19 Burst results for "University Of Toronto"

"university toronto" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"How concrete language shapes customer satisfaction was published earlier this year in the journal of consumer research jonet. Thanks for joining me. It's really great to speak with you again. Thanks so much for having me back. Let's talk about this study. Your co author was grant packard. Who's a marketing professor at york university. Toronto and together the two of you analyze more than a thousand customer service interactions. That were either recorded phone calls or written correspondence. What were you to looking for. And what did you find. This paper actually started with a little bit of a story. So i was a a number of years ago. I was on my way to an airport to catch a flight. And right on the way there i get this text message that every traveler dread saying flight has been cancelled and then two minutes later. I get this note saying. Hey but we re booked you on indirect flight tomorrow fifteen hours later with an extra stop along the way and i was like oh man i really needed to get on this flight and needed to get home and so i call customer service and i asked for help and we've all had an experience like this weather with an airline with somebody else and so i call them and the interaction just does not go well I asked for help. They're not very helpful. They're sort of following feeling like a sheet of normal questions. And i'm really really frustrated and i get off this call and the flight questions not solved and i'm sort of fuming and the the driver very nicely the uber driver says oh you know you sound like you're upset and i said yeah you know. I just called customer service. I'm pissed it's got to be so difficult to customer service agent. You know you get yelled at all day by people that are upset. I must be tough job and he goes. Actually you know. My daughter is a customer service agent and she was so good at it that they promoted her to helping other people be better. And i sat and i said wow be better i mean you know beyond like giving me a free credit or something. How can you be better. And i started to wonder. What might you be able to do. Besides giving people stuff what might you be able to do to be better. And so Grant i've worked on a number of papers together. He's an expert on language. I've done a bunch of work..

jonet journal of consumer research packard york university Toronto
"university toronto" Discussed on Blocked and Reported

Blocked and Reported

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Blocked and Reported

"It's called daddy cringe. Yeah it's called the id cringe and as you point out. In a lot of cases one alter will be neuro. Typical another alter we'll have autism so you will see someone switching from just like normal seeming interactions to what appears to be a little bit of a caricature of someone with an autism spectrum disorder. Little bit problematic. I wonder about this is how are you. Cognizant of one altered taking over. That's interesting i mean. I think it's just do you feel your your present. The fronting alter meeting the president alter preceding the like subjectively. It must be a really weird experience. Assume you israel assuming it's real so one of the more interesting parts of the input magazine article is the difference between like clinicians. Say and then what the influencers themselves say. I'm just going to read a little bit here. Dr robert muller professor of clinical psychology at your york university toronto author of trauma and the struggle to open up from avoidance recovering growth. Here's what he says. I've never worked with summer with the. Id who has felt it to be an okay way of living muller says when asked about multiplicity multiplicity just people having multiple altruism to life the declines i've worked with have found there to be a state of profound suffering. He did not however rule out the possibility of multiplicity working. I would never want to impose a version of self upon somebody that they don't themselves actually endorse. he says. Just because i've never seen it doesn't make it true. It's sorta seems like he's like he could get in hot water just for explaining what the clinical recommendations are that like. Ideally we should have it be the case that you present us fifteen different people every day even thinks that this would make things like getting job very difficult like. Do you have different resumes for your different altars. I mean for with one. Also you can apply for positions where they're looking for marginalized verse and then for the management positions wanna white guys so yeah the article then jumps back and we'll move on from this one article soon but the article then says a rally the twenty five year old host of the cloud our system of eight. That has fifty two thousand. Six hundred dollars feels the stance presented by muller's outdated one formerly..

autism spectrum disorder Dr robert muller autism muller israel toronto
"university toronto" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to pop. Up each deal with david mendez the podcast where we explore careers and life after grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving. Rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of papa phd. welcome to this week's episode of papyrus st this week with dr monica granados. Monica granados is committed to making science more than and accessible. She is open science and data policy advisor at involvement and climate change canada. She is on the leadership team of pre review working to bring more diversity to peer review. She's a frictional state of fellow and is on the board of directors of the canadian data society. Welcome to puppies st monica. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me here money. It's a pleasure to have you here. we you know we've talked before You were part of this program that i'm in contact with which is traced mcgill. It's a program at mcgill university. That is trying to understand the where graduates go in what they do. Once they finish the their phd At now the latest version. It's it was focused around mcgill university And and yeah i. I'm really really happy that You took the time and accepted to be on propensity to talk about your experience about your journey and to talk about this this question of careers after the. Which can you know can leave some people anxious fearful of you know of of are they gonna fit in an environment that is not academia. And then we're going to talk about that today so thanks thanks a lot And to begin I want to. I'd like to ask you if you could just talk a little bit about how you got into science. What was your journey in in academia Till up to you. Phd in how you know how how that part of the chapter of your life went let's say yeah great So yeah i think a was always one of those kids that was interested in science. I'd like being outdoors. I'd like looking under rocks. I like animals. And so. I think i always knew i was going to do something in science. I think originally wanted to be a medical doctor. But when i was doing my undergrad degree at the university toronto. I had this opportunity to do a A or like an internship at the In research station. So it's a it's on legal bianco on the research station and sort of getting to discover that you could ask questions about the natural world and have the forest in the lake. Should be the place where you can do. Experiments and ask questions kind of shifted interest into ecology. And so getting that exposure to the concept that this could be a career that your office could be you know about. was really compelling and started following that back to that trajectory so i did completed my gra- green ecology then. I did a masters degree also at the university of toronto Of asking similar questions. So i was working with asked looking at whether some areas that have been degraded. Were recovering and different ways to measure so it had a really big quantitative aspect. But still you know. I got to do some field work on the detroit. Saint clair river is where we do some Electro fishing and that is where you send a electricity into the water in its fishing. Pick them out in measuring way than in the back in so just getting to do sort of that. Counterplay cool thing. That's your job. Being outside on the water was really neat. That transitioned to doing a a peach at mcgill university. So i'm still studying a Aquatic ecology the moved a little bit more into food web so studying what what in an ecosystem in like mapping those different interactions and also doing experiments to the change. Those interactions like what happens when when you change those interactions and Yeah did a did some studies. Where like i worked with muscles fish. I worked with crayfish. I got to do. Some really need experiments in the magdalen islands. Which i didn't even know existed until i went out there off the coast of pi and they're actually belong to quebec. So when you go out there you're actually in tobacco so i Your really got that notion of getting to work outside and Having again the lakes and rivers and oceans being the place where you can ask some really neat questions and During this whole time I always had the intention of doing starting at my old lab at the next thing i was going to do is do a postdoctoral fellowship and then you know start looking for four positions But as that like you know my time to complete my phd. Sorta was drawing to a close. You know you start to sort of more realistically. Think about what the next steps are. I coincidentally also was starting to get really interested in what we call open science. So it's you know it's this idea that the way that we've been trained to do scientists often very close so we keep our results secret. Publish them We keep our methods really secret until we get them and then when we do publish them. We often publish them in these journals. That require a subscription to access. And you know it's kind of this. You know people will ask a question like you know like when were you. Radicalized hen. Remeber open science. You know it was when confronted with this question that you know. We are asking these questions about the environment. You know in college and we're trying to understand it better for for humanity and for people in for canadians but then we don't give them access to this information like we don't give them access to to the journals and we also don't make it interpreting or like accessible understandable to kenny. And i thought you know. I think this is something that i want to work on you. Know how can i as a scientist make my work more more open and accessible and so yet during the as you know I was finishing my phd. I started making more and more my.

Monica granados david mendez Saint clair river mcgill mcgill university papyrus quebec monica today this week one monica granados magdalen islands university of toronto canada kenny university toronto each dr pi
"university toronto" Discussed on Look Behind The Look

Look Behind The Look

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Look Behind The Look

"Grew up. Kind of debarring all these magazines and you were in canada. We're up in canada. British columbia s. I remember i mean. I'm sure it'd be talked about it before. Like magazines back then. He had to wait for them like once. A month was like a ritual to go get them. I remember my my parents. We had a mailbox across the border in the washington. Zeke get american l. cheaper that way so it was adopted on so once a month so me and my mom and my dad's they get to mail my mom cater magazine. So i go with that and it was like the best saturday morning than we would stop on the way. Are there on the way back like for like lunch. Denny's but getting into the fashion magazines was like a ritual thing for me so yeah it was always part of my Just in my world. I guess and and what. What did you do with them did you. You took them home and then you put them all over your walls. He saved them in an envelope with never cut them. I i just. I just read them and kept going through all the images and i think i kind of Yeah when i say. I started drawing cartoons and things about the kid i think there is a point when they may maybe when it's governed fashion like eleven or ten. I kinda graduated from superheroes. Supermodel site asleep. Kinda religiously re sketch all the editorials. I think that's how i learned to draw like ace's alive and like postures and gestures. I think i remember like in art class. I remember lincoln grade five or six rescheduled. This whole editorial of not your arm an urban pattern. That was like my like homework assignments so that that was kind of how i just. I taught myself through fashion magazines. So i think it just became like the natural thing that i wanted to get into action. Can you remember the teachers reactions. When they saw this they just take it for granted or were they. I mean people like me. I never really told them where it was from and stuff. I guess about little awkward. Everyone's drawing like whatever. And i'm like all these lake any it's definitely was. It was just part of me. I think it just devoured all his magazines in watching Like fashion tv g backers. So that's that was always in my leg orbits or sure and then you know then it came. And then i kinda know what i was going to de-link after high school in terms of my career work and so i just kinda did my general arts degree in university toronto and then and then i found about this program at parsons bashing design so i mean bashan was always wanted to get into it. Didn't really know how to. What was my entrance that so that's my family. I made the move here Generic like fifteen sixteen years now this career than when the fashion and which amazing so i think just getting to do all that just really So what year was that sixteen years ago. Fifteen years ago. Yeah ok to came to new york For this Like associates program. Fashion program at parsons was a two year. Urine acro- gambling really zuber accelerated. I did that and luckily from that. I got my first internship at don't have to remember to la brands the work of course it was amazing. I think for me like coming from where..

canada new york Fifteen years ago saturday morning sixteen years ago parsons eleven parsons bashing design ten two year washington once a month Zeke first internship British columbia fifteen sixteen years american Denny toronto Like fashion tv
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"This is the path that Peter and Jean are on now this is the number one thing that blows up retirements causing it to lose all your leverage and have to take social security at sixty two rather than full retirement age sixty six or maybe even wait till seventy I'm talking about sequence of returns risk these are real numbers from two bubbles ago let's say you're retired in two thousand at age sixty five with one million dollars saved and you pull the recommended four percent Wall Street withdrawal rates are out of your growth mutual fund okay problem is the market falls by nine percent the first year ninety one thousand dollar loss twelve percent the second year hundred and two thousand dollar loss and twenty two percent the third year a one hundred and fifty six thousand dollar loss you don't have one million dollars left anymore you have five hundred thousand dollars left in even though the markets good from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven you have only six hundred thousand dollars left in the damage is done your four percent distribution rate has to go to nine percent in two thousand and three and then sixteen percent in two thousand and ten after you take another thirty seven percent loss or two hundred and twenty five thousand dollars after the two thousand and eight market meltdown the Stanford center on the study on longevity along with the university Chicago university Toronto has studied this at length if you take losses in those first two or three years of retirement due to the sequence of returns a sequence of losses the odds are very high by your early eighties you run out of money before your run our life build a retirement income portfolio you could live with in any type of market if you're over fifty with five hundred thousand dollars or more you may be effectively retired and just don't know Bloomberg says according to the research out of the university of Michigan and former social security officials two thousand households were used as a data sample to calculate ideal filing years retiree spending and longevity researchers ran five hundred thousand possible scenarios for each participant including various market conditions for a total of about one point one billion simulations and in the US only four percent of U. S. retirees are waiting until age seventy to claim social security while some fifty seven percent should be doing so the report calculated meanwhile more than seventy percent start taking checks before sixty four a time when only six point five percent of retirees should be doing so the lost income from these decisions amounts to about a hundred and eleven thousand dollars per household however rather than a simple rule of thumb about when to claim social security the optimal filing decision varies broadly both across and within households now here's the kicker while most people are better off waiting until seventy about forty three percent of adults would actually be better off claiming benefits earlier than that according to the report social security rules are so complicated particularly for married couples so you need to get professional advice call Scott man he's a.

