17 Burst results for "University of California Berkeley"

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:49 min | Last month

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Here & Now

"That is here now transportation analyst. Seth kaplan seth thanks scott. Nearly two decades ago a black woman named colletion weight applied for a team leader position at target and worried that her application had been ignored because of a race so she sent it back in with the name sarah white and slightly fewer qualifications and got an interview. Eventually she want a class action lawsuit against target twenty years later. A new study shows not much has changed. Economists from university california berkeley and university of chicago conducted what they called a discrimination audit sending eighty three thousand job applications to one hundred and eight companies. Some applications with traditionally white sounding names some with distinctive black sounding names and they found well. We're joined by berkeley economist. Patrick klein one of the study's authors professor klein. What did you find. Well what we found was that applications with distinctively black names were called back about ten percent less often than their white counterparts despite having characteristics that are otherwise the same as those applications. I gonna talk a little bit about the applications. Because i'm sure people are wondering well ten percent. Maybe there's some other reason for this. So let's talk about the applications. What was on them. How'd you set up the study. So we put a lot of work into creating applications. That would look realistic. So if you apply to a job posted a major company these days you'll have to fill out your employment history. You might have to take a personality test. We automated that entire process and we eventually had bought. S- fill out all of those fields and then we also created a resume that was uploaded for every applicant. Wherever we were able to and to our knowledge we actually have the highest response rate. That's ever been garnered from one of these studies and what were some of the names that were the white names or the black names so the white names were names. That are that are very common. Like emily or greg and examples of black names would be jamal or lakisha. These are names that most people recognize as being distinctively white or distinctively black and we should get a rush to say that we know that there are black americans. That are named william or john. I mean just this was just a way of trying to get at what discrimination there might be and you said on average. The applications from candidates with the black names had fewer responses. Did you follow up with those companies and ask any of those people why this application over that application. No we haven't reached out to the company's yet. Our guess is that they would have a hard time answering the question of. Why did you favor. This applicant over this other applicant and the reason is because these are major companies that were selected because they have a national employment footprint so we sampled these companies from the fortune. Five hundred companies companies. Like this the hiring decisions are spread all throughout the country and despite having very sophisticated screening algorithms and application portals. That in many cases are outsourced to third parties. Ultimately these questions come down to the decision of some human somewhere in fact one of our key findings was that discrimination is actually more prevalent at companies. Where more phone numbers called us back which we interpret as a measure of the decentralisation of the hiring process so suppose that company a called us back one hundred times where we contacted. By one hundred distinct phone numbers that would be extreme decentralisation or where we only contacted by five different phone numbers if each contact was a different phone number. That was a very strong predictor of discrimination against black. Dame's what we think is going on here. Is that some places have different hiring practices than others in some places. It's not very internally regulated by hr practices so whoever's maybe working a shift at that restaurant that they can sift through the applications and just decide who they want to call in for an interview next week at other places. There's more hoops that you have to jump through before you can decide to call someone back. Maybe you have to run it against a few other people and at those places there seems to be less discrimination and we know that in some parts of the business world. There's an effort to look for diversity. So if it's a trained. Hr person they may be more likely to do that. And to realize they're just a bias they didn't even know they had and maybe override that we don't. Yeah yeah but you brief the department of labor on the findings. What did they say. Well i can't share exactly what they said. But i think there was a lot of interest in seeing a scientific measure of discrimination. Testing for discrimination is very difficult right in so legal battles over discrimination often very contentious because companies will often be investigated for discrimination based upon a single complaint and a key piece of evidence might be that a company has a very low fraction of some protected. Groups say african americans or women. But when you see a very low employment share you don't really know whether that low employment share is rising because of discrimination or because of something else could be that not. Many people applied to that job or the qualifications of people. Applying for the job is different across groups here. Everything else was held. Constant and so these patterns by sector and for particular companies are telling us that discrimination is actually much more concentrated than the previous literature had been able to measure roughly half of the call backs lost due to discrimination in our experiment. We're accounted for by the top twenty percent of discriminating firms and that came as a surprise to us. And it's perhaps an optimistic message actually suggests that this isn't really a needle in the haystack problem. And it seems possible that perhaps by imitating the best practices of the companies that are doing a good job in terms of bias that the twenty percent of companies seem to be doing very bad job can get their act together and provide more equitable and inclusive workplace. We know you spoke to the labor department. You can't tell us too much about that conversation except you did share with them which industries you.

Seth kaplan california berkeley and univer Patrick klein lakisha sarah white seth klein berkeley jamal scott emily greg william Dame john department of labor labor department
"university california berkeley" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:24 min | 11 months ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Trump has not yet conceded the election. The governor also spoke about the surge of covert cases in a Commonwealth announcing the Bay State is making preparations to construct field hospitals. I'm Tina Gal. You're on night side with Dan Rei W B Z Boston's news radio, My guest, his university, California, Berkeley, professor John you Hay is Again. Someone who I look to for guidance. Did you happen to hear what Governor Baker said in that newscast, Professor? No. Oh, yeah, It's something to worry about. I mean, I was in the Bush administration in 2000 won I was there during 9 11, and that's when we first I think a country started concentrating on the idea that a slow transition could have serious national security effects because Now, the Bush administration had a very short, almost no transition because of the Florida recount, and so a lot of important jobs, we're still waiting to be filled by the time leaving his latest September the first year the presidency. All right, let's continue with our calls. And again. I'm going to ask everybody full line, So I'm going to ask everybody pleased to be as direct as possible. No long conversations. Just questions and comments and Tony in Newton, Tony, next on night side. You're the ring set from Dan the man. Okay, John. Good evening to you, sir. Okay, so I really believe here that we have a case for the simple reason. And, uh, you know, I believe there's been 160,000 claims of fraud in the Michigan area. Factory you fall Could computer machines that whatever flipping so many votes divided or whatever. Also, I wanted you to know if you remember John, You heard the case. Former congressman Ozzie Myers from the 39th Ward in the 36. District of Philadelphia. He was caught with the judge Dominick the mural back in July in Philadelphia for the shoot that early. I know you got a question here your seconds into your minute, My Michael, By the way, they like the late late show Frasier. He voted. He's dead. He's been dead for nine years. You voted in this election for Joe. My Joe Fraser will make an exception way, Tony, Let's question Come on. The question is, as we way have a case and I'm just saying, John, when the When these federal agents start coming around the federal questioners come around to the poll is that were there and they stay. Look, buddy, you're going to talk or you're looking at 10 years. These people are going to start talking. I really believe we're going to see the Supreme Court called this thing. Ah, fraud and then it will end up going to the Congress to vote. I don't proceed, Tony. I don't hear a question but a vast lie. But the question is is when when these guys come around, saying you're gonna be looking at some question, that's a statement. That's a statement. If you can phrase the question in 15 seconds Great, I gotta move. Great. What will they talk? John? Thank you Have a great night. There's two different ways to think about it. One is I think there might be some confusion. About what? How this works, so Um, a voter consumed in the campaign can sue. That's not a criminal prosecution. That's just clean like a constitutional like I'm saying, Oh, my right to vote was diluted. Because they're all excessive invalid votes, let in or it's the right of the campaign, saying, you know, my are right under state welfare affair count was violated. That's different than sending in the federal agents. I just want to caution anyway, That's not gonna happen unless there's some kind of violation that comes the attention of a Justice Department. That's a different matter. And actually, you might have seen today that Attorney General Bill Bar shed. A memo out to the U. S attorney is to be on the watch for any kind of Allegations that ought to be investigated of voter fraud. But it doesn't sound like anything's been brought forward. I haven't heard or seen of any actual cases where the Justice Department has seen enough evidence actually launch an investigation. I heard someone today someone trying to make it equal protection argument about that. Somehow voters, Republican voters were treated differently. Thank the Democratic voters in terms of if they made a mistake of their mail in ballot. Apparently there was an affirmative outreach. What I heard it sounded legitimate to invite voters to come in. And in effect, quote unquote cure their ballots, Andre, we're tryingto constructing equal protection argument. But that also seems to me to be very, very difficult to, uh To proceed with unless the evidence is overwhelming. Let's go to Chicago. Susan is in Chicago. Susan different tonight. I want to question if you'd be so kind. Go right ahead. Uh, I also heard in Pennsylvania that ballots came in in after election days. After Election Day did not require a postmark, or we're allowed to have a smudge postmark that there was a ballot harvesting and, Ah, you know, equal protection. If I got in line on Election day in Pennsylvania, nine PM because I got caught in traffic, I wouldn't be allowed to vote. What's your question? But my question is, Was it true that they allowed balance to come in for three days after election day and count them even though they had no postmarks or smudge postmarks? Okay, let's see. Let's see a professor. You can direct that question. Thank you for that question. Is a sub section of the case that the U. S. Supreme Court might look at what they did They basically either potentially Segregate all the balance or then sub segregate and have ballots that were clearly postmarked on the Let's see the date no later than November, the third hair and they were received by by Friday. And would they have to sub segregate another group of ballots? If there was a smudge? I'm told that in some of the ballots that were mailed out the return ballots. Were, you know, group mailing and that they weren't postmarked and I looked at a ballot that I had because I requested a mail in ballot. And I don't know that that there even was a postmark. There was it was sort of the equivalent of not junk mail, but That that they were treated differently. There was no way they were prepaid. So there was no need for postmarked. Can you address that at all? John, You know this is this is the part of the lawsuit that we were discussing earlier that's pending at the Supreme Court. Because of the Legislature's role. There's a very simple rule. The ballot has to get there by the end of the day of Election Day was the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that extended it and start changing the rules say yes, much postmark. No postmark. Just long as it gets in by Three days later. So Susan's right there in her called a dour these allegations, and the U. S. Supreme Court could end up excluding all of those. All of those votes came in after November, 3rd..

