19 Burst results for "University Of Toronto"

"university toronto" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:27 min | 6 months ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"My son off to school is if they go to school and they stay if they are either one of two things, happen the either stay on the AG campus. Campus because every time they go over to the History Department or the Science Department of the sociology department. People are telling them that the way they do. Farming is bad and evil in their culture is all wrong, so they regress and they go back to the college, so they don't have this big broad experience, or if they don't complain about that, they say I sent my daughter Sunday school and they came back indoctrinated, so they hate the farm and they hate what we're doing and. And they question everything. What should I do? Should I quit sending my kids to school and I didn't have a good answer for that, but I, had heard Dr Peterson who's a clinical psychologist out of the University Toronto. Talk about some of these issues and I thought you know this would probably be a good conversation to bring to the farmers to expose them to somebody that helps people learn how to deal with problems that they have how to make their kids more resilient. And I went to do this, and about I don't know a couple of weeks before it came out I posted something on linked in, and there were a group of people that were pro- biotech, but very much of the political mindset that Jordan Peterson was leading people down the wrong path, and that that he was somehow dark and evil, so a group of people decided they were going to make an active protest of this, and it went from this being an exciting thing that we're bringing the farm bureau to being accused of bringing a right wing Nazi sympathizer to the American Farm Bureau in that Monsanto was sponsoring a fireside chat with him so suddenly overnight I went from having built lots of good relationships where people were willing to let me push the envelope to potentially I had pushed it too far and the event itself went off great the there were some people who liked it. Some people that didn't, but he had a huge line of people to talk with him. It was it was. It was a very successful thing. But what happens inside of a corporation when you take a big chance, and it causes reputational damage is that people are much much more cautious about what they're going to let you do and we were in the middle of being purchased by bear so.

Jordan Peterson American Farm Bureau AG History Department sociology department Monsanto Science Department University Toronto
Understanding Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

06:54 min | 7 months ago

Understanding Neural Networks

"My name's Tim Willie Crap. I have affiliations with deep mind which is a part of Google and as well. Ucla University College London. Could you tell us a little bit about your career and how you got into machine learning and AI and topics? Like that. So I can around? When I was in undergraduate I took cognitive science course which I think was really the turning point for me. It got me interested in philosophy of the mind and figuring out how we think sometimes and I was in university Toronto when I was in Undergrad and was fortunate enough to take some neural networks courses from Jeff. Engine Bruce Sarah's a professor teaching undergraduate courses and that got me hooked on thinking about neural networks deep neural networks and from there I kind of went off and did neuroscience during my PhD post doc but of kind of slowly come back into. She learned philosophy of the mind doesn't show up on a lot of sort of traditional computer science curricula. How is it the to able to integrate that in also understand the more mathematical sides of these topics? Most of the everyday computer science we do is working with data structures trying to transform numbers and so on but on the other hand I would say that even fairly early on was some connection to this reflexively of mind. Kind of ideas. Touring famously proposed entering test very early on in their development of computer science theory and I think there has been sort of a bridging interest the whole time in part because so why is that I guess because we have this question all the time about what it means to think and in a certain sense computer science has sort of understood that is what does it mean to compute. And there's been a bridge built. I guess at each step along the way as we've gone into that all depending on how lazy I want to get as an interviewer the paper that I invited you on to talk about poses a series of questions. So I'll just do it once. Start with title. What does it mean to understand the neural network? Yes yeah that's right. The title is a bit funny. I mean there's actually probably a bunch of ways to interpret that title and I should say really commutes looks at the paper was aimed. Maybe most at risk kids audience. So it's really trying to speak to neuroscientists who are in the process of trying to understand the brains understand biological brains in particular and how they work and how they compute. It is a paper. Midi written from the perspective of where we find ourselves right now in machine learning deep network theory but then trying to take some of the recent results and ideas and reflecting back into neuroscience in terms of these two fields. I'm wondering if you can describe the relationship. I mean I do bump into people that kind of share both worlds but the ven diagram does not overlap as much as you'd think between machine learning and neuroscience what are some of maybe the successes are inhibitors that can help or hinder the ways in which these two fields can share information depending on who you talk to been massive amounts of transfer and. It's sort of an easy thing that happens all the time or almost no cross talk and I don't know if you like get too bothered about that. I think it's just a case by case basis where there might be transferred interesting ideas flowing one or the other. I think sitting in between them certainly where I've spent a good deal might time and thought but there's very successful practitioners who are just totally. Ignore the other thing that's going on. I guess maybe to connect this question back to the paper though. There's this huge. Recent set of successes in machine learning employing deep. Neural networks to solve all kinds of problems that we couldn't solve before and I do think that there's at least one particular story that's coming out of that progress which we to try and take seriously over on the neuroscience solid. That's what this paper is kind of about of the areas that the paper delves into notion of intermediate languages. Can you talk a little bit about what those are and why they're necessary and helping to understand neural network commitments from perspective of neuroscientists? I for a long time. People doing neuroscience have wanted to in some sense understand how the brain is computed and sometimes the functions of the brains computing are incredibly complex their complex enough that we really do not understand how computing they compute. And so. There's a sense in which you'd like to be able to describe that and how scientific language that we could talk to each other with debt. Let's say this is how this brain tissue is computing complex function. Made it a ground. All of discussion going forward. I'll pick a very particular one. One I think has almost become common currency which is categorizing on object in an image. So this is sort of the canonical example machine learning and you can imagine lots of animals to their answers this kind of computation and certainly humans do tons of this kind of computational time it's very sensible to ask people for ages you know how our brains performing that kind of a problem in could we have a language that would let us get a hold on that describe. What's going on as these computations vote that I think is really the thing that people have had in mind. The aim people have had in mind and I think that the recent results that have come out of the deep learning machine learning community cast a bit of light on this funny light on this. Which is that. Maybe that is not the best question to ask. Certainly. Maybe it's not the best kind of question to start asking right now. What is the best question to be asking right now? If we look at all the progress it's happened in deep learning. We have this picture where we can now build say large networks. That computer function like that quite easily. So in fact weaken specify learning algorithms and the network architectures in a couple of hundred lines of computer code. That will train network to perform that kind of a task quite easily. And we as human computer science practitioners to look at that code and pretty much have a good understanding of of each line of it. How a good idea how they string together in fold together and produce the outputs at the end produce a functional piece of in Silica Brain tissue and even though we can do all that we have almost I would say no true understanding of the computations that have been put into those networks after train. Now I want to distinguish from moment. What do I mean by understanding? I think understanding is this a very loaded philosophical word that gets his into all sorts of trouble just wanted to distinguish for a moment. I mean I think for these networks that we train these deep neural networks. Between our computer we have in some sense. Complete understand what those in that we can look parameters the weights in the network. We can look at how it sort of performs computations on inputs how it transformed the images from hidden layer to in there and then finally to the Oakland so we understand all of mathematical computations. That happened in between sort of totally white box way. But when we step back from that if someone asks you how does that network that this image is a draft or this particular images of an elephant we have? I think no good intermediate language we can sort of talk to other scientists about let us feel like we really tangibly understand the computations that have been put into that network.

