18 Burst results for "University Of Missouri"

"university missouri" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:51 min | Last month

"university missouri" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Matt Nadal. Now, you know, we always have to when we're talking about money in the market. Talk about the Fed. And we're going to talk about the state of the economy. And actually last week, the Federal Reserve chair of your own pals, words actually helped improve and grow the weeks marketing equity market returns. And in his speech at the Economic Policy Symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Paul confirmed that the U. S. The U. S economy had made some substantial progress. Toward the Fed's maximum employment and price stability, goals goals. Consequently, the Fed is likely to start slowing and eventually stop the bond purchasing that they've been doing. We call that quantitative easing. And just, you know, to ensure a smooth market functioning during the pandemic. They that's one of the reasons they did that. Yeah, that's uh, referred to as tapering. That's what they're talking about. Also, I could see a lot of, uh, at that symposium. I could see a lot of people from Harvard talking like that. A lot of intellectuals. Really? Yeah. Would you say? Are you making fun of people on the East Coast? Goodness, man sounded very, very intellectual. Hey, I went to university, Missouri. Isn't that right up there with Harvard down this team That's the Harvard, the Midwest. So, you know, Pal did offer some assurance that the target range for the federal funds rate, which is one of the Fed's tools for influencing short term interest rates, is going to remain unchanged until and I'm going to quote The economy reaches conditions consistent with maximum employment. And inflation has reached 2% and is on track to moderately exceed 2% for some type..

Matt Nadal 2% Paul last week Fed Federal Reserve Economic Policy Symposium Missouri U. S. one Jackson Hole, Wyoming Pal Harvard U. S East Coast Midwest
"university missouri" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:15 min | 11 months ago

"university missouri" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"From the Chicago 18 snap to Travis Key in a tight pocket. He's hit, fumbled the ball. Backed up by President Smith, He mother still up to the answer. Tents down That's way Larrabee on Packers radio Preston Smith Scoop and score gave Green Bay a 27 3 2nd quarter lead. It was one of three turnovers from Travis Key. All of them became touchdowns. The Packers winning 41 25 the three game lead for them on the Bears and the Vikings. In the new words, Chicago's losing streak is now five. Lastly, from the NFL. The league is that you're scheduled for Saturday. December 26th It's bucks at Lion's Niners at Cardinals Dolphins at Raiders and don't forget you have Viking Saints on actual Christmas Day. Indiana QB Michael Panics junior reportedly in danger of missing the rest of the season because the leg injury he suffered Saturday against Maryland and Florida State is losing a third straight game to covert 19. Duke will play Miami and said on Saturday and is it the Maui Invitational if it's being played in Asheville, North Carolina. Number 19, Texas and Davis and tip off in the Maui Invitational. National North Carolina at the top of the hour bill back to you, bogus shut the risk of creating more rifts that I don't need or want to be part of this show. I'm gonna ask each of you one person you've met If there were aliens among us who would be the alien you've interacted with. Us to call. That's apparently good one. You know, That was gonna be my answer to. I think we can. All three agree. I was going to go with a gun in George Kennedy Benevolent Alien Overlord, who opposes my editor, the university, Missouri in the Missouri and But all goes to Kovacs. The best answer the most alien like person around us. So is the monolith. His power source. Does he play like alien video games with it? Clearly, it's his Yeah, and you can. He's not going to tell us. He's not gonna break. I isn't a power source. No. Is it a toy? I think that's more likely. Problem is, he's never been west of Texas. So this would this would have been a big, right. Yeah. We want you to see that 132. That's the cover genius. His genius. Bogus. We missed you. No more than you missed us. Okay, though. That's there so you can see you. To Andrew Bogus at Andrew, Bogus on Twitter 855 to 1 to four CBS maybe a little color to.

Travis Key Andrew Bogus Packers Chicago Maui Invitational Texas North Carolina Preston Smith President Smith Michael Panics Larrabee NFL Green Bay Missouri Cardinals George Kennedy Indiana Asheville Miami
Interview with Carl Robinson live from Project Voice

The Voice Tech Podcast

05:46 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Carl Robinson live from Project Voice