John you Hay U. S. Supreme Court Tony professor Dan Rei Susan fraud Supreme Court Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Department Pennsylvania Joe Fraser Philadelphia Governor Baker Tina Gal Bay State Trump Florida
"university california berkeley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"My caller just said had they just let the man sleep everything would have been just fine how do you know he would have awakened got behind the wheel the car and then killed somebody you don't know end of longer playing if if you simply are cooperating to be alive I mean this is just not I'm sure every person I'm talking to what advice by his or her parents when you are stopped by the police be respectful cooperate cooperate fully if you feel you're mistreated make sure you get a name and or a bad and then we can deal with it later isn't that the advice you heard and what part of the advice included by the way resist violently and whenever possible run did your parents say that absolutely no sympathy whatsoever for these police officers forty eight thousand assault in a recent year in recent years on average now an anonymous Berkeley history professor wrote open letter and it's quite a stunner the letter was sent to a bunch of professors including Thomas soul in a perfect we've had on the program name will Fred Riley who wrote a book about all the hate crime hoaxes that have been committed over the last several years dear professors I am one of your colleagues at university California Berkeley I have met you I'm contacting you anonymously with apologies I am worried that writing this email publicly might lead to me losing my job and likely all future jobs in my field perceived to say help pressure he feels.

assault professor Fred Riley university California Berkeley Berkeley Thomas
"university california berkeley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Primary question today again citing the paper I dug up from my archives from nineteen sixty sorcery illnesses social control in the Philippine municipality I've kept this paper for ever why why do I hold on to this one monograph from an obscure journal of anthropology because I was intrigued by the title house sorcerers and doctors use the illness to control the population in the Philippine city and now I see sorcerers like talk show host say would be the sorcerers and I see doctors like vouchers using illness for social control it's interesting to me how things really relate to in a sort of universal way from village to a nation fearing covert nineteen resurgence trying to ask people to stay vigilant so we thought it was whipped in China it isn't it's not within China came back with a vengeance as I told you what what did I not tell you to be a second wave that would be worse than the first yes I did how do I know that again I'm not going to hide the fact that I've studied epidemics ever since university epidemiology as part of my doctoral degree at university California Berkeley one of the great universities at the time and when I say one of the great universities I have to say for a reason because I'm not going to hide my credentials just to make you think I'm just an average Eddie I'm an average any with my sentiments were not an average Eddie with my education and studies any needs me to guide him any needs me to guide him and I'm telling you the epidemiology suddenly become center stage all of a sudden whereas three months ago no one ever heard of the field it's a fascinating field and use this this this the district's data but mostly common sense to study epidemics and why do I say common sense because it's gone out the window without you none of them have used common sense thus far they're all using models and data and statistics and I think that they're over not only do I think I know they're over reacting and they're not acting properly for the nation at all I'll be right back join those.