Google AI Tim Willie Crap Ucla University College London Jeff Bruce Sarah Oakland Professor
Aligning Your Research, Business and Life with Cheryl Lau (Part 1) | GBP053

GradBlogger

07:12 min | 8 months ago

Aligning Your Research, Business and Life with Cheryl Lau (Part 1) | GBP053

"Those that may be feel like you're recognized shells name. It's because we had her back on episode forty two earlier question backing up so forty to vote fear of sharing her work online and some of the concentrations efforts that she's doing some questions. She had their Shirl I have been talking behind scenes about her journey since then and it's really been inspiring to me tactile which he thought about where career was going thought about. Wear on my business going though what you wanted in her life actually found found quite refreshing through discussions. I knew something that we really need to talk to the podcast listeners. So I want to shoot a couple episodes here. I'm in the subsoil rentable lining both your research direction. Your Business and your life and shows actually created an successful online business. She's had a couple of switches in her career direction. We talked on offline about things like support expectations of her family. And much more. So we're GONNA go through this all in her story and what. She's learning what she can share with us. And with you the listener over the next two episodes so Cheryl maybe a great place to jump in. It's just how did you get started? Online? And what is your. What is your back story in academia? Ria So thank you. So much for that introduction curse A bit about me to start with is so right now. I am an early stage researcher in I'm based in Hong Kong and I currently work in the Social Work Department of a university here in Hong Kong and outside of my nine to five job. I am an online personal branding strategies. So that is my side hustle business and right now. I help early. Stage researchers develop a personal brand that essentially a slum become known as an emerging thought leaders. So that they can call me apply to graduate school programs or jobs and ultimately create really value pack content and contribution to their fields. And how? I got through the online business space or the online space in general will. I guess my venture into the Allies. They started with my own major curb it and that involved job out of law school a few years ago when I saw that when I realized that law school was just not the raker fit for me and that's when I saw firsthand how the scourging and stress Loa can feel to start over your career journey however I at the time I was. I gave myself a year to really become experiments. Wanted to try new things throughout the process throughout that during the I I started the process of building my personal brand which actually helped me to directly and indirectly attract new opportunities both academically and in business so for example more specifically in the business days. I started pushing myself to show up online to share my thoughts and ideas and experiences and this led to building an audience on social media who took interest and what not to say and eventually able to work with some of those audience numbers in a professional capacity and this eventually became a business. That's probably the genesis of the things. We're GONNA talk with this episode but I wanNA pull out some threads and also share the some of the magnitude so all the way back. You mentioned that you went to law school in Hong Kong. You actually did degree before that here. In Canada in Toronto is that correct craft us. Yeah the latest story. So you did was your Undergrad to a degree here right so I did my Undergrad in the University of Toronto. I did it in psychology and pretty much grow in Toronto but then after I graduated from University Toronto I went straight into law school with a scholarship because back then. My mind's was very different. I I was really tunnel. Vision on getting the highest. Gpa possible. I really cared about doing the most practical Christina saying I could in terms of career and I really cared about what people think so back then when I had the opportunity to go to I jumped on it and I didn't really give much thought to what my strains on interest lower and that's when I went to law school and a year later after starting law school I realized Oh I don't think this is a right curve fit for me because the studying part was fine. I really enjoyed studying the law but the issue was when I was doing my internship. I realized I don't really enjoy being here. I don't really enjoy the corporate Looking up piles and piles of paperwork of contracts. And that's what I realized. All this may not actually be the career path for me. That's kind of when I hit a quarter life crisis. You could say yes I mean. It seems like a pretty big onto your here. In Canada you did a degree you went to law school on the other side of the world which you're still in Hong Kong now And it's and then you've felt it wasn't for you was there some pushback from maybe people groups or your family or anything. When you made that decision a law school might not be the best spot for you. All one hundred percent So for me my parents I think they were. They were very against the decision to leave law school because they they saw in their opinion. They felt that it was a sign of quitting. But for me when I looked at when I looked at the pros and cons of Continuing disagree the cons really outweigh the pros? Because even if I had finished his degree the end result I wouldn't end up in the law the legal space anyways and so for me. The pros and cons just did not match up and prose is not always the cons of finishing his degree and I think this was a very difficult conversation to have my family because they were the ones who were really excited for me when I gone to law school and they were really proud and they were really excited to to see their daughter going into a profession that was known as practical procedures. But the difficult conversation had to happen. Because I just I I knew that my strengths and my talents did not lie in the legal space and so it was a very difficult conversation to have. You know an end the end they were accepting but they were not necessarily supportive by think fast forward to today twenty twenty seeing the amount of progress in the things done in the past two years since leaving school and I think they're the very leads to see what has come about since leaving law school but in the moment it was very difficult and I also was so worried. About what my. Here's the thing. Because people were moving ahead in their careers. They were still in law. School other people were pursuing other graduate degrees or other career paths and it is at the time. It seems like wow. I am really taking a few of stock in everyone else's moving forward and I don't a lot of imposter syndrome. A lot of self doubt ought of move. I guess there's a lot of yes. So does the keyword here and I just felt like wow like I had. I had gotten my way here to law school and now I'm leaving. So what am I doing? My life and those are thoughts. I really can soothe me at the time but now in hindsight I'm really grateful for the opportunity to make decisions leaves law school because now I feel like I am definitely realigning my interest and passion with my

Hong Kong Canada Toronto University Toronto University Of Toronto Cheryl Social Work Department Researcher Christina
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:01 min | 10 months ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"In two thousand and nine he's lost half of his money a second time okay so later on in this segment I'm a talk about how we fix the problem but what he almost did to himself was a run out of money due to what we call sequence of returns risk in this is well documented in the probabilities are so high that you will run out of money if you get swept up in the US that you should really listen to what I'm gonna go through now so let's just say that your jam you had a million dollars what if you have five hundred grand in two thousand in you were sixty five years old okay and let's say that the next ten years look like this ten years in the stock market so Jim has a million he pulls the recommended four percent withdrawal rate now forty grand the problem is as the internet bubble comes apart he loses nine percent the first year ninety one thousand dollars twelve percent the second year hundred two thousand dollars is gone twenty two percent the third year one hundred and fifty six thousand dollars is lost he's just four years into retirement the sixty eight he has half of his money gone in its distribution rate goes from four percent to nine percent he has to spend it nine percentage generate his forty thousand dollars in income plus a little increase for inflation Marcia you can't spend at nine percent of your portfolio yeah okay so even though the markets good from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven then we come to down to two thousand and eight he takes a thirty seven percent loss two hundred and twenty four thousand dollars is gone he has about six hundred thousand dollars laughed his distribution rate has to go to about sixteen percent to generate the income that he needs by twenty ten the what I had about three hundred grand today he'd have you know maybe two hundred grand left so statistically and they've studied this at length the Stanford center on the study on longevity university Toronto university Chicago if you take losses like that right before retirement the last few years of retirement or the first few years where you're taking in come out of your now stag odds are very very good you run out of money by about age eighty three the way that the life expectancy tables are going you better plan to live till ninety or beyond because if you're wrong it is not a good luck to run out of money by age eighty three and live jail age ninety okay your only defense is to have a.

