19 Burst results for "University Of Oregon"

"university oregon" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

04:18 min | 3 months ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

"Is the guy did it that wipes him out for any future politics and it creates massive diversions next year in the midterm elections. That's what this is all about about finding anything but the fbi. That's what they're doing. That's what they're investigating. So is nancy pelosi panel better than the g. men. I know the gymanst image problem as well but come up so this is just a hollow joke oregon beautiful state you know i worked at channel to. At you tv in portland are at four point. Two million oregonians eight hundred thirteen thousand live in multnomah county. Maybe the most radical left county in the country. Okay so they have. Three major universities oregon oregon state portland state in two thousand twenty last year. Ninety eight percent of all faculty donations from those three universities went to democrats ninety eight percent get a one party state in oregon color of change george soros or pow giving them a million dollars a million dollars. What is color of change. It is an activist far left group that wants to defend and destroy the police. That's what he wants to do. I've run up against them. They are subversive and vicious subversive and vicious but not only to george soros. Give them money. Jennifer gave him money. Brad pitt anna. Kendrick michael b jordan. Justin bieber riana. Leonardo dicaprio lady gaga. Hate the police. Those celebrities gave color of change money. Usa today took a poll in detroit. Seventy eight percent. African american in the city of detroit ninety percent they said told usa today. They want more cops. More cops ninety percent. Unbelievable ben and jerry as you know. They're pulling out of what they call. Israeli occupied palestine. Close near ice. Cream stores there. So in florida and texas. They're taking revenge on ben and jerry this bureaucratic stuff. It's symbolic deal of ben and jerry ben cohen. Jerry greenfield both jewish k. They sold to unilever there. Had been in jerry but they still run a company. Those guys but unilever is behind the decision own. The company this season in history. All right right now. Top ten shows for nineteen seventy seventy one fifty years ago. Here they are number one. Marcus welby thirty million viewers flip wilson. Twenty eight million viewers. Now this is interesting guy okay. He after this huge success all right he left showbiz. He died at age. Sixty four liver cancer. He had some drug beefs some domestic problems but he was a second highest rated show fifty years ago. Here's lucy number three ironside. it's raymond burr. He was perry mason four gunsmoke five movie of the week. Six y five. Oh jack lord. Seven medical center. Eight bonanza at the end of its run nine. Fbi tent and everybody watched shows twenty billions and millions and millions of people. And then everybody talk about. And that's what i was saying. That cultural they. Now forget it if you get five million if you get five. you're huge. hit on cable. If you do three million your big hit all right quick break. We got a good mail saying in.

oregon george soros portland Brad pitt anna Kendrick michael b jordan Justin bieber riana Leonardo dicaprio lady gaga jerry multnomah county nancy pelosi ben detroit jerry ben cohen fbi Jerry greenfield unilever
"university oregon" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Why It Matters

"For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success. What's at stake for Japan as the situation plays out. Well Japan has plunged a lot of money and prestige and human capital into making the Games happen if we think back to when they were originally bidding on the Olympics, they said that the entire escapade would cost seven point three billion dollars, but by the time this summer rolled around, they had spent some twenty eight billion dollars, according to an audit by the Japanese government, and so that's four times what they had originally planned postponing means adding anywhere from two to six billion dollars. Those are the best guesses that we have now. So what's at stake for Japan is they've already spent way more money than they expected and now they might not even get the Olympics to actually

Olympics Olympic professor NBA Wellesley College Julius boy Japan Gabrielle Sierra Katherine Moon Football US Oregon Pacific University soccer Ben
Hey, Remember the Olympics?

Why It Matters

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Hey, Remember the Olympics?

"For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success. What's at stake for Japan as the situation plays out. Well Japan has plunged a lot of money and prestige and human capital into making the Games happen if we think back to when they were originally bidding on the Olympics, they said that the entire escapade would cost seven point three billion dollars, but by the time this summer rolled around, they had spent some twenty eight billion dollars, according to an audit by the Japanese government, and so that's four times what they had originally planned postponing means adding anywhere from two to six billion dollars. Those are the best guesses that we have now. So what's at stake for Japan is they've already spent way more money than they expected and now they might not even get the Olympics to actually

Olympics International Olympic Committe National Olympic Committees Professor Soccer Julius Boy United States Japan Oregon Wellesley College Pacific University BEN Katherine Moon Japanese Government Tokyo Australia Portugal Germany Canada
"university oregon" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Why It Matters

