16 Burst results for "University of Alaska"

"university alaska" Discussed on Trapping Today

Trapping Today

12:43 min | 3 months ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Trapping Today

"If it's fun it's fun I'M NOT GONNA go further. There's a spot by couple spots by town. I may go I'd have to have to check them every day based because our laws states If you're within a built up section of town you you within a half mile of built up section of town you have to check daily which I don't really like it's kind of You know driving fifteen miles more For a chance at catching one or two beavers every day. I don't know but I I don't know I may get the ITCH I may go and go and set those up for at least for a couple nights just To see her I catch But yeah that's that's kind of. That's kind of the way I've been doing it. I'm not going crazy Not running a big trap line. I'm just enjoying myself and join the weather. Learning a little bit Hopefully helping the town on a little bit. The towns out Taking care of a few problem beaver meet meet land owners And let them know him. I'm trapping here. And there who knows in gaining experience and may be prices. Come back to twenty five. Thirty dollars average In sometime in the future and be pretty well set up to to take advantage of that. I hope so. Yeah that's kind of. That's kind of my trap. Line here Probably you know the season goes for another Levin twelve days. I probably won't trap the whole time but maybe I will more like L. Go help out this other guy and and I run go along his line and maybe trap with him a little bit helping skin a few beavers and and have fun But yeah good. Good time of year to be trapping boy. It really is awesome. You do it. It is a little bit. You gotTa Watch it because the beaver pelts seems like about a week of open water in the pelzer. Really start to decline considerably in quality so This just as the ice is melting. And they're coming out is is the time to get him for as far as quality and They certainly are easy to catch right now. So it's It's a lot of fun. Also cut some back straps off those beaver so Guinot Take advantage of that as well. Have eat some beaver meat and And add a little variety to the Diet here or at home. Doing a lot of cooking social distancing. So that's a little update on my trap line. That went quite a while I so I I just wanted to give you a little overview Coming up for the PODCAST. It's kind of a slow time of year so You know things. I get a lot of other stuff going on to and not necessarily get flooded with emails and questions and all that sort of thing but It's a good chance to get caught up on projects and Get into some things that I that I wanted to get into so We've got tyler selden coming on the show here At some point probably either next week or the week after got more from Nathan and Minnesota We talked a lot of trapping with Nathan. And I've got a few more of those Interview segments to play it a couple of other guys a hit list that I I would like to get on the show so I haven't contacted them yet but I think I'm going to Get into that Coming up I WanNa talk more about on x maps May Try to get somebody from on X. on the show to To just talk about the product and answered answer any questions we might have about using it on the trap line and and go over some details and stuff. I think that'd be that'd be good and then The book Walter Arnold Book. I'm I'm completed. The vast majority of it. I'm actually now working on the formatting and so that you know days we enough beautiful sunny days like today. That's not going to go very quick because I I work on on on Nice days but you know. Get a rainy day in and get some time and I work on it. Sometimes in the evenings I'll pug away a little bit but I I gotTa get through the formatting and then it will not be long so I'm going to be asking you For your interest in in buying that book And for your support. It was a lot of work as a big project and I think he is really going to enjoy it. It's GonNa be a big book. It's going to be well. I haven't decided completely at all. That's GONNA stay in. I I get I get a go over some some details and see what is going to look like. But if it's what I want it to be right now it's going to be over three hundred pages And just all kinds of awesome trapping history and entrapping information so That's exciting and then One of a listener to the PODCAST From Virginia Phillip or Philly. I can't remember. I don't know how to pronounce your name but I know you'll correct me on that. I hope But a new trapper from Virginia and he Actually is an artist in. So we've been talking about doing a shirt and oh I I love Martin and Fisher Obsessed with trapping Wolverine I just I like mustache. And he just so happens to to be a big mustache guy as well and I know a number of you guys. that listen to the show. I think you know Martin and fissured. All Michelle is just the coolest things on earth. I mean of all the things we trapped. They're just they're really neat critters and so we're talking about doing a A must t-shirt a trapping today. T shirt I know. A lot of people have asked about shirts in the past and I've never really gotten around to doing it. A part of the reason was I didn't really go through the effort of trying to find an artist or someone to do the design but Somebody offered so we're going. We're working on that right now. let me know if you're interested and I will keep you in mind and for sure there will be more. We'll be talking about that more coming up So with all that I wanted to finish this episode by reading you a little section of a book and I wanted just to give a little bit of an introduction About how I came about this I. Of course I'm obsessed with Alaska. Yeah especially after having been there That that didn't help any to to slow down my My obsession with with the place. Just kind of solidified all the things I thought were so great about Alaska and Trapping Alaska. But I've I've been going through so many different Alaska trapping An overall ask books lately and I cannot keep up The the stack of books that I need to read is Is growing continuously and even in this Cova Nineteen era. I am not catching up As quickly as I need to so Anyway this is one that I did finish recently called Jim Riordan's Alaska and Jim reardon is a really interesting cat. He's actually. He passed away on two thousand seventeen. But he's a guy that I really would have liked to meet and sit down have conversation with just a really interesting guy. He was a wildlife biologist. He was a fisheries biologist and he actually went to college at the University of Maine where I went to school. And then he moved to Alaska and he he actually taught Wildlife Program while biology program at the university will ask fairbanks he went to work for Alaska fishing game and then he Became a fulltime outdoor writer. I mean all the things that I enjoy this guy lived And so so you had a really interesting life. And and he's really into big game hunting and A fishing and just the overall outdoor stuff. He ended up living most of his life in homer. Alaska US there for for a very long time built a house in support his family for a lot of years just writing. So Jim is responsible for books. Like Sam O. White Alaskan You remember me talking about that book. Quite a few episodes back in the podcast he wrote the Sydney Huntington Book Shadows on the Koya. Cock another awesome book One that I have not Read yet he wrote the Frank Glazier book. Alaska's Wolfman pretty incredible book. I've heard a lot of great things about sitting on my shelf and my to read stack So so he. He has a long list of books that he's written In not just outdoors But also a few Alaska Military Kastner's cutthroats talks about Some some military guys from up there in Alaska so really good gifted talented writer really interesting guy and he he had a lot of great observations. I want to read just a little bit of his obituary and then what I WANNA do is is. Read a section of of this book. Jim Regions Alaska that that really that. I really enjoyed so writer photographer editor professor. Biologists outdoorsman scholar veteran Alaskan and family man in the history of Alaska's post World War Two generation that came into the country and settled the state. Jim Douglas reardon exemplified. The breed wicked smart funny personable and handsome rate down to his neatly clipped. Brush Moustache. He stood as an example in the arts humanities and sciences on February eighteen at the age of ninety one surrounded and this was twenty seventeen surrounded by family one homers. Most prolific writers died at South Peninsula Hospital. He was a man's man and outdoorsman but he was also a staunch family man to said homer pioneer. Ray Cranach homer writer Tom. Kizzie who picked regions brain about Alaska hunting for his book. Pilgrim's wilderness called reardon a bedrock of our literary community the generation of Alaska. Riders came up after Jim looked up to him for his deep experience. Knowledge of the subject as well as for his work ethic in narrative skill Kizza said born April nineteen twenty five in California. He finished high school at the age of seventeen enlisted March nineteen forty-three in the US Navy Father Agriculture at his high school reardon served on the USS Lovling during World War Two doing destroyer escort in the Pacific Ocean and the Gilbert and Marshall Islands Reardon boyhood friend a dreamed of coming to Alaska. You'd be a cowboy and his friend Bush pilot. After the war. He finished a Bachelor Science degree. Oregon State College While junior he got his chance to come to Alaska working a summer job in nineteen forty seven. Us Fish and Wildlife Service as a fishing patrol agent in chick in the Alaska Peninsula. I got the greatest job. Anyone could possibly have reared and told the homer news in twenty ten On a stop in Sylvia. He saw his first view. Homer across catch McVeigh not dreaming. At the time he'd wind up here in nineteen fifty here in a master science degree from the University of Maine or know where he had a teaching and research fellowship. There he saw job announcement for the University Alaska Fairbanks he applied and got. The job was his first wife. Ursula and their family drove up the Alaska highway in nineteen forty one. Buick Rudin soon became the chairman of the Department of Wildlife Management at UAF. He quit after finding teaching didn't suit him. I wasn't happy standing in front of a blackboard. I wanted to do things he said. In July nineteen fifty five and moved to homer with uncertain prospects but a dream to be a freelance writer and a registered guide. He'd started writing in college. Like many new homer arrivals. He kicked around at odd jobs. Working at log company.

