17 Burst results for "University Of Portland"

"university portland" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:42 min | Last month

"university portland" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"My friends. I'm Dennis Prager. This is Friday Show Eric, go the happiness Our So the, uh the young woman who was been on my show weekly. Told me going into the studio today. That a friend of hers? Well, you know what? Why don't you give her the mic even though it's not Thursday? I just want this story related about my happiness book. Okay? This is Julie. Yeah. Alright, Here we go. Yeah. So in high school, we went on a senior class trip and one of my friends who is coming into the show today. She's very excited about it to observe she was reading your happiness book. And a lot of, um the other students at my high school said to her. Why are you reading that guy's book? He's a fascist. He's a this. He said that and I just remember sitting there. I didn't know who you were at the time. I'm sorry to say, but I do remember that incident. And I thought, Why would my good friend be reading a book written by a fascist that just doesn't add up. Thank you. Okay, There we go. So I'd like to tell you, my listeners my reaction. My reaction is pure sadness. So I've never said this on the air. I don't hide anything. Essentially from you, my listeners as you well know, as one caller, so well put a dentist You are transparent, which I am proud to be. As one of my son said, You have no idea how difficult it is. To be raised by a transparent Very funny line, he said at a speech after transparent life, But anyway, I I would like to share with you. My 99% of my reaction. I have 1% something else. But 99% is sadness. Take my happiness book, for example. There is just yesterday. L a Did you see it? Sort of an epidemic of unhappiness among young people. Did you send it to me? Yeah, well, then you sought. It's hard for me to remember which he sends, which I find. Put that up again, Would you? I would like to make note of it in this instance. And there was no doubt in my mind that my book can help a lot of young people. It helps a lot of people of every age. Mhm. There was no where I've gone that somebody has not told me what an effect my book unhappiness had on them. Look, you know how the happiness our has affected Many of you so why would it not be true? For a whole book of my thoughts, Unhappiness. So what the left has done in my life has deprived a lot of people of things that could help them a great deal. That is how I view it. By the way, Isn't it interesting that any of them think I'm sure the answer is no. Why would a fascist write a book on happiness? Do you know any other fascists who's written a book because mine happiness? See what they what they do out of staggering fear. The left is unbelievably fearful of conservative ideas. That's why they don't debate us. That's why they don't want us on campuses. That's why if you show 15 minute prayer you video at a school The left comes down on you as if you had shown. Mind camp. Which by the way, even mind camp if you thought it properly as evil, But obviously we're good. But in any event that's that's the way they would react. So what's your sadness? I've lived with this my whole life. I really do say good things. I'm really only preoccupied with goodness. And if the left dismisses a decent guy like me Doesn't speak well for the left. That's really my primary reaction. The kids were deprived of something that could help them. It's in The Wall Street Journal of this article that I just made reference to June 10th. What is today? The 11th. So it's today's paper. The Internet predates the date by a day. The pandemics toll on teen mental health. CDC tried to spark a panic about covid hospitalizations while ignoring the real crisis. God bless these authors. Let's see who are one of the one of their IEDs. When is the doctor conductor? Gandhi, an infectious disease physician and professor of medicine at UC San Francisco. Oh, my God. For Dr Gandhi. Oh, while you see San Francisco. I want a wasteland. Dr Noble, the other The other author. An emergency physician and director of Covid response. Also, U. C S F. Varanasi is emergency department. Are there. Three authors and back to Leslie Beeman is a public health researchers. The Oregon Health and Science University, Portland State University School of Public Health. Oh, that's personal contributed okay? There is an epidemic of unhappiness. In a country that is freer and easier going. And More opportunity, giving Than any on Earth. The left has created all of the crises. All of them. They made up most of them. Of course, there was Covid. Was there a crisis of Covid among teenagers? It virtually did not touch teenagers. Everyone knows that to be true, But if you say that YouTube may take you down So that's my reaction. These kids could have had something good in their lives. A book on happiness. But they were brainwashed. What is amazing to me? I don't know if that's accurate. What is distressing that amazing If I knew that there was a book unhappiness and somebody said to me You know, a fascist wrote that I'm trying to put myself in high school college age. I remember myself very well. I see a book. Happiness is a serious problem. I see on Amazon. How many people say it changed their lives? And somebody says, you know, that's a fascist wrote this So I know I would read it. Because I would find it so fascinating that a fascist wrote a book on Happiness. Cause it doesn't comport with my concept. My picture of someone who's the fattest They have not been taught to think they have been taught to respond. Yes, sir. No, sir. Yes, ma'am. No, ma'am. So sure. Nobody says, sir. Romance. I'm using the the language of the armed forces. They don't say, sir. Oh, man, that is correct. Alan, Is that your reaction to when you think of a kid who won't read the happiness book? It's their, It's their loss. That's right. Mhm. The damage every day. Every day. I bring to you the damage the damage done to young people by the left. And to everybody else. Here's the latest look at this YouTube. Well, it's an amazing story. YouTube banned Senator Ron Johnson for discussing early treatment of Covid 19. It will come out as everything does that YouTube was killed a lot of people, as has Facebook as his Twitter. And the like. They have. They are actually responsible for many deaths. And needless to say, it will not bother them. They will not lose 11 minute of sleep. Because power is more important than life. Google's YouTube has stepped up its draconian censorship of a sitting U. S. Senator. That Americans accept this that Publicly elected officials are shut down and their ability to communicate. By the real fascists. That's the That's the joke. Of course they do this. I'm used to this because I studied everything. About the left since graduate school. Stalin Cold Trotsky, a fascist Trotsky, the father of Bolshevism. The head of the Red Army. But he opposed Stalin..

