18 Burst results for "University Of San Francisco"

"university san francisco" Discussed on The Life Stylist

The Life Stylist

05:30 min | Last month

"university san francisco" Discussed on The Life Stylist

"But you froze your tail off if it didn't have its heater on. So again, the power of water is really powerful and he did harness that for sure. I wanted to know what happened to the gel chair thing or so. When that leaks, you get sticky nasty stuff all over the world. It was part of his thesis project for he was university San Francisco design school. And he started with the gelatin we're trying to find just fucking furniture. Everyone has a furniture project. They have to do pretty much out of design score. He started with the Jell-O chair. I think it was like 300 pounds. And I think if I understand the story quickly, they ended up throwing it out of their third story bedroom window on hate and ashbury street. So it was like classic and that was like epicenter hippie hippie Ness. So yeah, it didn't work out the Joe. It's hard to move around a 300 pound piece of chair. And I think literally it did have Jell-O, I think it was literally supporter. I like the idea of this could be fun. Because I'm really good at sitting. All right you guys, so I want to remind everyone you can find the show notes for this episode and any codes and stuff we'll just put everything there at Luke story dot com slash sleep. I got one last question for you all. And you can each answer. So it's three parter who have been three teachers or teachings that have influenced you, your life, your work that you might share with us. So mine are probably all very science skewed and it's has he has become for a lot of people sort of icon Nikola Tesla, mostly from a patent perspective..

San Francisco design school Joe Nikola Tesla
"university san francisco" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pain from the inside. And when you see that and feel it for me, that was that was when I got the clarity. Hey, this is Kelly Corrigan. And that was one of my oldest friends and truly one of the best woman I've ever known. Talking about her 15 year old who is right now transitioning from a girl. Sure, boy. As part of our Syriza round. How change happens for person, our system, our culture or country. I could think of no better person to invite onto the podcast than Alex and his mom. Kelly Corrigan wonders is a place for people who believe that knowing more and feeling more will help us do more and be better, right? Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. The Department of Homeland Security is warning of an increased threat of attack by domestic extremists as NPR's Greg Meyer, a report Department Bulletin says the recent attack on the U. S Capitol may have emboldened radicals. Homeland Security has put out periodic warnings over the years, but they generally cited threats from foreign terrorist groups like Al Qaeda. This bulletin doesn't name any group or any specific threat, but it does refer to domestic extremists who may be fueled by quote false narrative related to the election last November, the January 6th assault on the Capitol and last week's presidential transition. Critics say the Trump Administration paid little attention to the growing danger posed by far right groups. President Biden has already called for homeland security and the FBI to lead an assessment of risk posed by domestic extremists. Greg my read. NPR NEWS Washington President Biden says the government's approach to climate change should be bold minds. Latest executive actions include a temporary ban on new oil and natural gas leases on federal land. And the creation of new jobs in the clean energy sector. NPR's Windsor. Johnston has more president Biden says the executive actions are designed to supercharge the administration's plans to confront the ongoing threat posed by climate change. We know what to do. Just got to do it. When we think of climate change, we think of it. This is a case where conscience and convenience cross past where dealing with this extra central threat to the planet and increasing our economic growth and prosperity are one and the same. Biden says the government needs to take steps to help revitalize economies of coal, oil and gas communities and create new good paying jobs. Opponents of Biden's decision to shut down the Keystone pipeline site, the tens of thousands of jobs that will be lost Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington President Biden's nominee for transportation secretary says the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy Must take into account the impact it will have on workers, Industries and communities. Pete Buddha judge discussed the matter during his confirmation hearing by the Senate Commerce Committee. I think the most important thing we have to do is put an end to the false construct that says that this is about Climate versus jobs look, climate policy is John's policy, and the reality is the on leeway to have a sustainable growing economy is to grow jobs in a way that helps not hurts our climate goals. The Commerce Committee sent the nomination of Buddha Judge to the full Senate for confirmation. Secretary of State and Need. Lincoln is expressing deep concern about the detention of Russian opposition feet figure Alexey Navalny. Lincoln says the administration is considering a response to Russia's actions, including the poisoning of Navalny. This is NPR. Several states are easing restrictions on restaurants and other businesses amid declining corona virus, infection rates and hospitalizations, But the steps are being taken with caution. His health officials monitor New Cove. It 19 variants that originated outside of the United States. More than 146,000 new cases were confirmed Wednesday. More than 429,000 Americans have died from the disease, according to John Talk and University. San Francisco School board has voted to remove the names of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln and others from 44 buildings. The move prompted debate that the city is taking the national reckoning on America's Racist past too far. The school board says it sends the message that racism and wrongdoing should not be honored. Actress Cloris Leachman has died at the age of 94, the nine time Emmy winning actress that easily into a whole spectrum of roles as MPR's Colin Dwyer reports. It's a tall task to some of coarsely twins vast and varied career. You could mention the two Emmy she won, playing a nosy Land lady on the Mary Tyler Moore Show. Then there's her Oscar winning dramatic turn in the last picture show. She even competed on dancing with the stars at the age of 82. But as she told fresh air in 2009, this abundant variety arose from a simple lesson that she learned early in her career. I think that was a basic decision for the rest of my life. I would never be the same way twice the versatile actress earned induction into the television Academy Hall of Fame in 2011. Colin Dwyer Reporting. This is NPR support.

Biden NPR President Kelly Corrigan Trump Administration Abraham Lincoln Homeland Security Greg Meyer Windsor Johnston Washington Alexey Navalny John Talk executive Senate Commerce Committee Department of Homeland Securit Colin Dwyer Emmy
"university san francisco" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"The sixth and sickness fifty to seventeenth century But what the what is happening is greater awareness, and for a long time, you know you talk about topics like this and people ties with glaze over, and they wouldn't pay attention and politicians on the talked about it when it serves their political interests and so I, think the fact that they athletes particularly the NBA are making this much of a of a statement, his bringing it into the public discourse and once you get in the public discourse it eventually can turn into solutions. Now, there's not one. Big. Mega solution we're GONNA. Impose but. Getting rid of, for example, unconscious bias having people realize that. Yeah. Maybe they do have a bias that they never really thought about before they at least start changing their individual conduct. That's a step in the right direction. So I'm all in favor of what the NBA is doing, and my metric isn't GonNa be whether they can affect immediate change. But my metric is that they are making this now a matter of acceptable public discourse as opposed to something that nobody wanted to talk about. I noticed that there was some kind of pushback from the athletes in the national football league about some of the things that the league itself did and trying to promote and support this effort. They just felt it was more words than it was actions. I don't know that we could ever get to a point that it would satisfy everybody Roy but from what you have seen from what you've heard, how do you feel the messaging from the National Football League and the League's in general. Yeah go back The impression that the NFL created in Twenty fifteen. When Kemper Nick was it looked at in such disfavor and the owners many of them had very Flattering things to say about him and it gave you a definite impression about where the NFL came down on questions like this Contrast that to the NBA, which has always been on the leading edge of. Addressing, some of these justice issues head on. So when the NBA does something today, you say Oh that's that's credible. That's consistent with the way they've always been when the NFL does it. You say, well, wait a minute what happened in the last five years that all of a sudden they're doing all these things that before they were saying, you're unpatriotic you you didn't like. The military you didn't like the flag. You know a lot of the criticisms at the NFL owners were buying into. So the NFL has credibility arnold to get over before I. Think we start taking what they're doing at face nonetheless, they are doing it and I give them credit for that and time will tell as to whether Eric read, for example, get the job right. I mean that was another thing I was going to mention I. Mean here's a guy that was a great player doesn't even have a job in the national football league because he kneeled with capper. That's right. Yeah Yeah. When you take a look at this, we've got about a minute left when you take all of this, what would you crystal ball and think might happen say in the next two years or even wanted to years. Well tell me how the election comes out first of all good point. Yeah but I think that the issues are being I think one of the things that stood in the way of change was our political structure, and because you know particularly with the introduction of campaign money into politics, politicians are basically purchased by whoever gives them the most money. So we weren't seeing things going the wrong direction re pulling back on Voting Rights Act doing everything you can to make it more difficult for. Minorities and disadvantaged people to be able to vote. But I think politicians are getting overwhelm. Now by things like athletes, things like business organizations are more responsible people in the media people in Hollywood So I. Think more. We can get politics out of the way and get real people. Making this on this faster, we're GONNA get changed. So that's my next two year prediction. Okay Great. Thanks a lot. Roy have a good weekend. We'll see you next week on inside angle. Again. Roy Eisenhart with US each week, very interesting segment that we have. He's been a lawyer former president of the Oakland, A.'s when his family owned that team, and now he does teach law and sports at UC Berkeley and also the University San Francisco already to continue as we move across the country and around the world with you on sports byline. Hello and welcome back to the Ronnie do each tax program on the line is Paul from California Hi Paul. What's your tax problem today? Hi.