Alaska writer homer Jim Douglas reardon Trapping Alaska University Alaska Fairbanks Virginia Alaska Military Kastner Us Fish and Wildlife Service Jim Alaska Peninsula Jim Riordan Walter Arnold Michelle University of Maine Frank Glazier pelzer Sydney Huntington Book Shadows Levin
"university alaska" Discussed on Verified

Verified

09:13 min | 5 months ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Verified

"This is verified. I'm your host Natasha del. Toro here's where we are in the story after. Maria returned home to Portugal. She admitted to herself that she'd been drugged and assaulted by her couch. Serving host the Italian cop the Ardo and she managed to track down fourteen other women from all over the world who like her had also been violated by this same guy so Maria formed a secret facebook group where they could talk openly about what had happened and how to. Stop Leonardo the even considered returning to Padoa to try to catch him in the act but instead marine. Her boyfriend decided. They needed some help so they turned to a group of three Italian journalists at European the investigative reporting project Italy now. I want you to get to know them because they play a huge role in the story. Cecilia Giulio and Alexia are all Italians in their thirties. They're hard working. They're passionate and and their own investigative journalists though. None of them plan to be. I'M CECILIA I wanted to be. An archaeologist says looking stories mice Amy's later she wanted to be a painter before turning to journalism then I decided I wanted to be a war reporter so I got picked up by City University in London and while she was in London she met a fellow Italian reporter named Giulio. I met Julia at a team and from there like literally stopped a minute. I am Julia and I never really decided. I wanted to be Jordan analyst journalism. Something that happened to me and even pretty late. I started doing journalism when I was twenty seven in a long backpacker trip six months around South America and when I came back to Italy was too hard to actually find a salary as a journalist so I went to live in London. And that's where he met Julia and and yeah she told you this story. We started doing things together and we didn't start who Julia when Cecilia worked freelance together. On important stories they felt needed attention like stories about illegal waste trafficking that were published in Italian media and they really threw themselves into it days nights and weekends then. We got very lucky. I mean we've got invited to the Global Investigative Journalism Conference in Kiev in two thousand eleven. And that's where he ought my training basically from colleagues that were giving me amazing tips and And and stories Kiev. The capital of Ukraine is also. Were Giulio and Cecilia. Met the third member of their reporting team. I saw Malaysia. Well I wanted to journalist But before I wanted to be an archaeology says Chea Like Indiana Jones in this kind of colleges then at University Alaska studied Japanese and Mandarin before she to started freelancing as a journalist and decided. Okay it's time to report about Japan for Italian media and so I did. I started some of Alaska's first stories. Were about the nuclear disaster following Japan's devastating earthquake in twenty eleven and Well remember that time that I was telling to my parents for the first time a I'm going to push him and to cover what happened there and my parents sesame isn't it be dangerous for you. I said No. I have friends who are now covering narcos and others are going to South America and others covering organized crime in South Italy. I'm just going to Fukushima is not that dangerous competitive what other people are doing. That just told me. Isn't it better. If you just change your friends. Instead they tried Alaska was committed to a future as a journalist and she found to like minds and Cecilia and Giulio. The conferencing Kiev was a the cradle. That made eve be start. A we realized that you only talion stare were poor young freelancers without any media backing up and we say like like let's back each other up and that. Sowell over center was born by twenty thirteen. They're center Europe. Was Up and running but it was still pretty new. They had just created a platform for secret tips from the public. And that's when the email from marinas boyfriend arrived explaining what Leonardo had done Maria. And the other women in the facebook group the reporters recognized right away that this story could be huge much bigger than anything they'd taken on before most of us where the very beginning of their career some of us at a little bit more experienced but none of us had worked as a journalist for more than a couple of years seriously. At least so you know. It was a task way beyond what we knew. We could tackle on our own normally so it was a real challenge even from a professional point of view but the reporters were up for that challenge. They knew they wanted to dig in town cover. What Leonardo had done and to try to bring justice to the women who've been wronged by him not just in the media but in a real courtroom and that meant helping them build a judicial case but they also knew they needed help navigating how to do that it was like we cannot do this alone like his quite serious. We need some lawyers when it some support we need to. We weren't trained. I mean we were trained for outer type of reporting. So how do you not? Just how do you deal with US rivers but also how to investigate such a story so we were just facing somebody who you know? Officially it was just a good cop so the reporters turned to lawyer. They knew Julia's cousin. Gianmarco talion Sour. We always resort to family when in doubt so he was the only lower knaw that I could trust and that would ask us for money. Straight ahead like he would at least give us some sound advice before anything outs. Gianmarco was an experienced lawyer but he was also someone they knew had no connection to Leonardo and that was important. We were afraid that there could be a system of people that knew each other So we did an all how deep disfiguration if it was just a single cop doing diet or if it was multiple cops or if it was if there were other people involved so it was hard to to find someone that we would be absolutely sure had no connections to that and Demarco it was the only one I could think of. We think of that was surely outside of any possible connection to this guy and that we could trust so they decided to meet up. Julia and Cecilia traveled to John. Marco's home in Milan like it was is living. Room blew so far Big Table. We had a drink and Marvez dinner also cooked by his wife. I remember that over a nightcap. The reporters Phil John Marco in on everything that they knew about Leonardo and the women who claimed he abused them. Gianmarco looked shocked by what they told him. He couldn't believe what we were saying. An amendment were saying D toes and getting into like the stories of each girls showing evidence. He like really turn like. This is incredible. I we have to do something about it. And he was stepping out of being a lawyer too. In that moment I think there was this common sense of acting as citizens but he said we need to act very carefully because Does manage a Cop. Econ just ran there like freelance journalist. And and promise you're going to have this and then how do like we need to be clever about it? The reporters needed to come up with a strategy and fast. We're sitting in his room with DeMarco lawyer. And while we were talking about that we knew that possibly impact of a dino was perpetrating crime. Again I mean that was possibly to and it was a feeling that stayed with us for the months that we kept working on this thing.

Leonardo Julia Cecilia Cecilia Giulio Kiev Maria facebook Alaska Italy London South America Phil John Marco Demarco CECILIA I Gianmarco Natasha del Portugal Toro Ardo Japan
"university alaska" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well hello boys and girls dingoes and wombats ladies and gentlemen. This is tim ferriss welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show and i mentioning more animals than usual for a reason my job every episode as some of you may know is to deconstruct world class performers and or people who are extremely well known in their respective fields to deconstruct how they do do what they do the thinking behaviors influences and so on that makes them different and my guest this episode is mike phillips and there's really really something for everyone in this episode whether you want to get a better understanding of the natural world and ecology or you just want to avoid being mauled by bears if you're in bear country entry. There's something for you. Mike phillips mica served as the executive director of the turner endangered species fund and the advisor to the turner bio-diversity division since is he co-founded both with ted turner in june of nineteen ninety-seven before that mike worked for the u._s. Department of interior leading historic efforts to restore red wolves to the southeastern u._s. us in grey wolves to the yellowstone national park. If you've seen the video online how wolves change rivers on youtube with forty million plus views views that is a short story a reflection of those efforts he also conducted important research on the impacts of oil and gas development on grizzly bears in the arctic predation costs for gray wolves in alaska in dingo ecology in australia in two thousand six. Mike was elected to the montana house of representative. He served there until elected into the montana senate. In two thousand twelve his service in the senate will extend through two thousand twenty and mike received his masters and science and wildlife college from the university alaska and his bachelor's of science in ecology from the university of illinois so this episode and past conversations with mike doc have led me to find the opportunity that i'm currently most excited about aside from psychedelic research at places like hopkins hopkins and imperial college and elsewhere. This has become what i'm most excited about and we'll get to what that is in the episode but i had the same feeling with this and it's not a common feeling but the same tingle in the belly feeling that i had when i was first looking ain't getting involved with some of the startups that i've been involved with in early stages duo lingo facebook twitter shop affi- so when you say engage or meet i should say a small team like the shop team at the time which was something like ten or twelve people. There's sometimes a tingle in the belly that reflects flex the feeling the realization that this could be really really big this could really be huge and it makes sense and so we will talk about in this episode something that triggered that same response in me.

mike mike phillips Mike phillips mica tim ferriss mike doc montana senate facebook ted turner yellowstone national park alaska executive director university of illinois university alaska advisor australia representative
"university alaska" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