Leslie Beeman Dennis Prager Alan Stalin June 10th YouTube Google 99% 15 minute 1% CDC Facebook Julie Red Army Earth Senator 11 minute Gandhi Oregon Health and Science Univ Thursday
"university portland" Discussed on The Free Agents

The Free Agents

06:23 min | 6 months ago

"university portland" Discussed on The Free Agents

"Some rumors occurs shams coming through with that inside pass on the athletic s already. He was dropping some names. Some juicy names we gotta talk about. But let's get to our special guests because he's joining a super early on the west coast and we're really appreciative. Dairy is it's blazers. Tv analysts lamar hurd. What's up man. how you doing who honor in rejoin you guys. Are we really appreciate again. It is very early where you're coming from so we thank you for jumping on here and we'll let's just get right to it. I mean the way this happened is because you are a wedgie. Whisperer lamar. There's been four wedgies from the blazers and you're giving us a shout out every time there's something about you that balls getting stuck. Yeah it's been crazy Like the amount of what we've had this year. Are i think more than we've had in any other season and we're only a month and the last one we got. I think it'd happened. Also like block yup in our. I don't know that that's happening. Any of our games before probably has played by. Just can't remember that and you guys are first one that i remember talking about it. Here in the league was the two thousand sixteen two thousand seventeen season and For me coming from the college game. I hadn't watched him be a you know most basketball players do but i hadn't really dive into it very deeply so like this little things that i don't know like what are the hot shows. What some of the the the info behind the scenes those kind of things in so. I got you guys at the stars in nine guys just bought so much joy to people like what your show and Talking about the west and that was the first time. I felt. Like i'd heard it all the years. I've played basketball. I don't remember ever hearing that and it stuck in fit. So anytime i seeding in games like i got to give credit where the wedgie we really appreciate it. We got a big kick at anytime. Drop that and you're one of the ones like the rare guys that like a lot of people from the starters some not so in tune with us move into no dunks and part of the athletic. You're right on it. That's why we really appreciate it. Because like most fans of your all the four guys the starters and then they leave it at that but you're dropping the no duck so like while you're talking about how did you get into television broadcasting into covering games like that. Yeah it's really weird. It's it's a long story that would take of a lot of time in terms of how that all came about basically what happened in two thousand seven basically retired from playing. I just played a year overseas in. Germany came back to the portland area. Because i went to oregon state university portland's about ninety minutes. North of corvallis city oregon state is and i started working with a group of kids in youth basketball. In reason i did. It was because i grew up in houston. Texas am my childhood basketball coach. Probably the most influential person my life. Because i was a kid like you guys love basketball through and through in will do anything ford. I watched every game a new player as a new all staff as loved it. So i've been my basketball. Coach has a six kid He was a great influence to insult. Ended up happening. Is i moved from south west houston to this little town north of using cleveland taxes. To go to this tiny one a private school that had about one hundred thirty kids k. Through twelve but had the time of my life because the coach had accused at the jam. We had a good time and we always played in. So i spent seven years with this guy in once. I got a little bit older. I realized how much he had really impacted my life just through my love for basketball so fast forward to spend four years at oregon state one year overseas in germany. And come back to the us as a quick paul's and a friend of mine. My actually my college roommate said while you're in in town you know before you go back overseas or at the time i had an invite to get involved in a d league and so my friends will go do that once you go work at his gym called the who is the six facility in beaverton oregon which is where the nike are west of portland and You know just work out for free. Because that's we're all looking for life. And so i did it and while i was in the gym i was like oh i love this like i feel like i'm able to do for these kids with my clothes. Do for me all those years and retired so when i did that guys two thousand seven. I thought there's no way on. Tv always wanted to be on the onus being analysts. I wanted to share my love for the game through that medium. But you take classes when you're at school. Like communication class communicated glasses. I did a you know. The the biggest thing i think i got from those classes was just the understanding of how and why in asking all those experts in golden into surface but i thought Classes were for ways. When i decided to retire. Twenty three with a down. Korean college in short professional career but oregon state university's administration. They asked him to be a part of the coaching search. Two they were doing Two thousand eight. And i joined to do that during that whole process. They asked me. Do you still want to get in tv. A said yes. I have no idea how they ended up connecting me with fox sports northwest which was covering all the regional games in our area and i had a meeting with the executive director in two weeks later. I was hired. That was my introduction. Tv in two thousand and eight and since standards just been from fox sports northwest route four north west of Networks some games. Espn two thousand sixteen. The blazers called me expectedly in here. We are now and so you obviously must love it. Yeah i do. I love anything with basketball of. But specifically as being with the blazers. I've been in his city in portland area since two thousand seven and i've made a lot of context latter relationships in like talk about the game of basketball. You get a lot of influence through. You can have a lot of impact a love organization mission. it's really about impacting people through our platform where the biggest show in town here has been that way for a long time so in addition to the cool basketball that we get to watch and be a part of we get to do a lot of really neat things in our community. So it's been a really nice fit for me. I think your love of the game really shines through on the broadcast. You're obviously having fun calling these games. We got questions from some of our fans there are asking. Is there beef between.