China university California Berkeley Eddie journal of anthropology
"university california berkeley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Want to build call out here yes graduate from bold university California Berkeley law school in nineteen eighty seven and did you go immediately with gives into I did I I summer interned with them back in nineteen eighty six and joined the firm of Gibson Dunn and Crutcher in nineteen eighty seven have been there ever since for twenty five years now and you're mostly in the league and the litigation arena yes I'm a I'm a litigator and trial lawyers probably don't get to trial as much as you do Tom but but wish I did that trial stuff you know it's a lot of fun at the end of the day and Dave Dino let me tell you this you get your report card baby mmhm that when that jury comes out first of all you're in that courthouse in the state courthouse especially and the jurors in the jury room have a little note that if you have a verdict those three times and I don't care if the case is over fifty thousand dollars or five hundred trillion dollars you're hanging around and pretty soon the three buses com it's very exciting you're about ready to get your report card and the truth of the matter is the better lawyer wins the case you see the cases that go to trial those cases witcher toss up fifty fifty case if the drunk truck driver runs over the little kid on the sidewalk that case didn't go to trial and if there's nothing to the case that case gets thrown out nuisance settlement or something but the cases to go to trial are those cases that if it were a fight maybe a six to five pick him sort of mind of body armor making the call right so it's massively exciting so the jury comes in and the judge says have you reached a verdict and the jury doesn't say Hey listen you told us about three times a week but if I don't say that yes your honor so then the court attendant meanders over to the jury box to get the verdict the word meander came from watching courted tend to pick up the phone so they did all this exciting stuff so you know you're about to get your you're about to give you a report card the court attendant takes a look at it hands up to the clerk the clerk read said the same gently to sense okay she takes about ten minutes she then has a to the judge the judge looks at the saying like he's reading war and peace he then hands it back to the clerk and also here sitting there maybe every what's going to happen here the clerk then title of court can cause Los Angeles Superior case number we've been here for two weeks we know the case number we know the name of the case ma'am just what happened we the jury find in favor of exciting stuff you know I mean that and the idea that you persuaded in these in this case or you didn't persuade when you call the office you say I won the case and you're telling the truth it was you the one and if you call the office and say I lost the case you're telling the truth there noon you lost that you are like this trial stuff the trials are extremely exciting and if I had any advice for for lawyers just starting out who who want to get into the trial for fresh profession it's don't let law school or the practice of law allow you to to lose your humanity or your common sense being being a lawyer doesn't mean you're no longer a real person in fact you need to be more real than ever to understand and communicate your client's concerns effectively if you don't believe it then don't say it nobody on the jury is going to believe it if you don't you are listening to champions of justice with underwriting injector already in our guest today is attorney David battalion what do you love about being a trial lawyer meaning in law you can go hundreds of different directions in the practice of law why do you like it here on the hot seat in it as a trial lawyer well it's the ability to to communicate the facts of a given situation and apply the law of a given situation I to to a jury of of it all citizens who are honoring their obligation to serve in in letting them decide who in that case should prevail and who should be in it's it's extremely exciting you know what Dave Dino here's the here's the difficulty though the day pass the type of cases he handles our cases which require a great deal of explanation to a jury and a great deal of understanding if you try a case of who ran the red light well okay fine the signal was yellow when he was here and bottomline this doesn't take a great deal of communication to the jury with respect to the aspects of right and wrong in his stuff the intellectual property stuff the all the stuff that he handles this is totally foreign to jurors so not only do you have to persuade you have to describe the issue so the jurors understand very very difficult it's a it's a much different ballgame would you say absolutely it's it's a an ability to take the complex and and really narrow it down in a way that that is is easily understood and and convey your client's position and theme eight and and and and lay it out there for for the for the jury to to understand you know there's an old saying in the law that too if the laws on your side pound the law if the facts are on your side pound the facts and if neither the law nor the facts are on your side pound the table good lawyers never pound the table and it's do jurors are never convinced by such empty drama Jack David I know we we know about the Cali means warrior and we know that you went to Gibson Dunn you started in their trial department in mergers and acquisitions but it's doing trial work very early but he did take up a side track there I I know from reading do a little research you work for a member of Congress I only went to Georgetown free undergrad so you're in that whole milieu what what came of that what made you decide that I I don't want to be out of the congressmen are working for congressman instead go arm wrestle I'm not sure anything that made me decide I wasn't going to be something as opposed to that I've I've always wanted to it to be a trial lawyer back to high school and and I hated it and and that just led me to appreciate the ability to to grasp both sides of the position and be able to effectively communicate that in in a sense adopting a right and a wrong position even in the most complex business cases I very much enjoyed my time working as a legislative assistant on Capitol Hill and I think it was an honor to do so but I I I think California is is a great place to practice that business litigation you know what Dave Dino that's very interesting what he said I think that trial lawyers are definitely born and not made hi I knew I want to be a trial lawyer in about the sixth grade there was a little TV show on call Perry Mason and I thought boy that was really something and his won loss record is pretty good but he did always in a very gentle way he lost one as I recall I think so exactly actor actually leave if I can tell you a little about the Girardi family it started before that because if you remember the miracle on thirty fourth street where joint pain represents Santa Claus and convinces the US postal system that in fact his client Kris kringle is the real Santa Claus that was a very informative moving my brother's youth and I think it was that rather than Perry Mason that got him to be a trial lawyer you know we we were talking there was some just some trial guys and I was telling them how nation was on at seven o'clock Saturday night and Perry was in the show but it was Paul Drake man who really kind of cemented the deal and these lawyers were telling me says Tom Perry was a lousy lawyer he never had a clue but for Paul Drake bringing up to surprise witness at the end he said if you try the case that way where you can just kept looking at the door waiting for Paul Drake is that your record would be over nine hundred so they then they went out they got some film clips from old film clips of Perry they were going to convince me that Perry Mason was a lousy lawyer and once you look at it as the lawyers opposed to a sixth grade kid you say yeah you know what he really wasn't very prepared and he did really lucked out in those situations I got a question for you what we're talking about how you are a trial attorney you love to do jury trials and we've been talking about how your cases are not just the kind of the run of the mill they are very complex and of course we we are entitled to trial by a jury of our peers well you've got you know clients like Broadcom verses Emulex and computer associates Corp versus computer sciences Corp these are very complex issues you cannot necessarily go out and find yourself a jury of people who come from these different milieus how do you then break it down for a jury of average citizens so they can really understand the issues jurors are very smart people an an twelve jurors together I'll take them over one judge anytime because that collective intelligence and Uman experience is extraordinary and and and the one thing that jurors never do is they don't check their common sense at the door they have a very good sense of of what the right and what the wrong position is if somebody can explain to them either through experts often times and some of these complex cases or through that the clients themselves what this case is about and who's right and who's wrong under the law you know what they've got I think jurors get right and I say that he got a right most of the time even I've lost cases obviously and you didn't think they were getting a right issue said they're taking the verdict but in retrospect down the road a little bit you say yeah maybe they did get it right you know it's very interesting are we did a mock trial Dave over to Loyola law school and we had jurors from the LA Superior Court come over and then we had six judges three of more justices three more judges so they sat in one side of the room in the church sat in the jury box and we try the case in two hours and then we eavesdropped on the jury deliberations before that though each of the judges are justices had to write down his or her verdict in the case they were not permitted to talk to each other they then listen to the deliberations and then the jury came down and decided in gave their decision five out of the six judges said and they listen to those jurors they would have come up with this materially different decision than what they wrote down the M. the jurors were just lay people they were regular from the jury panel downtown they had no particular knowledge of the subject matter but that interplay of those people back and forth their common sense David you just said while you know that had an effect on five of the six how about that it's ME who feels the weight of the case and who feels the weight of the potential outcome of the case more the jury for you the lawyer well clearly we the lawyers you ask the jurors they get to go home we have to we have to go back to the office zero zero it's it's a little bit it's a little bit different you know you've you've dealt instability S. U. really preach are you amazed at what jerks a bunch of lawyers are out there well you know you you just have to watch the the first victim in the movie Jurassic Park which was a lawyer to understand the bad rap that lawyers have received the audience I'm afraid the audience cheered I the audience I was in Steven Spielberg actually nicknamed his mechanical shark in jaws after a lawyer lawyers have gotten a bad rap often times because some in the profession who think they can further their clients interests act with this courteous nis or in a derogatory or frankly a downright offensive fashion Oliver Wendell Holmes once stated lawyers.

university California Berkeley Gibson Dunn Crutcher
"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The other was a scrum an A. S. M. A. R. rugby game this involved university California Berkeley and Arkansas state in on that field of play was a young man who was known by many in this audience Robert Taylor what distinguished distinguished himself as an athlete and a scholar a Jesuit high school moving on to cal as an aspiring young of student and an athlete certainly blessed with a impressive physical presence is six foot five two hundred and thirty some pounds I'm guessing and he was told after that his family was told first of all his other of the prospects for the future or not good it was a very very serious injury he anchored and they have ultimately what looked as though his is hopes for survivor had materialize survival I should say had materialized I usually never walk again but I'm here to tell you that Robert has overcome tremendous odds and that he is right here with me in studio and by the way I got a welcome Robert great to have you here yeah I think from me thank you for being here and thank you for a being such an incredible model for a body else to follow I mean it's that I I I mean I'm sure you've had some tough days along the way certainly but your you seem like you guys never had a bad day in your life and I know I know the horrors of your your injury and that the news your your parents undoubtedly suffered die every bit as much as you did at the prospect of perhaps losing you completely and then saying this this young man in whom they had so much pride suffer to this extent which looked at the very least like a cheap shot on the field of play yeah I don't know that's ever been resolved now as it is now it is what it is but I know that what was it about a year later you actually managed to walk onto the field and got a standing ovation from the after after the fans in the standoff edible yeah that's absolutely correct yeah it's crazy no the spinal cord injuries what happened to me your odds are terribly law I mean we're talking three percent or less that you move anything let alone walking again so when that happened that is actually may sixth two thousand seven say I'm sorry yeah yeah it's one of those M. mines but anyways yeah very illegal move something that should have been called should have been done but it was done it wasn't called in laying there on that field thinking on my future like I mean am I gonna get my degree and have a family you know helpful both my kids some walk so did you say you knew where you rattle a right right away that this was not just a it wasn't a shock this was a newer and you are paralyzed this was bad yeah I remember being in this illegal hold and kind of thinking okay I can fight through this I got most of this I mean this is the national championship I need to drive this thing in but I fell down kind of close my eyes and grit my teeth and fill this crunch in my neck immediately just proof can't feel anything can't move anything I'm just laying there doing everything I can to move but I'm not even gonna twitch and dom I immediately knew right then that this is really serious this is not good and your freshman of the time sophomore a sophomore yeah and now advanced has a time you will graduate this may yep that's the plan your drinks that you believe me there's doesn't everybody but yet but if you will actually walk across the stage there are graduation in may which is pretty incredible it really is I mean this stuff like doesn't happen and I'm taking anything for granted you know I I've really had to earn this it's been a lot of re have a lot of therapy but getting it getting into a Walker right now I can do that on my own as long as someone's holding it things that on day one doctor said Robert forget it never happens happens this is a really exciting moment for me I've worked a lot to give this degree and do it the way I I'm so so to whom or what do you attribute your success man I mean I think you lost me this all the time like Robert how you do it like what gets you up in the morning what gets a smile on your face and it's because I want for myself and I want to for others in the beginning of this thing I want to walk for myself you know surprise selfish desire away I don't think that's bad no haven't but when I have all these people started reaching out to me saying you know Robert I'm getting up into achieving my goals and my life is so much better by reading your story making these things happen I'm like this thing isn't even about me anymore it's about them I can't stand bad and complain about it on because I am accountable to them I have to do this for them so it's the selfless desire now to really do something good with this world and take my challenge and turn it into an opportunity to change someone's life so just kind of summarize on a bear the lead here in in a total of five years are all things that looking up to mystic at this point you will have finished your undergraduate degree at cal and that's arrive year time frame is about the norm is it not for nowadays yeah yeah the the four year graduation especially out of the school I got Howard's **** are impacted on that's pretty impressive especially with the year free have I had to take off on four academic years no five raw yeah it's pretty big feet did you were there times if that Hey it's not worth the effort I'm just gonna coast my best days are behind me and I'm gonna never happened no absolutely not I thought this is terrible you know this is a living nightmare one that you're waiting to wake up and you're just not certainly but I got one life you know I got one life and if the majority of my life is going to be spent battling out of this thing so be it you know I've still want to get my degree these are still things that I can do and I'm gonna push my limits as far as I can take advantage of this one life I got and every day I can on this earth it's a gift at one time it wasn't certain there's nothing guaranteed right on so now to have that in my pocket you know Sir so as you went through the progression after the I think the worst nightmare one could imagine in in terms of it being going from from where you were frankly and by the way you didn't just land where you were you work hard and achieve the I mean you were blessed with some good fortune to that I was not but but you did you you worked hard to get got there and that day all of a sudden have as a result by the way you're not engage in any force contact you weren't doing something stupid you write sober and alert and on the field to play with their roles are prohibit the kind of injury and other kind of behavior that causes injury and you find yourselves just zap down to ten nothing will yeah I think an environment in which many people would be overcome by despair and so there's got to be something that kept you so motivated and so focused on improving your conditions and I think that's that's something if we could tap into and that and share that with others many people who just frankly can't get out of their own way and they are they're being given all kinds of reasons to to accept who they are what they have when in reality I can say they never had a bad day they could they could be a thriving so if that if if your experience your motivation your drive could be shared with others I think and that's a tremendous opportunity for others to to to improve their lot in life enormously yes so I get a lot of questions for you gonna take a break take care of some other business but want to get that some specific in terms of what it is you want to do because you do have a very very unique experience and I can just envision people who think you know the odds are stacked against me I have a lousy home wife my parents were nice to me my one or the other was was abusive bad things happened I don't get to go to the best schools but I'm willing to believe that there are certainly times when you would have jade Frank places with those people in recent years and you would have overcome all that and then just fine so I want to pick your brain as to what it is that that that that others could die could learn from you and take that to their own improvement the biggest thing that this injury gave me was perspective so I live by the saying I try to share with everyone and it's compared to what so are you in my life right now I can get up and I'm not gonna hop out of bed it's gonna take me about forty five minutes to throw on some clothes and some shoes you get to be my age as they want yeah but I can think of someone like shoot you know they just take me two minutes yeah but there was also a time when I can do that all right impossible so compared to what not just in my own situation but that of others and I think if things get really tough and and I'm tired and I don't know if I want to do the seven am work on this is this is too early well compared to what this is too hard compared to what that perspective really drives me very good with a quick break we're coming right back with more conversation with Robert Taylor do not go away there's much more to.