Peter Jean
Understanding Neural Networks

Data Skeptic

06:54 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Neural Networks

"My name's Tim Willie Crap. I have affiliations with deep mind which is a part of Google and as well. Ucla University College London. Could you tell us a little bit about your career and how you got into machine learning and AI and topics? Like that. So I can around? When I was in undergraduate I took cognitive science course which I think was really the turning point for me. It got me interested in philosophy of the mind and figuring out how we think sometimes and I was in university Toronto when I was in Undergrad and was fortunate enough to take some neural networks courses from Jeff. Engine Bruce Sarah's a professor teaching undergraduate courses and that got me hooked on thinking about neural networks deep neural networks and from there I kind of went off and did neuroscience during my PhD post doc but of kind of slowly come back into. She learned philosophy of the mind doesn't show up on a lot of sort of traditional computer science curricula. How is it the to able to integrate that in also understand the more mathematical sides of these topics? Most of the everyday computer science we do is working with data structures trying to transform numbers and so on but on the other hand I would say that even fairly early on was some connection to this reflexively of mind. Kind of ideas. Touring famously proposed entering test very early on in their development of computer science theory and I think there has been sort of a bridging interest the whole time in part because so why is that I guess because we have this question all the time about what it means to think and in a certain sense computer science has sort of understood that is what does it mean to compute. And there's been a bridge built. I guess at each step along the way as we've gone into that all depending on how lazy I want to get as an interviewer the paper that I invited you on to talk about poses a series of questions. So I'll just do it once. Start with title. What does it mean to understand the neural network? Yes yeah that's right. The title is a bit funny. I mean there's actually probably a bunch of ways to interpret that title and I should say really commutes looks at the paper was aimed. Maybe most at risk kids audience. So it's really trying to speak to neuroscientists who are in the process of trying to understand the brains understand biological brains in particular and how they work and how they compute. It is a paper. Midi written from the perspective of where we find ourselves right now in machine learning deep network theory but then trying to take some of the recent results and ideas and reflecting back into neuroscience in terms of these two fields. I'm wondering if you can describe the relationship. I mean I do bump into people that kind of share both worlds but the ven diagram does not overlap as much as you'd think between machine learning and neuroscience what are some of maybe the successes are inhibitors that can help or hinder the ways in which these two fields can share information depending on who you talk to been massive amounts of transfer and. It's sort of an easy thing that happens all the time or almost no cross talk and I don't know if you like get too bothered about that. I think it's just a case by case basis where there might be transferred interesting ideas flowing one or the other. I think sitting in between them certainly where I've spent a good deal might time and thought but there's very successful practitioners who are just totally. Ignore the other thing that's going on. I guess maybe to connect this question back to the paper though. There's this huge. Recent set of successes in machine learning employing deep. Neural networks to solve all kinds of problems that we couldn't solve before and I do think that there's at least one particular story that's coming out of that progress which we to try and take seriously over on the neuroscience solid. That's what this paper is kind of about of the areas that the paper delves into notion of intermediate languages. Can you talk a little bit about what those are and why they're necessary and helping to understand neural network commitments from perspective of neuroscientists? I for a long time. People doing neuroscience have wanted to in some sense understand how the brain is computed and sometimes the functions of the brains computing are incredibly complex their complex enough that we really do not understand how computing they compute. And so. There's a sense in which you'd like to be able to describe that and how scientific language that we could talk to each other with debt. Let's say this is how this brain tissue is computing complex function. Made it a ground. All of discussion going forward. I'll pick a very particular one. One I think has almost become common currency which is categorizing on object in an image. So this is sort of the canonical example machine learning and you can imagine lots of animals to their answers this kind of computation and certainly humans do tons of this kind of computational time it's very sensible to ask people for ages you know how our brains performing that kind of a problem in could we have a language that would let us get a hold on that describe. What's going on as these computations vote that I think is really the thing that people have had in mind. The aim people have had in mind and I think that the recent results that have come out of the deep learning machine learning community cast a bit of light on this funny light on this. Which is that. Maybe that is not the best question to ask. Certainly. Maybe it's not the best kind of question to start asking right now. What is the best question to be asking right now? If we look at all the progress it's happened in deep learning. We have this picture where we can now build say large networks. That computer function like that quite easily. So in fact weaken specify learning algorithms and the network architectures in a couple of hundred lines of computer code. That will train network to perform that kind of a task quite easily. And we as human computer science practitioners to look at that code and pretty much have a good understanding of of each line of it. How a good idea how they string together in fold together and produce the outputs at the end produce a functional piece of in Silica Brain tissue and even though we can do all that we have almost I would say no true understanding of the computations that have been put into those networks after train. Now I want to distinguish from moment. What do I mean by understanding? I think understanding is this a very loaded philosophical word that gets his into all sorts of trouble just wanted to distinguish for a moment. I mean I think for these networks that we train these deep neural networks. Between our computer we have in some sense. Complete understand what those in that we can look parameters the weights in the network. We can look at how it sort of performs computations on inputs how it transformed the images from hidden layer to in there and then finally to the Oakland so we understand all of mathematical computations. That happened in between sort of totally white box way. But when we step back from that if someone asks you how does that network that this image is a draft or this particular images of an elephant we have? I think no good intermediate language we can sort of talk to other scientists about let us feel like we really tangibly understand the computations that have been put into that network.

Google AI Tim Willie Crap Ucla University College London Jeff Bruce Sarah Oakland Professor
"university toronto" Discussed on GradBlogger

GradBlogger

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on GradBlogger

"Those that may be feel like you're recognized shells name. It's because we had her back on episode forty two earlier question backing up so forty to vote fear of sharing her work online and some of the concentrations efforts that she's doing some questions. She had their Shirl I have been talking behind scenes about her journey since then and it's really been inspiring to me tactile which he thought about where career was going thought about. Wear on my business going though what you wanted in her life actually found found quite refreshing through discussions. I knew something that we really need to talk to the podcast listeners. So I want to shoot a couple episodes here. I'm in the subsoil rentable lining both your research direction. Your Business and your life and shows actually created an successful online business. She's had a couple of switches in her career direction. We talked on offline about things like support expectations of her family. And much more. So we're GONNA go through this all in her story and what. She's learning what she can share with us. And with you the listener over the next two episodes so Cheryl maybe a great place to jump in. It's just how did you get started? Online? And what is your. What is your back story in academia? Ria So thank you. So much for that introduction curse A bit about me to start with is so right now. I am an early stage researcher in I'm based in Hong Kong and I currently work in the Social Work Department of a university here in Hong Kong and outside of my nine to five job. I am an online personal branding strategies. So that is my side hustle business and right now. I help early. Stage researchers develop a personal brand that essentially a slum become known as an emerging thought leaders. So that they can call me apply to graduate school programs or jobs and ultimately create really value pack content and contribution to their fields. And how? I got through the online business space or the online space in general will. I guess my venture into the Allies. They started with my own major curb it and that involved job out of law school a few years ago when I saw that when I realized that law school was just not the raker fit for me and that's when I saw firsthand how the scourging and stress Loa can feel to start over your career journey however I at the time I was. I gave myself a year to really become experiments. Wanted to try new things throughout the process throughout that during the I I started the process of building my personal brand which actually helped me to directly and indirectly attract new opportunities both academically and in business so for example more specifically in the business days. I started pushing myself to show up online to share my thoughts and ideas and experiences and this led to building an audience on social media who took interest and what not to say and eventually able to work with some of those audience numbers in a professional capacity and this eventually became a business. That's probably the genesis of the things. We're GONNA talk with this episode but I wanNA pull out some threads and also share the some of the magnitude so all the way back. You mentioned that you went to law school in Hong Kong. You actually did degree before that here. In Canada in Toronto is that correct craft us. Yeah the latest story. So you did was your Undergrad to a degree here right so I did my Undergrad in the University of Toronto. I did it in psychology and pretty much grow in Toronto but then after I graduated from University Toronto I went straight into law school with a scholarship because back then. My mind's was very different. I I was really tunnel. Vision on getting the highest. Gpa possible. I really cared about doing the most practical Christina saying I could in terms of career and I really cared about what people think so back then when I had the opportunity to go to I jumped on it and I didn't really give much thought to what my strains on interest lower and that's when I went to law school and a year later after starting law school I realized Oh I don't think this is a right curve fit for me because the studying part was fine. I really enjoyed studying the law but the issue was when I was doing my internship. I realized I don't really enjoy being here. I don't really enjoy the corporate Looking up piles and piles of paperwork of contracts. And that's what I realized. All this may not actually be the career path for me. That's kind of when I hit a quarter life crisis. You could say yes I mean. It seems like a pretty big onto your here. In Canada you did a degree you went to law school on the other side of the world which you're still in Hong Kong now And it's and then you've felt it wasn't for you was there some pushback from maybe people groups or your family or anything. When you made that decision a law school might not be the best spot for you. All one hundred percent So for me my parents I think they were. They were very against the decision to leave law school because they they saw in their opinion. They felt that it was a sign of quitting. But for me when I looked at when I looked at the pros and cons of Continuing disagree the cons really outweigh the pros? Because even if I had finished his degree the end result I wouldn't end up in the law the legal space anyways and so for me. The pros and cons just did not match up and prose is not always the cons of finishing his degree and I think this was a very difficult conversation to have my family because they were the ones who were really excited for me when I gone to law school and they were really proud and they were really excited to to see their daughter going into a profession that was known as practical procedures. But the difficult conversation had to happen. Because I just I I knew that my strengths and my talents did not lie in the legal space and so it was a very difficult conversation to have. You know an end the end they were accepting but they were not necessarily supportive by think fast forward to today twenty twenty seeing the amount of progress in the things done in the past two years since leaving school and I think they're the very leads to see what has come about since leaving law school but in the moment it was very difficult and I also was so worried. About what my. Here's the thing. Because people were moving ahead in their careers. They were still in law. School other people were pursuing other graduate degrees or other career paths and it is at the time. It seems like wow. I am really taking a few of stock in everyone else's moving forward and I don't a lot of imposter syndrome. A lot of self doubt ought of move. I guess there's a lot of yes. So does the keyword here and I just felt like wow like I had. I had gotten my way here to law school and now I'm leaving. So what am I doing? My life and those are thoughts. I really can soothe me at the time but now in hindsight I'm really grateful for the opportunity to make decisions leaves law school because now I feel like I am definitely realigning my interest and passion with my career. I Love Dadan I e remarked here kind of family understanding appears understanding. Daska later. But you sort of you sort. Of course it was going to be. What do you feel now? Or how do they feel now and targeted but my experience I left full time employment Sort of my corporate role and I was on the corporate ladder there and yeah my family and understand either And today even you know I have a family now and I'm running my online business and must surely still quite get it but they are more accepting. We still do get strange questions like like this. This podcast does safety sci-fi gas you know like I hope you're getting paid for it. It's like well. Well no but I run a business that pays me a salary and keeps a team of people employed It's it's it's just a different mindset. The most people aren't used to farm refreshing it. What your story is self. And we'll we'll probably talk with this law more for the self evaluation in.