"What are you noticing? What are some common themes that you're hearing show so? I'm asking the questions of the people that I've been into seventy now since I've been here. One of them is that agencies are noticing. Their clients are moving from proof of concept projects from come from the budget just to prove the point that voices thing and that can help them through to that full budget. So I think there's definitely a movement now there's optimism and the projects in the APPS that people are building are becoming more complicated more integrated into the systems of the business. So that's positive. People are paying for full voice apps. But there's still uncertainty around discover ability so clearly the the model that people are transplanted from mobile into voice isn't working as as hoping there isn't a great APP store so that's an open question. And people have got different ways of tackling. I think the model and these component marketplaces that envisioning a future. That isn't individual APPS. They're more components that you can revenue from developers can revenue from by having them integrated into a larger experience. There isn't direct invocations to these APPs. I think that's really exciting but could be one way. That voices improved another way or these cross. Go Promotions or being able to invoke some fancy from one school to another but definitely. I think that these smart speakers are very intermediate technology. Voices got way more potential than a smart speaker fixed object on the desk. We can talk about some of the predictions between the space. I think you know what get excited about is every person I've talked to. So many NE- shes when you're talking about education or you're talking about cars or you're talking about fitness and everybody's got this need and they're figuring out how to use voice in a way that works for them and to me. That's really exciting. You know it just becomes more clear as a use case of what you can be doing really well joyce straight if you start to look a little bit broader and you realize how many people are working. Invoice is incredible. I mean I could do a podcast episode every week on a different subject. I never run out. We can add. It's true so you were saying one of the things you wanted to talk about with some predictions you have for twenty twenty you again because you have an interesting background. So you're working voice kind of development side but then you're also talking to so many people are getting a lot of information so when you're thinking about those things as a whole what are some of your thoughts for what voices GonNa Bring in the future. We'll I think a lot more people are going to be interested in learning the voice calls and I'm seeing evidence of that everywhere so does really fast. Growing interest seen voice developers purchasing utilize skills causes on my site that people are going through the very affordable that ten bucks to learn the basic skills of owning an APP. There is compensation designers that purchasing compensation design courses. Robo copy again. There's Lincoln for that and there's no copies great. Had Him on the show have you. We'll we'll we'll post sooner. Maybe I don't know when this will pose. Yeah he's doing great. Thanks for that space. And it's a serious cause. These are not because you can do in an evening. These are serious commitments. That people are paying hundreds of dollars for and they're selling so that really gives me hope that people are putting their money down the optimism in the industry and it's worth that time and investment. The other thing is obviously business. People are asking more and more about voice. Now we saw the sound guy and at the end of the last year or something like comments went in there that I did really well. We see the launch voice masters by the Vixen lab. Steve involved with James Porter. They're great people were again. Everybody's so passionate about this education so I think that that helps propel it forward. It does come station yesterday with Zach Gerard from the Puck University Missouri Alexa Club for the students so in literally. They're going on tall. He's got club they build these Alexa APPS and other going on tour light showing them off and getting more people into the fold as one of their own. They have their own APP in the university. Of what you scores. I know what classes are coming up. They all these things. So we're seeing things Levels Ngozi people to the tech showing interest people investing their time learning it. So that's that is a growing trend. I think we're GONNA see more. And more of really positive. Some of them will exciting ones than about the thing. That's most exciting for me. The novel uses the like. You're saying it's so broad so four five of these that I would say that for me. The most exciting festival I would say biometric authentication a second conversation with execute from ideology yesterday such Aku Tak basically at the moment as you know because voice assistance you have to log into them right to get your personal information to get your own APPs to have anything that access your own data you have to link it to your Amazon account or you account. Whatever but with biometrics you could literally walk up to any small speaker or microphone in the world. It's not talking and with zero logging. It who you are. It would grant you access to your data to your impersonal configuration. And if you go and that's really important I think is why because it's conversational interfaces you and I having a conversation now if I wanted to just bring Lexie or Google assistant into the conversation right now and just as a quick question about. What's my calendar softening? I couldn't because I'd have to log into it because it's your smile speaker. I couldn't do that on your phone. I can't just pick up your phone log into your phone. Phones are very private and smarts because at the moment kind of that they have these default open interfaces where I can ask general questions like a question about Google search pedia or something but I can't access my personal is services and as personalization connect your awareness so important for these loss assistance to be able to guess correctly. What your intent is so that is a huge one looking to be more secure as well. Because they've got life check so I've been learning about these multi-modal likeness checks. They can have cameras looking face making sure the or moving lifelike way and then not holding up a photo trickett and the same voice checking that against the database as well as other senses as well as putting all of these inputs together to make sure it's you and you're a real person from consumer side the business side. Everyone's asking about it so that's great to hear we're hearing more

Google Puck University Missouri Alexa Joyce Trickett Zach Gerard Lincoln Amazon Steve James Porter
"university missouri" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"university missouri" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Of the show just go to sports talk radio dot com they're out there without the commercials and also I tweet them out right around midnight so if you're following at sports X. radio you'll get that tweet right to you also follow at Ken Thompson eighty seven and that is a look at what's going on as far as the show get down here to look at Aussie stadium it's gonna be wall to wall next week with conference tournaments getting with the big conferences and then the first three days Thursday Friday Saturday already sold out for March madness here Sunday I I talked to the folks about eight to ten percent they still have availability on that first Sunday of March madness but you know how this place get all right my first guest Rick Strassman at Ritz restaurant in a long time with this guy quietly goes about doing his business here in Vegas valley making it a better place for a lot of us Rick is a man of faith big time and the faith he's been connected with the fellowship of Christian athletes for a long time I've been privileged to know this man for a long time he's university Missouri grad loves his sport but he loves god more and he loves helping people more that's just who this guy is tomorrow night a big function fellowship of Christian athletes connected their faith Lutheran high school the high school rise up slam dunk competition three point shoot out and also be a celebrity basketball game you know getting down to the nitty gritty Rick was desperate he had you know a roster that needed somebody the the the north Thompson qualified but he threw the email out anyway Thompson answered said Rick if it's basketball I am in body I'm ready to play I don't care from coming off the bench doesn't much matter Katie's ready to launch and Rick's roster joining us right now on the pregame dot com celebrity guests on Rick it is always great to have you my man how is everything going in the life of Rick Strasser and your beautiful family and that was probably the best introduction I've ever had Kenny thank you so much but I D. I think you you you misspoke there because if we happen to celebrity basketball game you were the first name we went after so wow I thought boy I'm telling you so so we're going with the B. list celebrities but that's okay.

Ken Thompson Aussie stadium Rick Strassman Vegas valley Rick faith Lutheran high school basketball Katie Rick Strasser Kenny university Missouri
"university missouri" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