14:28 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Well hello boys and girls dingoes and wombats ladies and gentlemen. This is tim ferriss welcome to another episode of the tim ferriss show and i mentioning more animals than usual for a reason my job every episode as some of you may know is to deconstruct world class performers and or people who are extremely well known in their respective fields to deconstruct how they do do what they do the thinking behaviors influences and so on that makes them different and my guest this episode is mike phillips and there's really really something for everyone in this episode whether you want to get a better understanding of the natural world and ecology or you just want to avoid being mauled by bears if you're in bear country entry. There's something for you. Mike phillips mica served as the executive director of the turner endangered species fund and the advisor to the turner bio-diversity division since is he co-founded both with ted turner in june of nineteen ninety-seven before that mike worked for the u._s. Department of interior leading historic efforts to restore red wolves to the southeastern u._s. us in grey wolves to the yellowstone national park. If you've seen the video online how wolves change rivers on youtube with forty million plus views views that is a short story a reflection of those efforts he also conducted important research on the impacts of oil and gas development on grizzly bears in the arctic predation costs for gray wolves in alaska in dingo ecology in australia in two thousand six. Mike was elected to the montana house of representative. He served there until elected into the montana senate. In two thousand twelve his service in the senate will extend through two thousand twenty and mike received his masters and science and wildlife college from the university alaska and his bachelor's of science in ecology from the university of illinois so this episode and past conversations with mike doc have led me to find the opportunity that i'm currently most excited about aside from psychedelic research at places like hopkins hopkins and imperial college and elsewhere. This has become what i'm most excited about and we'll get to what that is in the episode but i had the same feeling with this and it's not a common feeling but the same tingle in the belly feeling that i had when i was first looking ain't getting involved with some of the startups that i've been involved with in early stages duo lingo facebook twitter shop affi- so when you say engage or meet i should say a small team like the shop team at the time which was something like ten or twelve people. There's sometimes a tingle in the belly that reflects flex the feeling the realization that this could be really really big this could really be huge and it makes sense and so we will talk about in this episode something that triggered that same response in me where i'm going to be applying a lot of focus it without further ado please enjoy a at times times very hilarious at times very profound and certainly wideranging conversation with mike phillips. Mike welcome to the show tim. It's my pleasure to be here. I couldn't remember i'd done all of those things so thank you for reminding me of where i have been in the past well i i may do more of that and that'd be helpful as i get older i get forgetful and one of those those old old memories that i thought we might stoke is related to grizzly bears and you and i connected through another scientist to recommended. Did we speak which came about because long ago i saw video and we'll probably talk about this but how wolves chain rivers which led me to reach out to to my friends sanjin who's been on this podcast before conservation international and he led me kevin who had to you and that's the background background people listening grizzly bears. I'm looking at one of these bullets and it says that their muscles are bloodstained but their teeth are green could you you explain why that's a great star. Tim thank you for many years ago. I was studying grizzly bear behavior and habitat use in the arctic national wildlife refuge in anticipation of oil and gas development but for a period of time. I was part of a capture crew we would we would dart grizzly bears from helicopters. The drug would take effect the bear would lay down and go to sleep and and my job on the capture crew was to was to extract a premolar if if you take a tooth from a grizzly bear many other animals for that matter you can section tooth very finely and just like with a tree you can come up with a good estimate of age by counting annualize yearly growth rings so my job was to be the local dentist and pull a tooth from this grisly bear now every bear that i handle tim the muslims were bloody dried blood or wet blood. The muslims were bloody because at that time of the year grizzly bears bears were making extensive use of caribou calves the porcupine caribou herd one hundred and forty thousand animals strong they have en masse on the coastal plain native northern alaska grizzly bears no this and interested in a pulse of animal protein in early summer so they go out to the coastal plain and they they haunt these caribou calves and you okay successfully for at least a few days so everyone of these bears had a bloody muzzle and you think well this is what a fantastic carnivore bloody muzzles but every rebirth that i handled it. I pulled a two from what i would pull them the lips of the bear back to get at the teeth. The teeth were all green teeth weren't bloody. The the teeth were stained a deep green and the message to that story or the lesson from that story is looks can be deceiving grizzly bears all over the world world mostly subsist on vegetation. They eat so much vegetation that their teeth are stained green at least animals. I handled the arctic in contrast contrast that flash of animal protein in the form of a few caribou calves across a few days gives you this dramatic portrayal of predation with blood on the muzzle <hes> but gee whiz just for the ecology of the great bear. They're mostly living on planets. Sometimes things aren't as they seen yeah i <hes> i may share some some grizzly bear stories later but i've i've spent some time in the brooks range in alaska and <hes> up always wondered about that because i've been to the brooks range during caribou migrations and have seen grizzly bears which at least locals sometimes refer to his barren ground grizzlies because there's there's almost no tree cover at least where i was and it seemed very very very very difficult for them to to catch caribou and in which case what's left. It's green it is tough. It is barren ground country. There there are no trees are well north the tree line that some of the shrubs are big enough. They begin to resemble trees. This work was done in the brooks range so so you and i spent time in the same country. It is a tough place to make living. The bears don't have access to a long growing season. They've got to be smart about what they do. You and the smart bear understand that while i might kill it a few capable cavs over the course of a couple of days and when you understand caribou caribou give birth to what would be called a the following is the caribou calf within short order. A day or two is able to follow the herd without any problem in contrast to other ungulates. Let's hoofed. Mammals like white tailed deer whitetail deer give birth to haider's it takes white tailed deer fawn longer to mature so so their strategy is to be very good at hiding caribou calves that a lot of country to hide in oh boy they give birth to followers in those calves get up and go and in short order order or very capable at following the herd so capable all they can outrun a grizzly bear at two or three or four days of age and so the bears have this very narrow window oh of opportunity as that calf is beginning to get his hopes underneath them so to speak you. You could have taken so many different career paths. You could have studied so many different things. How did you end up focusing so much on predators well. I'm i'm intrigued by readiness as an ecologist. I'm intrigued by ravenous in by definition just the way every natural system is structured. The way energy flows a system carnivores always relatively uncommon certainly far more common than the prayed they consume and of course the prey are more uncommon the plants that they consume so i've been intrigued by predation for a long time i'm intrigued by carnivores because of rare and early in my career tim <hes> even before i did grizzly bear work i was deeply <hes> situated in the world of wolf conservation and while gray wolves are fantastic and i'm fascinated by grey wolves. I'm fascinated by lots of native life forms gray wolves gave me the chance to focus on restoration because when i started grey wolf work back in one thousand nine hundred eighty and i've been working on wolf recovery nearly daily now since one thousand nine hundred eighty when i began grey wolves were very very very very uncommon and i was seduced i was seduced him by this notion of restoration taking something that was amiss and putting it back together together again that that's that's what kept me fixated if you will on carnivores in and restoration and why not become an attorney rainy or a math teacher or a an instagram model. Why did you choose. Why did you choose nature. Why did you choose choose ecology. Was there any formative experience or conversation. Four can the road that led you into that world to begin with we'll do i would be a lousy model so that's not going to happen. Buddy now. Teaching is valuable and important serving as an attorney. We're a country guided by laws. That's important to those are wonderful ways to contribute but i am at my core on outdoor guy i knew when when i was twelve years old back in nineteen seventy i saw on my parents little black and white t._v. You know back in the day you got a._b._c. c._b._s. N._b._c. or p._b._s. Yes that was it. I saw in nineteen seventy on that little black and white t._v. The national geographic special on the pioneering grizzly bear research search being done in yellowstone park by john and frank craig ed and i said to myself at twelve years of age. I wanna do that and i would. Have you believe tim attended. I might have bested the crackheads about eighteen years later. I was in yellowstone national park. I was studying a large carnivore but not one that was naturally occurring but uncommon crackheads and grizzly bears. I was actually working to restore species that have been extirpated so this was a fire fire in my belly since i was twelve years of age and we are gonna talk about wolves but i want to get their vis-a-vis a few other species or at least one other other species and maybe some macro issues you mentioned twelve years of age. You've obviously a lot since age twelve. We won't be able to cover all of the stories all the studies but i have some notes in front of me and i have bullets for prompting certain things and i actually don't know any of these stories so so there's one that clearly popped out and caught my eye because it sounds so odd and i quote. I'm sure that the students in the dorm would be willing to donate use tampons to grizzly bear research. What is the context on this. Well now tim we are talking about women and alaska so back in the day back in the early nineteen eighties there was this sense that menstrual odor menstruating women shouldn't hike and grizzly bear country and interestingly clean up there was some research that showed that menstrual fluid <hes> actually the blood from menstrual fluid listed as strong response in polar polar bears as the odor of their primary prey that ring seal so as i was building out my graduate research i thought well maybe i could somehow test this on grizzly bears and i thought if i could get women to help me they would donate use tampons. I would take the tampa and i would still from that mostly blood but menstrual fluid and then i take that fluid and i was going to create these little. The story gets more interesting as we go. I was going to take that and with a small rock. I was going to take a small rock and i was going into affixed to the rock. A a proper amount of spag mosque stumping that would or cotton something that i could then dip in paraffin refund and create a small waxy ball that i could then take the metro fluid and inject into the small that was designed to be fired from a crossbow so that when he hit the ground nigga grizzly bear the little ball would perform to blow up and exposed the missile and of course we'd have we would have had placebos in we woulda shot water and we would have shot up to there was concern that toothpaste got grizzly bears all excited so it was an attempt camp to see <hes> just what kind of behavior could be elicited from grizzly bears odors from nonfood items and we were most intrigued about whether menstruating women should hike in grizzly bear country as it turned out. I wasn't able to get funding for the study. There was some concern that i wouldn't be good enough with my crossbow. Uh-huh i love that was that was the concern concern the crossbow in the work would have been done in denali park and and there was some concern this would see me shooting crossbows grizzly bears thinking. I might be trying to hurt him..