US Jim Stanford center Toronto university Chicago
"university toronto" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

11:27 min | 10 months ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Revisionist History

"So yes to my allegiance is are very very clear. My agencies are I am a faculty brat myself so identify very strongly with faculty and identify with the students but I remember come from Canada. Wear the goals of education. We're very clear. Access to higher education. Education was harming candies what the entire system is supposed to be oriented around And you're willing to make all kinds of sacrifices in order to to maximize the affordability and access to right. So there's two things I'm interested in systems that serve the faculty and systems that serve students informed of access to my mind. The American Higher Ed System has betrayed both those things I think. Academics are grossly undervalued and underpaid which is weird because the cost of university education has skyrocketed. Which is one of those strange puzzles whenever I hear like what someone teaching like eight classes at a state university what? They're making him appalled. This essential functions of a civilized society society's the education of its intellectual class. And you know we're paying people embarrassing wages a but be an at the same meantime with escalating the cost of education to the point where people are spending their tenures post college more paying off their loans. That's also oh crazy and I think what's it you know. There are many things to blame of this but one of them is sick. The example there was a hamlet institutions that are at the very top of the food chain that are setting an extraordinarily bad example and they are the schools of the Ivy League. My favorite with the most at the moment is Princeton. Princeton Pinson art or both should be ten times size. I mean ten days may be too much better. Stop when you when you realize that. The University Toronto is seventy five thousand students. uh-huh becomes really really really hard to justify Princeton which has resources that are probably Tax University of Toronto why Princeton Instan- is attempt sides. That sentence. Size everything you're saying is true and I WanNa let me just raise a couple of possible count driving to deteriorate thoughts. It's about them so I I hear you know some of this is. You're seeing it from a Canadian perspective and like a good Canadian. You look at the United States. We have a crazy constitution and we have a crazy higher educational system. That's fair enough and I think it's true. It does raise first off the question of whether the putting a lot out of resources into a handful of institutions actually produces better conditions for the faculty there. So you mentioned the terrible underpayment of professors was who teach at state universities. And that's absolutely right. But that's not the elite institutions delete institutions. Do much better in terms of compensation and especially when you measure it in terms of how much teaching they're are doing so if you teach at Princeton you actually have the chance to write and read or if you're in a lab do lab research and that's a huge amount of the scholarship is getting produced. I don't think anyone could say with a straight face that Princeton professor underresourced or underpaid to the contrary there well resourced they're fairly paid and they produce a ton of of interesting ideas because that takes up a lot of time whereas the same exact people with the same degree of training and skill creativity were put in a state institution where they had to teach four courses a semester they would produce lasts in the way of creative and original ideas a lot less and I would just add. We talked about University of Tonto in a second. It's an incredible institution but you know I have a one of my best ever is a professor at university during the law school and that's a great great loss. Quit Hasim private funding for it. But her work requirements are substantially greater than they would be at a comparably ranked U. S. law school. She does does a lot more work because as you said they're just so many students and the law squashy isn't that huge George. Yeah no I mean though think about underpayment is a critique of the the ninetieth percentile on down is not a critique of and my critique Sheikh about the second critique though is critique of the top one is one's amass critiquing ones in the league but they're linked in the sense that one of one of the things is it makes it difficult for universities who are not elite to pay their faculty properly and to preserve access is is that they are trapped in an arms race as being driven by the elite institutions. The problem is that the whole system is in the middle of this amenities arms race. Which is all Oh being fueled by the actions of you know fifteen schools ta which have access to disproportionate resources? If I'm a high of state I am on some level. I am competing for students with You know private elite colleges and I have to play that game to attractive. I gotTa have a nicer dining all better food. I gotTa have and what does that leave me less money leftover to pay my faculty properly unless money left over to subsidize is the cost of providing education more money going into things that have no real educational function This a little bit screwy about on on the incentive structure of of higher education. I mean I'm not saying anything that has not been set a thousand times before I just. I just lose beginning to lose patience nations with the FETISHES -ation of private education's country right. I mean look the amenities arms race is completely insane. It's a product not just cost of competition although that's a big part of it but also of the commercialization of education where the universities and colleges think of the students as customers and their customers tumors within the customer's always right and you have to cultivate the customer and you know if you're in the business of providing education services for the customer ironically the elite institutions worry less about that than the middle level institutions because at the elite institutions. We know that the students will come and although we try to be nice about Mendis because after all we have the resources. Why shouldn't we be? We're not really doing amenities in order to get students to come here. Who might go somewhere else? What's difficult is if you're a middle ranked institution you know my? My brother teaches at Connecticut College. which is a fantastic liberal arts college in Connecticut and they have to be very aware that they're competing with other small liberal arts colleges for? We're the best students and that. If they fall behind they could fall off the cliff you know if they go on to the second page of the. US News and World Report. They've seen it happen to other colleges so they have to compete on every the ground that eighteen year olds care about and I don't think that that amenities race is actually coming from the very top. I think it's coming from other colleges in their same in their same range. They're competing with similar colleges. Yeah Yeah you did that. If I might bring this comes in trying to bring it full circle the reason he's in Weiser go back to Michael Paulsen for a moment the thing that is So beautiful families that were about. That oracle erode was. He uses a provocative mischievous idea as a vessel for almost must tricking you into thinking about some pretty weighty serious subjects right in other words. He's doing what a great teacher is supposed to do. I'm not someone who would normally ever read something about constitutional law. He tricked me in the most beautiful lovely way into like spending the month of my life thinking about constitutional law because he had discover way in and to my mind back saying that he did in. That article is what a university is supposed to do. Is Lure you into thinking about things that you would never have thought about and the end of the day leave you with a feeling of that just satisfaction but joy like like the whole experience was fun and I when I look at what you're doing now. I feel like they are doing everything. But that they're trying to convince you that their here or at nine reasons to go to our university but the idea that you might get some kind of intellectual pleasure out of toying with a radical. The idea seems to be not just way down the list but also when they do encounter radical ideas they run for the tall grass screaming cutting. They're just like it's such a kind of weird inversion like it should be enough. If I'm seventeen and I read an article I should say. Oh my God I want to go and be taught of course by that guy. It should be the reason I call. CH- right yeah in a world where seventeen knows. Were already reading law review articles. Though we'd have no other problems that would be a magic doc. World where everything would already have been settled. Everyone would be a little Malcolm Godwin. The making you know no. But but Noah think about this imagine if I said if I asked you to teach a course I in an honors class of a public high school on senior honors. Pass the public high school in the Boston area and your text was that Michael pulsing fanatical could hold their interest for a semester totaling for sure. Yeah for sure. I don't know about a whole semester but you can get students engaged and interested no doubt about it the and again that's against the backdrop of having as you say an honors class at a public high school kids but that's feeding ground for what we're talking about. Those are the kids who are going to go because because we're talking about news on lot. There are hundreds and hundreds of thousands of kids in honors classes in America who potentially could find that article really really fun and hire us and exciting. And that's what I that's this little piece of it that seems to me to be absent. That's super Nice way of thinking about it and I I agree that in the long run our objective should be to get those teachers who are teaching. Those kids who are in for the most part are doing a great job Bob to you know to have the opportunity to teach them stuff like that. I think that's a very Malcolm perspective and I think it's super helpful. Can I ask you one last question. And it's to this and it's relevant to also to to. You're you're finding Paulson it. You'll be able to get that interview with him. How do you find getting the interviews to work so so well in a podcast? I mean you're you're spectacular at it here. I am trying to have my own podcast trying to learn how to do it properly. What's the what's the secret sauce? I'm not talking about the secret sauce of coming up with their ideas. That's unique you know. There's no way to share that. You're you're Malcolm but when it comes to doing the interviews maybe there you've got some secret sauce you can share. Well the lovely thing about if I'm interviewing you for a newspaper article having been a newspaper reporter for ten years of my life people would often be nervous to talk to you. Because they're aware of how Difficult not biased. As though buys of some of the problem just inherently difficult. The task is so. I'm running an article on deadline. That's going to be eight hundred words in which I'm tackling a very difficult topic. I'm going to talk to you for twenty minutes when the conversation should really be an hour and a half and I'm going to extract two sentences that Baron thing I'm writing about that it is almost certainly the case that those two sentences and I extract do a far less than adequate job.