Hong Kong Canada Toronto University of Toronto University Toronto Cheryl researcher Social Work Department Christina
Aligning Your Research, Business and Life with Cheryl Lau (Part 1) | GBP053

GradBlogger

07:12 min | 2 years ago

Aligning Your Research, Business and Life with Cheryl Lau (Part 1) | GBP053

"Those that may be feel like you're recognized shells name. It's because we had her back on episode forty two earlier question backing up so forty to vote fear of sharing her work online and some of the concentrations efforts that she's doing some questions. She had their Shirl I have been talking behind scenes about her journey since then and it's really been inspiring to me tactile which he thought about where career was going thought about. Wear on my business going though what you wanted in her life actually found found quite refreshing through discussions. I knew something that we really need to talk to the podcast listeners. So I want to shoot a couple episodes here. I'm in the subsoil rentable lining both your research direction. Your Business and your life and shows actually created an successful online business. She's had a couple of switches in her career direction. We talked on offline about things like support expectations of her family. And much more. So we're GONNA go through this all in her story and what. She's learning what she can share with us. And with you the listener over the next two episodes so Cheryl maybe a great place to jump in. It's just how did you get started? Online? And what is your. What is your back story in academia? Ria So thank you. So much for that introduction curse A bit about me to start with is so right now. I am an early stage researcher in I'm based in Hong Kong and I currently work in the Social Work Department of a university here in Hong Kong and outside of my nine to five job. I am an online personal branding strategies. So that is my side hustle business and right now. I help early. Stage researchers develop a personal brand that essentially a slum become known as an emerging thought leaders. So that they can call me apply to graduate school programs or jobs and ultimately create really value pack content and contribution to their fields. And how? I got through the online business space or the online space in general will. I guess my venture into the Allies. They started with my own major curb it and that involved job out of law school a few years ago when I saw that when I realized that law school was just not the raker fit for me and that's when I saw firsthand how the scourging and stress Loa can feel to start over your career journey however I at the time I was. I gave myself a year to really become experiments. Wanted to try new things throughout the process throughout that during the I I started the process of building my personal brand which actually helped me to directly and indirectly attract new opportunities both academically and in business so for example more specifically in the business days. I started pushing myself to show up online to share my thoughts and ideas and experiences and this led to building an audience on social media who took interest and what not to say and eventually able to work with some of those audience numbers in a professional capacity and this eventually became a business. That's probably the genesis of the things. We're GONNA talk with this episode but I wanNA pull out some threads and also share the some of the magnitude so all the way back. You mentioned that you went to law school in Hong Kong. You actually did degree before that here. In Canada in Toronto is that correct craft us. Yeah the latest story. So you did was your Undergrad to a degree here right so I did my Undergrad in the University of Toronto. I did it in psychology and pretty much grow in Toronto but then after I graduated from University Toronto I went straight into law school with a scholarship because back then. My mind's was very different. I I was really tunnel. Vision on getting the highest. Gpa possible. I really cared about doing the most practical Christina saying I could in terms of career and I really cared about what people think so back then when I had the opportunity to go to I jumped on it and I didn't really give much thought to what my strains on interest lower and that's when I went to law school and a year later after starting law school I realized Oh I don't think this is a right curve fit for me because the studying part was fine. I really enjoyed studying the law but the issue was when I was doing my internship. I realized I don't really enjoy being here. I don't really enjoy the corporate Looking up piles and piles of paperwork of contracts. And that's what I realized. All this may not actually be the career path for me. That's kind of when I hit a quarter life crisis. You could say yes I mean. It seems like a pretty big onto your here. In Canada you did a degree you went to law school on the other side of the world which you're still in Hong Kong now And it's and then you've felt it wasn't for you was there some pushback from maybe people groups or your family or anything. When you made that decision a law school might not be the best spot for you. All one hundred percent So for me my parents I think they were. They were very against the decision to leave law school because they they saw in their opinion. They felt that it was a sign of quitting. But for me when I looked at when I looked at the pros and cons of Continuing disagree the cons really outweigh the pros? Because even if I had finished his degree the end result I wouldn't end up in the law the legal space anyways and so for me. The pros and cons just did not match up and prose is not always the cons of finishing his degree and I think this was a very difficult conversation to have my family because they were the ones who were really excited for me when I gone to law school and they were really proud and they were really excited to to see their daughter going into a profession that was known as practical procedures. But the difficult conversation had to happen. Because I just I I knew that my strengths and my talents did not lie in the legal space and so it was a very difficult conversation to have. You know an end the end they were accepting but they were not necessarily supportive by think fast forward to today twenty twenty seeing the amount of progress in the things done in the past two years since leaving school and I think they're the very leads to see what has come about since leaving law school but in the moment it was very difficult and I also was so worried. About what my. Here's the thing. Because people were moving ahead in their careers. They were still in law. School other people were pursuing other graduate degrees or other career paths and it is at the time. It seems like wow. I am really taking a few of stock in everyone else's moving forward and I don't a lot of imposter syndrome. A lot of self doubt ought of move. I guess there's a lot of yes. So does the keyword here and I just felt like wow like I had. I had gotten my way here to law school and now I'm leaving. So what am I doing? My life and those are thoughts. I really can soothe me at the time but now in hindsight I'm really grateful for the opportunity to make decisions leaves law school because now I feel like I am definitely realigning my interest and passion with my

Hong Kong Canada Toronto University Toronto University Of Toronto Cheryl Social Work Department Researcher Christina
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"In two thousand and nine he's lost half of his money a second time okay so later on in this segment I'm a talk about how we fix the problem but what he almost did to himself was a run out of money due to what we call sequence of returns risk in this is well documented in the probabilities are so high that you will run out of money if you get swept up in the US that you should really listen to what I'm gonna go through now so let's just say that your jam you had a million dollars what if you have five hundred grand in two thousand in you were sixty five years old okay and let's say that the next ten years look like this ten years in the stock market so Jim has a million he pulls the recommended four percent withdrawal rate now forty grand the problem is as the internet bubble comes apart he loses nine percent the first year ninety one thousand dollars twelve percent the second year hundred two thousand dollars is gone twenty two percent the third year one hundred and fifty six thousand dollars is lost he's just four years into retirement the sixty eight he has half of his money gone in its distribution rate goes from four percent to nine percent he has to spend it nine percentage generate his forty thousand dollars in income plus a little increase for inflation Marcia you can't spend at nine percent of your portfolio yeah okay so even though the markets good from two thousand and three to two thousand and seven then we come to down to two thousand and eight he takes a thirty seven percent loss two hundred and twenty four thousand dollars is gone he has about six hundred thousand dollars laughed his distribution rate has to go to about sixteen percent to generate the income that he needs by twenty ten the what I had about three hundred grand today he'd have you know maybe two hundred grand left so statistically and they've studied this at length the Stanford center on the study on longevity university Toronto university Chicago if you take losses like that right before retirement the last few years of retirement or the first few years where you're taking in come out of your now stag odds are very very good you run out of money by about age eighty three the way that the life expectancy tables are going you better plan to live till ninety or beyond because if you're wrong it is not a good luck to run out of money by age eighty three and live jail age ninety okay your only defense is to have a.

US Jim Stanford center Toronto university Chicago
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"Sixty and in good health the ever expanding life expectancy tables now show odds are actually very high you'll live in here late eighties or early nineties all come on Scott that's crazy my family doesn't live that long okay I understand so tell me about your father well Scott actually my father and mother are actually still alive self sufficient and pretty active my dad's eighty five in my mind eighty three but no one in my family lives that long you see what I'm saying Marcia okay today's eighty is like yesterday's sixty according to recent analysis there is a ninety percent chance that as a married couple one of you will live in your eighties and a forty nine percent chance one of you into your nineties many actuaries believe that the baby that will live two hundred years has already been born think about that if you retire at age sixty six chances are you and or your spouse will live for another thirty years and you have to do it off your savings here's the first telltale sign you'll run out of money in retirement and may be unknowingly sabotaging your golden years you are failing to account for the ever expanding life expectancies the fact that you will likely live a heck of a lot longer than you think with everything much much more expensive nearly thirty percent of your life could be without earning an income and since most of you no longer have tensions you'll be relying upon your four oh one K. to find your monthly cashflow so here is where it all falls apart here's the second telltale sign you are currently low into a false sense of security due to four oh one K. performance nirvana thinking the juicy returns will go on forever you're not accounting for what blows up retirements sequence of returns Rask here's what I mean okay Jim retired in two thousand with one million dollars invested in the market these are real numbers by the way he pulled the Wall Street recommended four percent out every year or forty thousand dollars here's the problem he lost ninety one thousand dollars in two thousand and two thousand dollars in two thousand one in a hundred and fifty six thousand dollars in two thousand and two yes distribution right one from four percent to almost nine percent right there based on the research are the Stanford center I'm sorry longevity university Toronto university Chicago due to the sequence of returns rest odds are very very good he runs out of money by about age eighty four because the portfolio cannibalize itself don't be that guy build a retirement income portfolio you could live with no matter what life throws at you if you're over fifty with five hundred thousand dollars or more you may be effectively retired and just don't know believe it or not if you say five hundred thousand dollars or more you are high net worth and because of this you have other services and benefits available to you that others do not for the first ten callers Scott and his.