National Football League NBA Roy Eisenhart US Kemper Nick California Ronnie president Hollywood Paul arnold Eric Oakland UC Berkeley University San Francisco
"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Used to listen to sports radio I was big into sports back then I'm not I'm too busy I don't follow sports as much as I used to but there was KNBR six eighty have the razor and Mr T. and there was a guy named Ralph Barbieri and Tom Tolbert and Tom Tolbert used to plan a gold state warriors he was kind of like a twelfth man on the team and Ralph Barbieri I don't really notice background what's been you had an MBA from Wharton and they were really low I mean was the ultimate button Jaffa mean like Tom holder six ten rapper rears a short he was really like Joe Pesci like he sounded like Joe Pesci on the radio these two guys honest out like he was it was the funniest it was the funniest stuff I ever heard in my entire life and I used to listen to this I would most of the time when I was writing from my job in the Coast Guard to school at university San Francisco and honestly with some of the there was some of the funniest stuff I'd ever heard in my entire life I I I remember apparently they got rid of Ralph Barbieri at some point he got fired by the station and now it's just Tom Tolbert like doing a solo show man that was great that was great stuff so that was really where I first got my inspiration they had they had a joke about it Mrs Butterworth's syrup bottle which one time which I'm not gonna get into here I want to talk about cash and when I talk about cancer actually gonna be talking about actual hard currency I'm talking about like paper money and I'm an advocate of having more paper money I've talked about this in the past we'll have like weird attitudes about carrying around cash the like all I know I don't carry around that much cash in case I get logged like what is the chance that you were going to get mugged like this zero basically like yeah I I mean unless you live in a like a genuinely bad neighborhood when I I guess that's a concern but you know most places in the country like when people get mugged you know and if if somebody like he sticks a knife at you in like once your wallet the cash is like the least of your concerns it's the least of your concerns as the credit cards your driver's license it's all that stuff and I've you know I've I've just I'm a big proponent of carrying around more cash I I like cash one of the reasons I like cash is because well first of all if you put stuff on a credit card that you don't pay the balance and you pay interest so lots of people's pay a lot of interest there's actually this thing called a cash diet where people recommend that you only pay cash for things for a month or two months so you start to get a handle on how much you're spending that's the thing with credit cards you don't really know how much you're spending but the other thing is is that the credit card is an electronic record of your transactions okay like and by the way it would mean if you're if you're if you think at all about privacy or anything like that if if you pay for everything with a credit card if somebody investigate you they can see where you are and where you go all the time like you know I don't think the government doesn't need to know that I go out to lunch and so I'm not doing anything bad but they just they don't need to know like where I go to lunch so I'm not one of these crazy like what anti government types but I do like the anonymity of cash it's not like I'm doing anything illegal or suspicious but the government doesn't need to know where I go to lunch every day the optionality of cash if there is something that I want to buy that is slightly expensive I don't need to put it on the credit card you can pay with cash not worried about getting mugged sell you know if if if I'm carrying around five hundred five hundred Bucks my wall and I get mugged like it like I said the cash is the least of my worries K. it's also good to have some cash in in the house somewhere and the example I always use is I mean we I live in you know the hurricane country right so let's see hurricane blows through the blows that knocks down all the power lines and if there's a tree on my work okay credit cards don't work hello my supposed to pay somebody to get the tree off my roof right be nice to have a couple thousand Bucks laying around lots of personal finance experts will tell you that is a good it is a good idea to have ten thousand dollars laying around in case of emergency you might actually want to have it in cash in I am way more paranoid than you I can think of a hundred different things that can go wrong where you might need that kind of money in cash I'm you're not earning interest on the cash but you're not earning interest on the cash in the bank anyway so it doesn't make any difference talk about optionality optionality means different things to different people it has a very specific meaning to finance people who have studied option theory in the definition of an option as an option is the right but not the obligation to buy something at a certain price by a certain time more specifically it is a choice when you go to the grocery store you can choose between original speed stick deodorant or Irish spring speed stick deodorant you have a choice that choice has.

Ralph Barbieri Mr T.
"university san francisco" Discussed on Dear Baseball Gods,

Dear Baseball Gods,

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on Dear Baseball Gods,

"Little older like sixteen, Seventeen, where you're actually potentially recruit Then, those can actually be very good recruiting tools where if you're good enough to play at University of Illinois and go to their camp. They're going to be like. Hey, look at this kid, let's. Chat with you after depending on the recruiting rules and all that stuff, the time of year but you'll put yourself on their radar if you're gonNA play there, so a great chance to be in front of a school like that. The other ones, the big combines the showcases something like a prep baseball reporter, perfect game or whatever your local ones called. Those are ones where you know you'll get a profile on their website, and you know maybe two hundred fifty or three hundred bucks, maybe a little more depending. And, then your profile will have your numbers, and then depending on the recruiting age, which is probably sixteen or seventeen you. There will be scouts. They're actually watching. If it's fifteen, you freshman age players. There's probably not going to be many scouts their attending. They'll just be really from a profile type thing just to get your numbers. Get some video and put on the website. So really, if your, if your cost conscious which I think you should be because if you really say like. Hey, I want to go play. You know a school across the country. It's going to cost a lot of money to go. That's what was camp to fly over. There dry their drive there. Stay in hotel for the CAM etc.. You might have to make those choices later on their group process junior junior year senior year. Something like that. So you WANNA keep some of your cash reserved for when that day comes. If your kids like Hey, I know I'm from the Midwest but I really want to go the university San Francisco. Can we go out to university in San Francisco and can I go there camp? Mom and dad and you're like okay. That's GONNA cost a grand. You have a pretty good idea that your son's potentially play there, but also you want to leave some money leftover to maybe do that if that's really important them and I really want to go to the school, so find a way to to make it happen if you can, but if you're always going to these three hundred dollars showcases left and right, and all these younger years you might be out of your budget by that by that point, so be conscious there, so it really doesn't make sense to go to a lot of fifteen us of freshman year. Showcase cans because they're just not gonNA sign either. They're going to say okay. There's your profile. College might be there and say okay. We'll come back and watch a year, but. The reality is that you're not gonNA. Get pretty much anything out of it. Sophomore year if you're premium player like the best player on your on your team, your varsity players a sophomore, and you're pretty darn good. Then sophomore year is probably time to start going to some of these recruiting camps, just a handful of them. Just get yourself a profile. Start to like. Get Your name out there. Get in front of some schools. That'll be a good thing because players do start getting signed by the by the one schools after their sophomore year. So then. The junior year is really the key. So this is again. If you're going to say, I'm only going to spend X. amount of dollars and I WANNA. Get the most bang for my buck. It's your junior year so the winner before your junior year your junior season starts. Go to some camps. Get yourself seen so then local schools can come watching that high school season, and then definitely watch that summer season you WANNA. Be On radar for junior summer for sure, so if you're gonNA spend most of your payload. Payload I would do it in their junior year before the season starts so that's the best time to go big showcases. By by that time, most players have started to mature a little more. They're starting to put some meat on their bones. If your kids one hundred fifty pounds the sophomore, he's just not going to get recruited by anybody. That's just that's just the way it is, so if you WANNA go spend three hundred bucks and get a recruiting profile. Okay, but you pretty much is through that money in the trash. If your kid then is one hundred eighty five pounds. The next year read one hundred seventy five pounds. That money's GonNa. Be Much better, spence because they can see. The cake is actually starting to look baked rather than just this big blob Adele still sitting in a warm oven, so make sure if you're going to let me let me summarize my my advice here. Goto individual college camps. When you're young, so he can see what it's like, so he can start to interact with coaches. Coaches realize not scary and just start to get his feet wet. They're not as expensive. It's a good experience. If you really am are really interested in a specific school when you're sophomore junior senior, go to their camp again. Get in front of them. Tell them that you would love to be a part of their program. Show them that you're enthusiastic. Makes crude process easy. Okay. This kid wants play here. Do we wanted to player Yup okay well? It's a fit you know to go. And then with the big, the big showcases, those.