seven years houston germany nike portland four years Texas four guys first one one year nine guys two weeks later fox sports six Two about ninety minutes oregon beaverton oregon cleveland lamar
"university portland" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"university portland" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Tackle some of the issues relating to mental health and that was very much say with loneliness is about removing the stigma of being low knee and thinking. Well how come show that people stay connected to society. The very idea of a loneliness minister struck some people as comical. This is so British. The American Comic Stephen Colbert for instance. They've identified the most ineffable human problem and come up with the most cold bureaucratic solution but tracey crouch didn't mind at. She thought that it was a really good opportunity to get the message out there that we in the United Kingdom recognize that the issue of loneliness is something that is serious and that was recognized by the number of countries. Got In touch with us to come and talk about how they too could tackle lowness not included by the way the former chief medical officer from the United States that former chief medical officer. Being Vivek Morty. That's right yes. Morty had found compelling argument that loneliness was increasing and that loneliness can be damaging even physiologically damaging the mechanisms for how it works and for how it impacts our lives. I think are still in the very early stages of being understood and so we have a lot of data that shows strong associations between loneliness and health outcomes including shortened life spans and conditions like heart disease. We have far less of are the kind of studies that beyond the shadow of doubt prove causation But when stories about loneliness hit the media that Dow tends to be glossed over. Consider the much reported story acquainting loneliness and smoking. Researchers say suffering through it can be as lethal as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. That statistic is often cited. So let me give you a little background of where that came from. That is Julian hotlines dead. And I am a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University Portland's Dad was a lead author of two thousand ten paper. Where that fifteen cigarettes? A day comparison came from she and her co authors. Did what's called a Meta analysis rolling up nearly one hundred and fifty earlier studies that covered more than three hundred thousand research subjects so this. Meta analysis really wanted to look at the overall effect of being socially connected or lacking social connections on overall risk for premature mortality. Some measures of social connection our objective marital status instance or network size. Or whether you live alone and others are more subjective like feelings of loneliness. Yeah so it's good to define loneliness upfront. Because I think it's used very loosely and can often be used interchangeably with social isolation and other related terms. So how does her field define loneliness? Loneliness has been defined as that subjective discrepancy between our actual level of social connection and our desired level of connection okay. That's a pretty concrete definition. And maybe not what you were. I might typically consider loneliness. Let's hear it again that subjective discrepancy between our actual level of social connection and our desired level of connection with that definition. You can see why loneliness may have spiked lately with the rise of social media. It's easier than ever to see other people doing things that you'd like to be doing being with people you'd like to be with but it's also important to note the difference between loneliness and social isolation and so someone could be objectively isolated and feel lonely but it's also possible that you could be objectively isolated and not feel lonely so you may take pleasure in that solitude and conversely someone may have many people around them and yet still feel profoundly lonely okay so loneliness and social isolation are not the same thing and in their. Meta analysis loan stat and her colleagues looked at whether there was a relationship between mortality and social connections generally including loneliness social isolation marital status etc. In other words how important is social connection to how long you live? The participants in the rolled up studies were on the older side average age nearly sixty four and they were followed for an average of seven and a half years. So what did Lund said find? What we found was that those who were more socially connected across these various indicators had a fifty percent increase odds of survival and the researchers controlled for socio demographic differences as well as a person's initial health status and cause of death so what that means is that these studies followed people over time and they were fifty percent more likely to be alive at the follow up than those who lacked social connections or had insufficient social connections. Okay so that looks to be strong evidence. That longevity is at least strongly correlated with social relationships. But you could imagine that. The Causal Relationship isn't so airtight. It could be for instance. The people with fewer social connections may have other issues personality or behavioral issues or whatever that make it harder to maintain social connections and my concern. Was that by simply just stating the fifty percent increased odds of survival the the general public and to some extent even perhaps the medical community may not necessarily know what to make of that or how to contextualized that in other words. Holt didn't want to contribute to sensationalized reporting we are constantly bombarded with the latest health findings. And it's hard to know what to take seriously and whatnot to take seriously but she also didn't want her research finding to get lost so she and her colleagues tried to draw specific numerical parallels between the risk of low social connectivity and more common physiological risks things like alcohol consumption obesity air pollution and and smoking. Judging by the media's response to the fifteen cigarettes a day comparison the message got through but the nuance was lost. Oftentimes people will say that. Loneliness has a greater risk than smoking. Up to fifteen cigarettes per day and of course loneliness was one of the indicators. But it wasn't the only indicator remember. The researchers looked at a whole basket of social connections. All of which by the way can be measured more tangibly then loneliness but in the media reports it was loneliness that stood out now. This doesn't necessarily mean that loneliness doesn't create health risks so tell let's start by asking a different question. Where does loneliness come from? So the late John Casio argued that loneliness is a biological drive. Cassiopeia was one of the founders of a field called social neuroscience much like hunger and thirst biological drives so hunger motivates us to seek out food thirst to seek out water. That loneliness is a biological. Drive that motivates us to seek out others and being around others. Cassiopeia argued was a key to survival so we gain added resources by being around others. There's protection from predators there's protection from the elements on the flip side. Then when we're alone we have to be more vigilant and so throughout human history being around others has an essence ben a form of protection and more effective use of effort. So when we are alone. What's happening to us? So this activates regions of the brain that intern signal our physiology to adapt to these situations to handle whatever situation. We're in loneliness is our bodies cue that we need to get out in the world and participate in social life that again is the nyu sociologist. Erik Kleinberg. So if you experience some loneliness in your life that's not necessarily a bad thing. That can be restorative. And it's not something. We NECESSARILY WANT TO ELIMINATE. Because loneliness is what motivates us to reconnect socially the problem becomes when it becomes chronic loneliness places us in a threat state and that again is former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. And whenever you're in a state of threat you are concerned about self preservation. Morty believes this is how chronic loneliness can lead to bad health outcomes. The psychological stress of being an elevated threat state can lead to biological responses like higher blood pressure and inflammation. You might also become hyper vigilant about potential dangers. Like the proverbial man eating lion lurking in the tall grass of our ancestors savannah. And that's good. Because I want to err on the side of thinking it's a real threat because my survival may depend on it but in modern day world. If you're in an elevator threat stay for a prolonged period of time. Not only is exhausting. But that focus on yourself and that greater suspicion if you will.