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"By your family longevity okay my favorite story is this happens pretty frequently I've got a sixty five year old guy and my office he's a few years from retirement or put together a financial plan form and I say Mister Jones how long does your family live and he says all well not that long because I modeling the might live out to age ninety thanks so okay really what about your dad well my dad's ninety but no one in my family lives that long okay so both of my grandfathers died in there very early fifties yeah my folks are eighty going on fifty okay when you think about it it almost seems as if in the last people have the massive harder task or cancer or stroke right everyone else is living tonight longer yeah it's like you get the you know the the year that the small percentage the gets the really bad stuff otherwise you were living a really really long time okay here's an example of two couples that retire at slightly different times but with vastly different outcomes just due to when they retire and why smart couples retire rich it's all about the sequence of returns Rask plus protecting verses longevity of running out of money before your ride our life okay Jim in June retired in nineteen ninety at sixty five with five hundred thousand dollars save they spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in nineteen ninety nine they have one point two man laughed all market was good for most of their retirement okay challenge you retire in two thousand two weeks ago all right at sixty five also five hundred thousand dollars a spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in twenty ten they have only one hundred and fifty seven thousand dollars left and they're likely out of money and have to go back to work at Walmart at about age eighty four K. the Stanford center on the study on longevity has studied this at length along with the university of Chicago university Toronto if you lose money in the last three to four years before retirement or in the first three or four years in every time are there very good you will run out of money.

Mister Jones Rask Jim Walmart Stanford center university of Chicago universi five hundred thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars four years fifty seven thousand dollars two thousand two weeks sixty five year eighty four K
"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on KTRH

"Okay so both of my grandfathers died in there very early fifties yet my folks are eighty going on fifty okay when you think about it it almost seems as if in the last people have the massive harder task or cancer or stroke right everyone else is living tonight again longer yeah it's like you get the you know the the year that the small percentage the gets the really bad stuff otherwise you were living a really really long time okay here's an example of two couples that retire at slightly different times but with vastly different outcomes just due to when they retire and why smart couples retire rich it's all about the sequence of returns rast plus protecting verses longevity of running out of money before your run our life okay Jim in June retired in nineteen ninety at sixty five with five hundred thousand dollars safe they spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in nineteen ninety nine they have one point two man laughed all market was good for most of their retirement okay challenge to retire in two thousand. two weeks ago all right at sixty five also five hundred thousand dollars a spend at thirty thousand dollars a year in twenty ten they have only one hundred and fifty seven thousand dollars left and they're likely out of money and have to go back to work at Walmart at about age eighty four K. the Stanford center on the study on longevity has studied this at length along with the university of Chicago university Toronto if you lose money in the last three to four years before retirement. or in the first three or four years into retirement are there very good you will run out of money before your run our life due to the sequence of.

Jim Walmart Stanford center university of Chicago universi five hundred thousand dollars thirty thousand dollars four years fifty seven thousand dollars eighty four K two weeks
"university toronto" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

11:02 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"We're back. Thank God it is a throwback Thursday. Cj It is Thursday September the night two thousand and nineteen. It is fifty one minutes after the hour back to the show features sin J. along in Cologne. We're you get your morning star right sitting J. Chat rooms wild over type away. If you want say hello to each and everyone you guys in the room or you can call a land because the phone ring on this is the number sausage zero nine eight two six five zero zero zero. Sydney put that number. We're in the ruble sitting good morning and how are you today. I'm doing great shock. I'm doing great. I'm having a great great day. You know I made it here. Citizen Yeah Right now in sorry. I'm so sorry so sorry that Strasbourg beautiful shows where we currently forty. Four degrees is going up to a high of seventy. Two in New York is currently fifty five going up to a high of seventy three in Allentown. It's forty six degrees up to seventy one. It is clear skies all all around where a shirt wear a sweater morning and go about your day because it'll be fine. It's locally in the POCONOS. Traffic is still good. As on Everything is green and the POCONOS end in the Lehigh Valley. This might have construction on thirty three southbound connects Italy Valley Alley over the net. Everything is cleared in green on the decide in Strasbourg which is located ninety miles west West of New York right today. That's right a lot of folks that from New York and New Jersey live out here and that's where we located but since they're also again once again alleged it should all around the country the well again Chicago Sixty six the highest eighty-one Los Angeles Sixty four the highest eighty seventy eight a land end of fifty nine degrees is low anyone as a high and I'm GonNa keep saying debuted things I was on the low seventy degrees and the highest one hundred sake a shot out the wrong. I WANNA go special. Thanks among their son Oliver last night for the show. We dead at forty. The Street cafe in Irvington New Jersey Mamane cool Bob Isis in build. Cj Cracks Alfred was there as well quit show Rene they will sit up in the building of represent and like when she was dancing jeff felt like I was at home right one of our family members but we're going to do now NJ. We're going to show the chatrooms some love as though back. There's the bank back beats. Let's Chat Russillo. Let's do that because without the channel each each and every day we wouldn't be here and also like you just pointed out sitting when Samantha Signatura who post Pitcher of heart attack was one group page when I saw that picture just my heart just like hearts those linked highly hi linked up out of this none of my business but the distant when I saw that picture was so nice and apprentice put this picture posted his picture on social media and that was a bill and I took some atmosphere not posted a normal paid right just awesome. I know why I come come here. Everyday city Jay is to everybody she thought deal to the folks connect it it through a chat room and our new members welcome to tell you the folks that have known. Please stay for the ride stay. Here is the only place we against you want to start right more than move. May New will meet so incredible lovely people in I say all the time before we shot this get into the show. I wish I had a four of the character that some of these logs Jabal hang around long enough. You know they say hang around the barbershop shop long enough. You get a haircut around. These folks long enough in this room. I know I could become a person so me me me but new folks. Please embrace the veterans in the charitable so think what we're GONNA do right now actors they. Let's show the chat rooms. Some love is modified modify short by going to stay here tonight. Thirty then once we get everything together would sing schedule a lot going on we go back to seven and ten and we're going to go straight include to the to the holiday season yeah so we appreciate you pay less show chat room some love all right. Let's see the black heart the heart from everybody hey hey. The heart sat in the chapel heart sat in the chat room. Hey hard that ten the chat rooms where the heart attack back chat rooms in chat rooms hard taxi list go with Tash Win. The heart set a the host read high attack win wants. There would run who say hey. Hey wait the heart in the heart sac in the chat. Hey where's the heart set in the chat room where the heart set in the chat room. Hey Ray the hearts rights act data Chat Room Jabril Heart Center. Let's look where the heart where the heart sac the heart set win. The heart attack a win. The highest where the heart attack win the hearts win the heart third one would hey that was nice. You like that problem. You felt that shot out to rose gladys and thank you chat room member K 'cause you chat route member of the week jam one go rose shout to you sat up to Samantha Aka to Hager shout out to Valerie ads. Tom That's the borough Leslie Shutout to Michael Grassi mcnasty twenty dollar trick. He's home today. I'll shout out to Joe bottom-up. Yes so B next won't see what up Joe and shout out to his people's Carletta morale hate Carlota and glenise tall. Hey Goanese. How are you Lanese. Glow Okay Glue back on that day shadow meath shoutout to Shelagh Hall. Hey Shayla Tonya Lynette Tanya Globe Asia on Saturday shout to Wanda Santiago Shepherd. I bridge. That's the hood of your the twisting wonder said shot hybrid. You know that she's a row professionals that she could get him. Sir X. Commodity don't leave shot of how your husband's seen that George Ah the Hybrid Wanda Jacob opening the white man to the Lewis he goes there he goes. Is there on Sundays when they have tours shout shout out to Juliet Fagin Haley like desma. She came out of nowhere yeah that's Joanne's friend and she came in and she is here girl you win here more than Joe and I'm getting on her shot out to Diane Diane Hall Oh Diana. I hope you feel better. I hate being sick diet. She's sick. She's not feeling well. We're here for you. Just lay your head. Camaro laid down shout Lee Scott Lee. I Dunno if you're there Michelle to you shout out to Khalil Rashid Khalil what is going on same inquiry guilt. Christ homey right there shot out to the godmother comedy Tina Graham Haiti see you shutout a two prizes. Cox No pause. I wanted to skip you but I wasn't GonNa do what Mr Robinson. Hey Mr Robinson the shot the Shannon's the Manelli Figueroa. Hey Shannon shoutout to laments Toronto. I WANNA I wanNA whisper when I say her name. Highland met this woman Man Island that stuff makes me Colonel University Toronto Right. She blessed us with this woman. Shout out to Deke Shia grant. Hey how're you know we love you. We love you. I have to come by and see you right over. There shut got out. I WANNA go over there in you do well. Give me a gift card thank you. I think it's horrible. Whatever I don't mind shutouts who Reggie Harley Reggie past mount chat more we shall never forget shoutout to China China Baby. Hey China without hey for all you. All you folks it was China myself was China's derail rayle. Og shout out to wral. Hey Row Holla to have this radio personality himself in our the chapel whatever's cooler whatever shutout Veneta George Henry when I leave Ricardo's homework to regard because because that's something he's doing is crazy shoutout to robber mcfaul. Hey robber chat remember the week. had a lot to say that that. I did shout out to Maria Simons. Hey Morita reduce like you know what this favorite show. I could tell marina you just came in and Marina. How did you shop.