"I'll be the first to admit that I am not a huge sports fan. I don't follow the NBA and I tend to wander away from the TV during Football Games, but I do love to watch the Olympics, and that's because it's actually super cool to see whole nations rallying behind one team. It becomes something more than a game. It becomes this uniting cultural moment. It's like a global holiday, and so with a little bit of extra couch time on my hands I was very ready to tune into this summer's Tokyo Olympics the perfect distraction. But the July twenty twenty Olympic. Games aren't going to be held this month. They've been postponed by a full year. This decision wasn't made lightly. And in fact, Japan is working around the clock to try to figure out how to keep their games. Despite a global pandemic, it's part of a long story for decades. Just like their athletes. Countries have competed fiercely to host the Games despite mounting evidence that they usually represent a significant financial loss, and that made us ask why, if not money, what's the games offer that so special and worth so much effort I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today, the Olympics soft power and the deep running politics of the World Games. For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success.

Olympics Olympic professor NBA Wellesley College Julius boy Japan Gabrielle Sierra Katherine Moon Football US Oregon Pacific University soccer Ben
Remember the Olympics?

Why It Matters

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Remember the Olympics?

"I'll be the first to admit that I am not a huge sports fan. I don't follow the NBA and I tend to wander away from the TV during Football Games, but I do love to watch the Olympics, and that's because it's actually super cool to see whole nations rallying behind one team. It becomes something more than a game. It becomes this uniting cultural moment. It's like a global holiday, and so with a little bit of extra couch time on my hands I was very ready to tune into this summer's Tokyo Olympics the perfect distraction. But the July twenty twenty Olympic. Games aren't going to be held this month. They've been postponed by a full year. This decision wasn't made lightly. And in fact, Japan is working around the clock to try to figure out how to keep their games. Despite a global pandemic, it's part of a long story for decades. Just like their athletes. Countries have competed fiercely to host the Games despite mounting evidence that they usually represent a significant financial loss, and that made us ask why, if not money, what's the games offer that so special and worth so much effort I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today, the Olympics soft power and the deep running politics of the World Games. For many sports, the Olympics is the apex of what they can achieve as athletes, and it's a chance for the world to see incredible incredible athletes out there on the world stage. My name is Julius boy, cough and I. Teach Political Science at Pacific University, Oregon. Professor boy cough has written four books about the Olympics and as it turns out. He's also a former member of the US men's Olympic soccer team. and. That is really why the Olympics have stuck around and Ben so successful. Were it not for the athletes? We wouldn't really have the Olympic Games of course the money shuffle has become a big part of that. We can talk about that later, but for athletes in lesser known sports, sake curling in the Winter Olympics or maybe equestrian or something like that in the Summer Olympics, this is their one chance to make big. Now I think we have to remember that. The Olympics the Olympic Games themselves are a value or ideal driven event. I'm Katherine Moon and I am a professor of political. Science at Wellesley College I study issues related to eastasia particularly the Koreas and I love to talk about culture and values in international politics. As much as we say, it is about pure athleticism and fairer competition. It really was an is about ideals, human, being the human spirit to strive for excellence, and to do once best, and to be proud to be wist others who are excellent in their fields. And I think that's what drives people to go to the Olympics and to watch the Olympics. It's changed my life completely. Cultures and values together. Research big. So. It's July and we were supposed to start watching the summer Olympics in about a week, so what the heck happened! Yeah. The Olympics got corona virus and. They had to push back for a year. When you look back at that moment, there were calls to cancel the Olympics. There were calls to postpone the Olympics and the members of the International Olympic Committee seemed determined to press ahead with the games this at a time when other sports were shutting down, world soccer was shutting down various sports leagues around the world, and yet the International Olympic Committee felt like they needed to press ahead and the real reason why the. International Olympic Committee finally acted was because Canada basically said they were going to do a de facto boycott. If the Games were held in twenty twenty, they were soon followed by. The National Olympic Committees from Australia Portugal Germany, and when that all happened the International Olympic Committee had no choice but to postpone, and that's exactly what they did so now. They're slated for July twenty twenty one. To move has finally been confirmed. The signs are all over Tokyo symbols of what was supposed to be the Japanese revival. A comeback crushed at least for now. We're talking about it. Doesn't it seven years in the making millions of dollars. Two hundred countries at eleven thousand athletes. You can't just pick another date on the calendar. The Olympic Games have only been canceled three times. The first time was in nineteen sixteen during World War One. The second and third time we're in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty and nineteen, forty, four, due to World War Two. It's still unclear whether the twenty twenty games will become forth historic cancellation. The current plan is to begin them on July Twenty Fourth Two thousand twenty one. But. Many experts are skeptical of this time line, arguing that there is no guarantee that the corona virus will be fully under control in a year. Still the struggle to preserve the twenty twenty games shows just how invested host countries become an success.