social isolation Vivek Morty medical officer tracey crouch Stephen Colbert United Kingdom Cassiopeia United States Dow psychological stress Julian professor of psychology nyu Vivek Murthy Brigham Young University Portl Lund Holt Erik Kleinberg
"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Eleven ninety K. E. X. your wallet straight again the keyboard to text in wind comes just before the news at the bottom of the hour one eleven ninety six join can Cordy university Portland on February fourth for the a TF leadership in education awards with keynote speaker common award winning actor musician and education advocate info can Cordy leaders dot com Ken Corday university together toward change now Kate to whether a dry start to your Thursday with cloudy to mostly cloudy skies out there but a brand new coal from arrives by late morning and into the afternoon hours that means more rain back on the horizon the sea of which about half an inch of rain throughout the day it will be mild daytime highs in the fifties winds of the south and still in the cascades over seven thousand feet okay two meter on the state's Lasky watch Brian would inject with Orton weekdays on K. two news this morning we use the phone is where she's she was live from the city of angels this is coast to coast AM with George Noory RP and the incredible things you can do with that especially when you deal with life after death James Schwartz back with us on.

Portland Ken Corday university Kate Brian George Noory RP James Schwartz Lasky Orton
"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Anti BC news your wallet the keyboard to text in wind comes just before the news at the bottom of the hour eleven ninety six join can Cordy university Portland on February fourth for the a TF leadership in education awards with keynote speaker common award winning actor musician and education advocate info can Cordy leaders dot com Ken Corday university together toward change your home of the Oregon state beavers now Kate to weather a bit of a break for you on Friday at least for the first part of the day was overcast skies just some rain showers out about throughout the morning hours even if you sun breaks by the afternoon not daytime highs coming back up in the low fifties across the area still the cascades about five thousand feet but more rain in the forecast by Friday evening and going into Saturday I'm Kate to meet rather states Lasky watch Brian would encircle Fortin weekdays on K. two news this morning we to talk to George nori call the wildcard line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk toll free from east of the Rockies call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five to reach George via Skype use Skype name George nine seven three one three seven Georgia text message anytime at eight one eight two nine eight six five two one from the city of angels this is.

Portland Ken Corday university Kate Brian Rockies BC Oregon Lasky Fortin George nori Georgia
"university portland" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

Phil in the Blanks

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

"How's he going papacy you see you to see how's everything I got a real job? I just came from the job. Yeah I understand. You've had a busy day at a busy week yeah. Don't you always <hes> yes. I've never never changes well. I'm glad to see you. Thank you so much for doing this. So how'd you like the man cave here. Hey I like it. I like it as <hes> just saying my shop doesn't look quite this good well aboard Red Robbins car. I hit my fifty seven in here before but I've pulled Robbins car in now so it looks a little fancier fifty seven fifty seven fifty seven Chevy Sham Rea- I'll have to show it to you hard top no convertible convertible. Oh Black Red Interior. Oh I had everything in it stock until it got stolen and I got it back. They actually covered it so it got trashed and so when I started redoing thought yeah what the hell so I took the engine out and I'm now running about seven hundred horsepower with Flo Master L. Forty Eight headers and all and it's really a lot of fun. I didn't know you're a hot Rod. Cow Runs on pure testosterone. You don't even put gas. I Senate so well. Are you curious why I wanted to talk to you where you gave me a little idea. I do something unique which I don't think you do something you did come on. That'd be all humility aside my goal in doing this podcast is I want to talk to the top experts in the world. I want to talk to the people that are the best at what they do. You know the regard with which I <unk> hold you and you know what role you played in my life and my family both directly and indirectly but I I wanted to know about you because you're always behind him. Ask people don't see it. Usually we're rolling rolling into the operating room and you were unconscious within seconds and then you take our bodies apart and put them back together again so I want to start out by just talking about you and I want people to know because you have a very interesting listing life aside from just what you do in medicine. Where'd you go to medical school? I I went to medical school in Oregon at Oregon Health Sciences University Portland Oregon Right. Where did you do your wrist and see and all of that I came to Los? Angeles did my residence at U._C._L._A.. And I finished college finished medical school. <hes> I did some graduate work in research and then I started my residency. Oh you actually did research before you went to your residency distancing. Yes what was the research yeah <hes> and chronology of how the brain works really did you start your residency and that goes six or seven years. What do you do your first year different from what you do in your six or seven of your first year you get to run around and do all what we call the Scutt work and and you get to take care of patients and you take care of all the administrative paperwork you get to go see patients when they come in the emergency room and you get to go see them on on the war in new and you help out with doctors but it is like an apprentice and each year you have a great advancement in what you do in your responsibilities and you go to the operating.

