero four one five eighty eighty eight twitter some your tweets is well at least impairment and i next year our today's we have a lot more fun playing that's actually david last wrist is gonna join me you know what i'm used to right for the chronicle any used to be here on qo actually you know david leisure or so but he's the race for the alley times down there's a interesting credit credit score story he wrote about today also bobby kimbrel junior is going to join the recently retired special agent from the d oj surviving the stop yeah how do we keep these traffic stops in turning into deadly confrontation seriously is going to join is well when outside for not the onion he's a real had life around the world they're not set tire let's get right into this this first line is amazing it from the scripts institution ocean water fee at the university i've seen university california san diego one what's happening now what's happening study finds sharks get bad rap when viewed with ominous background music seventy actually did a study on that sharks get a bad wrap when you play.

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