Princeton Malcolm Godwin professor United States Michael Paulsen Princeton Pinson art Canada University Toronto Ivy League University of Tonto Princeton Instan U. S. law school Connecticut tricking Bob Boston Mendis
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"Okay so both of my grandfathers died in there very early fifties yet my folks are eighty going on fifty okay when you think about it it almost seems as if in the last people have the massive harder task or cancer or stroke right everyone else is living tonight again longer yeah it's like you get the you know the the year that the small percentage the gets the really bad stuff otherwise you were living a really really long time okay here's an example of two couples that retire at slightly different times but with vastly different outcomes just due to when they retire and why smart couples retire rich it's all about the sequence of returns rast plus protecting verses longevity of running out of money before your run our life okay Jim in June retired in nineteen ninety at sixty five with five hundred thousand dollars safe they spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in nineteen ninety nine they have one point two man laughed all market was good for most of their retirement okay challenge to retire in two thousand. two weeks ago all right at sixty five also five hundred thousand dollars a spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in twenty ten they have only one hundred and fifty seven thousand dollars left and they're likely out of money and have to go back to work at Walmart at about age eighty four K. the Stanford center on the study on longevity has studied this at length along with the university of Chicago university Toronto if you lose money in the last three to four years before retirement. or in the first three or four years into retirement are there very good you will run out of money before your run our life due to the sequence of.

Jim Walmart Stanford center university of Chicago universi five hundred thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars four years fifty seven thousand dollars eighty four K two weeks
"university toronto" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"We're back. Thank God it is a throwback Thursday. Cj It is Thursday September the night two thousand and nineteen. It is fifty one minutes after the hour back to the show features sin J. along in Cologne. We're you get your morning star right sitting J. Chat rooms wild over type away. If you want say hello to each and everyone you guys in the room or you can call a land because the phone ring on this is the number sausage zero nine eight two six five zero zero zero. Sydney put that number. We're in the ruble sitting good morning and how are you today. I'm doing great shock. I'm doing great. I'm having a great great day. You know I made it here. Citizen Yeah Right now in sorry. I'm so sorry so sorry that Strasbourg beautiful shows where we currently forty. Four degrees is going up to a high of seventy. Two in New York is currently fifty five going up to a high of seventy three in Allentown. It's forty six degrees up to seventy one. It is clear skies all all around where a shirt wear a sweater morning and go about your day because it'll be fine. It's locally in the POCONOS. Traffic is still good. As on Everything is green and the POCONOS end in the Lehigh Valley. This might have construction on thirty three southbound connects Italy Valley Alley over the net. Everything is cleared in green on the decide in Strasbourg which is located ninety miles west West of New York right today. That's right a lot of folks that from New York and New Jersey live out here and that's where we located but since they're also again once again alleged it should all around the country the well again Chicago Sixty six the highest eighty-one Los Angeles Sixty four the highest eighty seventy eight a land end of fifty nine degrees is low anyone as a high and I'm GonNa keep saying debuted things I was on the low seventy degrees and the highest one hundred sake a shot out the wrong. I WANNA go special. Thanks among their son Oliver last night for the show. We dead at forty. The Street cafe in Irvington New Jersey Mamane cool Bob Isis in build. Cj Cracks Alfred was there as well quit show Rene they will sit up in the building of represent and like when she was dancing jeff felt like I was at home right one of our family members but we're going to do now NJ. We're going to show the chatrooms some love as though back. There's the bank back beats. Let's Chat Russillo. Let's do that because without the channel each each and every day we wouldn't be here and also like you just pointed out sitting when Samantha Signatura who post Pitcher of heart attack was one group page when I saw that picture just my heart just like hearts those linked highly hi linked up out of this none of my business but the distant when I saw that picture was so nice and apprentice put this picture posted his picture on social media and that was a bill and I took some atmosphere not posted a normal paid right just awesome. I know why I come come here. Everyday city Jay is to everybody she thought deal to the folks connect it it through a chat room and our new members welcome to tell you the folks that have known. Please stay for the ride stay. Here is the only place we against you want to start right more than move. May New will meet so incredible lovely people in I say all the time before we shot this get into the show. I wish I had a four of the character that some of these logs Jabal hang around long enough. You know they say hang around the barbershop shop long enough. You get a haircut around. These folks long enough in this room. I know I could become a person so me me me but new folks. Please embrace the veterans in the charitable so think what we're GONNA do right now actors they. Let's show the chat rooms. Some love is modified modify short by going to stay here tonight. Thirty then once we get everything together would sing schedule a lot going on we go back to seven and ten and we're going to go straight include to the to the holiday season yeah so we appreciate you pay less show chat room some love all right. Let's see the black heart the heart from everybody hey hey. The heart sat in the chapel heart sat in the chat room. Hey hard that ten the chat rooms where the heart attack back chat rooms in chat rooms hard taxi list go with Tash Win. The heart set a the host read high attack win wants. There would run who say hey. Hey wait the heart in the heart sac in the chat. Hey where's the heart set in the chat room where the heart set in the chat room. Hey Ray the hearts rights act data Chat Room Jabril Heart Center. Let's look where the heart where the heart sac the heart set win. The heart attack a win. The highest where the heart attack win the hearts win the heart third one would hey that was nice. You like that problem. You felt that shot out to rose gladys and thank you chat room member K 'cause you chat route member of the week jam one go rose shout to you sat up to Samantha Aka to Hager shout out to Valerie ads. Tom That's the borough Leslie Shutout to Michael Grassi mcnasty twenty dollar trick. He's home today. I'll shout out to Joe bottom-up. Yes so B next won't see what up Joe and shout out to his people's Carletta morale hate Carlota and glenise tall. Hey Goanese. How are you Lanese. Glow Okay Glue back on that day shadow meath shoutout to Shelagh Hall. Hey Shayla Tonya Lynette Tanya Globe Asia on Saturday shout to Wanda Santiago Shepherd. I bridge. That's the hood of your the twisting wonder said shot hybrid. You know that she's a row professionals that she could get him. Sir X. Commodity don't leave shot of how your husband's seen that George Ah the Hybrid Wanda Jacob opening the white man to the Lewis he goes there he goes. Is there on Sundays when they have tours shout shout out to Juliet Fagin Haley like desma. She came out of nowhere yeah that's Joanne's friend and she came in and she is here girl you win here more than Joe and I'm getting on her shot out to Diane Diane Hall Oh Diana. I hope you feel better. I hate being sick diet. She's sick. She's not feeling well. We're here for you. Just lay your head. Camaro laid down shout Lee Scott Lee. I Dunno if you're there Michelle to you shout out to Khalil Rashid Khalil what is going on same inquiry guilt. Christ homey right there shot out to the godmother comedy Tina Graham Haiti see you shutout a two prizes. Cox No pause. I wanted to skip you but I wasn't GonNa do what Mr Robinson. Hey Mr Robinson the shot the Shannon's the Manelli Figueroa. Hey Shannon shoutout to laments Toronto. I WANNA I wanNA whisper when I say her name. Highland met this woman Man Island that stuff makes me Colonel University Toronto Right. She blessed us with this woman. Shout out to Deke Shia grant. Hey how're you know we love you. We love you. I have to come by and see you right over. There shut got out. I WANNA go over there in you do well. Give me a gift card thank you. I think it's horrible. Whatever I don't mind shutouts who Reggie Harley Reggie past mount chat more we shall never forget shoutout to China China Baby. Hey China without hey for all you. All you folks it was China myself was China's derail rayle. Og shout out to wral. Hey Row Holla to have this radio personality himself in our the chapel whatever's cooler whatever shutout Veneta George Henry when I leave Ricardo's homework to regard because because that's something he's doing is crazy shoutout to robber mcfaul. Hey robber chat remember the week. had a lot to say that that. I did shout out to Maria Simons. Hey Morita reduce like you know what this favorite show. I could tell marina you just came in and Marina. How did you shop.