12:25 min | 1 year ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

"It's it's part part me and it's part what I do because at my core. I'm a fighter and I always have been and I didn't even realize that 'til almost thirty years old I've been fighting for for what I want to bring to this world. I've been fighting for now. My family my wife and my son. I've been fighting for. I think I think what we mean what we miss. We think we're just meandering around this earth. Just kinda these creatures walking around you. You have a birth date and then you have a death date but man you should be on this earth trying to fight for every single drop of happiness insecurity and and end funds. So what does he wanNA bring this world? What is it can they bring this world? I think you know I started out and I and I've struggled with a lot of self image issues and it stems from it stems from just being a small guy from a small town who was taught to do small things because trying to do big things. Matt you're probably GonNa fall flat on your face and where I came from Jefferson County Missouri. Leaving leaving outside those county lines met you. You were taking way too big of a risk and you're probably gonNA fall flat on your face and you should probably just work your way up to middle management of Dobbs tires or you should probably work at pizza or of the local places. They're here in there in Jefferson County and in that and I love where I came from. I love my mom and Dad Betty Chandler and Mike Chandler pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Since I'm not joking to three jobs at a time to make sure myself and my two brothers had every opportunity had had this opportunity to sit here and speak to you and your and your listeners. Today but where we came from there wasn't a lot of upside there wasn't a lot of there was so much fear of the unknown that you should probably just not try and luckily for me. God has had me in the palm of his hand when I made the decision to go off to university Missouri Walk onto the Division. One wrestling team where everybody told me I was going to probably be a non-starter. Probably quit probably ride the bench. Probably just be a punching bag for five years. I didn't care I I knew there was something tugging on my heart. That said I had to go take that chance. And then to take the chance on myself to go in the sport of mixed martial arts now here I am one of the most successful lightweights in the history of this report and and doing a phenomenal job taking making a phenomenal living for my family. You don't do that. You don't get to those positions without taking those chances that I was told not to take since I was a young kid so I think that story the small guy from a small town. He was taught to do small things who who didn't listen to those small things. That's my story. And that's my that's my witness to the world which is interesting to me because you talk about the self image you are also one of the most devout guys when it comes to personal growth and self development that. I know you are constantly asking me. Hey books you're reading. What do you indulging in a podcast and everything else so that you can continue to grow? How how did you go from a young man? Who's struggling with your your your self esteem and who you are to like a personal growth junkie yet. I think I think at some point. You start to realize that some dragons you slay and some dragons you just pushed into a corner and you and you get you get good at mitigating. The risk of them popping their head out at the at the wrong time so I know for a fact that I will never get rid of this small guy from that small town at thirty almost thirty four years old. I've realized trying to beat him over the head and stuff them in a corner and chain them to a basement somewhere. I've never been able to just get rid of him so I realize I just need to duct tape him to a to a to a chair in the basement of my mind and learn to keep pushing him. They're leaving him there. You know so and you can't do that without constant self-help without constantly building yourself up so much that whenever he does try to rear his head. It's almost like you're able to flip them away rather than getting to a position where he almost becomes head to head with you and you start to believe the lies that he tells you you start to believe the salt that he's throwing on old wounds you you start to catch the glimmer of the spotlight that he's shining on your insecurities in your deficiencies. Those things that you know are there yet if you don't acknowledge them and you can just learn to push him into a corner and manage them and you can only do that by constant. Self-help surround yourself with the right people. Don't you think most people have something from their childhood or limited belief system or something that is that that underdog mentality or they been through some tough times adversity that if you change the perspective of that you can actually use that as fuel. Yeah and I think that's and I think even my story is very similar to that. I have realized I don't care if if the most confident person that I've ever been around in my life if they walk into a room of me I know they're absolutely lying to me if they if they tell me they are. They don't have any fears. Any doubts insecurities we all have it and I think and I think it's. It's one of our greatest weapon because I think that's how we have all been you look at history and you look at every single person who has who has accomplished something great. It comes off. It comes off of the springboard of their failures. It comes off the springboard of of them being Written off as someone that will never get to where they want to be or all the stories in the Bible all the stories at all the stories everybody that we've looked up to an an researched. Everybody has had those those things about them or those moments or those people that said they would never make it by So yeah I like I like to say use your adversity as your advantage. Because I've often talked about in the earlier episodes episode one and two of this podcast. I talked about my upbringing. Youngest of eight kids poor family. I was the lunch ticket. Kid I still use today that mentality of everything I do. I got a scrap for everything I get in. When it's that climbing the mountain mentality you always keep climbing even when you get to the top. I remember asking some of world. Champions like yourself Lt drew. Hey when you get to a certain level of success how do you stay hungry What's your adversity white? Yeah One and I think that's that is so important too because you've had so many awesome successful people on this podcast and you're surrounded by me so we just walked in here and there is when you talk about accolades and world records and you talk about bank accounts and you talk about the success of the lot of the people in here. I think I think where people can lose. Sight is that they just continue to look for success instead of significance as well right you know the the amount of significance you can make them in. Obviously when you're young you're just trying to survive you know and then you start to get then you try to get a little bit of stability in that position where I'm having stability and success right now but I know the next chapter in my life while still fighting what I do after fighting. How am I going? To be significant down. In People's life individual people hundreds of thousands of millions of people insignif- are significant here in the N. People's life and. I think that's something that that can be sometimes overlooked people. Just try to get more and more and more success but you can only eat so many stakes. You can only drive so many cool cars and really. It's more about you than it. Is anybody else so and you know I. I love that the four stages of life. But you think about those who have tasted success. I give the analogy of a windshield and vision. You WanNa be looking through the windshield of life where where you're going looking forward and not so much spending time in the rear view mirror because when you look in the rear view mirror and you're reflecting on your past good or bad maybe that a lot of successes or maybe a lot of losses that can actually hold you back because of too much time spent in the past whether you look at your vision your windshield and where you're going you want to get excited about your dreams and get emotional about your dreams of what you're doing because when you get emotional about your dreams about your vision about moving forward well then you are living your best as knowing that your best is still yet to come and I know your best is still yet to come to and the older you get to. 'cause 'cause I always thought it'd be done fighting thirty five here. I am thirty three. I'm turning thirty four here in a couple of months. There's no way I'm GONNA be thirty five right now and and then even after that now the the more success that you have or the more significance that you're looking for the more the more your imagination grows and the more you're you're blessed with more and more opportunities to so you can't see where you're going and get more opportunities with this very very large windshield that you could be looking through. When you're looking through that little bitty tiny two by four. That's right rear. Amir Link Shield ten times bigger in their view mirror so in in your fighting career. There's a lot of different components to fighting. What's your favorite part of being a mixed martial arts fighter? You know. I think there's different seasons back back in the day I would have been like. Oh It's the competition competing I love. I love fighting and and and let me also true preface with. I don't I don't like to hurt people like I'm of nasty human being when I'm in there and I will hurt. I will hurt somebody badly. But I'm never actually consciously thinking about hurting anybody you know just like just like Ray. Lewis wasn't necessarily thinking about doing really badly bodily harm. He just wanted to get a really hard tackle right. He didn't want to hurt the guy he didn't want to. You don't WanNa take the food off the guy's table like but and I'm not thinking that either but in the in the the movement of people are going to get hurt so back in the day I would have said it was that it was the competition. Now I think it's being in a position where you know selfishly. I think there's just not. There's not a lot of people who do what I do. So it is the guys who who compete in the. Nfl really really cool guys who do the MLB play baseball playoffs other sports? That really really cool. But what I'm doing is somewhat the enemy of manhood. You know it's the epitome of of the fight for life so it's it's being put in a position where people look at me and they're like wow. I don't know if that guy is kind of a crazy psychopath or fees like kind of sick in the head and then you have a conversation with me and they think Manny's just a normal guy like me so I think being able to just be somewhat of a chameleon a nasty human being inside that cage but also sit here and hopefully people are getting value out of what the words that are coming out of my mouth and I don't sound like a professional mixed martial martial artist who fights in front of the inside of the cage. I think that's I think that's where I realize I've been putting an awesome position. And that's what I love most about the sport that I my sport is such a such a crazy outlier yet. I can be a normal human being inside of it and relate to so many people on a personal level where people thought I would never be able to relate to them right. That's the biggest misnomer Mike. I think that happens to the public. That doesn't follow the fight game as they think that fighters are often just thugs and I realized that in two thousand eight two thousand nine and my first guy ever worked with was brandon. Vera and Brandon came in and everything was. Yes sir no sir. Yes coach no coat and Mike. Wow this fighters then I was like it's the Martial Art Sidon. It's the respect side and and when I hear you and I've always heard you Present when you do your talks when you you are a man with a dignity and pride in respect of even a your opponent knocks them now that you help. I'm giving them. I believe from what I see and sometimes the best in the world. You don't even know what you're doing why you're doing it. The thing that I see with Mike Chandler is your embracing of the process. The work that goes in that no one knows about you. Have to do two or three sessions. A day when you're really heat enough for ten twelve weeks before a fight between the weight room between your sparring and you're grappling and your boxing and you have different coaches in the nutrition and to me. You've always embraced the process at hard. Of course it is but to me. I look at you in one of the reasons why you've been a champion several times in. Mma is because of the time and discipline that you put into the process. And I think and I think that's the other side of it as well knowing that they just just taking pride in the fact that I know I have to do ten times. More than a lot of other people in a lot of other sports Or in a lot of other vocations whether it be business or whether it be other vocations I.