San Francisco University of Illinois reporter Midwest university San Francisco Adele spence
"university san francisco" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

Wealth Transformation Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on Wealth Transformation Podcast

"Is Dr Brenda Wade? This is the first segment of a two part discussion with Brenda psychologist television host keynote speaker founder of love money and see the seminars author. Dr Brenda Wade is best known for her. Dynamic love centered approach to transformation. She has earned numerous awards as a psychologist keynote speaker. Workshop leader author television host and producer. Dr Brendan known for her. Knock on the live. Interactive delivery offers keynote addresses and presentations on optimal health and success to corporate professional and generally general audiences internationally. She her presentations have been hailed as legendary and as a keynote speaker. Brendor doctor Brenda leaves audiences standing on their feet cheering but above all inspired with the takeaway tools to keep building success. Dr Brenda has consulted for. Mca The Disney Corporation. The Canadian Government San Francisco Fire Department and many other starter. Brenda chaired the Francisco. Human Rights Commission serves on the boards of various community organizations and has received multiple awards for her work in the field of domestic violence. Hiv and AIDS and service to family and children. Dr Brenda a clinical psychologist. In San Francisco. California specializes in couples and family therapy with a private practice that reaches internationally a protege of the world renowned author and Therapist Dr Virginia Sattar. Her approach is scientifically based humanistic impractical. She received her bachelor of Science Degree in biology at the University of puget sound completed repeat in development and child clinical psychology from the University of Washington. Dr Brenda is former a junk professor at John F. Kennedy University San Francisco State University and Antioch University West Afford Time National television host. Dr Brenda currently Co host healing quest nationally on PBS. An is in development for a new project with CNN net. C Net TV Dr Oz Dr drew and today show CNN and many others regularly book. Doctor Brenda as a guest. Pert A groundbreaking author. Dr Wade's four books..

Dr Brenda Wade Doctor Brenda Brenda Dr Oz Dr Brendan Dr Virginia Sattar Canadian Government San Franci John F. Kennedy University San San Francisco host and producer CNN Francisco founder University of Washington Human Rights Commission Antioch University West AIDS California University of puget The Disney Corporation
"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"This is the juror Gillian show broadcasting from New York City and after the show I'm gonna grab dinner add to Maloney imports Sally's report Shelley yeah where it which is the home of the crackling pork shank their signature dash but I will not be eating that because I'm a vegetarian and I will be instead eating awaits salad or something like that I'm actually having dinner with a guy went to business school with at the university of San Francisco from nineteen ninety to two thousand one and university San Francisco by the way the Jesuit school and the business program he look like it didn't have a very good reputation it was like ranked a hundred and seventieth in the country or something like that and I could tell you I got an amazing education at the university San Francisco and what I found was that when I got to lever brothers as an associate in two thousand one I actually knew more than all of my friends that went to Ivy League schools this actually raises a whole bunch of interesting questions about higher education what really the goal of higher education should be if the goal of higher education is to learn stuff then you know maybe paying eighty thousand dollars a year for a fancy education is not the best path the one thing that I can tell you from my experience is that you get out of it what you put into it you get out of it what you put into it and when I was there every moment that I was there that I was not in class I was in the library learning more and more and more stuff teaching myself stuff and I got an incredible amount out of that education that continues to pay dividends to this day and like I said when I got to lever brothers I knew more than everybody else and it was absolutely fascinating oh boy this whole debt issue you know a lot of a lot of there is this belief that process among people that we're gonna be able to pay for the stuff just that you know I'm not opposed I am opposed to Medicare for all but when I'm I'm not opposed to a public option which is something like a disaster insurance I think there should be a public option for does it basically high dollar medical treatments but that's beside the point so I'm not opposed to like any public involvement in Medicaid medicine at all but if we're gonna spend fifty two trillion dollars in health care a lot of people believe that we're gonna do this and we're not gonna be a what we're not going to raise taxes on the middle class and that is I can tell you is not possible that I can tell you is not possible so it'll be interesting to see what kind of sacrifices that people are willing to make because if you said to somebody okay you can have free medical care but your taxes are going to go from where they are now which is about ten percent to thirty percent do you think people would be cool with it see a lot of people think that their taxes will go up this is this all the rich people are just going to pay for it but like I said if you taxed all the rich people at a hundred percent and only raises a hundred billion it's not gonna pay for Medicare for all so taxes on the middle class have to go up and I don't think I don't think people are really prepared for that and what it actually wrote a piece last week where I talked about middle class taxes because Donald Trump is contemplating a middle class tax cut in there is the brackets from eighty thousand dollars two hundred fifty thousand dollars and family income household income that is currently taxed at twenty two percent and he's a hasn't proposes formally but people speculate that he's going to lower that tax to fifteen percent which would mean that if you're if you make a hundred fifty thousand dollars a year you get tax zero percent on the first twenty four thousand you get taxed twelve percent on the next sixty thousand and then you get tax fifteen percent all the way up to a hundred fifty so a hundred fifty thousand is that's a decent amount of money if you if you have a household that makes a hundred fifty thousand a year that puts you approximately in the top six percent of all households in the these are people that are not going to pay they're gonna have an effective tax rate of probably not even ten percent after taking into account deductions and credits you're talking about people who are richer than ninety four percent of all the people in the country and we gonna pay less than ten percent taxes correspondingly these are the people who think that you can have Medicare for all in taxes won't go up on the middle class so sometimes I wonder let's say for example Bernie Sanders does get elected and he does what he's threatening to do and I believe he is credibly threatening to do it passing Medicare for all under reconciliation without even needing fifty one votes in the Senate then it is possible that these that taxes on the middle class could go up a lot and I think that would come as a rude shock and I wonder how people would react to that with people and say Hey I didn't sign up for this and then vote Bernie Sanders out after four years or how that works by the way the tax code so we go back to nineteen eighty eight I don't remember the exact income levels but the bottom tax rate was fifteen percent in the top tax rate was twenty eight percent and that was it there was only two tax brackets fifteen percent in twenty eight percent so over time the top rate has gone up in the bottom rate has gone down in what we have is a situation where a lot of people in the in the bottom and aren't paying anything at all and a lot of people in the top and they're paying for a lot and you won the goals of the tax code is fairness this doesn't doesn't seem super fair you know well if you will call in talk about this please call eight four four three zero five seventy eight hundred that's eight four four three zero five seventy eight hundred thing is is that what you get what you get taxes up above fifty percent then people start changing their behavior to avoid paying those taxes or they don't work okay I can assure you that if taxes got up to seventy percent then I would really I would think hard about what I do for a living I have a decent money in the bank there's look I could have a good life I could spend a lot of time in the gym I work out.