Olympics International Olympic Committe Olympic National Olympic Committees Professor Soccer NBA Wellesley College Japan United States Oregon Julius Boy Football Pacific University Tokyo Katherine Moon
"university oregon" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"university oregon" Discussed on KOMO

"Increase seem very similar to corona virus should I worry experts say it's bad timing because we had a really wet winter and dry April so the pollen count is really high you're not being more higher fevers shortness of breath okay just mail now the other thing that you'd be more concerned about if you or someone you know plans to attend college this fall there's a chance they will be leaving home to do so however there are exceptions being made almost daily it was Brian Calvert has more online learning it's become the norm as this school year comes to a close and for some northwest college campuses the transition to online classes will continue into September Yakima valley college will be online only this fall the Seattle community colleges university of Washington and central Washington university are making plans for online only but have not yet made an official call we're doing a lot of scenario planning and scenario planning we've come up with about six eight ten scenario that's father mark poorman at the university of Portland he'd really like to see students back in class with safety precautions in place we'll be doing a lot of strategizing about how we can maintain social distance so solid that will take place in classrooms will take place in dining facilities will certainly take place in the residence halls also planning to open campuses to students this fall Washington State University Oregon state and the university of Oregon with an asterisk the fall announcements are subject to state stay home orders school leaders are trying to remain positive we just have to be very very conscientious about maintaining social distance until we hear differently the U. W. will host a town hall event Friday and could announce their fall plans then Brian Calvert komo news at twenty and fifty past the hour on komo news now your call mall propelling Sharon's money update generally positive quarterly results.

Brian Calvert Yakima valley college Washington university mark poorman Sharon Seattle community colleges uni official university of Portland Washington State University Or university of Oregon komo
"university oregon" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Week the impeachment public hearings will be passed over the course of three days this week eight witnesses fielding questions about their knowledge of the alleged back channel policy dealing with Ukraine and the call between president trump and Ukraine's leader asking Ukraine to investigate president trump's political rival Joe Biden and his son also on the table house speaker Nancy Pelosi's invitation for the president to present his case president trump on Twitter says he will consider house speaker Nancy Pelosi's offer for him to come before house investigators to testify or submit written answers in the impeachment inquiry the president writing quote I like the idea and will in order to get Congress focused again strongly consider it but the president has blocked several of his own aides from cooperating in the inquiry and he himself did not testify in the mall or investigation instead he submitted written answers Karen Travers ABC news the White House a new ABC news poll shows seventy percent of Americans surveyed thinks the president did something quote wrong when dealing with Ukraine fifty one percent say he should be impeached because of that wrongdoing this past hour the trump administration announcing a changing its position on Israeli settlements in the occupied west bank the latest move announced by secretary of state Mike Pompeii ABC's Andy field is in Washington resident from first move the US embassy to Jerusalem the US secretary of state Mike Pompeii says Israel will no longer get US criticism for its settlements in the west bank Israeli civilian settlements in the west bank is not per se inconsistent with international law a list of the leaders insist Jerusalem in the west bank are major roadblocks to achieving real Middle East peace and Israel ABC news Washington and on Wall Street this hour the Dow is on track for another record close following last week's high it's trading in positive territory as traders head into the final hour before the closing bell you're listening to ABC news our top story a key developments today in the effort to build a new interstate bridge eleven ninety K. E. X. is John Erickson reports governor Kate brown of Oregon and Jay Insley Washington convening in Vancouver in a show of solidarity for a new bridge K. brown says the current bridges over one hundred years old and is showing its age and our states are more interconnected than ever the two governors signing a memorandum of intent to build a new bridge Portland police are warning of a scam targeting real estate agents the scammers called agents in Eugene and bend to claiming to be a Portland police sergeant and using the name of an actual sergeant the caller ID is a number from the police bureau of it's no longer in use the scammer requests money to pay bail for a fake warrant Portland police say they don't contact people this way for warrants and they don't demand a request money under any circumstances Oregon's explosive population growth is starting to slow eleven ninety K. X.'s Gail Cunningham says that's according to preliminary research from Portland State University Oregon has added more than four hundred thousand new residents since twenty ten but Charles writer some with PS use population research center says there was just a one percent increase this year job growth has slowed a bit in the past year and that's reflected in a somewhat lower number of in migrants despite high housing costs most of the move to the Portland metro area the rest of the growth was centered in Salem bending Eugene writers and expects growth to continue slowing with lack of affordability lower birth rates and higher death rates as baby boomers age democratic presidential contender Joe Biden is calling Donald Trump the most corrupt president in modern American history the former vice president making the comment during a private fundraiser Saturday in Portland Kate to reporting Biden's main talking points during the fundraiser included putting the U. S. back in the Paris climate agreement and the wealth disparity and restoring respect and dignity to the White House I'm Joe Michael's K. yeah KDX traffic from the Papa Murphy's traffic center we make if you bake it a vehicle fire reportedly in hi way near Hawkins also we still have just.