tim ferriss alaska mike mike phillips yellowstone national park senate montana Mike phillips mica attorney facebook australia ted turner cavs representative mike doc executive director advisor tampa
"university alaska" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

15:29 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Venture Stories

"These families came together and created the Great Universities that of the twentieth century and as. Has This generation of tech wealth that is unprecedented or the only precedent that we have for the amount of the concentration of wealth and technology and disruptive technology is is happening today and this generation is starting to give away that level well when they're looking at higher education they're being remarkably traditional and how they're giving away their wealth. You're looking at people like Bill Gates Mark Zuckerberg and and not just Emba Ken Langone and other the people doing things like funding traditional scholarships funding traditional institutions that they're the last generation of you know extremely wealthy <hes> entrepreneurs and leaders in their communities created and it's actually disappointing disappointing right the people who are so brilliant and have so remade society in in in their image <hes> aren't doing the creative donations that <hes> their predecessors did and in and actually you know I mentioned it when I talked about the the Millennium Scholarship Grant that Bill Gates it you know there's billion dollars it's amazing amount of largess and so you know the giving pledges and instead of creating something really had a sustainable will impact. It really disrupted education. <hes> you know it really was given in a way that <hes> wasn't one shot deal in you know twenty years from now. No one's GonNa really remember it except for a few lucky participants and think of the impact of that hat versus giving a billion dollars to create new type of institution. Maybe a new type of workforce training that that instituted the union pay it forward concept bring people into twenty-first-century of coding knowledge that Andy Sandy just described as an alternative use case for that kind of money <hes> and you know we're seeing increasingly you know the rich in the higher education ecosystem getting richer right something ugh over fifty percent of donations to higher education or donate something like <hes> fifty schools. That's not what you would think would come out of the the great you know titans of Silicon Valley and so you know I I think that as we look at what we can do to improve how we give Phil improperly income share agreements pioneering income share agreements could become an area where <hes> you you redefine <hes> what it means to give. I mean Eric Schmidt I believe in. I think it's Google Foundation Eric Schmidt whose funding your workforce program developed yeah I wanted yeah. I was about to jump in <hes>. I think it's so so I do think philanthropy has an opportunity to to redefine our workforce development certainly works and more lying to outcomes versus input and so the are fun I should give some specific here so we have of a three point two five million dollar fund and we're looking to grow at but right now we have four tropic investors <hes> who have under it in the fund the first that came in with one point two million from the Strada Education Network got a at one point two million dollar investment or grant. I should say from the the James Irvine Foundation <hes> and then we had a google dot org came in with four hundred fifty thousand and then individual therapists here in San Diego. I'm invested five hundred thousand dollars in so that got us with people in Q.. Five <hes> I'm doing my math right <hes> and it has really transformed conversation about how we provide value to our customers reserve again twenty five thousand a year ear and has a potential to have ripple effects all across the country with the five hundred fifty workforce boards that we work with many of them have reached out what we're doing. How did it how we raise the money how we partnered with U._C._S._d.? <hes> in currently <hes> we have every dollar that come back to US less than servicing these goes back into the fund to pay four because none of those doctors are looking for any kind of term now our long-term vision is to have about ten million dollars of some profit capital kind of taking first loss with a larger lined up to twenty five million dollars assets <hes> with fifteen million dollars being social impact or evening commercial investments that <hes> <hes> you can imagine kind of a trance capital stack that offers still very friendly terms to consumers while delivering very good returns to <hes> both those impact and commercial investors and that will fundamentally transform the way that we create opportunity in thin Yego so <hes> I think that would have as blender be digs in with on the skills base learning side. I think that will have fundamental impacts on how the federal the government looks at public workforce investments focuses it on outcomes and focuses on Kinda longer term sustainability. We wanted diversify our tech workforce our healthcare workforce you know across the board. We're we're facing issues of diversity inclusion financial conclusion and you've just heard someone who's on the front line say look three million dollars redefined workforce in in one county. You know you could one of these like grants. <hes> one of these donations these donations being made to traditional universities like endow a school would fundamentally reshape the landscape of the world of work and so in a way. That's <hes> evergreen right that would forever perpetuate this new model of of hanging forward and so I think it's really exciting yeah. Let me take five minutes of advocate. Maybe less in just unpacked program a little bit more so what what that has done that sounds topic investment has done is that it has <hes> it's going to fund the coursework for five hundred individuals over the next years to get into tech careers in we have partnered our training partners. You see thing yeah goes attention and the four programs that we're focusing on to start with our digital marketing business intelligence Java programming in front end web design under we are the counterparty to the I say we're originally me is as a fire one degree nonprofit and then one folks have passed a competency assessment to get into the course that U._C._S._d.. We then have a performance base the contract with U._C._S._D.. That align their payments with the same kind of incentive structure that the eye of meaning that they don't get paid in full until the students successful that face value V._I._S._A. For us is sixty five hundred dollars and that includes both nine twelve months certificate programs that you get the depending on the program as well as what we do breath which is job placement in wraparound before so we have a career coach dedicated to every single one of the students and helps them land internships and job but also helps them access transportation childcare <hes> food stamps vouchers Jersey any nutritional assistant helps them with housing because some of the individual their housing secure and the terms of the I say are five to eight percent is the income share for between <hes> thirty six and forty eight months depends bound program and we have a minimum income threshold of forty thousand dollars meaning that if someone's not coming out of the program making forty thousand dollar they have no obligation <hes> and so those terms are we think will both create a lot of value for the fund and also are very consumer-friendly for for the customer that we are and to double down on what Dan I'll just said about access and inclusion our cohort of students. The first fifty have started we had four hundred fifty applications concern. The fifties locks with very little marketing and so like I said before this idea that dude in are not being asked take all the financial risk for the upskilling really Redman. That's what I mean we sent one or two emailed out to our network of individuals who have been unemployed unbending county over the last year <hes> four hundred and fifty people signed up and took the assessments. We have Kinda gone through this election process and the individuals in these technology programs in court one are not the typical students that U._C._S._D. U._C._S._d.. Extension professors get usually get kind of white collar workers who are already in jobs at some of our large companies here who their employers paying for them to get this or that certificate so they can go from making one hundred thousand two hundred twenty dollars but our our cohort is a completely different demographic for the students or for the U._C._S._d.. Professors they have all the same competency assessment that means that they can be successful in the program and so we're we've underwritten the is as not on pedagogy. Oh Gee where someone went to school or maybe a better way to with our folks. We serve where someone could afford to go to school but actually came. They do the job and then they do successful in the role so that's what we're we've kind of under inner is eight on competency and then <hes> the students are in the core are seventy percent <hes> people of color we have about fifty fifty <hes> women and men about thirty five of the individuals are on cal fresh or formerly known of food stamps. <hes> about sixty five percent qualifies something we'll be doing getting signed up so that they <hes> have you know food and <hes> and some are working <hes> many are not but of course was designed around kind of someone working in kind of retail or tourism industry which ago and we actually have a few folks with Nassar's degree the couple bashes degrees <hes> majority have kind of Sung College who are in the program and like I said kind of with this network wrap around four we'll be having kind of regular hosted event that kind of correspond with the coursework to build a sense of social capital because one thing that we know from our research folk befo can do the classroom work. They've shown that through their competency assessment they haven't accessed accessed some of these jobs not because of competency but because of lack of opportunity and lack of social capital so the opportunity is buddy. I'd say and then what we do is work connecting them who the business in the corporate network kind of be the country glove for people who don't have country clubs and to connect them with hiring managers and businesses and get them informational interviews and that kind of thing which is all of us know are sometimes just as for him to winning that job and whether or not you can pass the test so that's kind of how are is a is structured and <hes> I I left off a few details here and there but overall that's the kind of what we built and <hes> that was all underwritten by philanthropy. I will say kind of our we have a few areas where we want to look into the border. We think they play a role. One is with new American so San Diego has a lot of both refugees but also just traditional immigrants and one story. There's a a woman who came to our center who was a nurse in Mexico and San Diego is has a huge shortage for bilingual Spanish speaking nurses. I'M GONNA pay a lot of money but it takes some time in about nine thousand dollars to get your credentials to translate <hes> but you're here newly Mexico you you don't have nine thousand dollars in your pocket. Perhaps though this person's in it and so how do you finance that credentialed translation prophet which takes some classes and to get the do some paperwork state. We think an ICEE has some potential their second mention. I mentioned the Union area area third. I think there's drone. Aviation is a big area broken pain Diego but there's no courses that really teach John Aviation <hes> and so working with some Joan businesses around is saying some on the job training slash apprenticeship program is another frontier and then certainly healthcare I mentioned briefly but <hes> all of the other healthcare areas that were worrying for than area feasibility for us going forward so yeah philanthropy as catalyzed all activity and I think we can get more one thing you mentioned earlier you double clicked on this idea of the customer and I was watching this <hes> disposition between the conversation between a A._F._C. David Marcus about a libra yesterday and one thing Z. asked <hes> demarcus. which is you know should currency be a public good and Dave markets basically avoided the void the question? How do you think about in the context of Higher Education Urges Education broadly higher level visit a private <unk> students be the customer and if so what are the implications about so I think there's a big difference first of all between workforce development and and sort of education <hes> from the Latin Etchegaray to lead out of darkness but what you I let let's just I think that historically we considered higher education public good and if you look at the history of higher education in the United States it really started in the modern sense with the more l. landbranch back where literally the government gave land to start the State University Systems and state governments have been funding education <hes> for a very longtime hundreds of years with the explicit understanding that they would create economic development and that's really what's happening today where the justification for education as economic development but at the same time states are cutting back on their funding because they're not quite getting what they're asking for? They're getting political probably depending on you know what side of the political spectrum Europe and the reality is education education is both it's both a public good but also something people pay for <hes> and as states are pulling back from their funding as the federal government is transitioning. It's funding from grants and direct subsidy to loans loans <hes> that are ultimately paid back hopefully expect to be paid back by the consumer. You're switching from public good to a private and when you make that transition it's filled with the types of debates you're hearing today and I think it gets terribly irresponsible. Although understandable <hes> in light of the situation that you have you know basically a lot of members of Congress and senators and even other political leaders sort of attacking universities <hes> on on political grounds but at the end of the day which where people have have decided to fund universities is for Economic Development and so there is this belief that it should be public good. The reality is we fund it like a private good and so the debate actually happened. We decided to defend universities right so university. Alaska just had a forty three percent haircut in their funding. Most universities had fifty. Fifty sixty percent funding cuts Ariza San Diego Workforce Board Andy Just walked through twenty percent.