Gillian New York City Sally Shelley
"university san francisco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"To six twenty Monday through Friday here on KFI some colleges have been using facial recognition technology as a way they say to increase safety in dorms keep expelled students former employees registered sex offenders in any unauthorized or unwanted people's setting foot on campus however but it's you know there is a digital rights group called fight for the future and they say the risks of this far outweigh the benefits they put out a score card to grade which schools are weighing those risks appropriately some companies have already suggested that this would be a great way to track classroom attendance and resident assistants I assume that's like resident advisors to track them they're also saying that if a student in a college environment feels like they're being surveilled that could lead to a chilling effect on freedom of speech freedom of assembly and freedom of religion this I don't agree with no I don't agree with that statement because how many freedoms have teenagers already given up because they were chained to their phone the whole time yes but are you not being listened to watch right but it's not I wanna say government it's died it's Big Brother if your school's keeping an eye on you yes then and and then what it what did they get to do with that data that they get to sell that data so they know where you go after class and where you can be targeted for ads and all of that I mean that ice is slippery slope that I can understand but again they're used to that I mean but there was that here's the thing kids are on their phones all the time right there being tracked but I don't know what they don't want to sign off on giving it their university the ability to know where they are at all times fight for the future this this digital rights group has teamed up with a nonprofit called students for sensible drug policy so it makes sense to create a scorecard with information on fake facial recognition use at a hundred top colleges around the country when you look at local colleges for example UCLA is using facial wrecked a recognition USC is using facial recognize couple other schools have said that they will not do this you cease Santa Barbara is one of them you see San Diego UC Irvine they all say they will not be using facial recognition for it first I mean even for safety reasons like this it looks like Stanford and USC I have allowed facial recognition enabled kiosks for ordering food that is that to me is where I start drawing the line about it you know paying with your face well I open my phone with my face and I compared with my phone or phone I was so unnecessary nobody hurt you this morning all because hurt people hurt people I get it are you sure well tell me now let's just work through our emotions and then we can put them to bed university San Francisco used facial recognition but has since given up on it it has not formally committed to swearing off in the future recordings of students at university Colorado and Colorado springs have been used to improve facial recognition systems the I don't know your face was ten out of ten I mean we're gonna be critiquing each others faces I didn't know we were gonna do that I didn't know that your face is perfect and that you got to make fun of mine but if that's the kind of day we're gonna have and I'm glad I know that moving forward is the dumbest show video into anger is fighting any well at least we don't have corona virus yet like Chris and Carla to matter of time though isn't it feels like it you're like the the panicking more than anybody else that I know of I mean I think that you're convinced that this thing's gonna really take off I just don't want to blow through my house well of course not okay well on the view because of that I'm going to be careful that you are more in danger of the just every day flew as for your house why because people here have it that at least two people I know have gone down with what appears to be the flu just by looking at their face as in the past two days mackenzie was still walking around here secondarily barely walking she's she's not that pale of the person we have a wheelchair anywhere we could just kind of pushed her out on to the sidewalk we have a scooter and throw her on there like a work I think I remember a Walker about a year back there was a Walker there was a wheelchair to I just don't know if it's still in the building I don't think so all right Carl is going to join us in a few minutes he was out covering the Barrington place fire yesterday over west LA we'll talk about whether it was started by coronavirus or not Gerry and Stan and Chris little how are you I'm doing okay but of riverside county health.

KFI
"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"And in year nineteen you'll have seventy six thousand box in the year twenty two you'll have ninety five thousand Bucks so yeah there's I mean compounding is really really powerful and and that and that is without putting any money if you know I I mentioned last last segment I talked about if you have a four one K. if you have a four one K. and they actually take a call Chris from Westchester Chris you're on the air yeah Hey look this is the air that the press this call is to tell your audience that I like you're you're you're doing the math the compounding math and and one of the reasons I would always trust if their calculations is that your you were always in the front row at business school with any bit of professors and you know absorbing all that now good job well I was in the front row in grad school but I was in the back row in undergrad so yeah no I I I know I read all your stuff in and here that but I but I probably mattered more when you were in the front row yeah yeah yeah learn what can I help you with call in I was with the foot through the show and wanted to do call in an invoice might before I white guy everything you have to say and and everything you have the right and I just want to say keep it up good stuff Cole excellent well I hope to talk to you soon and let's get together sounds good sounds good my map okay thanks I was nice yeah I actually it was funny I was a terrible student I was a terrible student in college by by but most the time I was asleep I slept in class all comedies aren't doubt just totally dead drawing on the desk I had professors throw chalk at me I had professors throw books at me I just had a real bad attitude I did want to learn and I still ended up with a B. average but I really significantly under performed during college then you know then for grad school I turned it around and and my you know really want to learn about financing yeah it's actually it's it's a pretty good life skills that if you're if you're really excited to learn something you should sit in the front row you'll probably learn more that was kind of my philosophy I would sit in the front row and try try to absorb isn't as much as I could I you know I I don't know if you know this I went to grad school at the university San Francisco which you know is an amazing campus and it's absolutely gorgeous and it's a Jesuit school which a lot of people don't know and yeah I went to business school part time there for three years and it was yeah it was it was a great experience and it's a kind of feel like I don't donate enough to that program because really you know when I got to leave my brothers when I got to lean brothers now was in the social training program I really what I was over prepared relative to the other new hires that came from Ivy League schools I actually knew more was more better academically prepared than people that came from Ivy League schools it was absolutely fantastic so I wanted to memories for medical what we're talking about compounding I talked about you know I I like to talk about my thirty five sixty five portfolio which is going to earn five percent a year on average and I perceived by the way if someone tells you that you're gonna have something that earns five percent a year that is good okay a lot of people what go stocks were up twenty eight point nine percent last year which is the actual number stocks are up twenty eight point nine percent last year that's not normal it's not gonna happen all the time stocks or sometimes down twenty eight point nine percent if somebody tells you they're gonna give you an investment that earns five percent a year I would take it in a thirty five sixty five portfolio is more earn about five percent a year on average what is that look like and if you have a five percent earning portfolio you will double your money in your sixteen year old triple it in your twenty four you will quadruple in your thirty annual five exiting your thirty four if you've five X. your money without it without any other contributions over the life of you know your contributions and that's pretty good that's without putting any more money in so how often should you put money in in you should put it in every month in good times and bad and never checking out even if the market crashes don't make it up to you set up automatic withdrawals every month stocks and bonds automatic withdrawals from your checking account thirty five sixty five portfolio simple as that and after tonight with what's going on an Iraqi might want to think about adding some commodities to that portfolio with things Jeez Golden oiler weapon compounding still works even with interest rates are really low levels and even if you don't do it even if you just have cash earnings zero that's not so bad either because at least you aren't losing money in there is definitely something to be said for that how dare daily and this is the juror doing child well look who's home how was your day Hon you know stressful exhausting laid down on.

"university san francisco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:34 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Immense ago little from a place with a podium talking about the strike that killed Islamic revolutionary guard corps could force terrorist force general counsel many at the just reiterating that it's America's policy and two killed terrorists who have killed Americans that where they are and and there you go and that the regime the the the the key take away there was he reiterated regime change is not side he's not looking to spark revolution or whatever so he says publicly and again this all happened on an Iraqi airspace in on Iraqi soil so there's there's that all also someone swampy in the Tehran swamp what should the foreign minister Javad Zarif university San Francisco eighty two a university of Colorado eighty six a friend of once Feinstein it he said that the Iraq Iran it will seek international resolution and that he'll go to the U. N. which is the fact that he's saying that less than twenty four hours after so many is dead the fact they have the foreign minister on state TV saying don't you worry I'm gonna bring a briefcase to the U. N. and they're gonna get your full that that's a message as well I am sell when this all comes after a U. S. drone strike order by president Donald Trump on a Baghdad airport has killed a top Iranian commander in a major escalation in regional tensions that have pitted Tehran against Washington and its allies in the Middle East plan what what are you know the it here's another thing we're dealing with asymmetric warfare and I don't know that anyone in the swamp is thought of this but we're in a unique situation here where work conventionally thinking of well will the Iranians strike camp Arraf John in Kuwait or a the American base in Iraq or the greens on the US embassy in Baghdad or don't how or or whatever they can shoot back those guys can shoot back has anyone considered that there is any number of buildings within a thousand miles of Tehran there's one in Baku Azerbaijan with trump's name on them but I would just say if you have reservations there you might want to move to the the Baku Azerbaijan double tree or something like that but I mean they're the terrorism looks for a soft target with symbolism okay can't get to mount Rushmore but what about trump Azerbaijan are any field ABC news joins us so the the gang of eight as for Democrats four Republicans the four Republicans aren't complaining about being notified the four Democrats are so why did trump break up a custom did he have to inform them of the guy was gonna get get drowned well let's go to law school and find out this is not necessarily a settled case law the constitution gives Congress the power to declare war and to raise and support armies with presences he didn't do this to start a war he did this to prevent a war and there is a case if you go back to when the mode those are the immoral Barlow let the attack on Osama bin laden he did not inform Congress before that either and the justice department and said they defended his decision saying it was of a structure in the actual interest was scope and duration were sufficient sufficiently limited therefore we didn't need prior congressional approval was not constitutionally required so will you we you know we have these arguments over and over over the years and it's always been a push back and forth between Congress and the president George H. W. bush of course famous we did go to Congress and did go to allies before going after Iraq in the first Gulf War but most presidents of nuts you remember Vietnam was an undeclared war for the better part of a decade dude career was a police action never declared war so this is a but you know the answer your questions a long winded way of getting to the point which is it's a very murky question whether the president actually had to do this or not for people who don't know all the authorization for use of military force was from September of two thousand one it road bush through Afghanistan threw a rock rock Obama never bothered to get a new one before he loaned air power to Libyan rebels he never bother to get a new one for Syria though the war the fight against ISIS had nice is didn't exist on nine eleven and and so now we're on the third president using the same air mass that is now eighteen years old you're absolutely right about that so this is again a very murky area I think the the bigger question here here is what is the plan going forward yes Iran does escalate this and it's likely that they will this guy that they took out was a pretty important figure it was almost as if they took out our joint chiefs of staff and our joint chiefs of staff the Pentagon had the kind of power that this guy did so the president and the many people who support him are saying that this is a good thing this is a very bad god which should have been got rid of a long time ago but Mel the president in the same breath is telling everyone who thought they were relatively safe in our in our Iraq just yesterday get out of the country as fast as you can so that certainly is troubling for people who live there are making their living in trying to help rebuild the country yeah vents and certainly changed a bit and less than twenty four hours so all right let my sense is that this is the first and last for here of it today and absolutely reserve it's probably case closed yeah all right anything very much have a good weekend and may your hero may your news be breaking all right thanks what it is the gearing Shannon show back with more of a swamp watch money and now that he's dropped out the the other candidates are saying how come we don't have any Hispanic candidates that and more coming up and your brain to filling in KFI am six forty live or on the I heart radio weapon king with news president trump says Iranian general because I'm still a money it was not killed to start a war but to stop one the president has all the money was planning attacks against the U. S. and says the US is ready and prepared for any response from Iran which has vowed.