New York Strasbourg China Jabril Heart Center Joe Cologne Samantha Signatura New Jersey Sydney Irvington New Jersey Mamane Reggie Harley Reggie Allentown Los Angeles Sixty Italy Valley Alley Lehigh Valley Shayla Tonya Lynette Tanya Glo Tom That Mr Robinson logs Jabal
"university toronto" Discussed on The Lowe Post

The Lowe Post

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on The Lowe Post

"And bridges like there's a lot of atop who. Could be like I mean, a top another top five guy. Like, if I'm somebody who violates sculptor Potter looking for some nice, clay, and okay. The owner is eccentric and a pain in the ass. Okay. I can deal with that. Because you know, because I'm money Williams, and in terms of sort of communication indignity. Like, I can I can hold my own against anybody. And I can I can sell my vision. I believe in my ability to sell that vision. And by the way, like that is talent I'm gonna win thirty four games with that team. That's going gonna be the most franchises one in seven years. Devon, his I I've been looking for talent. Like Devon Booker. Do not come along very often. And and this is all attractive to me. And and I can get James Jones to buy into what I wanna do. He and I can break bread and share vision, and maybe we have competence. Maybe we can team up and. And go to on one against Sauber, exactly. Because you just said win thirty four games. And the first thing I thought was I don't know that. I mean, this is the same team that tried to sign Tyson Chandler on the Marcus Aldridge after accidentally winning oughta games the same team that signed Trevor Ariza for one year fifteen million dollars. I I don't know that I'd like Roberts harbor might look at this. And that we should be in the playoffs next year. We should be. We should be a forty five one team thirty four is not enough. And then you get the day Viagra treatment. Yeah. It's thirty four is not enough. We have Devon book day just told me all these great players. We have why are we not in the playoff, right? And now, you're the they're funny arguments against I I'm sort of. Yeah. I'm doing the intellectual exercise at least they're trying to say, hey, if I Monty Williams, why do I want this job and worst places to live in? And you get the pick is big because maybe you get Mirant who answers your point guard question. That's you know, it's ridiculous that the team that had nine point guards and is the point guard question. But here we are. And I've I am a Booker optimist. I think Devon Booker is really good and. There's a whole community basketball fans who think Devon Booker. Just totally bad an empty calories. I think done booker's good eight eight and is going to be interesting. Now the wings to me are Jackson is is getting pretty close to not quite sunk costs. But may have to go somewhere else. I'm on the team bridges on. That bridge is is is solid. But Richardson, he needs to be on a really good team because he's not going to take twelve shots game. He's not gonna he just needs to be Danny green Bray put up numbers there. I'm not sure how I'm going do break. Yeah. I'm not sure how real those numbers were in terms of you know, is that an is any of that going to translate to a good team? So we'll see we'll see how much they have. I don't want to talk about the Sunday morning. But you know, I don't want to talk about the Lakers. I just don't I'm done with the Lakers any other playoff things. You wanna hit Toronto Philly, Boston Milwaukee? I'm just excited to stay in Toronto. Another few know, you're moving in. Here man. It's a great city. Zach. I I mean, it is so cosmopolitan the food is amazing. I got a running trail like I like people. It's officiant. It's clean. I take the train to the games. I stay up on Bloor street. Like, so I'm doing the neighborhood thing. I think one of the problems sometimes in some of these cities as we all stay like downtown near the arena. And so I found a place like in a real neighborhood near university. Toronto I even joined the gym for a month at the university of Toronto. It's I'm very I got back from Orlando and after clearing customs, which is miserable at Pearson..

Devon Booker Monty Williams Toronto Lakers university of Toronto Potter Trevor Ariza James Jones Tyson Chandler Viagra Sauber basketball Roberts harbor Mirant Jackson Richardson Orlando Danny green Bray Zach
"university toronto" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Seven seven D O C D A L. So scientists have printed the world's first three d heart. It is so cute. It's a little cherry size little. And very these researchers Tel Aviv university. And they created this little miniature organ, it's the size of a rapid heart. Now cannot pump blood, but they were able to out of a biopsy of human fat cells and three D printing capabilities made this little baby heart is kid the day. Anyway. It's the size of a cherry. The hardest believed to be the first ever to have been printed with cells blood vessels and camers. Now, they say the hearts will need to work, obviously. And you know, and a lot more works that have to be put into it before they could pump blood, but the scientists are going to hopefully begin trials later this year research is Tel Aviv university in Israel unveiled decrease today and explained how it was made with human cells now tall, they're led the project, and he's had people have managed to three D print the structure of the heart in the past, but not with cells or with blood vessels. He added is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart. Replete was cells blood vessels ventricles in chambers, and the organism about the size of rabbits heart track like a muscle, but cannot do full pumping motion. Well, that makes sense, and it was made of cells up volts applied from a sample fatty tissue. Take from humid patient beginning by multiplying, the cells to produce small patches of heart tissue, the scientists then were able to build a whole organ, so they had to work out. How to expand the cells make enough to produce an entire human heart. They've been able to baby hearts they've got to work on, you know, printing, a bigger one and as high resolution printer, they say would be needed to print the smallest tiny blood vessels. And you see how it's being made. It's it blows my mind and. The technology is a little complex, but very they say the technique may one day be able to produce somewhat do heart using recycled cells from their own body. And if it's your own cells, you have less of a chance of rejecting it. They say maybe ten years there will be organ printers in the finest hospitals around the world. The spleen appendix gall bladder kidney even lung could be removed without killing the patient later allowing them to be candidates for trials. So the next stages of Israel Isreaeli teams research will be trying to teach the three D printed hearts to beat like living one. So they got get the nerves. They also have to have the impulse the electrical impulse. So it's pretty exciting stuff. Last year. I guess in Newcastle. Scientists printed corneas now cornea transplants from needed for people to prevent blindness, and they were able to do that they're able to even make spinal cords now. Experts at the university of California, San Diego restored the walk in a billion paralyzed mice by printing a spinal cord, they created a scaffold loaded it with neural stem cells onto the sights of severe spinal cord injury the implants than grew new nerves and tissues and attached to the existing spine to repair it and restore muscle control. That's fantastic. And then get this Daily Mail. The researchers at the university Toronto created a skin gun. A skin gut. It's glue gun like device that could three D print layers of the skin on debate. And it was able to treat severe flesh foods, can you imagine squirting skin like, basically stem cells. Generated sheets pros proteins on five Britons that helps heal wounds collagen, I'm pretty incredible stuff. I huge fan of these types of things. So, you know, well done scientists doing this fascinating fascinating stuff. One eight seven.