San Diego Google federal government Bill Gates US Eric Schmidt Great Universities Strada Education Network Higher Education Urges Educati Ken Langone Andy Sandy Alaska James Irvine Foundation Mexico Silicon Valley Mark Zuckerberg Nassar ICEE
"university alaska" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It in about twenty minutes after three o'clock we're talking with my it's a product one of the producers are Molly the nollie which is airing on PBS yes New Mexico New Mexico PBS enemy TV five point one on your TV dial it's part cartoon part live action and detailing kind of the cultural I guess realities in in in Alaska but for a lot of kids arm in a lot of different cultures probably experience the same things you know my A. in a kids are kids and kids around the world experience things similarly and and you know whether it's on the border between Mexico and and Mexico or or in Alaska you know kids are our our fragile little loan but also incredibly resilient little little creatures all when you look at the at the story of of mall you've done all the and you know the separation of of of kids in in days gone by from their family to the culture rise them how do you you know how do you present that to a four year old which is kind of the the low end of of your target demographic in in a in a way that's not gonna scare well I I I don't think it'll scare anyone because this is a history lesson and in in reality knowing our past and understanding where people are coming from a man we know that it's not history that there are currently things going on and today that's not what you're telling and Molly but that's not over time in mine and and and Molly story this is this is a history lesson and and it's a personal history and it gives some sort of sense as to where she's coming from you know the the guidance for the show was really strongly advocated for and we have a lasting native producers and and elders council that are you next step in hands with every single episode that's been written hi every design that's been drawn every actor that's been cast so that all along the way the elders and the advisors from Alaska who have been hand picked for their knowledge and commitment to sharing a representational view of Alaska native people in the media they are really guiding this show and the story of grandpa's drum comes from our elder look Titus and this is his personal story and so it sets us off you know in in understanding just what Alaskan native people how are still they could have the memory of its its living memory and so I don't think that I think that when we share the truth of where we've come from we can only move forward from that but if we are never can reveal that pass that's haunting us it's hard to move forward so I I really believe that this will hope fully engage compassion empathy for current children that are going through similar traumatic experiences wherever they're from whatever place that had to leave to come to their life today or historically and which many people can relate that they've given up in the immigrant story or they've had to go through some hardship in order to get where they are today for a better life for their children a lot of the video projects a lot of TV or movie projects or internet projects that are done have an educational component educational website that can be shared in classrooms I would imagine you're does as well it does there's an entire group of a curriculum that's involved with that the PS yes kids dot org dash Malli repeat ask kids dot org slash Molly and has games and it has some clips then you know it'll be continually expanding today is just the first two day event being live an on air so it'll be continually expanding over the next couple of months there was a podcast that's very exciting so if you like podcast it's really great to listen to Molly and how she met her dog suki and get to meet some of the characters how one of her other best friends Trini is from Texas and she's moved up to Alaska and she's has her own perceptions and misconceptions of what Alaska is and she and Molly take compare notes about what the lower forty eight as a like as we call it right Sonya some from your own experience and moving from loans right yeah to a to Alaska other projects you're working on you have a production company I do I mean I I am a faculty member at the university of Alaska Fairbanks and within our how many university Lasky campuses are we have three main campuses and then about twenty satellite campuses in rural communities many of them that are only accessible by either error or boat now university Alaska going through giant turmoil today today is an interesting it's been a very interesting several weeks I haven't decided to de fund university of Alaska by over forty percent yes that's true when an idiot I'll it's going to be a bumpy road for the future of Alaska interrupted anyway so you your teacher but you you're also have a production company yep and I run it through the university of Alaska Fairbanks so we have a production company called frame in which I use we get garner contracts to film up in Alaska for various outside groups and through the contracts I'm able to work with my students and I have my own staff members and we create content for a lot of different projects across the state people can find you through a website my SL Gannett dot com and then also through the university of Alaska Fairbanks theater and film department okay how is that it is their enthusiasm in Alaska for shooting film and digital and you know we had a very strong tax incentive program for a while back at about ten years ago but that has gone by the wayside we still do if you're looking for a good place to share acts yeah twenty five to thirty percent excellent yeah we got it we had a very aggressive when it was up to fifty eight percent for awhile whoa yep so there was a lot of work and then the oil prices went down and a lot of things changed after that red state kind of has tightened its purse strings so Molly of the non league is on PBS today and there are thirty eight episodes there are and you can catch it every day Monday through Friday and it'll be on and let's see said Monday through Friday nine thirty AM and two PM on five point one and on PBS kids five point two Monday through Friday at seven thirty PM and probably archive you can go back and watch past episodes online you can go online to band yeah sure can and play some games you can do a dog race with suki the dogs the and the dog team and yeah family still in Santa Fe yes all my family still mostly here in Santa Fe well keep us posted to come back to visit them come back I well I feel I am is really cool project thank you so much goodbye to damage to these really busy day for you appreciate it for them thank you all right take the email come back with Paul Gibson retake our democracy they have a very detailed scorecard for the sixty day legislative session out back of Paul Gibson brief time.