Mike Chandler Jefferson County Dobbs Matt Martial Art Sidon university Missouri Walk Missouri Betty Chandler Nfl Mma Amir Link Shield MLB Ray Lewis Manny Vera Brandon
"university missouri" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"university missouri" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A bipartisan Senate committee found last year in twenty nineteen that the Chinese Communist Party controls nearly every aspect of the confusions institute's activities here in the United States over the past few months the university Missouri the versa Kansas the university of Maryland have independent decides to cool down the Confucius institutes after conducting their own reviews in schools in twenty two other states I doing or have already done the same sadly China's propaganda campaigns particularly the college China has targeted K. through twelve schools there it's Confucius classrooms the C. C. P.'s program to influence kids in elementary middle and high schools around the world do you know that we have no ability to establish similar programs in China I'm sure that doesn't surprise you brother drove talked about reciprocity in trade we should have reciprocity in all things today they have free rein in our system and we're completely shut out from there's as of two thousand seventeen were five hundred nineteen of these classrooms in the United States Beijing knows that today's kids and tomorrow's leaders the China competition is happening is happening in your states in happening right now and he drives it home you drive it on the drive you know I want to drive on that you need to go see the currents Thomas movie critical go to justice Thomas movie dot com currency quotes are created equal Clarence Thomas in his own words made by filmmaker Michael pack you saw a lot of movies I say into this one maybe I'll be in the best documentary nominees next year it should be it is inspiring it is moving as justice Thomas's life story as really cool Clarence Thomas in his own words it across the United States playing right now you can go and find out wherever that is that justice Thomas movie dot com justice Thomas movie dot com remarkable life story I love going to interview him about his book my grandfather's son justice Thomas in his.

Chinese Communist Party United States China C. P. Beijing Clarence Thomas Michael pack Senate university Missouri university of Maryland
"university missouri" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"Home there it is thank you not gonna ask your question how would you know the lady is a wealth of knowledge that's wanna just so you would know thank you thank you let's go to Mike in Florida we might be able to squeeze him in Mike what's up morning my the we're hopefully is phased out of Columbia Missouri nine hello be afraid what might the five eighty five percent of all the hot belts played in the world wow along the winter tire marks Meyer loaded with fat and they usually are all university of Missouri encourage I do a lot of drama the window mobile okay I don't know about other I used I used to live in Columbia so soon so they get a lot in turn from the university Missouri to draw the winner yeah yeah yeah right motion yeah I guess that's the I mean if you're sitting around a campfire later in life and you got a you know I've driven Oscar Mayer Wienermobile I smoked are yeah there's a story out of him yeah yeah I got to dig a state and there's a story today at the university of Missouri about them tracking their students in classes like number four yeah what I can actually say where they are and how they have that's how they clock and I guess to go to school yeah I don't know how I feel about it in kind of you know what I would do if I want to schedule I manage my phone to say that my phone a class yeah I'm a I'm a skip it's like you have yeah it is isn't you know scanned.

Mike Florida Missouri Meyer Columbia university Missouri Oscar Mayer Wienermobile
"university missouri" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"university missouri" Discussed on From Scratch