Oregon Health Sciences Univers Red Robbins Robbins Oregon Scutt Senate testosterone Los Angeles seven hundred horsepower seven years
"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Has the latest a forceful denial from President Trump Monday morning, pushing back on the New York Times report that said the F B I opened a counterintelligence investigation into whether the president had been working on behalf of Russia. The president spoke to reporters at the White House and never worked for Russia. Did I never worked for Russia? I think it's a disgrace that you even ask that question because it's a whole big fat hoax over the weekend. The president said the New York Times piece was quote, insulting. Karen travers. ABC news, Washington, Oregon governor Kate Brown will once again take the oath of office today. Keita's Jacob wreck says is expected that Brown will discuss her action plan for the next four years, for example, with healthcare expanding access and coverage specifically increasing access to mental health and addiction treatment. Then there's child. Welfare earthquake readiness print transportation. Browns also expected to talk about expanding the school year and giving low income families access to high quality preschool as well as the homelessness issue in her plans to further address it Browns. Inauguration will be at one forty five this afternoon in the house of representatives at the state capital. The search for nineteen year old duck hunter who went missing Saturday MIR s story is now a recovery effort rally Salisbury was with his father duck hunting by Russian island in separate boats. When the two got separated Riley's, dad Todd Tulsky news, he immediately called nine one one after Riley missed a check in. We have all of his gear the boat. And now a shotgun. No riley. And what happened? We don't know sheriff's deputies believe he most likely succumb to hypothermia. Elizabeth smart kidnapped in two thousand and two at age fourteen is weighing in on what's next for thirteen year old Jamie, Clawson, Wisconsin Jaime's main challenge looking forward to start afresh to try to create a new normal. Elizabeth smart now a child safety advocate was held for nine months against her will a lot of the things that I went through. I was very embarrassed. I was ashamed of I didn't want people to know what I'd been through. And I can only imagine that she to fill the same way smart says it'll be a tough road ahead for Jamie cloths, but her life doesn't have to be defined by what happened has changed her life. But it doesn't have to define it, Sherry Preston. ABC news in open houses being held today for the grand opening of the Oregon state university's Portland center. Spokesman Steve Clark says is part of the open house. You'll be able to see nearly thirty exhibits representing everything issue marine sciences.

President Russia Riley New York Times White House ABC Browns Kate Brown Jamie cloths Elizabeth Karen travers Sherry Preston Oregon state university Russian island Oregon hypothermia Steve Clark Keita Washington Salisbury
"university portland" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on This Week in Science

"No, no, no. However, they did find out. It's in the last eight percent is the intestine that wombat waste turns into a solid. Keep and this. Good that the while about colon. Yeah. So yeah. So the less eight percent of the intestine. It turns into a sold cube that shape is retained even after it goes through this round NS. So something is going on in the intestine that is not only making it cube shape, but making it a well preserved Q because otherwise the push through might might ruin that shape. So. It would appear that this is a combination of two things one. They eat a lot of dry food. Are you laughing at the number two, Justin? And so they're really dry and compact droppings, which means that it retains it shape. If it was a very wet poop as it is often in zoos, it is less cube shaped because it doesn't retain shape as well. So this dry kind of desiccated poop is cube shaped. But the second part how originally got cute shaped appears to have to do with the shape of their intestinal walls. There's very Asians in LS city along the walls. And so the stretches of untested. There's some of them were certain areas are less elastic and more stiff and this creates sharp edges resulting in a queue so to explain. A little bit better pig intestine has uniform elasticity. So this is part of this fluid. Dynamics stuff is that they push things through these intestines on a pig on a wombat to see what would happen. So the pig intestine has uniform city, which is why pig poop comes out round. But one bat intestines have an irregular shape, and they have to reveal like grooves where it stretch here which allows kind of for this coroner to form. But we're that gets weird is that there's only two there's not four groups. There's only two so how to grooves make a cute. So it's still it's still not clear we have a good idea to the start of it. But the other thing that Yang says is we currently only have two methods to manufacture cubes, we mold it or we cut it. Now, we have this third method. So this finding aside from clearing the air on this confusing thing that walnuts bats do. They're the only ones it has. It gives us a good idea of how they're getting that done it also oddly enough could potentially give us methodology to make to manufacture cube-shaped things out of soft materials. So that is if those grooves are on opposite sides, they would sort of for the other corners upon the structure, then the thing that I thought was. Yeah. Why why? Why is weird there's Q Poos? But not weird to me that there's round Poos. Also, I would assume has to be formed before exiting otherwise. Yeah. I think about like giraffe. Dear poop, like the product little milk dud? Yeah. It is weird. If you think about it from the not knowing that these things before they escape. Then you would assume everything would be logarithms. So for for the thinking about kind of the milk. Dud poop, which I apologize for comparing food. But we've talked about on the show before I would always kind of categorize the antelope oops by the different candy anyway. So so the the milk dud poop is it kind of makes perfect sense. If you think about it because as an animal, that's a ruminant that's kind of has a slow release of nutrients into the stomach from a forget, right. So it's kind of a constant drip of food into the back stomach before enters the intestines is it as it turns through the intestines. It's going to make the most compact shape, it can which is fear. So that kind of makes sense if you think about that when you think about carnivores they of the log poops 'cause they're eating all at once. They eat in one big group. It drops down to. It comes out all at once. The word poop is the most performance in English language. It starts puckered. It opens up puckers again at the end. Are you saying it's an automatic Pia? Visual and auditory. Florida. It's a performance. I love the idea that someday we'll be using technology based on one that bet intestines. Materials could be good. This could be good. I see is e Awam bat Plato Christmas present. Yeah. Nobody knows that. Plastic mold. Okay. And my my next door is from Portland state university. Portland. Portland.