university California Berkeley Arkansas Jesuit high school A. S. M. A. Robert Taylor
"university california berkeley" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Die in their sixties spoke on the one hand I hope you emulate them and go get your financial planning done on the other hand I hope you don't emulate them assume got a financial plan the concludes but you're fine as long as you don't live past seventy well yeah thank you get it here's something also rather kind of crazy that might catch you by surprise I want to talk to you about Jonathan Hoffman he's a Chicago teenager and he's one of the world's most highly ranked athletes he's ranked number one in the USA and eighteen in the world in his sport I don't know if you've heard his name yet Jonathan Hoffman he's being courted by a number of schools according to a recent newspaper article on him UC Irvine Boise state university California Berkeley university of Missouri Robert Morrison Chicago Harrisburg university all of them are reportedly offering him scholarships to go to school there professional teams are also asking Jonathan Hoffman to go pro right now they're asking him to skip college and they're offering him initial contracts that could pay him six figures a year I know what you're now asking what is his port over watch you've never heard of that Jonathan Hoffman is one of the world's greatest players of an online video game plays a we try that one again yeah an online video game video games are now considered varsity sports E. sports to be specific about it more than two hundred U. S. colleges have varsity E. sports programs many of them offering full tuition scholarships so we'll just as you thought your children were wasting their time sitting in front of the TV playing Xbox all those years well it just may translate not only into full rides at colleges but a six figure career as well it's just further illustration and demonstration of how rapidly things are changing largely due to longer life expectancies which are bringing brought about by technological innovation it's not just our youth who are facing economic opportunity that you and I never wanted envisioned it never occurred to me when I was a kid playing pac man that I could turn that into a career but the bureau of labor statistics says it's not just kids that are getting the benefit of our technologically advanced society it's for those who are older who are enjoying that as well the two age groups that the bureau of labor statistics says are going to have the fastest rates of growth in the labor force are those sixty five to seventy four years of age and those who are seventy five and older already if you ask the typical American worker do you expect to work beyond age sixty five I'll put the question do you do you expect to work beyond age sixty five more than half of workers say yes another forty percent in vision of phased transition another word you're not going to go from full time work today the instant retirement tomorrow you're going to instead reduce your working hours for a little while you may work in a different capacity for a few years and a job that's less demanding war that provides greater satisfaction twenty two percent say they're going to work until they cannot work anymore only twenty two percent say they will be fully retired by age sixty five this isn't something that anybody would have thought of before back in the day you retired at sixty two you were dead at sixty five today people are saying they want to continue working contributing to society continue earning an income and advances in medical science medical technology bioinformatics bionics neuroscience all of this is allowing us to be younger at older ages than our parents and grandparents and great grandparents ever work and as a result we're seeing huge growth rates in the sixty five to seventy four age group who are working as well as those seventy five plus so just as I guess so I guess what does it all mean if we put it all together it means if you're in your sixties or seventies need to learn how to start playing video games because you can probably make a living at it here's another change of subject still within the technology field have you ever heard of review this is a company is a startup that's building an electric vehicle they've raised three billion dollars so far and they just completed another round of fundraising they raised another one point three billion this predominately coming from T. Rowe price the big mutual fund company so we know the technological innovation is continuing in the field of electric vehicles Tesla has had the market largely to themselves so far but we have virtually every major automobile manufacturer engaging in the development of electric vehicles Mercedes Benz has announced that they are shutting down our indie in their combustion engine division the engines that are in Mercedes Benz right now all of those cars in the show rooms that's it that's the most advanced combustion engine you will ever see at a Mercedes Benz all of there are indeed dollars are going into the development of electric engines and this is true of manufacturers in the auto industry all around the world let me give you an idea of the electric vehicles that are soon going to be on the market the first one I'll mention is lotus it has a nineteen hundred horse power automobile called the E. V. I. E. J. it sells for two point one million dollars it goes two hundred miles an.