New York Strasbourg China Jabril Heart Center Joe Cologne Samantha Signatura New Jersey Sydney Irvington New Jersey Mamane Reggie Harley Reggie Allentown Los Angeles Sixty Italy Valley Alley Lehigh Valley Shayla Tonya Lynette Tanya Glo Tom That Mr Robinson logs Jabal
"university toronto" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

13:56 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And joining me is award winning author and hypnotherapist. Dr Georgina canon, thirteen is background is growing up, basically in England. She was very cynical journalistic reporter, and it led her to question everything. And then this led her through corporate world trade, and eventually to her passion and purpose which it sometimes takes us a while to figure out. But like navigates us that way. And now she is helping people find their answers through the power of their subconscious mind. Welcome georgina. Thanks for joining me. Thank you for having me. Absolutely. So tell me a little bit about that background in journalism. You started off in something totally different than what you're doing now. Yes, I started off in journalism. And when I came to Canada, that most into running, or owning my own company, and very large international company, eventually came and bought me out and took me into their organization as creative director, one of their international creatives tramples the world for them. And then they asked me to open up a competitive business for them in Canada. We can take competitive accounts which I did. And then they brought me back to head office to run Canada. And after doing that for three years of the corporate world, especially as I was one of very few senior Wales. Difficult. So I decided that was it and took a year off around for something to do. Be good for the soul and growing up in England. Of course, we'd always known about the spiritual and existential, we believe in. The garden. And we believe. More than we seem. So I started looking at their being. Extol therapy, psychodrama and happened upon. That is the intro to the subconscious mind. You can connect with. Did you find yourself very suggestive oil during the hypnosis classes? Did you find that that really worked on you because some people it works on some? It doesn't. Came in. Table. And you read the book. Just come from the corporate world where I eighty boards of directors and into strategic planning, and I knew how to what groups and I am second day, I was ready to walk out. And I told myself to put my zone because what was in the book was more important than the way? I was receiving it. That's good. Not stayed with that. Literally women's I'd open to clinic and school. Wow. Yeah. That route to Canada's largest cleaning at that time and then five years ago, I sold it. And now I teach at the university Toronto and I will send in my own classes and seek lines in the clinic and white book, it will tell us a little bit about you. You got sick, you know, you stop doing that whole thing was it because it was too much or what? I think I got burned out because along the way is one is running the clinic and this will, I developed and written web shops. And those people who know about writing workshops it takes a week to write a day of workshop. I mean if you're doing it, promptly and also made a lot of recordings run the business did the work and did choose burn out. Go bigger. Go home. It was huge out. And I just add to sell it and genuine took it over. Hey, sort of gone into the ground. Nothing happened to it unfortunately, but it was still your passion to my passion and absolutely my passion because. We have no idea how strong the subconscious mind is, and that it, it is out blueprint. And we offer rate from that. And that's where on patents and habits and behaviors come from reaction. Isn't it weird that we're totally unaware of it, though? Georgina. Well, it's shutdown children operate from that part of the brain, of course until they're about five or six or seven, so they reactive it's so named become proactive. As we start to sink, and that thinking takes over and some of us takes over, mostly, and we don't allow feelings come through, and we don't allow our intuition, which is a shame. I'm teaching kids meditation at school. Yes. Exactly. So this is kind of tying into what I was talking about earlier where you find people in your life that you are, in a relationship with, whether you like it or not in laws of he will you work with that you just cannot seem to see eye to eye with no matter how hard you try, it just automatically will rub you the wrong way does that come from somewhere in our unconscious where or were connected from the past life. Would you. It should be. That's you. Found out. You know I've been doing this now for twenty one years. What I found out that it's a mix, it can come from post life with somebody who shared another lifetime with us, or it can trigger something that was conscious in our young life. So, for instance, if we had a parent that looked at. Or spoke in a certain tone. If that person who looks nothing like that parents, but triggers that tone in mind subconsciously, we don't even know or it's a movement of the head or a movement to the body when they're talking to us. It triggers that feeling of I don't like you. I don't feel comfortable with you. And one of the ways to find out why that is, is to do hypnosis, then get into the source of it, and that way we can find out the source of it thing, but it's the slide. No, you did a whole book on this. The your first book return right in tell me a little bit about what evidence you found from that book about past lives. That was an extraordinary and talk about luck phoning into your lap. The CBC came to my clinic and wanting to do and a show a fifteen minute piece in the Sunday morning show on past lives, and I said, no because it's not a sick and I don't play games like this, this is serious. This is sold Jenny. So they said, oh, right. So I said, I am teaching coming weekend. So why don't you come and join us? And she said, I'll bring my crew, I should know none of that you come by yourself. So she came, and she saw how powerful it was. And she came back a few months later and said, I've got a budget to do three one hour specials the CBC. That'd be like PBS doing. It was quite something. So they brought thirty people I'd never met before they wanted to keep it clean. And those thirty people twenty eight hundred pounds light that we could record of those twenty eight ten were researched and discovered they've, they found facts correllated, wow, that they were accurately their accurately there. Can you give us an example? Yes. Absolutely. One of the people, it'd be think now when she also spoke a foreign language in when she was in hypnosis, one of people went back to being a filter on the road. Trader trading herbs and spices. And in India, and China crossing the border, and she named some villages, that they'd stop jet, and they had a hard time finding those villages, but then they found an old old person that remember there was a village there. So they took her over to that place and on the way over she drew, what she saw in her journey. And when they landed the people, the local people told her that was what the village looked like. And then she in her life, she became a monk in a monastery, and she explained exactly what it was. They found the monastery and, and as the producer and the person and the camera guy. Woah. Into the monastery, one of the old monks came towards her and said, welcome home on child. Into cheers. Oh my goodness. That is amazing. So these were out of the thirty three people in the study that went through regression, and so maybe if people don't understand what, what regression is can you talk a little bit about what that process looks like. Basically, what we're doing. First of all, we were is seeming that there is such thing as reincarnation that the sole reappears in different bodies at different times to learn something new so that it kind of move and move higher into the light or creator, and they have so lessons each time. So every time it comes into a body, it's what we call a a life. And if it's not in this current life, it's a positive so you can come in as male, female, any color any country. Any language wherever the soil decides you need to go, and we do travel in pods, quite often people travel with us in different lifetimes, taking on different roles. So in this lifetime, for instance, your mother may have been your brother in another lifetime or good friend, or even someone. That was a boss like somebody who didn't like you would treat did you and, but every time we do a journey, we, we faced with some sort of issue that we have to solve it can be smaller than it can be large and each time we go through the process, so alone something, and if it doesn't learn when we come back to the same lesson to gain, for instance, if we have to learn to be have humility, oh, we have to learn to be kind, and we don't know that in a previous life where we born into a situation that teaches us humility it's interesting because even if you don't believe in reincarnation, or coming back, as you know, with the soul to evolve and so forth. It, it can be explained in a different way of life lessons, and you can really look at that. And when you unlock that life lessons, so humility, you just gave a great example. And when someone really understands that they need to have humor. Ability, and they get that. And they changed their lives. It looks like unlocks the key to a whole new way of living. Well, I got rid of my migraines through a positive life regression. How'd you do that? I had terrible migraines. When I was learning to do positive way back, and I studied under Henry bowl Duke, and we were practising in class. And the guy I was working with simply anything, you want to look for, you know, sometimes people say, yes, I wanted to find out if I why I like the violin or when I'm fascinated with Japanese. I said, I don't know. Let's see if we find out about my migraines. Sure. So he regrets me back, and I suddenly had this putrid smell and I didn't know what it was. And I realized it was me. I, I was old hag with filthy hair, virtually no teeth living in a cave outside of a small village in Europe somewhere and my role was to help the women in the village. Give birth or help them through them miscarriages, but I was outside of the village. I was not that they wouldn't kind to me. In fact, they pelted stones quite often, but they needed me. So every now and then they bring me food. I was living on the edge of starvation, most of the time, one day help to women give birth and because it was a bad book. She died in childbirth and her child also died, and it was a son, and because it was my role also berry, what was leftover? I did. Mocked up to my cave. Absolutely knackered. Tired hungry. I was and I just fell asleep. And the next thing I know I'm awake. And this man, who is the aureus with anger, and rage standing over me with a big brook and started hitting me with it. And then he's smashed it on the side of my head and kills me and where he smashed it on the side of my head is we got my migraines right on the side, right to the left of my left eye. And this is all very visceral memory, it, I can still see that now. And when I was brought out of that. Well, that's that wasn't very pleasant. Thanks, a lot because it was very real in your made me Queen of something or other. And so from then on I waiting for migraine, and every time there's a storm, I think, oh, God, we're gonna get a migraine, and it never came back because we did the whole healing process and forgiveness and everything around it..

migraines Canada England Dr Georgina canon reporter Wales CBC university Toronto director Europe Jenny India producer China twenty eight hundred pounds twenty one years fifteen minute three one hour
"university toronto" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

11:10 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Well, it put a tube down my throat this long. So the re to that looked like a snake? There's standing over me talking about death. There's Beatles music playing in this hallucination, they're playing using. So all it's going on as I misinterpreting everything that's going on in this Hayes of what's happening now. Steph comes to me and says do you want to live, and I'm going I wanna live sounds like a good thing to me. The only problem is I don't have any hands. I'm a snake? How do I work this out? So it took me a minute to figure out how to wrap my body around her hand and squeeze and that was the long 'cause that she had was me thinking it out. How do I probably solve this? And then I wasn't able to really control all that muscle. In my snake body. Manley snake that I was and I managed to squeeze her hand. And let her know that I wanted to live. So I mean for me, I think one of the big lessons. I want people to take home from this book is you should remember when you visit people in the hospital. No matter how bad shape they seem to be in speak kindly. Speak positively try to support them for me. I believe that knowing what I do know about the research being researcher. What do you think I do when I get out of my comas? I go read studies naturally at least fifty percent of people who have these kind of deep pollution, Asians and go into komo's like this come out with cognitive impairment. I didn't or at least I pretend that I didn't. And I'm from a hiding it pretty well. I think so far anyway, but I believe that a lot of the reason I'm able to maintain my cognitive ability throughout this experience was why daughters we're talking to me. Steph was talking to me they organized people to sit by my bedside and talk to me all the time. And when somebody touched me, it was like an electric shock went off. And just gave me power. I couldn't you just can't imagine how it felt. So I think those are really important lessons for people to remember as you're doing it. And I'm I always get the question. So I'll try to short circuit this part. And then we'll get on with the story. Did you come close to death? I had seven cases septic shock each. One. Of those cases, you're pretty much bound to die. And I did you see the other side. Well, I saw what I thought was the other side. But I saw the light of life. I didn't see bright light on the other side of heaven. I didn't see angels coming down to me. And I'm sorry to say, maybe I've let a bad life. I've had the usual privilege of practicing dying. And I hope to do it better. Next time. Thomas Patterson is in evolutionary social biologist and co author of the book the perfect predator. So I mean, the bottom line is these are true experiences that you have when you're in this in this state. But anyway, I squeeze Steph hand and. Well, then I realized okay, what am I doing now because I'm not a doctor, right? I'm in Texas is these apathy meteorologist, but this isn't my specialty and the top infectious disease dogs in the world have been working on him. And they say that they are out of options. So I did what anybody would do. I went home and I did. Luckily, Google for scientists is something called PubMed and anybody can access it, and it's P B M E D. It says search engine that was developed by the national library of medicine, which is part of the. And I put in keywords like in the name of his superbug and turn it of treatments and within an hour. I found a paper that had a whole bunch of different alternative treatments for this infection. Now, most of them were totally inappropriate vaccines have been developed yet for this photon therapy was something that was can only be used on the skin. He was fully colonized. But in this article something called saints therapy. And I knew what Phages were because I have this old degree in microbiology from the university Toronto. And I remember that fajor or short for bacteria Phages and turns out that Phages are the oldest and most populous organism on the planet there one hundred times smaller than bacteria, viruses, tiny viruses that are invisible to make it I, but they have evolved to attack bacteria. So the term 'Bacterial Phages derived from the Greek it means bacteria eater. So I thought well, how could bacteria being used to treat, Tom? I delved into the medical history. Little bit found. It was discovered these Phages hundred years ago by French-Canadian, and he had used Phages to treat people with bacteria infection, successfully. In fact, he was the inspiration for the book called Aerosmith that was a Pulitzer prize winner in the nineteen twenties. So based had a heyday for awhile, but when Dylan came on the scene, which is room time of World War Two the west considered it a wonder dry because it was for a while and parts of the world that had easy access to antibiotics like Russia. Hung onto stage there. It'd be worth still offered to the state. And of course, Russia was an enemy in the west. And so if you were a proponent of faith therapy, you were labeled a pinko commie sympathizers. And of course, this geopolitical bias was one of the reasons why faves therapy was forgotten in the west. So I have not going to go through all of them. Gory. Details in the book is some of our ori-, but I managed to get phased there before Trump with the help of not only are easiest e department of medicine who allowed us to try. This would seem like a crazy, you know, last minute. Type of treatment when doctor described it as a hail Mary pass in the fourth quarter of the game where there's one minute left and the quarterback is blindfolded. That's how it was considered. But a global network of researchers including those from Texas, San Diego State university, researchers from India's Winterland Belgium, they all offered Phages and a local company amplified biosciences donated fades as well. And then the navy even going involved, and that was another story. So and the eleventh hour, I mean, obviously spoiler alert. He lived. But our book really is not about the what it's about the how and it has lessons in about those global Superfund crisis. But also one hundred year old forgotten care that has been buried for quite some time. And we have kind of been I guess heralded with the revitalization of therapy in the west as a result of Tom's case, which went viral literally in a good way. Other people have been treated with therapy around the world, and we used the famous intravenously because he was fully colonized with his Factoria and that could have killed him. But I knew that we didn't have any resort. Really? This is our last opportunity to save him. So he lived and other people in Ventura it here in San Diego with therapy and around the world and now infectious disease providers are turning to us at UC San Diego because we both opened the first dedicated page there will be center in North America called the center for innovative Bauge applications and therapeutics or ipad for short. And so this center now is kind of a beacon. It used to be that. Patients and their families were contacting us for help. But now, it's doctors and we are trying to move therapy into clinical trials we have two trials being planned right now. And if they're being shown in clinical trials, then it can be licensed as the standard therapy alongside antibiotics, but right now, it's still considered experimental treatment. That's being approved on a case by case basis. Stephanie's trafficky is in epidemiologist co author of the book the perfect predator, though, if you have simple bug infection, or you know, somebody who does that's not responding to any antibiotics you can contact us at I'm path at UCSD dot EDU, and we will help. Tom. Yeah. People often ask, you know. How are you recovered fully? And I spent nine months in the hospital, which I wouldn't have had to spend had there been phased therapy available in the beginning. I could have gotten out very quickly. But the rule of thumb is takes five times as long to recover as the time you're in the hospital. So it's about four years for me to recover. I'm three years into the recovery. Now, I'm getting stronger putting on weight though, I can't put on a lot of weight people ask me to I have any side effects lost about a third of my pain. Chris I lost my gallbladder. I'm I've got numb this and my feet mostly from the about IX, I've got, you know, stomach problems just gestion, which you would expect with this. But we were just in Costa Rica, and I was bird watching and hiking, and I met work, and I've written a lot more papers. And so I can't complain. That's yeah. But I'd say the other part of this. It's important to understand that people don't really just get off the top of their head. Yes. This was a physical problem, but just equally as important. It was a psychological problem. It was a psychological problem for me. You know, not only was it the solicitation, but I had PTSD from the experience as did Stephanie and my daughters. I mean, can you imagine coming to the hospital, and they're telling you your dad's going to die, you know, and repeatedly this is just a roller coaster for them. So when you have one of these kind of experiences, be prepared for not just the physical, but also the psychological ramifications. And so now, we can answer some questions if you have any. Yes. Couple of.