"Welcome thank you so much for having me. It's a real pleasure to be here. I want to start by talking about meets interviews. Can you Give me some more detail around that if you look at human health and you look at your heart disease diabetes and cancer your. There's a growing recognition that that there's a link between meat consumption and those health epidemics And the World Health Organization probably the most definitive most recently where they put me in a in a category process media category. That was the same as Eh cigarettes then you go to to climate when animals breathing there'd bidding carbon and so it seems like a minor tissue but if you think about the number of animals we have on their surface and the fact they're all breathing and you add that up. You guys should come up with that. Fourteen percent of greenhouse gas emissions being attributed to. It's actually just the fact that the animals on their surface in such numbers in reading and you look at natural resources all across the country resource issues of one kind or another depending on where you live. Then last you'll go down and welfare now people on a handheld can see how their food's being made and I think more people are saying I'm not in agreement with that particular system you said just the the fact that the animals breathe yields a certain amount of carbon. Well what about human beings I mean we breathe carbon dioxide and of course that yields that helps with photosynthesis but is there an amount of carbon even beyond that that also leads has a dilatory effect to put it in context we raise and we slaughter about sixty six a billion animals a year right so think the human population big but it's attached to that right. Yeah so so. That's the issue. So why isn't there more a regulation. We think of the auto industry for example highly regulated to decrease The amount of pollution that it yields. Why has not the same amount of regulation Galatian Existed in agribusinesses it just because of the strong lobbyists you know. It's a really interesting question and I think it goes deeper than that Certainly that is a factor. It's one thing to be put new APP out or or you know I always talk about the landline versus cell phone and that quick traditionally had to another thing to change how we protein protein protein was such an important part of of of how we evolved party. Even when we were you know Homo sapiens meet played enormously important role in our development. Altman if you think about the human brain only started to consume me. It was about six hundred cubic centimeters it over the course revolution and I think largely due to nutrient dense food The meat is Grew about thirteen hundred giving centimeters right and what was happening was not only. were getting this really good nutrition right. But it was Reducing the workload on our stomachs. So all that excess energy good our brains. It would be unwise for me to say that people shouldn't eat meat. I think that's a mistake right because I believe meat is central to who we are What I do think as possible and really exciting is that you can get away from the idea that has come from an animal and with the science we have understanding? We have today of what it is. You can build a piece of me directly from plants so if we ask you know anybody will what is made they'd say oh it's the tissue that comes from an animal. So how would you define meet your historical understanding right is you know. And more and more recently is chicken s come from a would you can count pig. The composition of me. Something different might. The competition. Meat is basically amino acids lipids. It's very small amount of carbohydrates. It's it's trace minerals in its water and it's predominantly water that list of things that I just presented none of those exclusive to the animal. They're all present in plants. So let's say you you take p plant Walk me through how that P becomes a earth shots chicken strip so you take the and basically mill it. Then you have to separate the The protein From the fat. So what you do is you put an aqueous solution of water based solution place where You change the Ph troubles and that will separate out the protein from the carbohydrates in from the fat where. You'll get your plans now. The piece that we use actually grown in Canada and grown in France. But it's not about the particular plant it's really about the idea that the plant kingdom is a source of amino acids right and so if you think about it that way. There's enormous number of plants. We could use to t t take protein from and it's it really interesting. Cottonseed has protein would never do this but tobacco leaves has a pretty good source of protein. Right Lupine CAMELINA. Lina mustard seed if one of my favorites. So there's all these different places you can pull protein from twenty so so we know it we then it. It's it's crushed basically that separated right and and this was done by supplier of ours and then we take that that protein right and we want it through a really simple process of heating cooling and pressure and the machine is an extruder order that does the heating and cooling. The pressures is anything lost by changing the The shape of the protein. You know I think of like broiling Broccoli. You lose so much of the nutrients rather than steaming. It was cool is that it's basically been stripped down to its protein right and so you just changing the form beer stitching together in a new way. But there's not some sort of fundamental conversion were becomes a lesser protein. So you're trying to mimic meat have have you thought of calling. It's something else because in a way maybe when you started out you thought well how can I make a replacement for meat but aside from those people who have been eating meat Who are alive? I mean there you have new generations of people being born. You could call it plant or whatever word you want to put my mother after me for the exact same thing every time I hey trying to my well because we talked about With respect to the role displayed in our culture. I'm really focused pissed on providing a absolutely convincing piece of meat plants so I WANNA go back to the early days I you graduated from Columbia Business Business School and went to work at Ballard power systems which is a fuel cell company making clean batteries. Basically is that right So you've you've always had kind of this conservation ethos. Where did that arise? Turn for my dad when I was growing up You know I've always thinking about my dad this way that you ever seen at deer like in Central Park. They just don't belong there like scared like I got. That's my dad. He hates the city and and so every chance. He got packer up and he would drive us out to our farm. The he taught me there About the natural world and I fell in love with my dad suppressor he's at McGill. But when I was a kid University of Maryland. We have a farm in the western part of the state that was supposed to be a hobby farm. We turned it into a real business where we had Hosting Terry Calicut hundred head hosting dairy cattle. At what point did you start thinking about this idea of meat replacement. What was the catalyst for getting to this topic? Odd took me a really long time And really about courage. I think First and foremost and and a willingness to to let my own heart speak to to who I I am versus what I thought people thought I should be What did you think you should be? So I Had formal training and was like very focused on climate through energy. I just felt that it wasn't serious enough to like go start like some kind of Tofu factory but I am a sense that you know there was something amiss. You started reading about a livestock and the meat industry and you came across a paper in by two professors at the University of Missouri. Fu Hong Shea an Harold huff. What was their paper about? How did you find them? I was thinking about how. How do I get into this field? So I started to make some small investments in restaurants that we're doing well Serving lamps food. Everything that we were doing. We had to basically disguise the product. Something I just begin to think about the science behind it. There's no reason that you need to run all animal and so started reading and is really the story about the Internet. I mean I'd like literally would just stay up and read whatever I could find and Over time I came across what Phuong was doing. And what what Herald is doing and I call them up and and said I'd like to come in and talk to you. And what point did you decide. Okay we're going to partner and I'm going to license the technology so they they had actually extrusion trudeau been around for a long time. What they did was develop a basically a set of variables that it was like a lock on a safe like you can. No you have to have three numbers numbers there but if you don't know the sequence and everything else where the numbers you're kind of stuck and so they found the exact right combination heating cooling pressure that I felt created this really realistic muscle form restitching a protein into muscle form. I would basically produce as much as I possibly could in a day at the university Missouri in their lab all right and then We would take it back. I would take it back to Maryland island out fly back. You know hundred pounds of chicken and we'd have a place to store. Its output. Is My bathtub. Just jump on a commercial airplane with a a sack of chicken. unfunny episodes like where some went once it opened in overhead and start falling out chicken southwest. What's wrong with you? You can buy those big bags. Toss left like thirty five bucks over the airport with as cold as I can. Keep it in the overhead. Exactly yeah the sometimes the the the Boxes would open and people are carrying. Why do you have all this chicken? I'd be very flattered. That'd be like asking that way but Exactly but does it. How does that license? It was really interesting using and we're working on this for a long time. I was up at our our our farm and Our neighbor my neighbor came over to me and said I just read about this. Chicken chicken is being developed humorous Missouri. Wait that's the product. Work on Time magazine had run an article and the sort of press office. The Missouri had orchestrated it. And so I called up Herald as hell. What are you doing this as we were partners? He said you know that they were under very sharp. Borders to to basically actually just do this to knock communicate etc.. But you know what they were like. They got inundated with calls like all these big corporations want allies it athlete credible me herald flung and the tech transfer office Missouri. We already guy. I'm going to give me lessons. Amazing so at the time that you got the license through this kind a backdoor way. Thanks to Time magazine. Was it basically you. And how many others were you working with in Maryland right so we had a very small team so I started the business. Almost immediately started importing. What I felt was the very best protein that I could find on that came out of Asia because Asia the Buddhist temples? They've done a lot out of work on this for hundreds of years right and so I started to import From Italian East Company. A basic protein That was like beef and it. It was built soya and we'd wasn't very sophisticated but I began to sell it a whole foods. We would run it through Very Large Kettles in a kitchen that we who rented out in the evening restaurant And would sell it into toll. Foods prepared foods section. Now how did you get into whole foods. I mean you don't have a background in We don't have these relationships persistence. Absolutely you just call and call and call. When did you get your first investors? And who were they a a funded. The early part of the company like I don't have the figure your far more than like over a hundred dollars for sure and then Raise money from friends and family and then got the license and then I sent a note out to me every venture firm that I could find and you didn't have any relationships preexisting. No no and this is from western Maryland. You're writing to Kleiner Perkins. I remember the title of my email was oppressed for the play not not super effective but but Kleiner reached out to Missouri independently and Missouri connecting with me. And I've been through some tough tough times with them and I just I can't say enough good things about them. You're their first food based investment. Can you give me some more color on that I encounter two partners air Ray Lane and then a junior tournament modus bonday were the ones that looked at the company and even they had to convince their own partners. Like this made sense right sort of there were some can derivative perspectives on the company. That this is sort of fake. Meet what he's doing but ray okay was an and others on the board of always been there to knows. Let's get this get this done. Bill Gates is an investor the twitter founders of Williams and Biz stone are investors. How how did they come to be a part of this ad is through Kleiner and Bill Gates yes same thing? I mean Tiner I had the meeting with him..