general counsel America
"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Five seventy hundred this is the juror going shell it's actually been quite awhile since I as I want to say it's been about a year and a half I was really sick and I have like a bad stomach flu and I have I had a really bad stomach flu and my wife like went to some dinner or something I was a home on the couch and I got the idea that I was feeling better so I should order some food and I ordered a sausage pizza from domino's when it gets back I'm like literally hurling at all of if you she still talks about that to this day the time that I ought ordered a sausage pizza when I had the stomach flu anyway please call eight four four three zero five seventy eight hundred and you can ask me with everyone so as you know I used to work and we were brothers and I went to I I got my MBA from a school called University San Francisco and university San Francisco a lot of people don't know thanks the Jesuit school and it's interesting place it's got a great location it's kind of my Golden Gate park in San Francisco it's on a it's on a hill call lone mountain and I think of all the places to live in San Francisco that is really one of the past that is in a meeting has finished an amazing neighborhood and you know it's favorite Cisco it you know in spite of all the poop is is a pretty amazing place it is and I used to commute from out in Contra Costa county moment creek nice to get in the car so it would be the middle of summer and I would get in the car to be a hundred degrees and I drive into San Francisco it would be fifty degrees there be a fifty degree temperature difference just driving twenty or thirty miles and I would I would have to bring a coat you know I mean it was it was a he was the favorite Cisco has all these micro climates it's really it's really interesting but I was a business school you know I graduated I was twenty seven years old went to lever brothers in New York and I did index arbitrage in ETFs and I stayed there until the bankruptcy and you know have a great career and what happened was that the bankruptcy as you know we need to go bankrupt and the broker dealer parts of the basically the investment bank part was sold in bankruptcy to bark plays for about I think was for two billion dollars for most of the employees leaving got to stay on at Barclays was Barclays especially inequities Barclays didn't have much of an equities business they had a pretty big fixed income business but they didn't have much of an equities business so was really plug and play and if I wanted to I could get my job I turned it down they they wanted me to stay and I turned it down to start my own thing for my own business so they know it's what's funny when you start your own business you just learn about stuff like how do you form an LLC mon this Google it ten find an attorney and have them some you know you've come up with an operating agreement and submitted to the state yeah I got a got a computer I built a website I mean was it was it was huge amounts of fun like I was having it was really like I it's hard to describe but when you have your own business you don't work for anybody and it's just you figuring stuff out like it I mean that seems scary to some people but it's actually not scary like you just learn like you just figure stuff out and you know for me it's been a process of eleven years to an S. cell but I was fully in control of my destiny for the first time and I was building something keep in mind I'm building this business in the middle of the financial crisis all hell is breaking loose stock market is crashing every day keep in mind like yeah this was before the two thousand election bush was for it was towards the end of the bush presidency and people were freaking out about Obama because a bomb was as far left guy and he was saying all the scary things on the campaign trail and stuff like that so the financial crisis was happening people are freaking out about Obama and it literally felt like we were just going to go to hell in the middle so there's a great time to start a business so you know the markets crashing every day I had this office and it's interesting if you know if I did it today I might have been a we work is obviously we work is in the news nowadays but I did it in something called regents business center it was a building on forty six in third so on the east side and it was my office my office was like sixty square feet it was it was a it was smaller than a car that I've had closets bigger than this office I it was smaller than a closet had a desk and my computer had nothing on the wall the following year I would go to a Phoenix Suns game in Phoenix yeah I got a Phoenix Suns cheerleader calendar put up in the office but aside from that there was nothing in there I was just in this tiny little room and I would I would go to Starbucks in the morning and we get a coffee now go to my office and would sit down and I would I would put in a trash can no just picking a trash can and this is my routine every morning I did this for like three months probably I did this for three months and the reason I was doing that as I walked away I'm I'm gonna walk away from my job I walked away from what anybody would consider to be just a ridiculous amount of money to start my own business and here I I picked what I thought was the worst possible time to start a business and I didn't have any revenue yet and I wasn't earning money I was just spending money and I I lost a lot of money in the financial crisis and the whole just meanwhile like you we look on Bloomberg you look if you look at like the stocks city group is trading at ninety nine cents what city group was a penny stock love bank of America was trading at three box man I was I was I was pretty stressed out I was pretty stressed out so I would throw up in the trash can everyday I was what I was really stressed out guy I actually eventually did get business I got a couple hundred thousand dollars my first year he was a good start and it's been all up from there you know so what was the right choice you know have I mean to me it's actually pretty obvious okay so first of all I don't really function well in organizations you know before I was a lever brothers I was in the Coast Guard and that was a really good fit and even you know leaving was like it was a great it was a great big gifted in town to camp there a lot of smart people there but it's a big organization you have to function within an organization and also you know how things changed after the financial crisis and know the banks became less forgiving place to work and it's probably good that I just laugh now if I'd stayed in that job I know I would have kept running the ETF asking maybe got promoted I would have I probably would have made more money in the long run in the wrong one but I am definitely happier today this is been way more fun which is kind of the lesson here what is it there's multiple lessons there's multiple lessons I do want to say that everybody I know who started a business has been happy every single person and I know people who have started businesses that fail and they're still happy like.

"university san francisco" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Of BK there are reports this morning congresswoman Alexandria because the Cortez of New York plans to endorse Bernie Sanders for president news of the plan endorsement surfaced last night as the debate was ending reports say AOC will appear with Sanders and event this weekend all right the fallout from the debate to the reviews are coming in they hit the healthcare immigration climate change criminal justice reform and a whole lot more so let's go to university of San Francisco political science professor James Taylor who joins us right now and I'm looking at some of the headlines and by the reviews for people to judge this morning are very good thank you for having me today yeah I think mayor Pete did at represent himself well last night particularly with the way in which he interrogated I live with Warren trying to expose some of the shortcomings in her policy positions evening so going at her strength in terms of her wonky Smith and her having policy positions almost every make your issue that has arisen yeah Warren certainly last night under fire but she seemed to defend herself pretty well I would really warranted the shark bright removal and articulate individual she obviously goes with the with the flow you know she definitely is a sort of start and end rose and and she should have expected I don't think she did it as well as she could have in terms of preparation because she should have known that as she moved to front runner status that she was going to get front runner treatment which is all the single digit candidates will polling would be coming after her in a very tough way to try to make a mark you know going into last night professor Taylor I was very curious how Bernie Sanders would not only sound but how he would appear and I just wanna get your read because I thought it seemed to me that he looked energetic I thought you look good but I watched him carefully in the very beginning during the walk through and I watched his eyes amount of being a medical doctor but I just saw as a bit of stress in his eyes when he was being it might be Bernie just be a burden because you get irritated with with people just talking for the sake of talking so we came across that way but on stage cheaper than themselves in such a way and his campaign today got the endorsement of the squad he held his own he showed that even though he's had this heart condition it hasn't fundamentally change the body that we know came straight off strong in his criticisms of Elizabeth Warren and and everyone else and Donald Trump so I Bernie Sanders is is back on the trail and the end of his power behind him always been behind him which is his days and those people have great into the other for Bernie and it never really just been about Bernie only it's also been about their commitment to the ideas he represents it'll be certainly interesting to see what happens from here on in as we take a closer look at some of the polling numbers going forward and some of the lower ranking pulled candidates out there as you go into the next set of debates physikalische thanks so much we'll go we I'm sorry we have to head off to traffic thank you very much that's university San Francisco political science professor James Taylor giving us the insight to the debates last night let's get out of the roads right now Brian's been waiting for a space in the head and take it away Sir this report is ready by Jeff Anderson and associates eighty from Roseville already easing up just eleven minutes of the cap cities what eighteen though on the cap city freeway to get down count that getting up on the eastbound side as well slowing governments three to the American river making the trip in from elk Grove on I five is a thirty one minute drive if you're coming in on the highway ninety nine it's twenty nine minutes he got an accident at florin road that's still causing a backup dekalb line what to get past that things really start to break up however if you're coming in from also on highway fifty it's thirty one minutes the downtown first real slow down the doesn't happen to you get to make either from woodland on I five you don't slow down to get to del Paso you back up to speed once you get past the garden highway woodland the downtown twenty eight minutes it's also twenty four minutes coming in from Davis eastbound eighty well heavy traffic in Mason that again as soon as you get on the highway fifty it's time for the sexual with it's time for the sexual abuse of children to stop a new law help survivors of childhood sexual abuse take legal action Jeff Anderson associates is one of the nation's leading child sex abuse law firms visit Anderson advocates dot com or call one eight hundred it's time for that eleven eighteen twelve San Vincente Boulevard Los Angeles California nine thousand forty nine traffic on the tens every ten minutes mornings.