eleven ninety K fifty one percent one hundred years seventy percent one percent three days
"university oregon" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Out and get these organs and then bring them back flying on small single engine airplane winning credibly inconvenient times and weaken change that practice now we have a cultural innovation to match this technological innovation taking people out of the sky including organs in it right but instead of using great big airplane her helicopter movie at ten twenty pound box why don't we just moved box yeah but it will be safer for oregon recovery teams will no longer be required to fly mhm i understand it is also cut it out with some built in sensors the measure measure temperature and you could track oregon like you may be able the track cooper on your phone which is surprising that you can already do that but i guess you could not yeah no that's that's really wanna see innovations here in the bottle and even geo location of the you know the gps bs where is he oregon which will provide of course and estimated time of arrival and things along those lines but it will tell you worthy extrinsic forces affecting your gonna do those contributed organs outcome and that's not known yet so i'm gonna as a little bit of a scientist i'm gonna try to use that data that help inform my current system of oregon allocation and look at transportation so what the next steps involved in making drone oregon delivery a reality yeah you probably know from the enthusiasm my voice but we're not just like sitting around here so we've got a big plans big lynn we've got a bunch of interest nationally and internationally the move oregon's a we are working with a drone providers two daughters joan engineers a all sorts of different folks in that space to try to build the ideal product is and it helps patients in transplant but not only in transplant will be able to export that model other areas a where urgent payload delivery is important just the thanks so much for telling us about it absolutely i appreciate the time justice scalia isn't assistant professor of surgery at the university of maryland school of medicine and the director of the university's oregon drone laboratory refinery fire the phone.