Missouri Time magazine Kleiner Perkins Herald heart disease World Health Organization Bill Gates Central Park university Missouri Maryland University of Maryland Altman University of Missouri Ballard power systems Maryland island
"university missouri" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And with sufficient factual predication still Horowitz does the Senate Judiciary Committee investigators made serious mistakes and errors in applying for surveillance warrants including meeting information we also did not receive satisfactory explanations for any of the errors or omissions we identified or which says there's no evidence of political bias played a role that is the conclusion disputed by Republicans on Capitol Hill Jr and how burn fox news an idea for a national suicide hotline is one step closer the Senate commerce committee approving senator Cory Gardner is built to make nine eight eight the national suicide hotline this easy to remember number would make it easier for Americans dealing with the mental health crisis to receive lifesaving support the bill has bipartisan support a man who got his thirteenth do you why this year will be spending the next four years in prison the jewel offenders sixty year old Maynard wrong got his first do you why back in nineteen eighty six is thirteenth was in Denver where he was arrested following an accident and I seventy and north Havana almost all of his arrests were made in the Denver metro area the Denver district attorney says it's a miracle well didn't kill himself or others jury belt Kaylee news into our NFL insider Benjamin Albright CS you is hiring former Boston College coach Steve Addazio to replace coach Mike bobo Broncos working quarterback to lock is returning home to Kansas city to face the team he grew up rooting for second rounder played his college ball just down I seventy eight the university Missouri as high school ball thirteen miles away from Merrill had at least some at high he admitted he has thought about going to Casey once a year and beating the chiefs it's a cool thought anyone to visit any state home during college too and it's my first time out and then going to a team in the division I.

Missouri Mike bobo Boston College Benjamin Albright NFL Kaylee fox Senate Judiciary Committee Casey Merrill Horowitz Kansas city Steve Addazio Havana Denver Maynard senator Cory Gardner Senate commerce committee Capitol Hill Jr
"university missouri" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Right here then you. fresh air with all the ego an exaggeration that we see the hyperbole that you see in sports radio so thank you very much it's later than you with bill writer. welcome back to the show. are not life is a little bit of a well the joke here because I am saying it store there and if you know what it was. she makes me. Sunday the NFL on CBS features a full slate of games including Brady and the pats on the road of Washington and the ravens and Steelers renewing the AFC north rivalry check your local listings for the game in your area and it all begins JB in the guys on the NFL today at noon eastern nine Pacific on CBS eight five five two one two four CBS is the phone number we are talking here about the NC double a and the threat and I'm glad that there's a threat that is posed by the California legislation allowing student athletes to make money off their name and likeness then they're on their abilities not be paid by the universities but to solicit money from other sources as a result of their obvious prominence because of their skills as a student athlete in the end California this law now they signed it the governor signed it today and the stipulation law that these university here in California cannot punish them by revoking scholarship for making them eligible stopping them from plain obviously it's a big deal it does take effect to do that twenty three and we got some callers here eight five five two one two four CBS Tommy in Texas thanks for listening body happy Monday you're on CBS sports radio. are the horrible idea horrible idea for that all the state fair and equal like interact with a lot of our high school games your bigger than most states college games we have a lot of money we wouldn't be for a lot like Rhode Island and Delaware I mean it's not even a. it's a horrible idea really bad. thank you that's all thanks to the candor totally disagree with it but I you know I get it you your view is reasonable represents the view of a lot of people. I don't think it's unreasonable and I think that if it means that universities can't pay their coach is five million dollars they have to pay them for million but again the money's not coming from the universities it's coming from other places. the boosters who already legally pain student athletes in your state and most every state can just channel it for free now I own the car wash Johnny the linebackers picture come on by and get your car wash on Johnny the linebacker I mean what we're talking about here. the money would come from advertisers and for people who want to solicit the if it's a like Peyton manning and and what's the gag of toy blinking on the other athlete does the tie commercials. those guys get money from tied for what is it laundry night America that is nothing to do with the other bill pay the money or team like the Broncos he's retired with the exact same process I get what you're saying I understand the frustration with it but again these laws don't stipulate in any way that the universe is the pay the money it's that I went to the university Missouri right there's a great we're the best cheese burgers I've ever had ever Gooch's best pizza so the speed of a rabbit is missed out it's really good Shakespeare's bush's burgers in Shakespeare pizza Columbia Missouri Missouri passes law would be able to say you know what really like their quarterback we're gonna pay M. fifty grand a year. to sell our pizza the advertiser piece on the radio TV or whatever it may be. I think it's a reasonable solution eight five five two one two four CBS is the phone number eight five five two one two four CBS will go a little full Vincent thank you for listening down to Kentucky I appreciate your your on CBS sports radio Hey how you doing Sir I appreciate you taking my call I have more of a question that is like your perspective on it more than than some comments it's that our C. two scenarios happening the NCA a to save face is basically going to ban California schools they're going to say if you pay your players in any way shape or form you cannot be part the NCAA California will respond by making their only which will basically be a semi pro league they'll sell television rights eccentric cetera and and they will get I guess depending on. route eight players can make whatever they want they'll end up with all the top players I had the best league viewership in other markets will go down or if they pay them what I guess would be reasonable for student athletes maybe two three hundred dollars a week may it may be less than that then still I think top players will go will be scattered across the country but my question is is what do you see the NCAA's response to this as do you think they'll ban California schools and if they don't or even if they do where does the money stops are you going to are you gonna turn college basketball in college football the two predominately profit making sports into who who basically can be the red Sox and the Yankees the the the top dollar yeah those are the top layer great question yeah that's a great question thank thank the call so let's take your scenario right they might give us a call you can.