"university california berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on KGO 810

"To qualify for CS you or the university of California those are two different systems you understand fifteen of those classes have to be approved by the universities and include as follows very important for English classes let's count okay Karen and when did you do this to I'm just curious for English classes lavoratori science and a foreign language one in the arts and another of their choosing from the above list now the requirements are very different what when I was in school to go to university California Berkeley for instance all you needed was a three point average and you have to take the required classes in math science English etcetera under this new proposal students would take one more math science or other elective the relies on math or science that now they're critics and they say too many students are stuck in schools where they don't even have a chance to take the course is currently required much less another one and that's true that is true about if you try to sign up for certain classes I know kids who have Hey anybody remember why eat it sometimes takes five or six years to get through school so I want to ask you you're feeling in the CS use board of trustees won't vote until November at the earliest but the discussion what some of called an outcry has prompted the university to host a hearing in order to deal with us now civil rights groups here we are remembering Martin Luther king junior tonight so all rights groups say there will be plenty of cons they plan to bring busloads of students down to protest the plan more than four hundred current and former CSU students signed a petition protesting the plan and Sasha Rene Perez who graduated in two thousand fifteen from cal state Los Angeles and works for the advocacy group campaign for college opportunity she's a she's going to organize this last month awesome off reports fifty student advocacy groups sent a letter to the trustees of the CSU system opposing the plan on grounds that so many high schools are riddled with problems that toughening the university's admission requirements will place their students at a competitive disadvantage four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten okay first of all I want to ask you if you have teenagers currently in high school who may be applying for college the CSU system how do you feel about this if you are a senior high school or junior and you're listening to the sound of my voice what do you think about toughening up these requirements and most important if you're a teacher in a high school what do you think of this now a rom from Cupertino says the C. as you and you see systems should lighten up do you think they should just partially reading what you said Bob four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten well I have to tell you that this is fascinating and I wanna know how you react to this but we're told by awesome off that the opposition has stunned James minor yes use assistant vice chancellor and senior economic strategist who spearheaded the proposal and and this is what minor said if the opponents of this proposal are suggesting the best way to serve students of color and those attending under under resource schools is to the same as we've done for thirty years I'm completely boggle by that he points out by the way to CS you the study of its own students showing the students who had at least one end for class in math science or other numbers in high school or more likely to graduate from college four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten I I really want to know what you think to I I'm a great believer in in the experience of going to do the state universities whether it's university of California our CS use I I can only tell you our son Jole has had a marvelous experience in Chico tremendous at our son Samuel had a marvelous experience at UC Davis so I want to get your reaction to this because this is going to be controversial all right let's go to we'll do it in order of your call is received let's go to cam calling from Chico can welcome to KGO hello John.

university of California thirty years six years
"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The adult in class the university California Berkeley cal where me young students now is and it's as if the student directed curriculum to teach people the the the basics of life these are extraordinarily bright people who were studying at cal especially in the the fields of study that represent the people who put this curriculum together but what is it well along the way how have things changed in such a way as such it such a degree that we have some kids off to school American because let's be honest at this point my life they're still kids going to a school seventeen years of age sometimes eighteen for others that says pretty young person and if they haven't had that experience of the haven't balance the checkbook if they hadn't done all those basic fundamental things that I think people were doing a much much much larger numbers in past generations then I think there is a need for it but it would be wiser if we got some of that stuff if if just a young people were encouraged as they get to the point where there may be inclined to get a job which is very very good for them into try to to start doing other things would be to their advantage are you missing out on something by having people with such exceptional intellect not being prepared to deal with life yep that's nine one six ninety one fifteen thirty long distance callers eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty also curious as to where you think this is a bad thing or good thing it might might be boy five is that it's it's regrettable but the need exists but because it does exist I think it is a good thing I was checking with Brian in Sacramento Brian good afternoon welcome to the conversation thank you for holding on Sir John thanks for taking my call you every day and but boy this is one that I just really have to chime in on I graduated from high school in nineteen eighty four and I learned to home economics and other classes in this high school high school how to do all this stuff you know that's when they contact we we had metal shop with Iraq would drop we're all right you have different career paths that students yeah people could take classes wires that not everybody is designed to go to college absolutely true there's no doubt and from what I'm under I have friends that are in the in the construction trades enter sector huge shortage of skilled labor young people that want to go into the construction business because now we have a government Mr real risk education system that I think that everybody needs to go to college that is not the case we have we have a shortage of skilled labor there's no doubt about it and and I have I can so I can see multiple facets of that that particular observation I I do absolutely believe that that not everybody is suited to go to college and it's not if it's not over at indicator or representation of a person's Ryan like an absolutely is not some people just more academically inclined and others are that perhaps inclined to be self taught but I will say this if if you want to get into a construction feel which I think it face it we all need that this society needs that but I also they can be smart for a young person to all who gonna if you're gonna pursuing a career in construction to also pursue some of some of the administrative function of it either through formal curriculum or through experience all learning because at some point you're gonna go out on a day like this and your back's gonna hurt your knees are gonna hurt and it's gonna be a little bit warm for people have they been doing that kind of work for twenty five years to continue so it's nice to have a plan to transition into something else I I I and I totally agree with you one of my car I was just using that as it does look down below how we're not training our young kids you know that there are other career paths that they can go into that don't require a college education and so here we have to have a curriculum at college to UC Berkeley that for people to learn how to balance a checkbook we were taught destiny junior high school high school back when you know I was a student anyway that's that's kind of the point that I wanted to observations on they were lose not on some of the things I think there are other life skills and exposure and things that were not that that young people are not getting in sufficient numbers because of the the changes in the way we live our lives in a course pushing kids to to attain high academic standing yeah I don't think it's a bad thing but you drive that too hard to the elimination of other experience a learning I think is a mistake I do appreciate the call very much Brian let's check in with that Max in Sacramento Max good afternoon welcome to the conversation thanks for holding on Hey Cheryl good afternoon I think I think these bridges two different things first of all I got to give props to the dudes students that recognize the fact that there are some that need to happen and I would have to say that this should put that California teachers association on notice that it takes students to identify gaps in an education you were like the last caller said should be taught in a hole that class nobody uses checkbooks anymore so that dynamic is kind of change but I think the I've I've worked with all the stocks of of business for a long time and I've worked with people that were literally rocket scientists who could operate a fax machine I had trouble hand writing just like doctor you know he's hyper smart people where they spend their sole focus of bonds you know right when that decorated awkwardness and other skills that you and I would consider commonplace where is it in in in a it overlaps between different things like I I wouldn't have that I don't have the acting and that would relate to law enforcement lingo like you would first day but at the same time I would I would argue that my ID been around certain parts of technology business are probably light years ahead of you if you're gonna get out to you that that's not even an almost right you would leave me in the dust right yeah but I yes I think I think the this should be a a flag for you know maybe some of these high schools there that maybe active base excellence Dan have a class that says yeah this is this is what happens when you get your first job and why money gets taken out absolutely I had is that is a tremendous life learning experience for a young person to get that paycheck when they think they're gonna be pay thirteen Bucks an hour to get the check in is not in close to thirteen Bucks now because a lot of pain and then you learn you learn what that means in terms of withholding then versus payment on April fifteenth and all that goes with it so I think it is yes it's at the need for life lessons is huge and I appreciate the call very much Max got a break for news we're coming right back with more conversation right.