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"With a group of people all over the weekend and somebody's daughter the guy is paying a seventy thousand dollar tuition bill for the first year school and if you work that I mean the cost is gonna go up over time so that probably works out to about three hundred twenty thousand right three hundred twenty thousand plus you know food in four hundred grand to go to college foreign Graham that's where we are so yeah like I said you know the people running the schools I just had the opportunity who is the most important people at a university who is the most important people it is the faculty it is the families the people who teach the classes and do the research they're the most important people at the university they should be paid a lot of money guess what they're not they're not paid a lot of money except in a couple of circumstances where you have somebody's pretty famous there they are not paid a lot of money and they usually pay less than the administrators who like I said are useless they don't create any value at all and yet the administrators are paid more university of Michigan has I think the I think the number was eighty eight people as diversity faculty on staff at the university of Michigan and the high and the highest paid of which was making four hundred thousand dollars a year they're spending like ten fifteen million a year on people in diversity eighty eight people I'm I have the number wrong but I'm not off by March I mean this is this is basically like the college experience nowadays you're going to see the assistant associate dean provost for gender equality zero office is next to the Starbucks climbing wall that is going to school today not to mention athletics a lot of people there's there's some big misconceptions about athletics a lot of people think that athletics as a profit center first the first goals and it is not it is in a handful of cases I want to say eight to ten schools make money if you look at a school like Alabama I mean they they make scads of money off the football team I mean they do make a lot of money and that's the funny thing is about college athletics is that every athletic director at every school is trying to replicate what Alabama is doing but the economics just don't work in most of these athletic program programs just don't make money they don't make any money they actually drain resources from the school and yes you have what a guy Clemson demo Sweeney what is the make a like nine million dollars U. S. didn't seen you have professors make you like forty thousand a year this is madness which is a luxury but we can no longer afford it is a luxury that we can no longer afford we can't we can't do this anymore we have to change the notion everybody has to go to school that's just not true it's no longer a golden ticket in fact it's a brown ticket is a Kurd ticket because if you go to school you the the education socks and a lot of cases and you run up a couple hundred thousand dollars worth of debt can you start off your life not equipped to enter the work force and full of debt it is a brown ticket sorry I just I can't resist look I have I have a bachelor's and I have a master's so I am an educated person I guess except I went to school there were not that great I mean the Coast Guard academy is a good school but nobody knows about enough nobody knows about it doesn't really count in universities San Francisco I you know it's okay school but when I was applying for jobs nobody really thought it was a great so I you know having gone to number one the school that nobody knows about number to a school that nobody has in high regard it's a bit like not going to college I mean I'm kind of like somebody who doesn't really have an education and I've done fine I have done absolutely fine and trust me you can get by without going to school there's actually you know it's interesting there's actually a school font that says that you should try to get into Harvard and just get in and go for like one year and then quit because the value of Harvard is not graduating from Harvard it's actually getting into Harvard which sort of puts a seal of approval on you that Hey you got into Harvard so you must be really smart but the education is I mean it's a great education but it's not really Wierd bear and graduating doesn't really matter so just get into Harvard and go for your quit I mean that's basically what's Achterberg.

"university san francisco" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

Veteran On the Move

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on Veteran On the Move

"Get to talk about what you're doing on the entrepreneurial scene and business today take us back. I can tell us what you did in the army sure joe happy to thank you very much for having today. Appreciate the opportunity. I kinda got tricked into going. <hes> <hes> my route into the army. I knew the kid. My father was a a lifelong military officer <hes> he had left the hawaiian islands where he grew up to do. ROTC university san francisco and i knew that was going to be my path. My dad who was not fond early in his career of west point grads developed a fondness later iran. I believe and basically bribed me into applying to west point by a promise me i could get my driver's license earlier than my mother was going to let me so so i ended up at age seventeen unable to vote <hes> putting up my hand in in swearing in on the plane of west point <hes> and it was probably one of the best things that happened to me <hes> it was a horrible experience to go through in many ways but a wonderful experience to have as a foundation to start the rest of my life and dan went into the signal corps much to my father chagrin. <hes> i grew up in a family knowing there were only two branches in the united states army infantry and infantry support and and so when i went signal corps was taken out of the will until i graduated ranger school when my father found his way to put me back in i had a wonderful short career the eighty second airborne division as you well know many things in the military are made by the lowest bidder in a plane made by the lowest was bitter and shoot made by the lowest bidder did not work out real well for me. <hes> i was actually in the sago for the three seven three armor. Battalion is my last simon and before its inactivation. We were volunteered to be the first group of human wind dummies to go out on a c. Seventeen about seventeen of us got injured on that jump and i was medical out of the military which for me was very very difficult because when i graduated high school and went to west point the word civilian was not in my vocabulary. Maya very proudly watched a father served for over twenty five years <hes> i i watched the hardships he went through but the pride he had in what he did and listening to him in leadership challenges he faced. I knew that's how i was going to spend spend the rest of my life so like many bright eyed young second lieutenant i kind of had my way paved from platoon leader to chairman of the joint chiefs and <hes> having to get out as a newly pinned on captain was very hard for me. <hes> and i went through a variety different interviews. I was very fortunate when i got out in the nineties nineties. There was a growing crop of junior military officer recruiting firms that were actively recruiting young captains that were getting <music> out in in helping to put them into interviews and i went through over eighteen interviews i interviewed from everything from being a salesman salesman for corrugated boxes in south carolina where my interview where literally walked in a pair of jeans a t shirt with a spit cup in hand to the job ultimately ended up at which was a consulting firm called kurt salmon associates and it was pure eared allen say dumb luck i mean i definitely the junior military officer recruiting firms out there and so that made it easier it was dumb luck that i got into that interview because because i sat with that individual and didn't realize what they look for <hes> in this particular firm war people who are a little bit more her <hes> risk-takers a little bit more entrepreneurial they were looking for. They were unique consulting firm in that. They put part of the consulting team on the client site so meaning. We didn't fly in fly out on monday and friday. We stayed there seven days a week and we may only stay for three months. We could stay for up to twelve months <hes> but it was a little bit more like being in the military kind of going in doing your mission and getting out <hes> and the reason it ended up very fortunate for me was that firm in nineteen ninety not ninety eight actually was one of the first firms consulting firms decided it would take it's compensation in a half equity in half catch and because i had a computer science degree out of west point was the dot com boom. I was one of the first consultants assigned to one of. I e commerce clients which was a company called e. Toys dot com and each weighs dot com i was able to join them right before they started their around and got to ride them through several rounds of financing and IPO seven billion dollar valuation a death spiral into bankruptcy and <hes> bob was it was enlightening because it was not my company. It was not my startup. I was there as a consultant but i was able to watch the entire chief executive cutive team in and how they went through both the good times and the bad times in the two things for me it it definitely laid foundation of of how i've worked with start ups ever since <music> but more than that it's really gave me an insight on what not to do you remember when during the military probably have many good leaders that you modeled yourself health out of but after but you also probably learned a lot on sometimes even more from the bad leaders <hes> and so watching the mistakes a startup in the dot com amdahl made has has definitely informed in made me more successful as as i've gone forward story i swear i i have a marine corps everybody in mind that worked for that same cardboard box company because they interview scenario sounds very familiar to me. I think he interviewed a lot of people which i think it was a pretty good company. It's just you know you're selling cardboard boxes. So which which is a joke. It's funny because a lot of people they turn turn got used a lot when we were getting out of both military and out of grad school was now people wanted the sexy job they want goldman sachs they wanna mckinsey the either a navy friend who started his own private equity firm investing in the unsexy businesses in in one of the ones he invested in over a decade ago was a pallet company of all things in you know that's just not definitely not sexy and he today is worth worth significant amount of money in less than a decade because he just slowly built that company up and at the end of the day companies need palettes and he just made sure that he it was constantly either building the best pal company or acquiring the best pallet company so while i definitely got the sexy job going to start up <hes> the the non sexy one's definitely have not only their place in how the country progresses but they can definitely be very lucrative absolutely and you know. It's not just i in job seeking that. That comes up also comes up in entrepreneurship because everybody wants to start up the cool new app. You know this is going to be the next uber for the such and such industry you hear all of that or i'm going to invent the next iphone but the fact is if you're good at executing on a a basic need in the community then you can be successful i i've had folks on the podcast where guy got out of the.