Molly Mexico fifty eight percent thirty percent twenty minutes forty percent four year sixty day ten years two day
"university alaska" Discussed on WWL

WWL

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on WWL

"WWL. AM. FM. They're coming back to a Baton Rouge. Stony Brook baseball the sea wolves. Of course, we all remember they did the Tigers twenty twelve upset him in a super regional Matt zinc on whether it's right now. He's the head baseball coach at Stony Brook coach. Thanks for the time and congratulations. Getting in the baseball tournament. Thank you, having me. And thanks very much coach. How much do you remember about that twenty twelve upset victory? You guys had over LSU in the superego. There's, there's so many tremendous memories about so many things, you know, not only to the way, our team played in and, you know, the first game taken two days, and the weather, and we got the full Louisiana experience in the full Alex box experience and, and probably the thing that sticks out the most is, you know, how gracious and how their fan base was, you know, so, so ravaged their own team. But, you know, appreciated our team and what we did. And it's, it's clearly and definitely one of my fonts memories of just about anything in my life that tiger fans recognize good baseball teams period. They they've seen a lot of them down Baton Rouge. So they know when another good baseball team comes into their territory, Matt. When you when you talk to the. This this year's squad. Does it even come up? Does that even come up the twenty twelve team? And what he did. LSU. Yeah, that's, that's a great question. You know, seven years removed. You know, a lot of these guys were, you know, ten eleven years old and, you know, in the recruiting process, it might have come up that, you know, they remembered watching, and, and how cool it was and how it affected. You know this, this area, the metropolitan area on occasion, a we, you know, we site, a lot of our successes in the past. And certainly, you know that is, you know the greatest achievement on program ever accomplished. So it comes up. But, you know, each team we try to, you know, we try to team apart and, and, and work with them is the team they are, and not try to, you know, compared him to any others. But I can say this. They were super excited no in what, what on. Unbelievable place. It is the play in a story program. And and you know, we're very much looking forward to getting back down there now code sink the two thousand twelve experience. How is that help your case or when you dealing with the administration as far as that look, all of a sudden, we overtaken a big dog Annella Tigers as far as your own facilities talking about the progression there? And then the second part of what is the Sea Wolf? Oh, don't. Well, as we like to say because we get that question a lot here at, at Stony Brook university. When asked what to see? Well, we say honesty. Well, so that's kind of our, our replied today. That, but if you go to the dictionary, it is mystical creature I believe from the from the northwest like Alaska Indians? And, and in fact, our nickname, the only other to my knowledge, only other college nickname that has seawalls university Alaska Anchorage. So that's kind of where we're back comes from. And as far as the impact on our program at a Ted many, many impacts on our program, you know, frankly, as far as our facility, you know, we've had some. Prevents, but not too significant improvements that we were hoping to get off of the run to Omaha, but or director, Sean hill, Ron is working diligently. We've got some people fully invested in improving our, our facility, and we think, you know, we're right now we're we've been working very hard over that over that many years. But it looks like it's going to come to fruition in the next couple of months. Now coach would you could you tell the, the baseball fan base in the south, that we'll go out to the box and watch TV 'cause LSU Tigers just talk about maybe someone that would catch their attention to pitching staff are maybe a few hitters that you have on board. Yeah. Sure. Well, I think I think overall, I think what people certainly, you know, this is kind of thing. If you watch a team over time, but you know our guys have really bought into play in defense, and, and I'm, I'm really, you know, extremely pleased and couldn't be happier with with the way we feel about playing defense and, and hopefully that will continue this weekend. It's going to be very, very important to our success. It's important anyone success offensively, you know, Nick 'Grande, who is our was voted our conference player two year. He he's our shortstop. He's not flashy shortstop, but he's super steady. He he's a base sealer offensively. He's an exciting player he could steal bases. You know, he, he gives us, great ninety as far as setting an example for the rest of the team. So I think you'll enjoy. You're watching Nick and, and Mike Wilson are center fielder. He he's had, you know, he, he's has the most power on our team in Mike. Actually, he hit the batter's eye when we played Arkansas early in the year, so at Arkansas so and you had a big home run the other day that clear easily was over four hundred four hundred twenty four hundred feet. So so he can supply power. Mike wilson. Not sink. Stony brook. Baseball coats sea wolves coming to Baton Rouge Friday night. They'll face the LSU Tigers at six PM at the box. What do you see from afar? And we haven't had a great chance to really study up yet on LSU baseball. What do you see? Well, you know, one, we're not playing baseball baseball on watching baseball. So I'm on on the SEC network quite a bit. And, and, and so I have had a chance to see them. And, you know, Coachman areas again put a tremendous team together. You know they're, they're not a lot of weaknesses. You know, your press with their offense, certainly their their starting pitching. They're, you know, just so, you know, start is power arms bullpen, how effective it is. And, and so athletic. They're physical. They're, they're, they're your you know, top level south. He's conference type team. And, and so we know we've got a work cut out. I it's going to be a huge challenge. But it's one heck of a team that we're up against and, and we're open to not only embrace. She atmosphere there. But also be up for the challenge of playing such a team that sinks even baseball coach at Stony Brook base on coach on Twitter, coach one more electron. And I know you hate comparisons, all coaches do. But how does this team compare to the twenty twelve team that made it them all? Yeah. Yeah, that's, that's a tough comparison. You know, the, the two thousand twelve team ended up having on that team. Seven guys got drafted that year. We had three freshmen play all three of them were freshman all American who went on to get drafted later. We have we had a major leaguer on that team. Travis Jankowski playing the outfield to the San Diego Padres. We, we had clearly an extremely talented team. But that being said, I think we bring a lot of the intangibles of from that club, just this past week, we played a conference tournament, and we were lucky enough to go three, you know, we behind and every game and came back to win them. So I think the intangibles that we that we that two thousand twelve team this team has I think, you know, I think that there resilient and they're tough minded. And you know they they're their true brotherhood. They play for each other, and intangibles can make up for a lot of shortcomings. So hopefully that'll be the case come Friday, Matt sink. Stony Brook baseball coach good luck. And once again graduations on getting into the baseball tournament. Thank you very much. Look forward to getting down to see everyone on on Friday. Thanks, good. Goes Stony Brook. Sea wolves baseball. Coach. They take on the Tigers Friday at six pm right here on wwl. Now another traffic.

baseball Stony Brook baseball LSU Stony Brook LSU Tigers Tigers Stony Brook university Baton Rouge Matt sink Stony brook Mike Wilson Annella Tigers Louisiana Alaska seawalls university Alaska Anc SEC Nick 'Grande Arkansas
"university alaska" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"It's responding monitoring program was co founded by re of us. Yep. With Dr George Winston Barbara Carlson, Dr George Wes was a professor from university Alaska, but had retired. Aaron Barbara Carlson was a UC Reserve University of California riverside reserve director to get information that you need to really look at how hummingbirds are doing. It's important to have a coordinated program that Sharon data in the end the data's collected in such a way that. It can be used to make statements as the network developed the people just became interested. And there was one time. I think it was in two thousand four two thousand five where the migrating southbound Rufus coming through the southern Californian era Zona almost drop to zero. Now, if you look at where Rufus coming birds migrate their main migration route is oval in there. Southbound migration route goes through the rocky mountains in so the errors is on California sites aren't on the main migration path, but what we would see is migration of particularly juvenile's mate south, and it became really on that if we were to be able to. Understand was this drop in juvenile's. A a problem with the populations of Rufus in general, or is it just a bad season for nesting, we needed to really engage more people across the range of Rufus number. If you were to major the birds migration route by the number of body links that it flies the Rufus has the longest migration route of any bird it over winters in southern Mexico, southwestern Mexico and it breeds as far north as Alaska and in British Columbia north. So it turns out that we tried to engage British Columbia Bandres. And we also realized that we needed to have some sites along the Rocky Mountain flyway as well. So we actively went forward to try to identify people. Who would be interested in joining the network are starting to site and in that tower, British Columbia team came on board as well as our sites in south, western Colorado. And then a few years later the federal biologists in southern Utah near Escalante one at a project. They were starting to focus on holidays because there is a lot of big reasons why the pollination interaction animal pollination is at thread with our changing climate when do work together to be able to identify. What was going on with some of their pollinators in that were? A National Park Service for service end up Bill biologists joined the network, so not only did we have coordination among sites to look at hummingbird populations. We also started to have ordination between federal and managers, permanent hair. Things have moved. Slowly, we obviously when you look at the range maps of humming. Birds all of our hummingbird species, except maybe the Aniston in Alan are really dependent upon Mexico as a place where they migrate to live for many months of the year. So it became a real obvious need to reach out to Mexican hummingbird biologist we had a North American or the logical conference back. And I think it was too. Thousand six two thousand seven. The conference was in Vera Cruz Mexico fortunate than number of Mexican biologist there in we just had a meeting..