Phages Steph Tom Texas Stephanie Russia Hayes researcher Pulitzer prize Manley komo San Diego Google PTSD Thomas Patterson Aerosmith solicitation university Toronto Trump Superfund
"university toronto" Discussed on The Lowe Post

The Lowe Post

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on The Lowe Post

"And bridges like there's a lot of atop who. Could be like I mean, a top another top five guy. Like, if I'm somebody who violates sculptor Potter looking for some nice, clay, and okay. The owner is eccentric and a pain in the ass. Okay. I can deal with that. Because you know, because I'm money Williams, and in terms of sort of communication indignity. Like, I can I can hold my own against anybody. And I can I can sell my vision. I believe in my ability to sell that vision. And by the way, like that is talent I'm gonna win thirty four games with that team. That's going gonna be the most franchises one in seven years. Devon, his I I've been looking for talent. Like Devon Booker. Do not come along very often. And and this is all attractive to me. And and I can get James Jones to buy into what I wanna do. He and I can break bread and share vision, and maybe we have competence. Maybe we can team up and. And go to on one against Sauber, exactly. Because you just said win thirty four games. And the first thing I thought was I don't know that. I mean, this is the same team that tried to sign Tyson Chandler on the Marcus Aldridge after accidentally winning oughta games the same team that signed Trevor Ariza for one year fifteen million dollars. I I don't know that I'd like Roberts harbor might look at this. And that we should be in the playoffs next year. We should be. We should be a forty five one team thirty four is not enough. And then you get the day Viagra treatment. Yeah. It's thirty four is not enough. We have Devon book day just told me all these great players. We have why are we not in the playoff, right? And now, you're the they're funny arguments against I I'm sort of. Yeah. I'm doing the intellectual exercise at least they're trying to say, hey, if I Monty Williams, why do I want this job and worst places to live in? And you get the pick is big because maybe you get Mirant who answers your point guard question. That's you know, it's ridiculous that the team that had nine point guards and is the point guard question. But here we are. And I've I am a Booker optimist. I think Devon Booker is really good and. There's a whole community basketball fans who think Devon Booker. Just totally bad an empty calories. I think done booker's good eight eight and is going to be interesting. Now the wings to me are Jackson is is getting pretty close to not quite sunk costs. But may have to go somewhere else. I'm on the team bridges on. That bridge is is is solid. But Richardson, he needs to be on a really good team because he's not going to take twelve shots game. He's not gonna he just needs to be Danny green Bray put up numbers there. I'm not sure how I'm going do break. Yeah. I'm not sure how real those numbers were in terms of you know, is that an is any of that going to translate to a good team? So we'll see we'll see how much they have. I don't want to talk about the Sunday morning. But you know, I don't want to talk about the Lakers. I just don't I'm done with the Lakers any other playoff things. You wanna hit Toronto Philly, Boston Milwaukee? I'm just excited to stay in Toronto. Another few know, you're moving in. Here man. It's a great city. Zach. I I mean, it is so cosmopolitan the food is amazing. I got a running trail like I like people. It's officiant. It's clean. I take the train to the games. I stay up on Bloor street. Like, so I'm doing the neighborhood thing. I think one of the problems sometimes in some of these cities as we all stay like downtown near the arena. And so I found a place like in a real neighborhood near university. Toronto I even joined the gym for a month at the university of Toronto. It's I'm very I got back from Orlando and after clearing customs, which is miserable at Pearson..

Devon Booker Monty Williams Toronto Lakers university of Toronto Potter Trevor Ariza James Jones Tyson Chandler Viagra Sauber basketball Roberts harbor Mirant Jackson Richardson Orlando Danny green Bray Zach
"university toronto" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

11:07 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"NewsRadio ten three. Back. We go to go first to Tom, Tom. Welcome. You're next on nightside. Go right ahead. Jan definitive answer to your question. It doesn't bother me at all. The patch wanna get their kitchen and have a little advantage by donating a lot of money to the school and and seeing a school administrator. And maybe saying could you help my kid get it at school of donated a lot of money to a school. I'd like to school things like that. The problem comes when you get school administrators and Kogas involved, and there's money involved, absolutely. This becomes a conspiracy. Absolutely. It's so much trouble. Heresy to divide the school. So the. This is a conspiracy. And that's why it's bad. Look if if someone. Let's say is able to. I don't know. Let's say that you want your son or your daughter to go to pick a school Boston College. And you have a neighbor who is a professor at Boston College or someone on the administrative staff at Boston College. And you try to say Lee g my son really, it's his his or her first choice. Those are factors that different colleges. Do consider. All right. No problem with that. But once you start casting bundles of money. And producing a false test scores and false resumes. That portray an individual as something they're not you. And now deep your waist deep in fraud. And when you when you complicated by paying money for any legal opportunity. It's that's why this is in the criminal court system. Look, I'm sure that there are know college professors and administrators whose children or who's who's nieces and nephews are looking to go into the school. And maybe the college professor approaches, an admissions officer and says, gee, my niece is applying here, and I know that she would really love to come to the school her mom or her dad graduated a couple of years after me from here. Can you make sure that you look at her? Her resume, and may and make sure it least gets considered nothing wrong with that in my back. Nothing wrong with that. So I think you've nailed it. Appreciate it. Tom. Dan fish spiracy comes when you get the administrators, and the coaches involved and money transfer transpires that that is the conspiracy right there. So let's see. That's the whole the whole story idea. They're in big trouble. I think big trouble going to be some jail time here for a lot of people. Thank you. Thank you. Seven to five four ten thirty triple eight nine thousand nine hundred thirty Kevin Kevin. How are you tonight? Dan. How are you? Good, sir. What's your take on all of this? Piggybacking on what Tom said first of all I agree with what he said. I just doesn't help the image of all of all these people involved that these are influential wealthy people who are bypassing the usual channels of influence and these institutions, but what makes it kind of funny to me is that the Stanford University, which is involved in this scandal, and has some some issues with coaches being bored. Often bribed the alumni magazine of Stanford University came out about two days before the scandal broke and the cover story of the Stanford alumni magazine. They'll twist first-generation collegians and the challenges they face on the Stanford campus. Okay. So what where is the irony there because some of these students they might not have been first generation collegians, but they might be I. Ration- collegians at such top tier colleges. Well, they profiled three of them. And I thought I wonder if that's the only three first generation collegians. How are you a Stanford grad that you have that you get that magazine just happened to find it? No, I just have to have access to stuff like that. You understand? No. I'm just saying that. So with the students who were profiled were they sort of what would you might call? You know, rented the mill students or was like one the quarterback on the football team. And and the other the star of the basketball team or no. No. From disadvantaged backgrounds. But it's Honey that they're highlighting. It's a strange coincidence. Let's put it that way that they're highlighting that. And then this story breaks. You have these big shots and Jairo was to. It's two different avenues to Stanford. I think is what I'm hearing. You say on the one hand, you have some kids who maybe the parents never went to college. But they showed some academic talent in high school, and maybe they got a little bit of advantage. Because Stanford wanted make diversify their student body and they're coming into the day coming in through the door through the front door. They may be somewhat of a beneficiary of -firmative action outreach. But the other folks are upper class privileged wealthy students. Is that what you're trying to get? I'm trying to figure out what the points. Absolutely. Absolutely. And I'm just wondering this next one Stanford alumni magazine profile, the people who I would bet you a lot of money on that. Kevin. That's no. But I get your point. I get your point. Thanks so much. Great. Great, call great point. Thank you. Have a great. I wasn't quite sure Kevin was going. Let's go to Richard up on -tario, Richard. You folks in Canada must be laughing at us tonight. I wouldn't I wouldn't say laughing. Yeah. Maybe laughing a little. Disgusted more than anything. That's just terrible revolting to think that your son or daughter may have been bumped as a result of of what privilege may bring let me ask you this. Can you imagine anything like this happening? Let us say I think of McGill University as a school that is on the same equivalent a top tier college internationally known like a Harvard or or Stanford. Absolutely not. In canada. And you mentioned the findings diversity like McGill in Montreal or Queen's University in Kingston university Toronto obviously in Toronto. It's all academics every university in Canada. It's academics academics academics. If you're the star quarterback from from a high school or the best goalie in Canada and you're going to play hockey university too bad. If you're are good enough. You're not getting in. When I was a high school football coach for twenty five years. I had a student who had a ninety four average. He wanted to get into commerce at queen's commerce cutoff was ninety five percent is parents were alumni they had donated to the university. One percentage point. He didn't get in. Well, that's because I would think that at some of the better schools here. He would get a little bit of an advantage because of that. So you're saying that in Canada, it is only on academics. Meaning whatever your grade point average, whatever your you guys take the college boys up there too. I assume right. Oh, yes. What about what about extracurricular activities high school students? We what are the ways kids get to distinguish themselves in America is they develop their extracurricular activities in high school, many them go on charitable trips. They go to Nicaragua or El Salvador and on a. On a trip to help build homes or they get into some pretty very exotic trips. Yeah. Consideration for that. As a as a as a compared to being a jock, for example. Yeah. You've done if you've done charitable work. And and it comes down to the fact that are you going to be tied with another applicant that may tip it in your scales. So if you gotta great goaltender who's applied university Toronto, but his his his or her academic scores. This no advantage for very exceptional athletes. It's it's not supposed to be that way. And it's reported that it never is. Now, we're where we do fall down. Let's say a university takes one hundred medical students here. Right now, there's an invasion from Asia. So thirty Asian students may get in they pay multiple times more admission fees, and then bump Canadian students, then when they graduate. They take it all take all about education training back to Asia. Well, that's that's that is a concern. I mean, that's a that's a nice benefit to give a foreign countries. But obviously it doesn't benefit Canada. And and in regards to measles, and what have you damn if you're going to school like a grade school, for example, if you up to date in your vaccinations? You don't. Tacoma school down. Here. We give a lot of deference to religious viewpoints in. There are certain religious groups here in America as well as do growing anti-death seen community because of the preponderance. Now, the explosion of autism, many parents have convinced that there's a relationship between vaccines and autism. And therefore, they're saying I don't want my kids vaccinated, but I'm told by the best people who I rely upon that there's no relationship between the onset of autism and the beginning of vaccination programs. I hate to do this to Richard. But I'm glad on your time. Gonna let you run. We'll talk soon. Thank you for your perspective. Gives us a little different point of view. Okay. Let's congratulate Evan Walsh of Quincy. He won the family four pack of tickets this hour to the New England home shop which will be in operation from Friday, March twenty second.