oregon cooper scientist scalia director joan assistant professor of surgery university of maryland school oregon drone laboratory ten twenty pound
"university oregon" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Is if they just want him to get as many as possible? Out of the game. A lot of teams around the big for a few years. Now been hitting their best guy. Second trout second. Mookie Betts at second for a while. I it's become kind of a trend to to get guys more at bat. I think it kind of depends on just how much of a power shortage that they have. If it proves to be really drastic. I don't know if you want to hit second you might want him a little closer to the heart of the order. But he could definitely do it. He he loves to go the other way if you're doing hit and run do they still hit and run in baseball hope so well, they better if they don't hit the ball park here. Yeah. They better figure out a way to score some runs scored a run all week last Saturday was zeros or Sunday zero zero tie yesterday. They got shut out eight nothing. They they'd be Cleveland to nothing. You know, they haven't hit it all and I always say look at spring training. It's Randy Elliott had six fifty. You know, the light. Switch flipped hit fifty. So I don't put a lot into it. But you do like to see the ball jumping off people's bats. And maybe they have to put Posey in the two spot. And I hate to say it, you know, the analytics people will faith, but maybe you have to start somebody once in a while and try to go first third absolutely on this team. Jeez. I mean if say Ferguson is for real and it can handle that leadoff. Then you got a real good combination. There. I didn't think panicking second would would be able to do that job as well. But yeah, they they need to be aggressive. They need to make things happen. It's not going to be three run home or going into the into the, you know, the concession out there. No, no. They have to make things happen. I'm glad you brought a panic will end with this one Russa. He's having a great spring for whatever that's worth. And what I like about him is he's using the whole field. He's going the other way. And he got a couple of hits sued the Tony Gwynn five points. Five whole, you know between third and short the pitches were out there. And you could see in his mind. He said, all right. You pitching me. They're not gonna roll over. I'm going to put the ball into left center left field. And he did it a few times panic. You talk about Viti panic is almost the second story in the camp. Yeah, that's great to see too. I mean, I think they probably thought about trading him. They might have even thrown out some offers who who knows what happened there. But we all know what he can do. He was such a big part of the of a winning team. Great guy smart, fundamental player. Like you say he can take the ball over the field. Which is a great example for anybody. Who's going to be playing for the giants 'cause you know, trying to be dead pulling launch angle everything with this group. That's not not going to be the way to go. So I hope that that continues if he hits around to ninety three hundred that's a big big blessing for them. Well, it may be they're showcasing him too. You know, that could be also because they have a lot of middle infielders. Yeah. They have a ton of them. So but panic is Sean longoria John wrote about longoria today in the paper. So China's today is the story. So I'd say panic is up there though. I will tell you that. Now, we'll end with this one Bruce this guy worked so hard with Crawford on those double plays. Oh, they must take one hundred fifty ground balls together every game. Just just the two of them. Double-play MA one of my favorite photos of all time taken by batmans mansion with that great double play they turned in two thousand fourteen World Series. Photo. Whether it's probably still in the clubhouse there in the hallway leading back to the to the back. It's absolutely wonderful photo. That captures one of the not not maybe not one of the greatest moments in giants history. But something that just some some them up, you know, making a huge play the most critical time. I love it. That will come on that double play was in the World Series. Yeah. I mean. Yeah. One of the best, you know, it's probably in the annals of one of the better World Series place of all time. Really? It was tremendous circumstances. Yeah. Panic diving and puts it right where Crawford needs it. And cheese. I mean with the pressure that kind of pressure is just fantastic. I just thinking that the pressure of the moment. Well, free player like that. Boy. Very good. Hey, great to talk to you today. We'll talk next weekend. I want to talk about the Atlantic league. And all the. Yeah. Yeah. They're going to be trying out. We'll talk about that next week. But I'm sure we'll have a lot of issues this week with the ballclub is they start to get near cutdown date. So have a great afternoon. What's on tap for you today? Pretty pretty breezy day won't be watching some some basketball. We're we're Oregon university Oregon parents and we've been following their women's basketball team is a great player UNESCO from bay area. Mira Monte Arinda area. She's she's like the best player in the country. They're playing for the Pac twelve title today. That'll be on the agenda. They will barbecue. And you know, the typical typical sports sports day out here. Not bad. Well, we wish you were here. But I think you got it covered. You you did. Well. All right. Have a great afternoon. Take care. All right. That is Bruce Jenkins. We'll talk to the next week as well. All right. More coming up,.

Bruce Jenkins Crawford Mookie Betts Sean longoria John baseball Oregon Randy Elliott Cleveland Tony Gwynn China Posey Mira Monte Arinda batmans mansion Ferguson Pac basketball Viti Atlantic league
"university oregon" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"That was DIA was the most social media savvy conference I've ever been to has rocked. And I like to talk to you a Brian about what how you social media in your practice, and maybe we can share some tips with with our listeners, and they were also going to talk about what the future looks like for for DIA DIA two point. Oh, but hey, before we do any of that would many of our listeners, of course, will recognize you they probably know you more through Instagram or your social media handles. But we'll have many, you know, we have listeners one hundred seventy countries would you be kind enough to share a little bit about your back story. And what it was that sort of motivated you to become a dentist. Yeah. Totally. The health field working with my hands comedy. Explored other professions like being surgeon. You know, there's something about Dench with the immediate gratification of getting work done. You know, even though people say that eight the deaths I think for the most part, I think it's pleasant place any kind of surgery have any major surgery, even if it goes, well, it's not a pleasant place to be. There's always complications follow up dentistry is way. A I've found a widow come change lives and really changed people's attitudes towards it turns their own health in their mouth. So I graduated in a two thousand fourteen from the university of civic. So I think I'm still recent grad that counts. Yeah. You still count you still? Well, unlike like, so many Dennis, of course, Brian. You're just an academic wizard. You're a four point. Oh, valedictorian. Right. No. No, I Oregon and not really was a big contrast to two point seven at UC Davis. I wanted you to share that with her, and my tongue was firmly planted my cheek as I said that I wanted you to share that with our listeners because our listeners literally literally ranged from pre dent all the way to senior practitioners. I got an Email the last week from one of our listeners eight years old, right? Still practicing dentistry and passionate about it. But what would you be kind enough to share your? Let's just call it unremarkable undergraduate career now that change that change because I think this is going to be motivating to some of our listeners that might step in the mud, and let them know that there there there's options. So would you mind sharing that story? I find it fascinating. If you don't mind sharing that I think it'll be motivating sulfur. Share about before. Yeah. So I'm pretty open to to UC Davis, and I had a solid two point seven GPA at two point three science ninety. No, higher graduate, not place. Just give class the end. You know, it's funny. I take a quarter where I got a in the lecture in f- in the laugh because just didn't home. I just didn't take school seriously as part of fraternity and to prioritize that over my own academics. Unsure there's many listeners now that your stock literally just buying up radically. Now, what was interesting about it, though is there's a bit of a mulligan. You took the mulligan route using a golf term took the mulligan route to dental school acceptance, can you share that? Yeah. So I that's both Akram at you know, there's no getting around trying to boost your grace your grades. You. Gotta do. Something about it. You can't try improve the DA t get his shadow hours. You can't bridge low raise them. So I went back to school. I went to the university, Oregon..