officer united states army infantry an ROTC goldman sachs joe salesman iran dan chairman Battalion kurt salmon associates south carolina simon bob consultant chief executive allen
"university san francisco" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

13:51 min | 3 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Four dig Chad, the chatshow dot com Twitter handle at Chad Benson show. Legalize marijuana big it's been, you know, just going from state to state people talking about we need to just remove the federal law against it. Not just medical marijuana. We need recreational marijuana. Look, if you don't know much about me. I'm kind of libertarian on the whole drug thing. I really think the drug war has not worked. You look at how much money we spend on it. How many people we have to have in law enforcement on it? How much it has led to more organized crime. What happens with the drug cartels? This is where they make their money all these gangs. And it just doesn't make sense to me that you're going to it's like prohibition, like what we did with alcohol. That's what started organized crime. Really right component. Because now they had this big thing that can make money on take that away and you take away a lot of their power. And so to me, you, legalize it you tax. It used the tax money for substance abuse centers. So people can get treatment if they need see, I think, the vast majority of people. Who don't do drugs would still not do drugs if they were legal. When I go to Colorado, I don't say, oh, wanna go smoke pot, because I don't smoke. Yup. The reason I don't smoke pot is not because it's a legal. I don't smoke pot because I just don't think it's good for me. And I don't wanna do it. Same thing with crack cocaine and heroin, if heroin is legal tomorrow. I'm not going to go shoot up because heroin is legal. Now, I know some people will some people, the point is that it's a legal and that's why they don't do it. And that's true. So there will be some more people trying now for kids, it would still be legal for kids. But it just makes no sense to me. We've, we're losing the war on drugs. We're not winning it with all the people who are being killed with the amount of money that we're spending on it. It just doesn't make sense to me. So I'm for legalizing. But I do think you still need to look at the fact that there will be unintended consequences. So from. A new study that is coming out from, from Michigan, right? They did a study on the legalization of marijuana and they found that, while there was a decrease in diagnoses of chronic pain following the legalization of marijuana in Colorado. There was also a notable increase in and injuries while driving under the influence. And I think it's important because I remember when this was first starting, and I brought that up on the air, I said, driving drunk, there's going to be some people driving. Stone stone is called did stupid, Greg, every stone doesn't talk like that. I know. But it's fun. So dude, you think that we're all going to be driving. That so twisted because really what we do we sit at home to we don't go out driving when we're. Well, that's because it's a legal and you don't want to get busted. But if it's legal won't you be driving your smoking. Well, evidently, some people are. Ten percent increase in motor vehicle accidents of five percent. Jumping out Kahal abuse overdoses after it was legal. I don't know if that's any relation to that. Are you drinking and smoking, that's the other thing when people talk about it being a gateway drug to other things, and everybody goes to Kate a drug? I've been smoking for twenty years, and I don't do. Irwin. I agree. It's not a gateway drug for everybody. But there is such a thing as a gateway drug. I think the biggest gateway drug is alcohol because most people will have a drink at a younger age before they're going to smoke pot, or we'll have a drink of beer before they would shoot up heroin or have a drink of wine before they're going to do coke. Most people don't go. I don't drink at all, but a ham cocaine. Right. So there is a little bit of a gateway thing to it. I don't know that, that should make them just say. Five percent fewer hospitalizations of chronic pain, though, after marijuana was legalized. So. Less chronic pain, more accidents and more injuries related to the accidents while driving under the influence. So here's the bottom line author, Dr Gregory, Marcus. From the UC university. San Francisco says we need to think carefully about the potential health effects of substantially enhancing, the accessibility of canvas has been done now in the majority of states, now, he's the health cardiologists and associate chief of cardiology for research at UCSF. So this unique transition to legalization provides an extraordinary opportunity to investigate hospitalizations. Among millions of individuals in the presence of enhanced access. Our findings demonstrate severe potential harmful effects that are relevant from physicians in policymakers, as well as for individuals considering cannabis use agree agree. You got to look at the unintended consequences, and if you make cocaine legal and you make heroin, legal and you make marijuana legal, there are going to be more people, trying it, there are going to be more people driving under the influence. Absolutely. The other side of that is how many fewer people are going to be killed in gang wars. How many fewer law enforcement people are going to have to put their lives at risk every day? How much less money is going to be made on that to push more people towards criminal activity. So they're going to be trade-offs. There are always trade-offs, and we've got to figure out which trade off four in which one were against. Eight four four dig Chad program for chat. There's a great piece out in the Washington Times. And I think Fox News is picked it up to now by Tammy Bruce and she's talking about a new problem with identity politics. And I've seen this coming over the last few years, and it just keeps getting worse. So when I saw her column like, yeah, let's talk about this again. And here's what's going on. We are re segregation, the college campus, re segregating the college campus. And here's what I mean by that the national association of scholars has a new study up and they found quote at least seventy five American colleges. Seventy-five have black only graduation ceremonies. What a separate graduation ceremony. So you go to college together for four years. You're in classes together for four years. Activities together for four years. But at the end we're going to graduate separately. And this is what they've requested. So we had an entire civil rights movement to desegregate, and now they are voluntarily segregating again. Separate but equal was wrong with right? So seventy five American colleges at least have black graduation ceremonies forty three percent of survey. Colleges offer segregated residential halls thing about this. So the whole point we're trying to get to is a colorblind society where we can all get along. Together, we can live together eat together work together. Play together fellowship together. And the way to do that is to live in separate dorms, and graduate and separate graduation ceremonies. This is what I was telling you today. I'm living in bizarro world because. I've always believed that you treat everybody equally that I don't care what your skin color is you shouldn't care what my skin color is. And we should all try to get along together. Right. That used to be called liberal. That's no conservative. And I've always thought it was conservative, but I mean, people used to say, well, a liberal in, in the traditional sense of liberal, not left wing. But now you're called racist, if you say that. I mean really think about if say, I really believe that we should treat everyone the same. What do you mean everyone the same? That means you don't want to give the treatment that people deserve because you have privilege everyone treated the same. Well, you can't treat everyone the same because everybody's not the same. But then how do you figure it out? We figured out the way we want to figure it out. And obviously you're white, so you're privileged. So we've got to help these other people who aren't I'm privilege and you don't understand that. I can't help you, man. So now when you say you want everybody treated, the same you're a racist. I don't want to segregate people. I want everybody to come together racist. Don't you understand the people should have their own place? They should have their own safe-space, and people have color, only people of color around them. But I thought the whole point was that we, we need to get along. No, the point not anymore. Harvard separate commencement for African Americans. I made news in two thousand seventeen this is from Tammy Bruce. New York Times headlined said this colleges. Celebrate diversity with separate commencement nothing about that for second. You're celebrating diversity with segregated commencement s-. The newspaper wrote it was Harvard's first commencement for black graduate students. And many of the speakers talked about a different more personal kind of struggle the struggle to be black at Harvard this event, followed the traditional end of your ceremony that had taking place, two days, earlier and organizer of Harvard separate graduation ceremony told the AP, we really wanted an opportunity to give voice to the voiceless at Harvard, so many students identify with the African diaspora, but don't necessarily feel welcome as part of the larger community, and they don't feel like their stories are being shared, so Bruce points out. So the argument for the separate event, is that the Ivy league university. They've attended for years, doesn't accept them and has racial issues. So the answer is a segregated commencement of it is they're leaving reinforcing the perception that they don't feel accepted. Is is that? Is that really how you fix this? And the people who are for the separation this re segregation say, hey, look, I mean, people always associate based on interest in affinities, and that's absolutely true. You can join a club for surfing. You can join a club for jogging. You can join the chess club or the choir or the band or. Political group a religious group. But you know what all those things have in common? They're things that you've chosen to do. They're, they're, they're not based on your skin color, or whether you're a boy, or a girl, remain, or a woman, there based on your ideas, your interests, your beliefs, your feelings, so you don't have to exclude people based on what they look like. But what they're doing a saying it's all about skin color. Ward Connerly said president of the American civil rights institute. He said, these black amendments serve to amplify racial differences. College is the place where we should be teaching and preaching the view that you're an individual and choose your associates to be based on other factors rather than skin color, the Tammy, Bruce says he or she says. When you look at this identity politics that the left preaches it requires division and other nece. They're always trying to say all conservative. See everybody is the other. No, it's really the left the does see it requires the view of people. Unlike yourself. As unknowable and unrelatable therefore, you are unknowable and unrelatable. Hence the t shirts. Black thing you wouldn't understand nothing. Can separate you more? Then to see that no one else can understand you simply because the other person has a different skin color. There's no way they can relate. There's no way they can empathize. There's no way they can understand. So I guess we need to reset gate. Is that the America you want? Is that even the American Martin Luther King junior wanted, I shouldn't think so. I want I want us all to get along one everybody be treated equally under the law. And I don't want everything divided based on something Scillies, the pigment of your skin, eight four four dig Chad, get you on the program, eight four four. Dig chad. i want to talk to you about the sexual revolution and the new york police officer who had to fake his own death coming up in a minute my name's greg knapp on the chad benson show i'm andy solomon may twenty seventh is memorial day and in preparation university of phoenix plant fifteen thousand flags on the phoenix campus lawn for its tenth straight year brian ish mile senior director of the university of phoenix office of military and veteran affairs and former army sergeant has more for me as a combat veteran and.