university California Berkeley twenty five years seventeen years
"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Talking about the adult in class the university California Berkeley cal where me young students now is and it's as if the student directed curriculum to teach people the the the basics of life these are extraordinarily bright people who were studying at cal especially in the the fields of study that represent the people who put this curriculum together but what is it well along the way how have things changed in such a way as such it such a degree that we have some kids off to school American because let's be honest at this point my life they're still kids going away to school seventeen years of a sometimes eighteen for others that says pretty young person and if they haven't had that experience of they hadn't balance the checkbook if they hadn't done all those basic fundamental things that I think people were doing a much much much larger numbers in past generations then I think there is a need for it but it would be wiser if we got some of that stuff if if just a young people were encouraged as they get to the point where the may be inclined to get a job which is very very good for them into try to to start doing other things would be to their advantage are you missing out on something by having people with such exceptional intellect not being prepared to deal with life yep that's nine one six ninety one fifteen thirty long distance callers eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty also curious as to where you think this is a bad thing or good thing it might might be boy five is that it's it's regrettable that the need exists but because it does exist I think it is a good thing I was checking with Brian in Sacramento Brian good afternoon welcome to the conversation thank you for holding on Sir John thanks for taking my call you every day and but boy this is one that I just really have to chime in on I graduated from high school in nineteen eighty four and I learned to home economics and other classes in this high school high school how to do all this stuff you know that's when they contact we we had metal shop we had would drop we're all right you have different career paths that students yeah people could take classes wires that not everybody is designed to go to college absolutely sure there's no that and from what I'm under I have friends that are into in the construction trades enter sector huge shortage of skilled labor young people that want to go into the construction business because now we have a government distributor overseas education system that I think that everybody needs to go to college they're not we have we have a shortage of skilled labor there's no doubt about it and and I have I can so I can see multiple facets of that that particular observation I I do absolutely believe that that not everybody is suited to go to college and it's not if it's not over at indicator or representation of a person's raw elected absolutely is not some people just more academically inclined and others are that perhaps inclined to be self taught but I will say this if if you want to get into a construction feel which I think it face it we all need that this society needs that but I also they can be smart for a young person to all who gonna if you're gonna pursuing a career in construction to also pursue some of some of the administrative function of it either through formal curriculum or through experience all learning because at some point you're gonna go out on a day like this and your back's gonna hurt your knees are gonna hurt and it's gonna be a little bit warm for people have they been doing that kind of work for twenty five years to continue so it's nice to have a plan to to transition into something else I I and I totally agree with you one of my car I was just using that as it does look down below how we're not training our young kids you're out that there are other career paths that they can go into that don't require a college education and so here we have to have a curriculum at college at UC Berkeley that for people to learn how to balance a checkbook we were taught destiny junior high school high school back when you know I was a student anyway that's that's kind of the point that I wanted to observations on they were lose not on some of the things I think there are other life skills and exposure and things that were not that that young people are not getting in sufficient numbers because of the the changes in the way we live our lives in a course pushing kids to to obtain high academic standing yeah I don't think it's a bad thing but you drive that too hard add to the elimination of other experience a learning I think is a mistake I do appreciate the call very much Brian let's check in with that Max in Sacramento Max good afternoon welcome to the conversation thanks for holding on Hey Cheryl good afternoon I think I think these bridges two different things first of all I got to give props to the dudes students that recognize the fact that there are some that need to happen and I would have to say that this should put that California teachers association on notice that it takes students to identify gaps in an education you were like the last caller said should be taught in a hole that class nobody uses checkbooks anymore so that dynamic is kind of change but I think the I've I've worked with all the stacks of of business for a long time and I've worked with people that were literally rocket scientists who couldn't operate a fax machine I had trouble hand writing just like doctor you know he's hyper smart people where they spend their sole focus of bonds you know right and that that creates an awkwardness and other skills that you and I would consider commonplace where is it in in in a in it overlaps between different things like I I wouldn't have that I don't have the acting and that would relate to law enforcement lingo like you would first day but at the same time I would I would argue that my ID been around certain parts of technology business are probably light years ahead of you have got to get out to you that that's not even an almost right you would leave me in the dust right yeah but I yes I think I think the this should be a a flag for you know maybe some of these high schools there that maybe the basics a little bit each day and have a class that says yeah this is this is what happens when you get your first job and why money gets taken out absolutely I had is that that is a tremendous life learning experience for a young person to get that paycheck when they think they're gonna be paid thirteen Bucks an hour to get the check in is not in close to thirteen Bucks an hour because a lot of pain and then you learn you learn what that means in terms of withholding then versus payment on April fifteenth and all that goes with it so I think it is yes it's at the need for life lessons is huge and I appreciate the call very much Max got a break for.

university California Berkeley twenty five years seventeen years
"university california berkeley" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Was this tremendous interest I mean we still the weekend and good people calling me or give a left right and center and I'm sure they were calling other people not just me and though we spent time with the Allen telescope array we tried looking for we didn't find it the guys at the university California Berkeley you stayed in even bigger antenna they didn't find it and the Russians eventually put out a statement about four days later and the Russian Academy of sciences saying that well it was just a military satellite not heard it if that's what they said and you know track well I don't think that they ever claimed in the first place it wasn't reported by the Russians actually give the directions it is said that they had found the signal once in thirty nine times but they didn't say anything more about it and it was reported actually by an Italian astronomer who sent me in a bunch of other people emails about this thing the Russians are not done they're not stupid then you know they're they're very competent scientists and if they thought it was real it would just sort of forget about it for a year which is all no that would be a huge story either right exactly they would they would just call people up around the world say Hey you guys check this out and they didn't do that what's interesting is you are getting these anomalies whether it's one time or several either it's strange things are happening out there in the universe well I'm sure of that I'm sure that we we find strange things all the time but I don't think this was one of them I think this was something strange happening about two hundred miles overhead yeah well that's true there is a lot in our friends here from the earth isn't there well if it's incessant I mean look if you if you live in a dark place you know if you're one of the ten percent of the human race that live someplace with this guy's pretty dark just go out and look at the sky if they're in any spot on this guy for you know ten minutes and you'll see satellites moving around you see things there's no doubt okay let's talk about the Tammy star what we know here yeah can you start that's in the news now it's called tabby star because the lead researcher confining this phenomena not Baptist her is named cat but the the Boyajian we are G. and I'm I'm not sure which puts the accent I actually asked a nice Armenian name yeah she said she herself has trouble pronouncing it but this that's good I think I would have called the bush I book bush IGN well you probably know how to pronounce it better not that type of habitat but you know she goes by tabby and does he led the team that actually turn the thing up it was observed by NASA's Hubble sorry not double NASA's Kepler yeah space telescope and what Kepler does he just measured the brightness of stars hundreds of thousands more than a hundred thousand if you're looking for planets that's what is so if they see shadows they figure there's a planet if they see that the star suddenly get seen a tenth of a percent member for a few hours and then gets fried again and it does that repeatedly every about fifty days or something right and they know the planet but this one didn't fit into that category didn't seem to have any you know week hurrying dimming but he did have some non recurring giving that was considerable in one case it dims by twenty two percent huge that is incredible I mean if you could take Jupiter input in front that stars not gonna dim by more than one percent this is twenty two percent that's it that's it that's not a planet anymore I don't know what that is nobody knew what that was and did you know then it got gimmick Asian the again not quite as much but it was obviously you know somebody was flipping the dimmer switch on the star and that's hard to do stars don't do that we did when they really don't do that so nobody knew what was the people who founded cabbie in our team you know they could get the well it's maybe some dust clouds there maybe comets maybe something and some of my name is Jason right at Penn state said well you know maybe but on the other hand you shouldn't rule out the possibility that what it really is is an alien mega structures just something really big like that Dyson sphere Dyson smear for example that some relief you know it may have failings in that system built so media went nuts where people went nuts yes they did the media went nuts and we began looking at it with your own telescope array in other people began looking at it to see if we can find signals the trouble is the public troubles with the main trouble is that the star is far away it's one thousand five hundred light years more or less away and that means it's very hard to learn much about it because it's so far away and indeed we didn't find any signals but you know at that distance it it doesn't set a very interesting limit in other words the signals would be so weak after fifteen hundred light years that the fact that we didn't find it doesn't really rule out too much so tabby star remains a mystery however there has been a claim they've been too interesting point one is that there's another case very much like heavy star if you find a second one you begin to thinking might be nature not advanced aliens and the second thing is that there's a guy in Australia who uses Kepler he thinks it might just be an instrumental problem yeah but I I don't know whether that's true or not I haven't heard any other Kepler people weigh in on that but well you and I talked thirteen years ago about how the primordial soup in the universe is the same that there's going to be a lot of similarities there has to be just by probability remember that well guess what George yeah really remember dinner last I'm pretty sure which you but yeah we we talked about how the universe has the same randomness to it doesn't it yeah well the universe is it is kind of homogeneous in the sense that indeed you can look at the farthest galaxies which are pretty on far as the stars in them around made of the same stuff is everything around here the physics and chemistry the same everywhere and there's a lot of everywhere so I think what you're saying there is that if it could happen here could happen anywhere else and I think if you anytime I think every star system has its own series of planets for example well maybe not every but almost every yeah that's is that is that is amazing truly a south stay with us we're going to take this break in just a moment shot shot stack with us from seti search for extraterrestrial intelligence in the final hour of the program we will take your phone calls for them but I'll be back with more one of the.