Stanford University Canada Tom Kevin Kevin Stanford Richard Boston College professor Toronto Stanford alumni magazine Stanford campus administrator football America Tacoma school McGill University Kogas fraud basketball
"university toronto" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

16:22 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"The phone from Toronto is distinguished professor of political economy at York University Toronto, Leo panic panic for many years has been the editor of the annual socialist register and the author of numerous articles and books on contemporary capitalism. He's co author with along with his longtime collaborator Sam Gendun of the making of global capitalism. The political economy of American empire. Thought we'd go get into a discussion regarding a number of issues on the current global situation. Issues raised in the just out twenty nineteen socialist register so wide ranging collection of essays by number of left scholars and activists on the state of our world today. But before we turn to that. I wanted to turn to some issues taken up before we excuse me before we turn to some issues taken up in the register. It's a situate the discussion. That professor panic and Sam Gendun framed in in their introductory essay. I was wondering if you could give our listeners a brief sketch of the central arguments laid out making of global capitalism as a kind of fundation groundwork for our discussion to come. Sure and happy to do that and happy to be on your program. The main thesis of the baking is that. Something unique happened in the twentieth century that had never happened before. And that was the development what we call an informal empire centered on the United States. That. Took the responsibility, especially after World War Two. Of making capitalism safe around the world or trying to taking the responsibility that is for facilitating and underwriting in legal terms as well as in coercive military terms, the accumulation of capital by multinational corporations, by international financial institutions by the big banks in other countries as well as in the United States, and we called that the internationalization of the American state it continued, of course to have domestic responsibilities. It justified was doing as being in the national interest. But it that large part of what crucial departments like the American treasury Federal Reserve. Did in the world was not only concern themselves with maintaining the American economy. Reproducing American capitalism, but also concern themselves with doing that at a global level for the capitalist economy. And and insofar as they encourage free trade and the free movement of capital the treatment of multinational corporations and banks and other countries the same way, they would treat any of their domestic businesses. Are they did not only for American multinationals banks, they pushed that for international capital in general. And in that sense, the world's capitalist world businessmen the world's corporations look to the American state is the ultimate protector of their property around the world. That's the main thesis of the book, it's very common on the left every time that there was a downturn. Or a crisis every time that a capitalist country developed, whether it was Germany or Japan or China to meet we say, well, the American capitalist world is declining and is being displaced by some rival, the judge Germans the Japanese the Chinese etcetera. Whereas in fact, what was going on was there ever deeper integration into a global capitalism? That was superintendent by the American state that the American state had the responsibility for superintending their integration into global capitalism. That isn't was a difficult process. It was harder to do with China on it is harder to do with China than it was with Germany, not leave. Because China was never occupied in the twentieth. Century by American troops in state wasn't reformed in the context of the western occupation. But but nevertheless, the same process has wins on. Of course, what has happened since? So what salmon I address in our lead essay. And then you register is what we call trumping the empire. And are asking the question of what effect this will have on the informal American rule that we're talking about go go a little bit deeper with this notion of informal employer. It has. Territorial. You know, they involve the actual exercise of legal and coercive the sority directly by imperial powers by the European imperial powers. If you're looking for a model, and I think it's a good one if the Canadian relationship with these states, we are an informal colony of the United States by virtue of the deep penetration of American multinationals of our economy, which is a standing story. So when workers in Windsor. Make demands upon the American state, they make it as workers for General Motors. And that it flew reflects the extent who we are Shamir can capitalists are embedded as actors within the within Canadian society. And and if you look at the relations amongst Canadian businessmen the relations have to involve interaction with American capital. So in the nineteen sixties already you would find some critics of the deep investment by American multinationals in Europe by the nineteen sixties and the banks speaking of the Canadian is Asian of Europe. And and I think that's the kind of example, I'm speaking I'm so what when the two thousand eight crisis hits everyone thought that the euro would displace the dollar. There was a lot of shot and Freud in Europe about we'll just see it as you know, since the crisis was. Generated in American mortgage markets, you know, this was the downturn of the United States. But on the contrary the Deutsche Bank was more heavily invested in housing in the black areas of Cleveland than any Bank in the world. And European banks much more than the American banks are still not out of the crisis of two thousand eight. By virtue of their deep integration in all of the factors that produce that crisis. At what happened afterwards was still under the Bush administration, all of the leaders of the g twenty states were called together before that. And it just been a meeting of finance ministers under the secretary of the American treasury, which used to write the communicates they recalled together in the fall of two thousand eight pledged in a communique written ahead of time by the American print treasury that they would not reintroduce tariff barriers capital controls on capital flows. Etc. And and they didn't they have it quite remarkably. You didn't get the breakdown of global capitalism that happened in the nineteen thirties in the context of the great depression. Americans say played a crucial role in coordinating. In other words, the continuation of global capitalism. Through the g twenty more importantly, of course, through the g seven states, which are have a lot more weight in the global economy and and play a larger role in in superintendent. The big question is whether in the context of this administration. Unlike the Reagan and Clinton and Bush, both Bush administrations, and of course, the Obama administration whether this administration his playing that rule or is undermining that, and why that is so no that of course, brings us to the title of the of this just out socialist registered a twenty nineteen. Register a world turned upside down. And it has a question, Mark. That is why why the question Mark seems to be a debate going on a well to look among the broader left to and. What's that question? Mark about it. Are we in a new era a new world? Well, that's the question. I don't think we know that answer. And that's why it's there at one level. The title that volume is asking the question of whether the quote, unquote, global south and most people meeting by that when they see that China and the Asian region are displacing the west and the United States in particular as the sensor of global capitalism is the central global cumulation. And that's what you're dressed and both in in my essay and a number of others. And the conclusion is that. That that there's enormous. Within asia. The Japanese are more than Vietnamese. Koreans or more fear fearful of the Chinese partners in it. And are looking for the American empires back them up. In resisting what they see as Chinese imperialism, but more than that China is to integrated to dependence on the American market to dependence on foreign investment. It's the late capitalist developer with the most foreign investment in history. Signal a break. So the answer to that question Mark in that case is for the excuse me one second. We're we're kind of garbled on the phone. I'm going to ask you to hang up, and we'll call you back. How's that? You're listening currently two Leo Peniche. We were having some trouble apparently with the phone connection. But we'll be right back up. We're discussing his. He's the editor of the recent socialist review series of essays from scholars and activists around the world raising questions issues about the current global economy, the current political situation, and and what its meaning for today will be opening up the phone lines at two five six two thousand and one in oh about half past the hour. Do we have him back? I'm on now Ellen. Okay. Yeah. I think you sound a little clear. Good good. So, you know, you you write about this this this this back to this question of world turned upside down. You read about it being a topsy turvy world in which China's Jianping offer self up as a defender of globalization in girl capitalism. As Trump offers up trade protectionism in shifts away from a US led global instant from US led global institutions that you spoke of before talk about that. There's a whole bunch of central questions about what Trump's unilateralist or protectionist position stance means for what what's yet to come. I think that's the question. Mark. As I said before, you know, globalization was never a matter of bypassing states as people used to think the capital was escaping the world's states. It was always sponsored by states. People who signed the click, you know, free trade agreements. We're not the corporations they were governments often they were acting for capital, but it was government. So it was a state authored process, and they always made the case that globalization was in their particular state's national interest, even as they were opening themselves up to capital flows and free trade. And even as they're capitalists. We're moving their investments around the world usually in search of cheaper labor. But when the crisis hit, it was very hard to continue to defend this as being in the national interest, and you saw everywhere not only in the United States that those who had been arguing on the left, but especially on the right that globalization was off in the national interest that the legitimation of globalization has in the Nash. National interest was not correct. They were able to make a political breakthrough. And the economic crisis of two thousand eight has finally resolved itself into a political crisis a decade later with these far-right nationalist Zena phobic regimes coming to office and indeed making appeals to working class people in light of the extent to which the parties that claim to represent them through the twentieth century these social democratic parties in Europe, the Democratic Party since the thirties and the United States were so much to authoring globalization. So that left an enormous space open now open space for the left is all in. And you saw that with Bernie Sanders, and you see it with Gordon. In Britain, and you saw in Greece. But for the most part, it is really opened up space for the far right now. The question is what is that represents an above? All what is it represents the United States Trump who is a very smart. So carnival Barker has always been, of course, the great opportunitist saw the writing on the wall in this respect, and he turned himself into someone who was making this case about globalization. Now, it's ironic because Trump after all is a capitalists to invest around the world. He openly said one of the reasons he wants to do the deal with North Korea. So he could build luxury resorts and golf courses on the coast North Korea..