Tel Aviv university Israel university Toronto Newcastle San Diego university of California ten years one day
"university toronto" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And then extract the the the insulin or the diabetic extract or principal from the pancreas. And so he had that idea kind of he was but different from normal or from what other have otherwise had been to this sort of suggested. Of that time. And so he was encouraged to to go to the university of Toronto he was in London the university of western Ontario. The time teaching a course kind of as as a doctor. He was petted small practice in London Ontario. Any went up to university of Toronto. Matt, Dr John MacLeod, JJ McLeod who was an expert in Cobra hydrates and physiology and sorta to convince them that this was an interesting idea, and and some MacLeod gave him lab and assistance of recent medical student physiology student Charles best and during the summer of nineteen twenty one they they were managed to follow that idea to extract the Titanic principle as our eventually called Isla ten or insulin later and figured out how to do that. And but the interesting thing, though, is that cannot laboratories was was part of the university of Toronto. Right. They're literally downstairs from the lab at Banting and best will work in. And so they had they. Worked very much on that early development right of insulin from beginning. Let me just here for saying because I should note that Frederick grant Banting won the Nobel prize in nineteen Twenty-three. Right. So this was a this was a massive discovery interns from a Canadian perspective. It's the whole issue is has much stronger resonance because it's very much part of our culture here, as you know, being sort of Canadian role on this whole story is very significant. And so and this is a price and the and the whole history of insulin is is more kind of interwoven into our history. Personal level and priced became you know, a sort of an important issue. Solicits blow this a little bit more because yes, Frederick Banting won the Nobel prize in nineteen twenty three. And I mean, so this was a discovery that that Banting and best at least we're bending at all say really recognize the importance of almost instantaneously now had a similar. Discover discovery been made in this day and age those scientists would go on to own a patent or the companies would own a patent on it and make zillions of dollars. But that is not what Banting and his cohort. Did they sold it? They sold what the the patent for insulin or or the technology or the idea of insulin to the university of Toronto for a dollar. Well, that's a bit of a mess. Okay. Essentially signed over the patent idea patents to the university. Toronto. What became insulin committee at university of Toronto? And Eddie was to do this first before a commercial company did the went ahead, and and and started to produce it themselves because and he'll idea was not to monopolize it. But to make sure it was it was handled properly by qualified people and not exploited because at that time there was a lot of pharmaceutical exploitation going on and so on and they actually university of Toronto went cannot labs work very closely with Louis nearly days they had exclusive arrangement to help develop insulin on a large scale. And and ultimately they ended up having sort of a shared patent like that would the idea was to be say anybody develops something new with insulin there'd be shared with any other producer. So there was a real real concern because insulin is a a very unique product in the sense that it's something that a diabetic depends on. On daily for the rest of their life. It's not a one shot, you know, deal Banting discovered a cure for insulin. You know, something that someone could take and they were no longer have diabetes, and that would people would pay, you know, all kinds of money for this was an ongoing issue..

Frederick Banting university of Toronto Nobel prize university of western Ontario Toronto London Dr John MacLeod principal diabetes Ontario Eddie producer JJ McLeod Matt Louis
"university toronto" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on EconTalk

"A modern computer cheering. Got it, right. And his heuristic functions limiting the such assistant aside. But. You know, we tend to think everything's exponential. And so you know, my friends who economists or or others say, oh, but you know, in the last five years, we've seen such a big jump in in in out of intelligence, Jude, essentially, the deep learning. Surely, you know it's going to get faster and faster. Now those improvements. But what they don't realize that the main technical ideas of of these arrows, deep learning where around in the nineteen eighty s back propagation is the technical term for how the learning applies, and it was a big there was a big buzz about back propagation in the nineteen eighties at a lot of people thought it was the future, but then it sorta ran up against limits and almost everyone in the field decided. You know, we didn't get it right. It must be something else. And it was just a couple of people Jeff Han that in Toronto and Yang mccutcheon who was variously bell labs, university Toronto in why you kept pushing on. And you know, I say, I think all those guys, you know, they're just pushing away, you know, they lost, but the three little innovations. One was more computer power. One was a betta mathematical form of function that's used in the in the networks to relate the output to the input which meant that technically, you could figure out the relative on the inputs by just looking at the output which was a smart thing to do. And the third one was something called clamping where you pre structure a deep network with twelve lays three and into little segments of three lays by pre digested. What the concepts going to be by getting it to reproduce. It's. Input as output. Then Hewlett go with those three things suddenly in suddenly in two thousand eight. This back propagation living to hold up better and Mia ten years, it's become the dominant approach to machine learning ten years off the the twenty s appre work on, so it it, it didn't just happen those a lot of work to get there, but the maybe a hundred civil things back in the eighties that people decided with going to work. And when people ask me how come you didn't know deep lending was coming well, we couldn't tell it from the other ninety nine. This one popped maybe one of those others is going to pop some day. We'll see some some great new applications, but we don't know which one it will be. You know, I'm pretty sure that if he is from now something else will be the hottest flavor in a, I don't know what it's going to be, but I'm pretty sure that the already been a lot of research papers written about it, but we. Don't know which of the houses of thousands of ideas out. There are the ones that are going to work out for particular Robin narrow capabilities. An analogy is is I think about human. Javadi you know, it just was an assumption that we're just gonna live longer longer than eventually. We'll just have a breakthrough live to two hundred which could happen again, obviously could or it just a matter of time before we cure cancer. It's just a matter of time is made so much progress in the early days. If our Masuda goals and mazing things have happened are less fifty years, but it's not. It's not like worse law. It's like, yeah, every year lifespan doubles because we figured out better and better ways to keep people alive. It just it's, it's a trickier trickier problem. Most exponential 's a not exponential forever. You know, Facebook was exponentially growing for while it's soda used up everyone in the world. Now, so experts going to bars any day. Now. So and even Moore's law ran out since they win when the features size got down to where you could count the number of atoms you couldn't have the feature size mixed in the next two years, which is what you needed to keep Moore's law going. It's run out by the way. I think Moore's law running out as being a great service to to computer architecture because with fifty as you couldn't afford anything, but keep on the narrow path because someone else would beat you with Moore's law. Now you no longer have MOS Lois seeing flourishing computer architecture with the GP's applied to the blooming, earn example of that..