Allen telescope university California Berkeley twenty two percent one thousand five hundred ligh fifteen hundred light years thirteen years one percent ten minutes ten percent fifty days four days
"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Day got a lot of things to get through this afternoon can have a guest on the program in a bit junk fall from the taxpayers group is here to talk about some of the concerns confronting the state of California got an example of that that that data is it's everywhere I feel feel conflicted and I feel easy about even discussing it but it's real serious topic of conversation and it screams war for some level of attention and it has to do with the biggest pension system in the nation that a courses CalPERS a California public employees retirement system new data out now out of a cal was in university California Berkeley study disclosing the fact that that California is pension system is just grotesquely underfunded and median pension costs for local governments have grown a nearly six times as much in California is the rest of the country over a decade that is all coming out of this new data compiled that you by UC Berkeley professor medium pension costs went up seven thousand twenty two dollars per employee and a selection of cities seven thousand twenty two dollars per employee thus a coarser for cities counties and special districts in California from two thousand seven to two thousand sixteen that compares with the national median increase of loom twelve hundred and sixteen dollars that's is still time to change but you can see the doctor there on the six thousand dollar range and that's according to Serra as Andrea and associate professor of public policy his clothes that yesterday in Sacramento the rising pension costs have consumed an increasing share of local government revenues absorbing an additional two percent of general revenues over the ten year stretch in California compared to a national median of about seven tenths of a percent as all of the same data so her point is local governments are being affected by high pension costs and there's no doubt about it she says is not the future is now and if you think I well I'm not in cal person doesn't affect me well it does that's my point that's the reason for my concern and love this could disclose right up front for the people who have paid into CalPERS or even if they didn't pay any cal pers of it was part of their benefits as employees of the state or cities or counties or special districts are part of cal pers the in the they were promised this yeah I I I I understand concerns exists there and I do have concerns for them but I understand that the burden of this shortfall goes ultimately to the taxpayers because this is protected by language in the state constitution of subject subject to legal challenge I don't know how likely a legal challenge would be but if you have people have been living their lives working for thirty or forty years in public employment and they've been promised that on X. date based upon X. years of service and X. age they will be entitled to whatever Peniche at percentage of their arm their salary there were earning oftentimes formulated at the single has your employment sometimes said there there are and disparities there sometimes it's an average of three highest years whatever the case may be if they think that's coming and they live their life based upon that there is it that that is a reasonable expectation as part of a contract into which they have entered with the CalPERS and the entity that employed them so it's it's a real serious deal in debt for people who haven't do don't have a pension at all you may well be the ones that are most significantly impacted by this because you're gonna have to pay for it because the state and the cities and counties and special districts were part of this system **** that obligation that is sacrosanct that the state of California will have to pay those pensioners before they pay their current light bills so her analysis included data that the day involved four hundred forty two local governments around the country including some of from every state and twenty six cities and counties in California results are in working paper form and have yet to be peer reviewed after publication of but she suggests results could fill a gap in public policy debates says most researchers have focused on pension plans in their performance rather than a local government impacts I think she's absolutely right on there you see cities and counties and special districts up announced at a California many of whom have moved toward advancing at the ballot box increased as sales taxes or other taxes oftentimes not identifying a specific purpose to to a result in the lower threshold to clear it does a simple majority to pass the the threshold necessary to impose that tax but with their concern has been and is and will be at the ability to to meet that that pension funding gap so as she indicates that her data set is on unlike any of that has ever been done before and that you is uniquely suited to the task of assessing the on ground experiences of American cities and counties as a part of her data she found correlations between patching cost increases and union activity in collective bargaining which is more common in California obviously than most other states so from two thousand seven to two thousand sixteen per pension costs for local governments with less than fifty percent union membership increased by a median of seven hundred forty dollars with that while those with more than fifty percent increased by a median of twenty nine hundred and fifty dollars so you can see the collective bargaining is a big big part of it is not be down on the employees understand where they're coming from but frankly that well is going to run dry the only question is when and how will it affect your life and how will it affect the lives the lives of those pensioners CalPERS administers pensions for many local governments in California along with state workers' pensions like most pensions around the country CalPERS doesn't have enough money to cover all of its current and future obligations to public workers the three hundred and seventy seven billion dollar fund is the nation's largest it has about seventy percent of the assets that would need to pay all those obligations leaving it with what is known as an unfunded liability and course there has been I think an abundance of optimism in calculating the costs and trends and what the fund is likely to to see by way of growth there have been there's been a AB a change in attitude and philosophy that that actually because the system to divest of those things that many thought were we're not consistent with their own personal values and beliefs such as investing in tobacco a fire arms ammunitions things that were controversial I think there's that talk even of of staying out of the investments that wouldn't that would not be compliant with the the states general philosophies with regard to religion and that marriage and things of that nature what you're talking about find a system that has to be paid I mean that there's no getting around it so in recent years there have been some change in terms of the make up of the pers board and I think there is an effort in there some success in moving into a a more business my did more growth minded effort in terms of investments but it's still a major problem fact is looks as though it's getting worse she goes on to conclude the California pension plans are dangerously under funded are the result of overly generous benefit promises wishful thinking and an unwillingness to plan prudently that is also the finding of California's little Hoover commission reported back in two thousand eleven after the Great Recession had deeply affected CalPERS funded status so do you think about this do you think it's time that the the grown ups in the room come to terms with the fact that this needs to be addressed you want to see our leadership in the state of California and the legislative branch and the executive branch come to terms with us it is there's nobody that I want to see harmed out of this not at all but it's inevitable that if something isn't done to change the course people are going to suffer and you may wind up in it with the state and local governments in which basic essential services upon which so many people rely will not be able to be funded because the priority as it stands now absent a successful legal challenge goes to the the pensioners to get their of their payment and dead there there in in retirement and again many of them have contributed not all but even if they haven't contributed there is a contract involved here and there's a promise that is made that if you engage in X. employment for a given period of time you will reap the benefits accordingly so the ability to to change that obviously is just not there so a morally and legally and that's not gonna work that's not going to correct the problem so the poll question days do you think it's time that California leadership stepped up and resolve this issue or begin at least taking steps towards a resolution of this issue you'll find that poll question on the John again this page it KPK dot com is also the topic of conversation on the airwaves at nine one six nine two one fifteen thirty long distance callers eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty we got Juncal Paul joining the program right if we take a quick break here take care of some other business he's got all kinds of thoughts on this and many many other things affect in the state of California and your well being stick around we'll come right back away gathering at the local news destiny news ninety three point one K. up because of a.

California seven thousand twenty two doll fifty percent seventy seven billion dollar seven hundred forty dollars six thousand dollar seventy percent sixteen dollars fifty dollars forty years two percent ten year one K
"university california berkeley" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on No Agenda

"Twin. If you wonder why there's a wealth gap is because these people people disguise bitching about. They're just smarter in interest is the smartest thing I've ever heard Sushi here you go. Oh yeah you gotta made working working for you. Hey made you're now going to seventeen made I sign here made Need the Troll Room Reports D._C. Girl says that she knows someone did this in nineteen ninety five. It's an all of of course they keep it to themselves but they're saying dozens and dozens. It sounds like this is probably something that's been going on forever yeah. It's been under the radar. What a great scam? That is his. It's fabulous really like in fact somehow. I think it's something you could actually put your ethics. Aside for No because you're you're ethics are really not aside because these schools with these ridiculous tuitions out of the blue when I went to college at the university California Berkeley for almost free is they're. They're the ethical ethically challenged this ridiculous ridiculous. It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. Abel's I tell you I have one last okay so <hes>. I just thought this when I heard this I said here's a guy who's this it. I realized that booted judge is a is nuts. Yeah I think you may you may be right on that and and this is my proof. This is Buddha judges <hes> concept of TR- quote <music> unquote trump's gift and and what he's saying what is true what is trump's give and when I heard this. I'm going to give you the punchline for it give you the analysis before I play the clip. This is from a science fiction movie. I think even star Trek did this once before maybe star Trek's more more than one of these scenarios that he describes with trump and it was just a heads slapper you know the the the gift of this president is to take any energy that it goes his way even if it's in the form of criticism and turn it into a kind of food that it just grows off of and gets bigger. That's the code that we've got a crack and I think the way to do it his to name and confront everything that he does wrong but then immediately go back to talking about the impact that we will have on voters lives he sucks in energy and turns it into whatever it is it makes him bigger hold on. Let's listen to the gift of this president is to take any any energy that goes his way even if it's in the form of criticism and turn it into a kind of food that he just grows off and gets bigger. That's the code that we've got a crack and I think the way to do it is to name and confront everything that he does wrong but then immediately go back to talking about the impact that we will have on voters lives Uh Energy is negative energy is food. This is a story line. I have seen at least five. I think this is one of the older ones ends with <hes> you know like the original star Trek. I think you're right all right. Everybody that'll do it for our deconstruction. in for today's media landscape. We missed a lot but there's only so much time we have so we'll pick some stuff up on Sunday. We still have nutty Eddie Brexit memo's of be released by by Horowitz. Somebody somebody special thanks Chris Wilson Felix Wilson thanks to Sir seat sitter and <hes> <hes> K._p. Mix every go into show mixes and coming to you from the frontier of Austin Texas also on sixty nine thirty kilohertz U._S._B. On the shortwave bands in the morning everybody I am Adam Curry in from northern Silicon Valley where I do not understand why at this hour which is around noon. The traffic is so bad. I'm John Devora. We return on Sunday with another episode just for you. Make sure you're here on Sunday. We do it live and remember number devora dot O._R._G. Slash N. A. until Sunday smell oh and such Uh let me just say that so let me just let me just say that sucks up. I have the time I have the time I have the time. America deserves the the time. It's my time at lack to knock the crap out of juice. Hold off shame on this body ridiculous. We got a body eighty in that R._V. And it's getting.