United States Mark China Europe American treasury Federal Rese Sam Gendun superintendent editor Toronto American treasury professor North Korea Trump Germany
"university toronto" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:51 min | 3 years ago

"university toronto" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"We have a New York Times bestselling author of rise of the robots and he's joining us to talk about his new book architects of intelligence. Martin Ford is a futurist and author and he's just finished a book and talks with the best minds in our artificial intelligence and talk to them about three things about what's going on with A._I.. <hes> in terms of what's going on with central economic disruption the past towards getting towards true A._I.. Artificial General Intelligence as well as the risks associated with it and so Martin Welcome to confident R._O._I.. Thanks for having me US great to have byard here and you've you've now you finish up this book that you worked on in two thousand eighteen and it was talking with the best mind within a I in asking them covering similar areas but trying and bring it all together under one umbrellas that what was the purpose of this book while the purpose of the book is really to talk to these people and get some what you might think of his insider information about a from the people that know the most I mean the thing is that it's becoming evident. Almost everyone that artificial intelligence is going to transform the world. I mean sooner or later there's a big debate over what exactly that looks like but almost everyone agrees that it's going to be hugely disruptive and so that's led not huge amounts of hype and speculation and if you take people like Elon Musk saying some pretty scary stuff <hes> so I you know I wanted to talk to the people that really know the most and these are people that within the artificial issue intelligence community you know the people that researchers need to like rockstars these are the most famous prominent accomplish people and so I sat down with him have wide ranging conversations about future and what day is GonNa mean and I think it's really informative well in to me now. It's kind of a theoretical thing but it's starting to get more real world. There's there's been real world applications for me. I was reading the latest issue of wired wired magazine knows their issue and they had do it yourself examples of do it yourself a out and they literally they had these examples with <hes> was <hes> a guy at a Jackie inherited a small all dry cleaning chain in southern Japan nine exciting sexy business and had trouble getting employees and he taught himself how to access a I type of us the programs and open source code didn't really speak good English but he actually was able to train his computers to recognize different types of clothing lines placed on the towner which reduced amount of time Labor they needed it also got him towards it wouldn't even need someone necessarily in a store to to check in close and checkout close that to me was a real world example. You mentioned in the book the Me News Companies. He's now are actually using A._i.. To write stories is that accurate night there are actually a couple of companies. One is called Narrative Science and others automated inside should've actually develops <hes> technology to do exactly that to write new stories and also do many other things <hes> so these are systems that can look at a scream of data and based on that figure out what's interesting story in that data. What is what is what are we important insights there and then automatically generate a very readable story <hes> the you can read one of those stories and won't be obvious that it was written by an algorithm basically and not by human journalist and and this is GonNa get hydrologic by the areas you know internal corporate reports parts <hes> it's already being applied to real estate listing Joe to kind of listings you see describing properties? Those are basically you know compelling. You know listings that are designed to invite you to to be interested the property but they're based on data on statistics about that property so algorithms are now doing that so this is GonNa be a very very powerful technology well. That's even I could see how you get a computer extract Okay and say Twenty Five Hundred Square Foot House with two bedrooms two bath but how do you get to talk about the spectacular view or in in his that the jeep learning that it's wrecking who is one of the parts of A._I.. Is is out understand natural language right. I mean you can train you. Systems based on things that people have done so one approach the might be used in that kind of case is you might give this system them lots of examples of well written real estate listings written by people right and learn how to do that and then you would give it the data for picket house and it would it would fire off something you know basically learn how to do based on those examples and that's the same sort of thing that you see with language translation right where where you can go on Google translate and it can now do a pretty effective job but translating between any language is even Berry Obscure Languages that maybe you've never heard of it can do a remarkable job that and it's all based on training these systems so the thing that is really revolutionary revolutionize artificial intelligence just within many just within the last six years maybe ten years but really really just since twenty twelve has been the revolution in what's called deep learning or or deep neural networks and this is an idea. That's been around for decades going all the way back to the nineteen fifties <hes> but no one could really figure out how to how to really <hes> take it had level where they could be used you live in a practical way. They can really do important things and that totally changed in twenty twelve. When <hes> Geoffrey Hinton who's wanted to people I interview into Book Architecture Intelligence <hes> is team from the university Toronto took a deep learning system and was able to just blow away the competition <hes> in a competition you'll the system to recognize visual images and that was the point when everyone woke up and realized this was really an incredible credible technology and that's really what got companies like Google and facebook and Amazon and all these other companies really really interested in this technology to the point where now they're making just a massive investments in and that's you know it's it's a combination of the fact that we had these breakthroughs big rich? <hes> prominent companies are putting so much money so much effort into this <hes>. They're attracting the very smartest people in the world to go into this field. It's all it's GonNa call went to these things. There's really pushing the field <hes> Ford at a remarkable rate now and so that the University of Toronto or a there was a competition and the HINTON's team surprised everybody in wasn't isn't that there was smaller rate right so basically you I I mean historically you know people have tried to get machines to to to have machine vision and to be able to look at a picture and figure out what's in that picture right. Breath and she's been nowhere close to people I mean people are just dramatically better than that. Just maybe ten years ago people said you know this is something that human beings are just uniquely good at looking at a visual image and figuring out what's their machines machines are just not anywhere close <hes> but in twenty twelve <hes> hinton's team using deep learning came closer than anyone had ever done before right so is a dramatic leap in progress. I mean it was still a lot less than what did you mean to do but it really demonstrated that this this <hes> technology was gonna make remarkable progress and then since then as more and more research has been done more resources according to the field we have seen in tremendous progress beyond that and we now have computer systems that at least in some cases outperformed people at recognizing visual images and that again is already having real applications. There's an iphone APP it was has demonstrated at Stanford that was used by dermatologists to to take a photo of <hes> a skin condition right <hes> and determine whether or not that was cancer and that that system I'm in one case has actually was able to catch a case of cancer that one of the top dermatologists in the country missed and potentially save someone's life and I mean that's already happened so in areas like radiology dermatology that are about medical imaging we're already seeing bijl machine vision systems essentially that can can look at an image and figure out his cancer. There are not at a at a weight at a rate that some in some cases outperforms human doctor so that's pretty amazing and that you know think of how important that is for the future right. This is a technology that will be everywhere so essentially what it means is that everyone everywhere in the world but eventually it's going to have access to very best radiologists geologist's in the world looking at their particular image when they go to the doctor right so it's going to have tremendous implications doesn't it near a screening standpoint. Then the radiologist is looking at the ones the they should be looking at versus looking at a lot of them where there's nothing right. I mean and you get the thing that's happening is that these systems can be connected service second opinion. I mean the day may come when <hes> computers completely replace radiologists I mean I wouldn't rule it out at all because the systems are getting better and better. That's not happening now that these systems are working together with doctors she can have a doctor look at an image and and and make a judgment and you can also have the computer take a look and then you've got to opinions and then the doctor if they disagreed Dr Obviously we'll take another look right and and this is what happened with the example I just gave you so. I mean it's anyway you look at it. <hes> <hes> it's GonNa give better outcomes. I mean obviously the quality of doctors does vary right summer really good and some are not so good the here you have a chance to really democratize the very best medical expertise and you'll see this happening happy not just in radiology and imaging but also in medical diagnosis and and in many other areas as well in the denso's so one of the things you talk to these the A._I.. all-stars these are the experts you described him and you talking about three things the first one being the economic disruption the job impact is going to eliminate the need for truck truck. Drivers is Kinda lifetime people talk about but the the issue here with okay are all the radiologist out of business not necessarily right. I mean he's still need. They're still there is some human judgment whether or not he he start cutting off stat <hes> to to or growth the dermatologist that's right although that may be a different doctor making that judgment but <hes> you know for right now it's true these systems are not going to be replaced doctors. They're going to work with doctors. We don't know what the future will hold I again. I don't worry too much about doctors because doctors are incredibly skilled. <hes> they have very high levels of education. They're also protected by all kinds of regulations so even if a system can replace a doctor <hes> there are lots of regulatory regulatory and liability concerns that might prevent that from happening at least from a long time what I worry more about our people that are not as educated as as protected as doctors you know think of the the office worker typical office worker in a corporation someone's sitting in in front of a computer cranking out the same report again and again doing the same time analysis that person is also going to be highly susceptible in part because of the technology we talked about earlier right the the thing that can generate a new story can also generate a a corporate report or an analysis right so these same kinds of techniques used in those areas and of course these workers don't have any where near the kind of protection that doctors have in terms of regulation and so forth so they're going to be much more vulnerable <hes> someday someday we will have Bible self-driving cars. I mean I think that will potentially take a bit longer than a lot of people are suggesting but eventually it will happen and that of course will threaten millions of jobs for for taxi drivers and Uber Drivers and truck drivers arrest and then they're going to be robots and fast food <hes> establishments that were placed workers. They're GONNA be robots in retail stores the robots that are already in Amazon warehouses distribution centers. You'RE GONNA get a lot better a lot more dexterous sorted. They're going to be able to do more and more the work. That's currently being done by people in those environments. All these things are going to happen so that is what I mostly wrote about. In my previous book rise of the robots the economic disruption <hes> the potential automation and my viewpoint is that there is going to be a disruption although we may we may not know exactly when that's coming but I think maybe within ten fifteen years. There's going to be a big impact <hes> but I also talked to everyone about that in <hes> architecture intelligence and got different views <hes> most people believe there's going to be some level of the friction absolutely one really interesting person that I talked to in architecture intelligence is James Manyika who is the chairman of McKinsey Global Institute and they you got a lot of research on this on so they actually have our data and examples to give and <hes> so that conversation if you're really interested in the impact on the job market and on corporate <hes> worked in corporate organization. That's really fascinating conversation to read it. Is there already a split between the the larger companies with the resources and how they've used technology and the smaller companies that the just aren't technology centric because a look excels guy amazing tools. There's a lot of tools within databases that could eliminate a lot of work but in smaller companies loss utilize versus versus a larger counties had breakfast with someone a day doctor in a.

Geoffrey Hinton university Toronto Google cancer Elon Musk Martin Ford Amazon New York Times Book Architecture Intelligence denso Narrative Science Jackie Japan geologist James Manyika Ford HINTON