Rufus Mexico Dr George Winston Barbara Carl Aaron Barbara Carlson university Alaska Vera Cruz Mexico Rocky Mountain UC Reserve University of Calif Dr George Wes California Sharon professor Escalante Colorado Utah director British Columbia Aniston Alan
"university alaska" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"university alaska" Discussed on KOMO

"Fire. They burned down a Jehovah's Witness kingdom hall and Lacey today is considered suspicious, but it's caused hasn't been officially determined. Komo's Charlie Harker tells us there have been similar fires at other kingdom halls over the past few months, and he spoke to a profiler about that psychologists Joel voskan has researched and provided expert testimony about motivations for arson. I asked him for his take on what's happening in Thurston county. I'm sure that one. I pop assist. They'll be. Exploring his people who have some kind of grievance either real or perceived that they believe they've been harmed by that particular denomination. You hope that people talk about their grievances before they resort to fire which will make their job a little easier because it's just a question of finding out who expressed rage against that denomination. There's a lot of reasons why people said fires, but one that's not infrequent his anger. And at least there's one theory. That's frequently adhere to by many professionals that it's a kind of primitive way of expressing rage, and the people who have other options for expressing rage may be less likely to use fire. So for example, sometimes people sue people when they're angry at but not everybody has equal access to to lawyers and stuff like that. Or or knows enough to think about how to express their grievances, intellectual capacity. What we know about that? Well, one thing that's been written about frequently. Is that people who are more limited intellectually are more likely to use fire to express rage because they have fewer other option, but I'm very cautious about those kind of findings because the people that we know about the arsonists that we know about are the ones who got caught, and it's certainly possible that people who are more limited intellectually may be more likely to be caught arson. Investigators will tell you that quite a few are since maybe more than half are for profit and are much less likely to result in a prosecution precisely because people know what they're doing. And do it in ways that make it more difficult to determine who committed the crime? Do you worry this arsonists could strike again? We don't always know. So if somebody didn't get identified and prosecuted. And a crime stopped. We don't know why they stopped. We could the person have been arrested for something else. Could they have felt like okay? My I paid them back. Now, I'm done. They have received some type of counseling or therapy for some other reason, you know, we again, we only know what we know. And it's it's really important for us to be humble about how much we don't know about these phenomena. How difficult is this work? It's not what you see on television. This is very very hard work. And God bless those guys. They're superstars I mean. They're they're keeping us safer. And I think the world is up that's psychologist and expert witness, Dr Joel voskan, I'm Charlie harder. Komo news. A junior high school student from university places behind bars today arrested for threatening to shoot up the school on Instagram last night. Kasuga Romero tells us the threat went viral in the school district overnight students and parents who saw the. The threatening post on Instagram that had phrases like shoot up the school tomorrow, and everyone is going to die. Immediately reported it to the district and police the threat specifically mentioned narrow zoo intermediate school drum intermediate and Curtis schools in university place. Ed Troyer with the Pierce county. Sheriff's office says they tracked down the fourteen year old from Curtis junior high school using his address custody. Nobody else is involved and that he did not have access to weapons of rep was never credible. So far, they don't have a motive. Whether it was a joke or serious because point people need to realize if you're going to do that. And if you're joking, and you send it out for still larger ramifications on the back in for someone believes the teenager acted alone. See Romero, KOMO news coming up on three ten. Let's talk some sports from the Harley exteriors sports desk. We have this huge Monday night football game between the Seahawks and the Minnesota Vikings. Both teams battling to get into postseason. Play from Pete Carroll's perspective real challenge for his defense. Taking on a Vikings offense led by new quarterback for that team and Kirk cousins and some talented receivers that he throws too. Guys, come through and make the catches. They're both good after the catch. They both get down the field their their possession guys down the field guys. Are they have all of that ability in them? So it just makes them really hard in the QB knows it. They seem to really have hooked up was the quarterback to and executions really is because you can get should be an intense game playoff intensity. Monday night at CenturyLink field college football now the huskies and Cougars. Get ready for their bowl games eastern, Washington University is gonna OCC data's tomorrow with a spot in the FCS playoffs in the semi finals for grabs who got a quarterfinal match up tomorrow on that red turf the furniture over in it's chigney, and these are two teams played about a month ago with eastern winning that one in a blow out the championship. Major League Soccer to be decided tomorrow, the Portland timbers on the road to take on Atlanta. And we'll have you done men's basketball for you on Sunday right here on KOMO news is the dogs take on Seattle university. Alaska. Airlines arena game time, six o'clock. Our pre game coverage right here on KOMO news. We'll start at five thirty well more sports in thirty minutes. Former FBI director James Comey will make a return visit to Capitol Hill to take questions about the early days of the Russia investigation and his handling of the Hilary Clinton Email investigation. Comey took hours of questions from members of two house committees today, here's his reaction to what took place after a full day of questioning. Two.

Komo arson Dr Joel voskan Kasuga Romero Charlie Harker James Comey Thurston county Witness kingdom hall Curtis junior high school Lacey Alaska Pete Carroll Vikings Pierce county Hilary Clinton Ed Troyer Seahawks Seattle university CenturyLink field college
"university alaska" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"Spree in Dr Jason hill who is a distinguished professor of philosophy at depaul university in Chicago, and he's the author of a very fine book called. We have overcome an immigrants letter to the American people because Dr hill himself as an immigrant, I believe you're from Jamaica originally, right? Dr gas Bill, I am. I was is there when I was twenty right? And and look how well you've done in our country. When you came here legally and you work within the system. But anyway, you wrote a column in the hill. And in the column, you basically say that in general, American universities are harming the nation. How. Well, I think they have become national security threats because they have become indoctrination centers where every single subject is be taught through the lens of cultural Marxism or students are being taught. First of all to hate America, American professors merica. So we have students that are being spewed with invectives against America anti Americanism anti-capitalism, but that's not all they're being not just talked to hit capitalism and America. They're being taught at reason, rational argumentation, the western canon and cells are the constructs of white, racist imperialistic men. And at these educational criminals are used to explode minorities and to keep them down the very the very enlightenment project in. Humanities, and the social sciences are being taught to students as oppressive means to keep them down. And I think this is one way in which the very very far left, not the fair so far left of the left in general, it's using these methods to socialize students into socialism. Look, we face an ideological war in this country where we're indoctrinating students into becoming socialists and the rejoinders there is no fair and balanced educational rejoinder going on. They're not taught. Conservative criminals are knocked taught the office side quite the opposite when you try to head, but how did how did we get here? I don't. You know, I, I've attended three colleges Mara's college. I have a degree in history, Boston University degree in broadcast journalism, and Harvard a degree in public administration in all of my experience. I never heard a professor and it was back, you know, years ago say Marxism was good or you should be a socialist. I mean, I never heard. I did have a few radical left professors, but they were basically saying the United States is bad it because we exploited blacks and native Americans, and we're imperialistic, but did they didn't get into the fabric of, well, you should be a socialist. So how did it change so radically so quickly. I think what happened is that these offsite disciplines like, you know, women's studies, queer studies, black studies have been galvanized in the past couple of years where they think that cultural relativism and ethical relativism has gained ascendancy in the university where these I call them these offsite disciplines view reason and rational argumentation suspiciously. And I think that they view any kind of contestation to their ideas as a form of violence. I think the other side of the coin Bill is also that we have a number of students were coming into the universities who have never been faced with perspectives outside of their own. They exist in their own curated little silos and they are encouraged by their professors to exist in these curated silos and the professors themselves who used them as Guinea pigs for their own leftist the all shes are all too happy to engage in this enterprise of indoctrinate. I think through that the students because of the high technology need addiction to the machines are not nearly as I in history and economics and the the used to be and the public school system has collapsed. But I think it's on the to this what I never get by the board of directors of saving the university Alaska southeast. They've got to know that the school is moving radically left. I went to college as I mentioned, which was a working class school when I was there not conservative during the Vietnam years, but that wild anti-american. It was kind of both sides. Now. It is moved dramatically to the left because they hired a guy to run it from the university of Chicago, your turf who's moved. It left brought in a lot of crazy loons to teach and who's basically ramming the progressive agenda down throats of the students in a variety of ways. Why does the board of directors usually older people and wealthy people who've benefited from capitalism permit all this to go on in the universities because their moral coloreds because I think they care. Frade. Yeah..