Moore Hewlett Jeff Han university Toronto Toronto Facebook MOS Lois Jude Yang mccutcheon Mia cure ten years fifty years five years two years
"university toronto" Discussed on Jokes So Funny

Jokes So Funny

06:14 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Jokes So Funny

"Well, so the wall in that suit concrete. A great political messaging issue. Now, I've had people like centrist in Democrats would say, sinner right state Representative out of Texas, come on the program Pancho Navarro's who's wall whose house would under current plans be on the south side of the wall. Now to the Fisher. In here. Goal because he lives like twenty miles off of the Rio Grande. So would he get his own door and the wall note, maybe maybe it's own Werner ladder. Yeah, I hope he has his own basement that tunnels underneath this. My whole issue is that somebody who Sardi goes so serious on joke. So this is great. Man. I think somebody who's really great right now standing out in their say, a public theologian status on the national podcast is Jordan Peterson in Jordan, Peterson of public thinker. He's out of university Toronto believed. Then you have to understand, but arson the Peterson are used this thing. This is what I think Trump won in his primary election back to trade in back to the middle class being grinded down is Peterson, makes the argument now that there has to be a structure within American life. That is a healthy structure in traditionally. The conservatives have said in this goes to kneeling to the flag or anything else that you must pay homage to the the hierarchy to use his words, the hierarchy that you must protect back the blue and you must in. So I want to step away from own perspective here and just lay out a broader analysis I think is happening in American life. So in order to have. As a society in to have a civilization, you must sit here to broader truce. Now, even Brock Obama's said, what are those broader truths to which we have to ascribe? But Peterson says, you must have those. And now today in America to subscribe to an ascribe to those greater themes is considered quote unquote conservative. But what happens when the hierarchy breaks down and we all go to whenever because you're voting, this is my big deal west Ted, yes. My big dealing was Texas is because you pay in pay through your vote for the interest of very well. Capitalized interest does not necessarily make you conservative. And so now today you've got arguments about. We stand and we put our hands on our heart for for Justice and liberty for all liberty and Justice for all one about those for whom there is not Justice. And that's the role that the left has to play in the country right now. And so there must be a dialogue between the right in the left of what makes for a healthy hierarchy in this country, and there is, but I would argue to you that swing vote in the middle of the country in two thousand sixteen, we're Hillary's. People were like holy, Sonoma valley. They are not going for us here. That is the part of the country even swinging down into west Texas. I would argue that makes up for in accounts for whether or not we have a healthy hierarchy in the face globalism as well as American will capitalize in. Interest what happens to insert to get preachy the lease in the lost right in this culture. What happens to Dhaka worker right DACA recipients whose who sponsors are no longer alive way us there and just because she wanted to step out in the fray and say, well, what should happen doesn't make you a raging liberal. Exactly. It doesn't make you a pro choice like abortion monster liberal in. That's the disconnect in American life right now. Exactly what Peterson's talked about. What I try to to generate within conversation. There's a great American. Great American middle who appreciates podcast like this and others is it makes. Jimmy Fallon. You're overlap of this program rate overlap with Jimmy Fallon or any other late nut program. While I like to say he will release great overlap with loss. Let's get real. We probably have more listener that may be true well, but in my point here is and let me just say, stop talking. A point where there's some brevity here from being outside of the totalitarian or far left structure of you believe this. Therefore you're, you're cast to hill, right? Because you believe know what we're saying is in. I've got very conservative friends and I will not mention their names. I'll let them come on this podcast, Clayton, no people, Daniel put who believe there ought to be room for conversations in this DACA breakdown. There ought to be room for conversations in what happens to children with whom you forcibly been.

Jordan Peterson Hillary Texas Jimmy Fallon Fisher Rio Grande America Pancho Navarro state Representative Brock Obama Sonoma valley Sardi arson Trump Dhaka Clayton Daniel
"university toronto" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"Sounds wrong but even without it she can have a cup of coffee or a monster and go right to bed like yeah some people metabolize caffeine veteran yeah there's actually a quadrants actually saw this talk when i was at in graduate school guy came and talked i think from the university toronto people kinda fall into one of four categories in different different levels of each but basically fast metabolize her nonsensitive fast sensitive slow metabolism nonsensitive slogan tableau sensitive what's interesting is people who are fast metabolize irs who are nonsensitive caffeine has a protective effect on heart disease but for people who are slow metabolize insensitive it's like almost the same risk factor as cigarettes so so that's again like how different people can be what kind of what kind of implications would that then have four like these companies that have high caffeine beverages which are available to the general pop like well it is exists and you know it can be a problem for somebody like how do we say hey no we don't really know this originally go get out and get tested for polymorphism is on their genes compete for fifty we all need to come up with some kind of gene tests for that mark you just got roped into this company you in bro but i mean at the end of the day would that really change people's habits some people know cigarettes are going to kill them they drink it there's a lot of research showing that you know caffeine alcohol marijuana that they have a huge negative impact on your sleep and it doesn't change anybody's you know it doesn't change what people are doing and even just there's a lot of research showing that you know getting proper amounts of sleep is is really beneficial but still you know there's going to be things that people point out we ought will know healthy eating is going to you know help us go into certain direction and some of these things and you're right it's not going to always change but it's hard to do everything yeah like if you want to be the healthiest person ever you know that's going to be a fulltime job well and even in your effort to be the healthiest person every might be creating other problems you know voting your family yeah.

caffeine marijuana
"university toronto" Discussed on Talk Radio 101

Talk Radio 101

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Talk Radio 101

"Creative destruction lab which is i accelerate a here in university toronto now in six places all around the world and was seen these gripe entrepreneurial development pushing ahead at all manner of new technologies that are gonna improve things for instance in the medical field where saying new developments that will allow you to scan them o or even scan upon skin and tell whether it's going to develop into a skin cancer will ahead of what any doctor could do previously that's gonna push people's lives was seeing other situations where people are able to examine the risks of things for instance for the purpose of the pricing insurance contracts and come up with a much better much cheaper way of doing and bring that to people in other situations where people are able to to do fundamental signs and improve and simulate molecules and the periods and springs and things like that to come up with better you know better materials technologies i mean in a sense will soon think of is the new classic it's quite that famous scene from the graduate in the decision making section of your book professor you have backed back chapters titled the value of judgment and predicting judgment if you could expand on that a little i'd appreciate it because you is all about prediction it's.