trump president Chris Wilson Felix Wilson John Devora Adam Curry Abel university California Berkeley America Eddie Brexit Buddha Austin Texas Horowitz N. A. sixty nine thirty kilohertz
"university california berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"I'm going to talk about the reason they settled this case, but. One. I think we failed to to recap for new listeners. Sure. Just a quick details of. Yeah. Go ahead. Oh, oh, I see. I have to do it. Well, it had to do with the fact that see I might get tripped up on on the which are the actual legal point in which is the BS that the the the the Young America people spewed out because I I haven't it's been awhile since I read it, but it had to do with the fact that Ann Coulter was going to demand, and I think there's some other right wing people involved in this suit. We're gonna come speak at the campus end. They're speaking involved a lot of additional security because of their, you know, their train wrecks and. The dispute was over the fact that she wanted to speak in like the main big hall or whatever some some big venue at her time whenever she wanted. And the I've my memory is that the university said we can't secure that. And especially not at the time and place, you're saying we want to utilize normal time and place restrictions, which I think our constitutional by memory and have you do the speech some other time at a location where we can secure it better. And that that's my memory. But I'm I'm sure you can fill in a lot of the details. Yeah. And so that's exactly right. And so the Young America foundation and again because I'm five hundred years old this organization, same letters. I don't know why you wanna preserve Yaffa as your acronym. It's not like it's a particularly delightful sound kind of sounds like, you know, cat hairball. But when I was in. College. Yeah. Was still the right wing Yahoos who kind of smelled funny and didn't get invited to the good parties. But it stood for young Americans for freedom. But you know, look Oh, out. did I say the wrong one to today? It is called the Young America foundation. Right. So they've kept the acronym. They've changed. The underlying words, they haven't Shailer Marsh, right? It's it's MAC a hat wearing kids with, you know, body issues who you know, with body odor issues. I should say who, you know, don't get invited to on campus parties and bringing Ann Coulter to your campuses, a good idea. Right. So yeah, they teamed together with Harmeet Dylan who is a publicity hound right wing hack to file a lawsuit against university, California, Berkeley, claiming that the universities what they call the major events policy violated, the constitutional rights, and that also that Berkeley had a secret hidden agenda to prevent them ringing any conservative speakers to campus. And that lawsuit Berkeley filed a motion to dismiss they won on virtually all of their claims, with the exception of the Hugh have a hidden secret conspiracy claim, okay? And the reason that they didn't win that on a motion to dismiss is reasons that will be need the hawks. Yeah. Right. Right. Every away listener understands that that like if you say you secretly snuck onto my yard. And I say, no, I didn't you. That's not the basis for motion to dismiss right? You get to discovery and figure out did I sneak onto your yard or not. So the the the court allowed yet to go forward. But, but then what it did was referred the case to a magistrate judge with orders to conduct a settlement conference. I have done this a lot. I have friends who are magistrate judges both in the federal system and state. Court magistrate judges. The reason this happens is because our courts are overworked. Underfunded ninety nine percent of all civil cases settle and it is impossible for a judge to manage her docket under the assumption that all or most or virtually any of the cases on her docket are going to come to trial. Right. And when you win on ninety nine percent of a motion to dismiss and the judge says, why don't you guys go? Settle this case that's a very very strong signal. Right. That that that the judge is is taking says like there's this case is not going to get this off my docket..

Ann Coulter Young America foundation Berkeley Young America Yaffa Shailer Marsh Harmeet Dylan Hugh California ninety nine percent five hundred years
"university california berkeley" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"The gist is brought to you by the platinum card from american express there's a world of experiences waiting to open up with the platinum card backed by the services and security of american express and by spotify stream every episode of our show and other podcasts on spotify now just open the app tap browse and look for us in the podcast section learn more at spotify dot com slash podcasts the following podcast contains explicit language to thursday august 24th two thousand seventeen from slated the gist i might pasqua will hear is a trend spurred on by the trump presidency what puzzles a you didn't think that it be at university california berkeley energy professor resigned wednesday from his position at the state department a science on voice and he did so in fine fettle daniel kamin included in his resignation letter the words impeach as spelled out by the first letters of every paragraph hamid clarified that he's a scientist meant not be sure about the ins and outs of impeachment but he just doesn't like this guy now before that last friday the remaining sixteen members of the president's committee on arts and the humanity resigned in protest cal pan from herald and kumar who i found out his first name is calpine his full names calpine mody but he goes by calapan technical anyway resigns and here's the first paragraph of that or the for sentence of that resignation letter reproach in censure in the strongest possible terms are necessary following your support of the hate groups and terrorists who killed and injured fellow americans in charlottesville.

professor daniel kamin scientist president kumar calapan technical charlottesville spotify university california berkeley
"university california berkeley" Discussed on Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

01:53 min | 5 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

"Idea your next career idea next innovation yeah always been driven by curiosity i would say it is probably the single most driving force that feels this person that i am curiosity leads me to try things curiosity leads me to ask questions that i haven't asked before and i think actually for me curiosity comes before creativity boys carry it considered myself to be a highly creative person but then when i started to unpack will what makes me creative it was this dry of this in kirill bowl curiosity that gets me to keep asking questions in the looking around and what's an alternative and what something new and what something different so i love doing this podcast so much because i'm always meeting at people to interview and bringing new points of you two year that i go out i try things like it to come back and share it well today i wanted to to share with the something that i found from the greater good science center based out of the university california berkeley and actually steady things like curiosity and make radiate scientific research around it and some really really fantastic our resources around and put it compounds shannon and all of these things that help sb better people and better members of society so i found a resource by them and it's about six surprising benefits of curiosity now want to share these with pido just in case you ever one two rain yourself then and say the guys from just being multi curious round good stop on the sheriff you why these are so important might so important for you to be curious all right and i got a holistic this over at he tangle podcast dot com and.

university california berkeley two year
"university california berkeley" Discussed on Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

01:53 min | 5 years ago

"university california berkeley" Discussed on Itenco Podcast: Lessons for the Leading Edge

"Idea your next career idea next innovation yeah always been driven by curiosity i would say it is probably the single most driving force that feels this person that i am curiosity leads me to try things curiosity leads me to ask questions that i haven't asked before and i think actually for me curiosity comes before creativity boys carry it considered myself to be a highly creative person but then when i started to unpack will what makes me creative it was this dry of this in kirill bowl curiosity that gets me to keep asking questions in the looking around and what's an alternative and what something new and what something different so i love doing this podcast so much because i'm always meeting at people to interview and bringing new points of you two year that i go out i try things like it to come back and share it well today i wanted to to share with the something that i found from the greater good science center based out of the university california berkeley and actually steady things like curiosity and make radiate scientific research around it and some really really fantastic our resources around and put it compounds shannon and all of these things that help sb better people and better members of society so i found a resource by them and it's about six surprising benefits of curiosity now want to share these with pido just in case you ever one two rain yourself then and say the guys from just being multi curious round good stop on the sheriff you why these are so important might so important for you to be curious all right and i got a holistic this over at he tangle podcast dot com and.

university california berkeley two year