UC Davis Brian Oregon university of civic Dench Dennis Akram eight years
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars
"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"university oregon" Discussed on Love Your Work

"You know, it was really just sort of like it was, you know what college experience supposed to be where it was like a, you know, sort of space to make whatever we wanted with, you know, totally free, creativity. And then we started doing, you know, shows we're our college and you know a lot of entertainment on a college campus, you know, sort of a captive audience that we knew. Actually, what head space. All these kids were in. You know, we were able to get a lot of success the on the college campus. Then we started, you know, I knew how to soda HTML's that always, you know, been driven indoor internet kid who taught myself HTML and stuff like that. And I would also r-maine video editor. I told myself final thought and we started running videos on our website. And at the time it was about two thousand three thousand four. When we first started doing this, you know, there was no YouTube right YouTube, I think, showed up to six or seven, and there was not that much video on the internet. Not that much comedy. And so we got a lot of popularity internet very quickly because you know, people would share videos around. We would go viral. Remember, we started a one room the we were hosting videos on the politics server, which and the and that the the guy who ran a computer lab, I called us into. Show us how many like server requests server was getting to demonstrate why we couldn't. Eve are video on the web server anymore. And these were like fifteen megabyte videos. They were like very, like three twenty two forty like videos. But I like, yeah, you guys can't. You guys can't be serving these from the from the campus server anymore. And then we balanced around from just remembering that's like server server company, that server company trying to find some place that could deal with the bandwidth. There was a surprisingly common problem that that you know, kinda shocking don't have anymore. Thanks to, you know, YouTube and and other services like that. I mean, now I have a dream to accounts when I when I had my personal website on my have unlimited bandwidth for seven dollars a month which I wouldn't killed for. Five. So you're making these videos, you're breaking the internet. There is going so well that you decide not to go to grad school in that moment as you're making that decision. Are you thinking like, oh. I mean, it seems like a lot of people would be resistant to the idea that you know I'm gonna pursue this comedy thing, and something might come of that. Was that a difficult decision to make. I mean, first of all, everybody, nobody really wasn't courage in may to go to grad school, you know, like I wanted to, but you know, even my adviser when I was like, I don't go to grad school and no one in your family without a PHD. Right? So yes, that's true. I am the only wouldn't twenty right on the only number of my family out of beach. Grandly my interest in physics and my dad marine biologist now vice-president university Oregon, and yeah, but they weren't that encouraging about it. I think you know, maybe people had offense that I wasn't cut out for the economic lifestyle. I was really, really interesting ideas. And I, you know, did well in my classes. You know, I was a, you know, my professors don't like me and, and I think they felt they understood the ideas, but I, you know, I just never had great with getting the reading dump right. I had a little bit of a, you know, I mean, and eighty ADD and and ADHD diagnosis, but also ADHD personality a little bit. And just nobody was like, you should. You know, people were like you could, and I was, you know, getting geared up..

YouTube ADHD editor vice-president university Oreg fifteen megabyte seven dollars