Dr Jason hill distinguished professor America depaul university university of Chicago Chicago Spree Jamaica Boston University university Alaska southeast United States Mara Harvard Vietnam
"university alaska" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Drink token with bradley g wbz newsradio 1030 so wbz dan ray is a show called night side for made to midnight on wbz just before this program here very he's very consistent excellence show as you know and he covered up if these kennedy migration topic in a kind of a couple of ways tonight at least according to the rundown house upstairs preparing my program so i didn't hear it but he does send out a rundown the you can get it by way of email check it in you can contact him and figure out how to get this information but as i look at the rundown he covered this bill that would make massachusetts say sanctuary state and also either segment shut it down president trump on the offensive today same democrats if they don't wanna work on a bipartisan immigration bill that will satisfy the need to significantly strengthen our borders he says i'm happy to shut it down okay and i do i'm gonna talk about that in the context of these brocton mom killed kids in voodoo ritual i mean it does kinda is on its natural the kind kinda think oh my god we don't need any more people coming from other places where voodoo rituals are a thing can we not do that maybe we don't want people from places where the guy your hand up for stealing stuff and where men throw acid in women's faces i why why kind of agree with that i think it it it'd be great there are away to vet people the c they've what they believed it i don't buy you do it by any way does that make you think twice about and checked immigration does it make you consider perhaps that what president trump is trying to do on immigration situation it may be the right thing will i'm not sure what the thing here i'm looking for your input we have pollin some of ill here on wbz ball hello good evening comoran bradley evening i'm not a big fan of university alaska was fascinating i know as it through high school college i went out of talk enough about even to stay block global warming and transgender trade bathrooms but let me get what should be for the harvard or is that.

dan ray massachusetts trump university alaska harvard bradley g kennedy president
"university alaska" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Carbon back into the ocean this is a major problem are you are you are you looking at the possible role of the methane in rapid climate change i have been writing about messing for quite a few years just like you have calm because we understand how critically important it is i mean this is a greenhouse gas it over twenty year time scale to roughly five hundred times more potent greenhouse gas than even his co two in the atmosphere and we're already seeing large amounts of methane being released across the arctic the permafrost melts specifically on land but then also is now the arctic ocean warming we had another report that came out within the last couple of months showed already one quarter of the entire area of the arctic ocean it's now the chemical equivalent of the atlantic ocean so it's already changing it warming up and that's of course then posing a great risk of warming up in melting even more domestic hydration under the arctic sea ice in the shallow sea floor of of the north slope look the arctic and that's worth releasing more and more this methane and this is a huge issue in as the tally issue kobo a methane expert out the university alaska fairbanks as recorded now for years at any moment literally we could experience what she called methane burke where the melting basically reaches a point where a massive amount of methane can be releasing in the form of a literally one giant shifty gigot tom amount of methane being released into the atmosphere which would obviously dramatically and abruptly escalate all the the abrupt climate disruption that were already experiencing yeah it's it's a it's a very dangerous thing and we're about i'm working on a documentary on the subject audience walberg norway next month the or some filming on we've just came back from costa rica where we were filming a re carbon is a soil so there's there's a a i i'm so glad you're still working on that say that you're either you are working on that because we need a lot of choices and a lot of work on this dar if it we just have a couple minutes left and i and you have done such great work in and been on this program many times over the years on your work.

climate change greenhouse gas university alaska fairbanks norway kobo walberg costa rica one quarter twenty year
"university alaska" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That carbon back into the ocean on this is a major problem are you are you are you looking at the possible role of the methane in rapid climate change i have been writing about messing for quite a few years just like you have tom because we understand how critically important it is i mean this is a greenhouse gas it over twenty year time skills of roughly a hundred times more potent greenhouse gas than even is c o two in the atmosphere and we're already seeing large amounts of methane being released across the arctic if the permafrost melts specifically on land but then also is now the arctic ocean is warming we had another report that came out within the last couple of months showed already one quarter of the entire area of the arctic ocean is now the chemical equivalent of the atlantic ocean so it's already changing it warming up and that's of course been posing a great risk of warming up in melting even more methane hydrate under the arctic sea ice in the shallow sea floor of of the north slope of the arctic and that's worth releasing more and more vis methane and this is a huge issue in as the tally issue kobo a methane expert at the university alaska fairbanks as we were just now for years at any moment literally we could experience what she called the methane burke where the melting basically reaches a point where a massive amount of methane can be releasing in the form of a literally one giant shifty gigot tom amount of methane being released into the atmosphere which would obviously dramatically and abruptly escalate all the the abrupt climate disruption new are already experiencing yeah it's it's a it's a very dangerous thing and we're about i'm working on a documentary on the subject audience walberg norway next month the or some filming on it we've just came back from costa rica where we were filming re carbonation the soil so there's there's a a i i'm so glad you're still working on that that you're either you are working on that because we need a lot of ways a lot of work on this dar if we just have a couple of minutes left and i and you have done such great work in and then on this program many times over the years on your work.

climate change tom greenhouse gas university alaska fairbanks norway kobo walberg costa rica one quarter twenty year
"university alaska" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"University of alaska is that a good thing or bad i don't know i mean i certainly don't think super smart kids are kids in the in the you know the ignite program which grayson hopes to get into this year you know you have to test for those things bottom line as i don't think there i you never stable ask and now i know athletes are to get scholarships i know kids like i you know i did well in school i'm no genius or so bought you know that that's laughable but i mean i'm smart enough to get good graham's and study and listen to the professor is a make friends than you what universe to the last got can do that university alaska i think it's a great starting point for your kids some may want to stay like i say my degrees or from there might my undergraduate that that shares a masters and so i can sway i was only alumni association and i didn't get but i do not think that if you got the budget and you maybe reduce deferred made memphis or they building or the new infrastructure projects at you you never said alaska it yet reduce times you got some professor is you raise the two which should i don't think those things are going to redirect students from attending if kids don't attend that's not because of the new nursing building it's not because of the the hours or the new library and just isn't it maybe because based on programs you know i mean if you don't evan engineering program that i could see some in departing and they're not going.

graham professor memphis University of alaska grayson alaska
"university alaska" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For people who work in the tech industry is that being reclaimed i'm not trying to reclaim by it and there are those who are trying to reclaim that term but it has been you for the majority of for sure you one you worked in the tech industry as an engineer for fifteen years how did you get a test so my background as kind of the opposite about how later spoke about earlier you know the people who gotta take early eric who she was provide people who you know didn't get into tech early i kind of dead some my mom beast working combat plans in the air for offended shoot happ become tyrod job sometimes you just like happy poke read on her computer all she is doing you're working out to get now the way and so i started being interested in like the low what was happening on this like black and green screen on the she got a computer house and i got more and more interested and an so like fifth grade eluding alaska and they're word folks who were like we need to get people kid for more into technology and so they had the foot off being and the city i live and i and then airforce base and the city with you know population like fifty thousand in alaska they fit me to this thing right where paper card and i was obsessed at that point lately i'll my god this is amazing i can do these things with the computer at one gillmore and so i you know stayed with then i'm sorry taking programming classes in high school it was there are clash so you know kind of a nerd come to school before school started an that's how i got into and i just kept with that and acknowledge if thirty been in my blood from fan yes you started working as a system administrator for the university alaska and were for home depot you work for google what you did was write also i'm pretty provocative article doubt diversity in technology that got.

engineer eric happ alaska system administrator university alaska google fifteen years
"university alaska" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"university alaska" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Education funding has gone up yet again every giro by the way don't let the rhetoric fool you every year we spend more money on public education and enrollment continues to decrease so with all due respect to we're going to blame the previous administration that is such an obama move it's hole larry us that is such an obama move it makes me laugh even trump or don't we don't know but we're we're bowl aiming the airport uptick in crime that's a bush league we're spots we have people fighting poverty not according your economic indicators we don't we are underperforming an education will continue to spend more money on education we have some streetlights out older we will get bolch for the streetlights my mother is going to know when she can come out of the basement residence of the city bank rage see no end in sight to be increase in crime and they were giving a multitude of platitudes but no real response and i think all the things that are frightening to residents of anchorage he seemed a little strange together to see better response is we have no idea is more terrifying than the crime itself forty six minutes patsy are a good friend mark goal a back you is talking about the cuts university alaska system and the board of region speedy will get his thoughts shortly you're listening to the davis i agree or disagree call in and led dave.

davis dave obama patsy mark forty six minutes