CBS California NFL bill Rhode Island NCAA Washington Missouri Johnny Peyton manning writer. NC university Missouri Broncos pats Brady AFC Tommy
"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Graham how you doing it's wonderful to be with you today well I'm really excited to have you because I'm so fascinated by your work and I want you to tell us everything about it because I've been reading lots of things about you and and I'm so excited to get I don't know some inside information on what makes our cat our cat in the feline genome in genetics first I want to establish though for my listeners a little bit about you and what you do yes I'm not a professor at the university Missouri in the college of veterinary medicine so my primary role is to do research and my specialty is genetics and I primarily focus on domestic cats so really what I hope to do is a reddit Kate all different types of inherited diseases that are not wanted in cats but also to find some of the genetic causes of some of our interesting traits like Kerr will be years and funny tales of long hair in different colors so that people with Kristen breeding cats can do that more efficiently and then produce less on wanted cats and being very efficient with their breeding program so that every can't they produce is a highly desired so I think that that is amazing and I admire that so much so let's talk a little bit about the genetics of the cat what is a cat's genome well the cat's genome anyone's genome consists of all the DNA that makes up their coding DNA and the DNA makes the proteins which makes an individual who they are and so all mammals have about the same so our eyes of genomes meaning the same length of DNA but that the they can be broken into slightly smaller lands and that's called crimson's so camps have thirty eight chromosomes where humans have forty six but overall they have about the same amount of DNA and the difference the real difference between the cats is catching humans let's say is not the number of chromosomes but the actual difference between how the coding sequence of the DNA brie and DNA is made up of four different bases that are called for search for different chemicals that hope together to make a big long DNA string and those four different chemicals depending on what order they are make a cat different than from what a human would be so really it's all about their genes and how their genes are just slightly different from humans and really we share eighty percent of our genes with humans so we're quite similar because we're all mammals but just how those genes get turned on and turned off in tweet in little ways makes a cat a cat in different from humans well I think it's extremely fascinating that little tweaks in four base pairs tell ourselves who we are and and the traits we're gonna have an even some of the diseases that we're gonna have so I think that that is fascinating so how long have we known the exact feline GM well no one really knows the exact sequence Regina even in humans and they've had the human genome project for a couple decades now and that's because there's many tricky parts in that genome that we can't quite read properly my chest of last year December twenty seven to twenty eighteen or twenty seventeen actually we came out with what's called a new gene assembly from a cat and during that year we were the best genome there was for any species other than humans and mice they have quite a lot of research on their genomes also the cat is really at the top we have a very well organized genome so that means we know how it's put together and how the jeans relate to one another in their order and distance on the chromosomes and so we we have a very good cat genome assembly and that makes hunting for diseases and hunting for traits so so much easier there's still a lot of work to be done it's not perfect but it's actually quite a good cappuccino so I want to get more deeply into what you know.

Graham eighty percent
"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"If I can't comes into your clinic and you suspect hate I think this could be a genetic problem we could actually get blood from the cat perform a whole genome sequence and hopefully find the cause for their cancer ailment and what we want to do is be able to do it fast enough that maybe they'll be a good targeted treatment that is appropriate for that disease or health concern that you now as the veterinarian can apply in help to precision medicine for that cat so everyone should be out long look out for what might be genetic diseases and we could possibly put them in the ninety nine lives project well I think that's wonderful because not only could you help the cat with the problem but maybe future cats with the problem so that is terrific so tell us one more time hal my listeners can find that information on the web so that ninety nine lines can't genome project can be found at our website for the lions genetics lab at the university Missouri which is feline genome dot Missouri dot EDU well that is terrific thank you so much for joining me today and I know now I'm kinda tempted to send a sample for scamper because the as far as I know he's normal but it's really fascinating so thank you to all my listeners and as always our amazing producer mark winter four nine lives with doctor Catelyn can't live radio.

university Missouri Catelyn lions producer
"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"And I'm so excited to get some inside information on what makes our cat our cat and the feline genome genetics. I, I want to establish, though for my listeners a little bit about you, and what you do. Yes, I'm a professor at the university Missouri in the college of veterinary medicine. So my primary role is to do research. And my specialty is genetic in, I primarily focus on domestic cats. So really when I hope to do is a radical all different types of. Any Herod diseases that are not wanted in cats, but also to find some of the genetic causes of sim are interesting traits, like curled years, and funny, tales and long hair and different colors, so that people interested in breeding cats can do that more efficiently and then produce less on wanted cats and being very efficient with their breeding program, so that every can't produce is a highly desired. So I think that that is amazing. And I am Meyer that so much. So let's talk a little bit about the genetics of the cat. What is a cat genome? Well, a catch genome anyone's genome consists of all the DNA that makes up their coding DNA in the Dini makes the proteins, which makes an individual who they are. And so I'll mammals have about the same size of genomes, meaning the same. Length of DNA, but that they can be broken into slightly smaller lens, and that's called chromosomes. So catch have thirty eight chromosomes where humans have forty six but overall, they have about the same amount of DNA and the difference. The real difference between the catches. Catch in humans. Let's say is not the number of chromosomes, but the actual difference between how the coding sequence of the DNA read and Dina's made up of four different basis that are called four different chemicals that hope together to make a big long DNA string, and those four different chemicals, depending on what order, they are make cat different than from what human would be so really it's all about their genes, and how their genes are just slightly different from humans and really, we share eighty percent of our genes with human. So we're. Quite similar because we're all mammals, but just how lose genes get turned on and turned off in tweet in little ways makes a cat, a cat, and different from humans. Well, I think it's extremely fascinating. That little tweaks in four base pairs, tell ourselves who we are, and the traits, we're going to have, and even some of the diseases that we're going to have. So I think that, that is fascinating. So how long have we known the exact feline genome, well, no one really knows the exact sequence for a genome, even in humans than they had the human genome project for a couple of decades now and that's because there's many tricky parts in that genome, that we can't quite read properly, but just the last year, he Semper twenty seven twenty eighteen or twenty seventeen actually we came out with what's called a new genome, assembly for the cat and drew. During that year. We were the best genome, there was for any species other than humans in mice. They have quite a lot of research on their genomes. So the cat is really at the top. We have a very well organized genome. So that means we know how it's put together and how the genes relate to one another in their order and distance on the chromosomes. And so we, we have a very good cat genome assembly. And that makes hunting for diseases and hunting for traits so so much easier. There's still a lot of work to be done. It's not perfect. But it's actually quite a good catching them. So I want to get more deeply into what.