professor
"university toronto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The regime taken to control access to social media indicating a couple of steps wine is that you know how many and ali shamkhani the secretary of the supreme council they've come out and said look social networks uh we feel like social networks like facebook and twitter the world are actually proxy there's a they are these technology companies or a proxy war against the iranian people they've actually come out and fact that a hashtags than the messages on that are coming from all around the world they see it as a sort of a conspiracy against the iranian people and it shows you how focus they are on on this information battlefield the other thing they've done it they've actually um a number of uh services uh internet providers they've nearly shut down a lot of access to information so telegram for example is not working be slowed down and a number of other areas and so they're really trying hard to control the flow of information that's harder because the you know forty eight million people have have access to phones and there's these very brave um protesters that are using this new app call safe on uh in other apps which helps uh break the censorship and and and and circumvent um some of the blocked internet access so you have a lot of brave people on the ground that are that are facing up to the regime what was that that uh after that you just mentioned by slightly higher it is that it said it was invented by the citizen lab um at which is if university toronto and you had you know almost a million download the day uh recently and you know this is where you find this app which is which is it gives people the ability to bypass some of the blockage the internet access at the government's trying to shut down its one tool among many that you're putting in the hands of the people so they can get word out about what they're facing uh and sort of the citizen reporting and they can express their views on what the regime is doing right that was as and as because you mentioned telegram this also an app called line and of course is let's ask and these are the.

social media secretary social networks facebook technology companies internet access university toronto ali shamkhani twitter shut down
"university toronto" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Learn about yourself were outside of canada i think ice ice at university my secondary would university toronto was it international relations and i studied a lot about africa ends in for some reason hustle make these choices african agriculture what do i know but african agriculture i still think these poor guys from tanzania must have i who's this bird you know talking but african agriculture she's never been to africa hardly ever in a field of obama did grow up toast on farms on end so i join canadian crossroads international which is a volunteer organization and first of all it was i was going to be sent ethiopia and in the theo pinson like someone who's expressing interest in journalism and was going to india but it wasn't great finish my master's degree of course um and then ivory coast came up with while they figured lista said she must speak french so i went there and i worked for four months and then started out freelancing and it was one of those kasich of until women ons supposed to say this this was to say and of course i was sold so experience own tell login so clever but i i will say big bright place right time the bbc was setting up its first west africa office and there was wrong accent wrong cv the only by only journalism experience was a few articles rue the state news in toronto and a university paper and wrong country everything but by an to god are taken on and that was the 1983 ends for better or worse i'm now part of the furniture at the bbc but i always wanted to do foreign news in his you know threaten any shortcuts when i graduated from university there was a recession in canada so that weren't many jobs for journalists every time i applied for a job they'd say will you have to have a journalism degree which i didn't want to have and gift of experience which i didn't have so i thought the best way to do it is to go abroad and to take a calculated risk and it was a risks i had no money no experience but it paid off and so nice beyond journalists are we say take a risk but he calculated riskin right now of course it's difficult because a lot of places are very.

canada toronto tanzania obama ethiopia theo pinson kasich the state news bbc africa india west africa four months
"university toronto" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Start first day in this this headline as i think that a lot of people pandy's eleven to budge it's an article saying that female surgeon navy better than male surgeons in whatever no no no those started bad for the last thing we win the need is a study trying to make it look like we are better than anybody else now i don't want i don't wanna look better than anyone else i i don't i want to look like that you know i i hold my ways by the i got a lot of weight i got agenda the drug lenses of that no i don't need any help well you know when it comes to well you know trying to make it look like you know women are as good if not better but this is an interesting this is an interesting i guess that i should say so hold on now personal computer is acting up so these are what their lives as the outcomes all right and they found that female patients or our patients of female surgeon is seemed to have a twelve percent better survival rate now now in terms of you know the less likely to die within a month so when you look at these statistics of when when you look at the sample size it looks like oh wow well these patients do better if it if it's a female that would just be saying you know i would say look hold on a second here so i basically wanted to have these canadian researchers wanted to know why patients who were operated on by women are less likely to die in the month followings insent they they wanted to know if there was the difference you know what could be going on and they think it's because we may be better at communicating are more willing to follow guidelines now this is stereotypical this is a woman will follow the rules a woman will follow will now that the guy owns a guy won't do that i don't know i've seen male surgeons go by the book that guy i don't know if if you know we wanted sharpness up deal well you know that's gonna go rogue and he's going to go on john wade observation and you know let the chips land where they fought now that's not how it works so it is it to find out there was a difference of death rates for male and female surgeon since the from university toronto looked back over.

personal computer john wade twelve percent
"university toronto" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on WLOB

"Finally god broke through and god showed me that this was shaken that christians don't have to worry about those things that god says migration sufficient for the and of god has called ssr preach god will look after rush and god will keep us onto him shelf and god will bless and god will provide he says migration of fish should for the and my god she'll shall pie all your need according to her richardson glory by christ jesus and show god did undertake but you know while i was there i wasn't unhappy never had her professor that believe the vital not one and i knew nothing much about the bible i was brought up in it but i know enough that i believe the bible and i believe it literally and i believe it to be inspired and it yet we would glynda clash after clashing with jeff seem as though they were carrying out page after page after page even before all these versions in perversions came upon the same and so i just told them i couldn't go back would they allow me to go into the university toronto and unstudied their knocks them and spend the rest of my time there well i went there of course and it was almost the shame at instead of outright liberalism it was barth the initial them and that kind of new thinking nieto arthur doc she in show on which says that the bible only contains the word of god and only becomes the word of god when it speaks to you personally my what a disappointment that was again i knew so little about the bible them with so many studies and everything thing i was not able to do too much research on my own and my i remember just as one example one day i guess at all i have to do something i'm gesture becoming bewildered at this kind of teaching and shauble seven o'clock in the morning i went to the library the college and i thought my i'm going to see if i can't get some help here my own studies my own research and while i was there after some time i heard a voice and i looked up was one of the professors you should meyer luxuries today watched the trouble while i shed your you're lecturers is one of the main crop he should west the trouble while i shed your carrying out page after page you don't believe the bible.

professor jeff university toronto barth nieto arthur one day
"university toronto" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KGO 810

"Prize hold happened for insulin to the university of toronto for three dollars three dollars and university toronto in turn made that patten to build the drug companies without any royalty the whole point of this was not at all profit it about what's best for society and look how things have turned around that man ya so so insulin yeah right i'm going to stop you in your tracks when you think about it it it makes me crazy it just it there's just no excuse to repay i mean so the rest of the world regulates drug prices we don't right and and as result were the ones who basically pay in all of the prophet it's too the drug companies is that not correct amine pretty much near am i noted is going to be some contributes listening who heads exploding and they're jiang yeah but if you if you regulate drug prices you're going to stifle innovation and then we're briefly throwing out the baby with the bathwater and there's an answer to that i mean look look at a drug that was approved all also last week by the fda and old boot debbie and it's for hepatitis b and it's the latest from gilead sciences up there northern california which has brought a series of very very impressive hepatitis c drug that aren't just a treatment they are accuweather and that that's remarkable but then there's no question how do you price something like that and the latest drug that just got if year pool is going to be.

toronto fda gilead sciences california university of toronto patten accuweather three dollars