Portland Portland state university Poos Justin Florida Yang milk eight percent
"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"After the second planned interim analysis among the four hundred seventy seven patients for whom follow up data at ninety days were available fifty eight percent of the patients in the early strategy group and fifty four percent in the delayed strategy group had died in the delayed strategy group thirty, eight percent did not receive renal replacement therapy. Criteria for emergency renal replacement therapy were met in seventeen percent of the patients in the delayed strategy group. Among patients with septic shock who had severe acute kidney injury. There was no significant difference in overall mortality at ninety days between patients who are assigned to an early strategy for the initiation of renal replacement therapy and those who are assigned to a delayed strategy. Allogeneic BK virus specific t cells for progressive multifold Lugo encephalopathy by Moharram moved Tolo from the MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. J c virus the cause of progressive, multi focal Lugo. Encephalopathy PM l. and the BK virus are genetically similar and share sequence homologation in immuno genyk proteins. These investigators treated three immunosuppressed patients with PM l. with ex vivo expanded partially HLA matched third party produced cry, oh, preserved b k. virus specific t cells. The immunosuppression in these patients was due to the conditioning regimen for cord blood transplantation. In one patient, a Milo proliferative neoplasm treated with rock-solid nib in another and aids in the third after tesol infusion in two of the patients alleviation of the clinical signs and imaging features of PM l. was seen and j c virus in the Cerebrospinal fluid cleared, the other patient had reduction in JC viral load. And stabilization of symptoms that persisted until her death, eight months after the first infusion, two of the patients had immune reconstitution syndrome donor derive t cells were detected in the Cerebrospinal fluid after infusion. Classification ontological and precision medicine. A review article by Melissa handle from the Oregon Health and science university Portland. A goal of precision medicine is to stratified patients in order to improve diagnosis and medical treatment. The health trajectory of person can be measured many times and in many ways, including by examining various aspects of Gino typic- pheno, typic- and environmental attributes. Clinical data currently include family history notes, laboratory reports, imaging, clinical instrument, outputs drugs, and drug doses, and interpreted variants in single genes. Well-structured clinical data can be readily integrated with discovery research data by using untolerable. He's which may clinical and basic science observations computer in a way that reflects present knowledge and allows new inferences integrating the two streams of data enables a mechanistic classification of disease across. Many data types making a more refined and dynamic classification of patients possible. This review describes on tala, jeez, and their use in computational reasoning to support precise classification of patients for diagnosis care management and translational research. The authors described terminologies on tala gies and the changes needed to permit analyses of.

immunosuppression neoplasm Gino typic MD Anderson Cancer Center Oregon Health and science univ Moharram Melissa handle Tolo Houston ninety days fifty eight percent fifty four percent seventeen percent eight percent eight months
"university portland" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"And get their day super super super fund they'll typically have at least two or three boombox is the big d batteries thank you you're still available at seven eleven you know and so we we have different speed groups and so we all get into portland at different times and we stage at what does it what does it university of portland university portland we always joke we always forget the name so yeah the university of portland school college seminary that helps kids college institute yeah so i'm curious why you do it because of the times that i've volunteer with kids next thing you know you're teaching to drive or you're helping them to figure out what school they're going to go to college you're talking about a scholarship like it turns into more than just biking i think everyone volunteers for a reason what's what's your reason yeah that's a great question you know the reason why i do what i do is for the students seeing them as mentioned at that i s t p watching their transformation from three miles to two hundred miles and can wanting more that just fulfilled my it filled me up with joy and pleasure and i feel right now with the way things are going in our society this is something that needs to happen we need to be doing the work that we're doing for these kids because you never get to be around people's i very much and you get to be around a bunch of people's first that's good and there's something that happens when it's your first time to do fill in the blank it's powerful really is it really is it's transformational it's the best word i could use to to just think about what happens i'm going to write a eighteen year old bike on a saturday so my friends have looked at my bike in there like you're ryden that die so like yeah man they say why are you run that dinosaurs because you know what i'm gonna be honest with you and life i lost my way a little bit are you sure that dinosaur across america i've written that bike across america three times i used to ride double centuries back to back to back to back over ten day period two thousand miles haven't done that in eighteen years having ruined a double century in eighteen years that bicycle became a clothes rack it's a place where i hung my clothes and the dry in about a year ago i got back up on that bike and i said you don't want i'm not gonna just see myself as an exerciser running on a treadmill and a gm or at an i met teaching spin class i'm like i'm going to get i'm still teach much spin classes but i am going to get out of this big box gym and all the spin room and i'm gonna get on that bicycle i'm going to get on that road i'm going to reconnect with humanity on the reconnect with other people and ultimately going to reconnect with myself and that's exactly what happens when you get on a eighteen year old clothes rack so do not laugh don't laugh at my clothes rack man with do not let i always saw your bike on lot i know what you're right we always have one or two close right bass guitar drums set you know with your parents get and they're like you're not gonna play that base for really weaker sales and sure enough to play it for what would you tell people listening right now they're gonna do this dp for the first time and it's gonna be it's gonna be it's gonna be hot it's going to be how would you coach hydrate what we know it's such a wonderful thing to see ten thousand people come together and some have you know like louis read from his sales chicken whose catering saturday night he's this will be his twentyseventh he's writing and then serving this is twenty seven and so you you have all these stories you can see the the ones that are like the greedy people who you know who get earned the stripes and then you see people who you like wow mile ten they're getting hurt know there's this really cool thing that happens is there's exchange of expertise and ideas there's a community of ten thousand people that is helping everyone get to portland and achieve their destination and he's also some mechanical i've seen crank arms fall off i've seen people hit a pothole and ruin wheel we had a student last year that did that and and.