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"university san francisco" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"All right, six thirty seven might McConnell. The rest of the fire. This college admissions scandal, and we had the sailing coach fired. At Stanford University, poor guy selling coaches out the door, and I mentioned earlier that is that west once, and there was some landslide along the beach. And they mentioned that San Diego states surfing team was practicing and that the team was okay. But a lot of their equipment was affected by this landslide surfing NCAA surfing. Really? So I did look it up on his list of the top ten. Surfing teams NCAA surfing teams in the US. You Cal San Diego is considered to be number one number skipped one number two university of California Santa Cruz. Number two have point. Loma Nazarene University. You Cal Santa Barbara's in their university of Hawaii Manoa, California, polytechnic almost. Technik poly tech state university. San Francisco state, San Diego State and then university of North Carolina Wilmington, but the one that really surprised me Monmouth university say whereas that Monmouth New Jersey. I didn't think the waves roll that big Monmouth is in the top ten in the country of surfing schools, and the only one I guess when well the upper east coast, but North Carolina Wilmington is in there too. So those are your top ten sailing schools. I don't know probably a lot of the same ones in California. I would think it's about six thirty nine. We've got to get to a market check here from Bloomberg excuse me, then Chuck stands by with traffic. That's next. Hey, alexa. Let me hear my favorite getting.

San Diego San Diego State university of California Santa university of North Carolina W NCAA Monmouth university Stanford University university of Hawaii Manoa Loma Nazarene University Cal Santa Barbara California San Francisco McConnell North Carolina Chuck Monmouth New Jersey alexa Bloomberg US
"university san francisco" Discussed on The Jump

The Jump

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"university san francisco" Discussed on The Jump

"Can light it up has experienced laying. It's the warriors. Can they get to? The warriors level all they need is to at the top three players in the league and three other stars. That's all that's all it takes to get to the warriors. No one is on their level eight ranks before the season. Remember kyri, very confident. He says can we beat Golden State in a seven game series? Yes. He's there's one factor that they're aware of an I'm aware of that. I've seen them up close. I've played them. So many times I think there's liberty in that just certainly the last part that he knows how to play him confident against him. He's a big shots loves playing career. I think that's and I'll tell you the warriors really respect him. The I this is going to be good Saturday night. All right. It's time for a league pass game tonight. Born it's at bucks that's eight thirty eastern night Kupu East-leading books Kemba Walker and the Hornets could be happy after that all star. Not look Kevin said that he felt he was deserving Zach. You had Bradley Beal on your board. Good UK Campbell taking spot. Bill Simmons Kemba, they're interchangeable happy for him. But he's super deserving. Nobody carriers. Have Kent carries a heavy in the league. It's fitting you said Jaanus in all these other things Kemba Walker and the Hornets. I mean, that's that's that's that's Walker in some other guys sixties band or something walk around the Charlotte Hornets. Yeah, that's gone video. We just flashed up there. It was Kemba finding out. He was an all-star starter. I I live the most Kemba thing possible come inside with us. The moment Campbell finds out. He's a starter. His reaction is like a small smile, right? Yeah. Chiloe key guy, but we had him here on set last week. And it was very clear how much it means to him to be a starter in Charlotte where the game is being played. I'm sure I mean, this has been coming on for the last few years, and I'm glad that he's finally emerged as an all star in now that is in Charlotte. He's definitely going to get the applause from the fans wants to game is there, but he's been having a great season in the Charlotte team tends to get over love, your friend, Michael and the Hornets are happy that he's going to be happy. 'cause they want him to take that contract. This summer at the buzzer last night Bill Russell, put it out on Twitter. He was calling for good nickname ideas because he never have one when he played Bill. Russell get whatever he wants. We asked some ideas. Here's a few of them came up with the see we've got the block father. Someone came up with several people just Lord of the rings Kipi Bill. Russell can't be derivative of something else. It has to be him. Go originally. What are the reasons? Pretty good, Don university, San Francisco dons, Don, I don't know. I promise the different.

Bill Simmons Kemba Hornets Kemba Walker Bill Russell Charlotte Hornets kyri Charlotte Campbell Bradley Beal UK Don university Twitter San Francisco Kent Michael Kevin Jaanus Zach
Smarter Pricing Could Ease Parking Frustration

60-Second Science

02:07 min | 3 years ago

Smarter Pricing Could Ease Parking Frustration

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you drive in the city, you've no doubt experienced the frustration circling block after block after block cruising parking. But scientists who study that phenomenon have a solution to free up more spots. You make them more expansive. So people have to decide whether to balk father away and Bailey's closer and be more. It's Benneton as system scientists at Tel Aviv university. San Francisco has piloted a program like that that raises parking rates based on demand, and it's been shown to reduce cruising. But the censors required for those systems can cost millions of dollars to install an operating Benneton says so instead writing in Tripoli, intelligent, transportation systems magazine, he and his colleague near Fomin describe an algorithm that can determine smart pricing without the use of sensors. They tested on the Israeli city of but yum near Tel Aviv. I they divide the city and disowns the estimate the parking demand in each stone by calculating the number of parts and offices there, and then they factor in parking supply in the area, along with how wealthy potential Parker's might be with that data the algorithm suggested pricing for each sewn that would guarantee a ninety percent occupancy rate of parking spots citywide. Meaning ten percent of spots were always available to drivers willing to pay the price regardless of neighborhood. Of course, not everyone will agree that jacking up parking prices will ease driver frustrations. Like last time benenson proposed hiking rates for city residents about one hundred react sill the web, and the ninety nine of them that said that they never third such as Jupiter statement from the professors, and I should be burnished a buyer that ultimately he says, it'll be up to cities themselves to gauge their residents political appetite for an easier parking spot. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher dot. Oh.

Christopher Dodd Yata Tel Aviv University Tel Aviv Christopher Dot Transportation Systems Magazin Bailey Tripoli San Francisco Parker Fomin Sixty Seconds Ninety Percent Ten Percent