portland eighteen years eighteen year ten day
"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Ic d was placed for primary prevention the procedure was complicated by lee dislodgement and seven years later lead fracture the device had never delivered any therapies and had not recorded any ventricular arrhythmias the patient underwent uncomplicated lead extraction and replacement six months later the patient presented to the emergency department after having facial flushing and lightheadedness while taking a hot shower she recalled intending to sit down and then awakening on the floor notable findings on examination included swelling in the face neck and arms and the presence of prominent collateral veins c t and geography revealed severe stenosis of the superior vena cava with a large filling defect suggestive of thrombosis this case demo strates the dilemma that is faced when considering preventive placement of an icy de the risk of a rare but life ending event fatal arrhythmia must be weighed against the potential for major illness or even death the microbiome and systemic lupus erythematosus a clinical implications of basic research article by james rosenbaum from oregon health and science university portland how can it be that such a repugnant substance feces is also the key to our wellbeing fecal bacteria are essential to life and humans are not alone in their dependence on the microbial world the fruit fly requires a cdc acid from seato bactor poem the bobtail squid needs the luminescence of video fisher i to survive the termite can't digest would without trick oh nymph a genus of symbiotic gut protozoa humans also depend on microbiology the bacteria in our intestine not only.

lee dislodgement stenosis superior vena cava lupus erythematosus james rosenbaum oregon seven years six months
"university portland" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on Le Show

"Hooper then agreed to suspend operations for few months while the city drafted new rules for a sanctioned launch over two years later the city learned from a reporter that uber had used software i believe it's called greyhound to identify avoid regulators trying to catch drivers while service was operating illegally the city is find uber three point five million after the company failed to disclose a security breach that affected more than one thousand drivers in oregon and tens of millions of accounts worldwide uber has disputed the fine so you know one apology doesn't change everything the president of the university portland's being of oregon apologized for not doing more when a sex it speech others to walk out of an awards banquet honoring athletes at the university and new jersey community college apologized wednesday after professor was caught on camera sound south shouting f your life during debate with the conservative student college says it expects to finish its investigation soon determine an appropriate course of action not involving the students life baltimore's mayor and police commissioner took the stage during a reunion tour for eric b and wrecking and videos the appearance posted the social media suggest they didn't exactly get a warm reception desouza the police commissioner made a brief speech to say how sorry he was about police have treated black communities since the nation's founding i wanna take almost twenty about twenty six to apologize for all the things police have done dating back to hundred years he said two hundred years ago all the way to civil rights all the.

Hooper reporter oregon president professor baltimore eric b two hundred years hundred years two years
"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:48 min | 4 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Survival was nine point one months in the combination group and eight point six months in the monotherapy group great three to five adverse events occurred in sixty three point six percent of the patients in the combination group and thirty eight point one percent of the patients in the monotherapy group the addition of bevis is you map too low mustang affected neither health related quality of life nor neuro cognitive function despite somewhat prolonged progression free survival treatment with low must dean plus bevis issue mab did not confer a survival advantage over treatment with low musty alone in patients with progressive glee 'oblast dilma dyer rettig treatment in heart failure a review article by david ellison from the oregon health science university portland most accepted pharmacologic treatments for heart failure are supported by evidence from large clinical trials in contrast evidence from large well controlled clinical trials to guide the use of dire radic's among the most frequently used drugs in heart failure is generally lacking fluid retention and congestion are hallmarks of heart failure and they are associated with both severe symptoms and poor outcomes given the centrality of congestion to both symptoms and outcomes dia red x remain cornerstones of management of heart failure furious in my view met a night and tore some i'd are prototypical loop dire radic's loop dire radic's have complex effects on renal and systemic chemo dynamics which are influenced by the dose and root of administration concomitant disease and treatment and longterm use although routine dia rettig treatment of heart failure may appear to be uncomplicated questions abound about how best to use dire radic's particularly in patients with acute de compensated heart failure and dire rettig resistance this review discusses kern pharmacologic principles of dire rettig therapy integrates data from recent research and suggests evidencebased approaches to die rettig treatment of heart failure this skillful use of dire rettig therapy remains fundamental to the successful management of heart failure and understanding of the physiological effects as well as the pharmacokinetic and form a code dynamic properties of these drugs is key for safe and effective use.

bevis david ellison oregon health science universi kern one percent six percent one months six months
"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The level of circulating follicle stimulating hormone f s h increases in women after menopause a recent report presents evidence that f s h influences thermo genesis and at apostasy in mice the study showed that f s h binds to its receptor on white a dip a sites and results in a relatively low resting energy expenditure and increased at a positi the finding that f s h regulates energy home yo stasis in mice could have important clinical implications related to the accumulation of abdominal fat and the associated metabolic changes in menopausal women and in hypo go nadal men controlling the cost of medicaid a perspective article by k john mcconnell from oregon health in science university portland the federal state medicaid program is facing the possibility of the largest and most consequential changes to its funding since its inception in nineteen 65 the american health care act ahca as adopted by the house of representatives on may fourth would replace the current federal matching program for medicaid with a percapita cap on federal funds the cap would limit the growth of these funds to the growth rate of the medical care component of the consumer price index with an additional one percent growth allowed for older adult and disabled medicaid enroll lease the congressional budget office has projected that this policy would result in federal funding reductions of more than eight hundred billion dollars over the next ten years equivalent to a twenty six percent reduction in federal support by 20 26 these large reductions represent an unprecedented shift of financial risk to the states.

john mcconnell the house consumer price index nadal oregon medical care eight hundred billion dollars twenty six percent one percent ten years
"university portland" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:33 min | 4 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Down in the headline just uh seattle mayor ed murray won't seek a second term quote it tears me to pieces to step away nothing about a sex scandal or anything in the headline now but his decision comes a month after he was sued for alleged child sexual abuse in the nineteen eighties in less than a week before the official candidate filing begins so i believe there are at least four men that have stepped forward and said that they were abused by him norman that no enemy now not even a little bit now now and he denying all the allegations and all these things and apparently to i mean this has been going on in seattle and we missed some decent headlines they data dropped trial and shows honor no was he in a junk lineup yes or allow our aiding yeah they they uh they said there there were headlines about murray's genitals as an attorney for the mare sought to rebut detail in the lawsuit by presenting the result of a medical exam and had something to do with a mole or something oh information you never want to have about the mayor let incriminating mole yep awful me something didn't they did wasn't there something about that with michael jackson you may be right i mean was there something about that with bill clinton to oh yes the point towards magnetic north or something i can't remember what it was that it was something that very distinct via easily identifiable and a line up see it on wanted posters oh man yeah so ruled buried three quarters of the way maybe two thirds of the way down his murray is a progressive democrat who built political influences state representative in a senator brokering transportation budgets and fighting for gay rights as state's leading gay politician a self described social justice catholic he considered the priesthood before studying sociology at the university portland yes they had to throw in there that he he studied the considered studying the priesthood yes of course so under murray seattle has set its minimum wage on a path or fifteen dollars per hour and voters have approved as.

seattle attorney michael jackson bill clinton portland ed murray official norman state representative senator social justice fifteen dollars three quarters
"university portland" Discussed on The Vertical Podcast with Woj

The Vertical Podcast with Woj

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on The Vertical Podcast with Woj

"Hey i wanted to someone's gonna pay me to play for a couple more years do at what what was the idea of why do i wanna had often do this all my parents loved a number getting a a beer with my dad uh the night before i left and the the told me this is really exciting hey said a of all the things he said man i i am jealous right now in our view able go over there and chase your dreams and none of us knew what to expect a of our noted by parents had been over europe at that time i'd never been to europe but it was something that i been talking about like i said for a long time now five six years for whatever reason i glamorized in my head that was going to be a dream that i that i was gonna be able to do and it happened by accident really that's that's the funny story about it my head coach in germany are called assistant coach um at the time uh our willmore one still very close with it at up about another player my team leading scorer while he ended up getting kicked out of school and par willmore said 'have we have another guy here is and so i ended up getting that opportunity because of that rib an accident but when i went over there it was it was like i said a little bit different than what i expected but you're in a different that's what i wanted i wanna life experience i wanted to continue playing basketball and i wanted to experience something new culturally by stayed at home for for college at university portland so it was totally different but my my dad loved the whole concept of it he probably thought it was probably gonna be a little bit different than it was as well but i learned a tom laws over there.

basketball europe germany willmore five six years
"university portland" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

01:38 min | 5 years ago

"university portland" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"I mean you're coach now university portland jeff one a that speeches because we all knew especially in sports movies the coach comes in the locker room to down at the half when we're going to do you jean happen in hoosier zero whatever and you give that speech did you as a coach ever give the speeches you try to give them but you know you try to do want to a year cause it kind of runs of course right they can't get i go ever that again on the oh you know pulled that one out one more time so you're tendon that we here i mean and you're you're not return the day we very short middle age like people on sunday maddon we are your basketball team again we're down in the locker room for have time were taking than the other mind schemes and yeah will any here you're motivational speech guys with the been one heck of a year though never managed we got the ball we here my with making bet that we got twenty more minutes one more minutes that our main who live and legacy play together play hard and making that.

maddon basketball