university Missouri professor Meyer Dina eighty percent
"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"I'm really excited to have you, because I'm so fascinated by your work, and I want you to tell us everything about it because I've been reading lots of things about you. And I'm so excited to get. I don't know some inside information on what makes our cat our cat and the feline genome genetics. I, I want to establish, though for my listeners a little bit about you, and what you do. Yes, I'm a professor at the university Missouri in the college of veterinary medicine. So my primary role is to do research. In my specialty is genetics in, I primarily focus on domestic cats. So really when I hope to do is a radical eight all different types of. Inherited diseases that are not wanted in cats, but also to find some of the genetic causes of sim are interesting traits, like curled ears and funny, tales and long hair and different colors, so that people interested in breeding cats can do that more efficiently and then produce less on wanted cats and be very efficient with their breeding program, so that every they produce is a highly desired. So I think that that is amazing. And I am Meyer that so much. So let's talk a little bit about the genetics of the cat. What is a cat genome? Well, a catch genome anyone's genome consists of all the DNA that makes up their coding DNA in the DNA makes the proteins, which makes an individual who they are. And so all mammals have about the same size of genomes, meaning the same. Same length of DNA, but that they can be broken into slightly smaller lens. And that's called chromosomes so camps have thirty eight chromosomes where humans have forty six but overall, they have about the same amount of DNA and the difference. The real difference between the catches caps in humans. Let's say is not the number of chromosomes, but the actual difference between how the coding sequence of the DNA re Andenaes made up of four different bases that are called for. So it's four different chemicals that hope together to make a big long DNA string and those four different chemicals, depending on what order, they are make a cat different than from what a human would be so really it's all about their genes. And how genes are just slightly different from humans and really, we share eighty percent of our genes with human. So we're. Quite similar because we're all mammals, but just how lose genes get turned on and turned off in tweet in little ways makes a cat, a cat, and different from humans. Well, I think it's extremely fascinating. That little tweaks in four base pairs tell ourselves who we are in traits were going to have an even some of the diseases that we're going to have. So I think that, that is fascinating. So how long have we known the exact feline genome? Well, no one really knows the exact sequence for a genome, even in humans, they had the human genome project for a couple of decades now and that's because there's many tricky parts in that genome that we can't quite read properly. But just of last year, he Semper twenty seven twenty eighteen or twenty seventeen actually we came out with what's called a new genome assembly for the cat and. During that year. We were the best genome, there was for any species other than humans in mice. They have quite a lot of research on their genomes. So the cat is really at the top. We have a very well organized genome. So that means we know how it's put together and how the genes relate to one another in their order and distance on the chromosomes. And so we, we have a very good cat genome assembly. And that makes hunting for diseases and hunting for traits so so much easier. There's still a lot of work to be done. It's not perfect. But it's actually quite a good catching them. So I want to get more deeply into what.

university Missouri professor Meyer Andenaes eighty percent
"university missouri" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"She's doing a great job. Again. Would you send your student to the U of after hearing all this after he, you know, hearing the lane statements from Bob Robbins, knowing he's not even doing anything to solve this. I mean, it's only gonna come more radicalized. Wouldn't you think you think applications are going to drop member university, Missouri? They had the big the big giant brouhaha university of Missouri. A couple years ago and it caused their application Friday. It's some kind of free speech whatever and they had applications drop immensely. That's what's going to happen in the U of M just telling you. Just telling you. So what you're gonna hear now is some old guy. Who is a former professor, but is some kind of a research. I left his beginning in there. I believe, but he some old guy with a with a ponytail, you know, that balding on top with the ponytail in the back. Typical you know, burned out hippie. I'm a former professor, and I'm a vision of that. And you got to hear what he says about the videos that came out where we showed that the border patrol is being harassed listen to this. And I think the basic comment pie should like to make. And I'm very glad that president Robinson's. Here is that he has officially in emails claimed that the person who was in gauging in speech the event disrupted. It anybody who looks at the video has got to know she did not disrupt that event really the event continued. You've got komo's. Apparently organized shook hands with the person at the end. It was a false charge and attempt to suppress free speech by criminalising..

professor Bob Robbins president Robinson Missouri university of Missouri komo
"university missouri" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

The Ziglar Show

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on The Ziglar Show

"And there's a truck driver in there as wells. You did such a great job of bringing MS visual sing to- life. And I think. A lotta people who have been told how to listen, you know, we spend fifty five percent avowed died listening as a minimum. The most senior you are in an organization with the lodge the influence, you have the mole listening likely to do manages. Listen about sixty percent of the size in senior executives. Eighty percent of a dies. Only two percent of us vivid Bank told so one of the things I've been told by great listeners around the world. Whether it's professor Grahame bowed. I from the university Missouri oil from. Avi. Over in the Hebrew University in Jerusalem will from klaren of rain in the Netherlands is to trust your intuition as mauden people. We have so much technology in distraction around us. We got to trust the various of what we are. And that's listening for feelings. This what you're talking about the Kevin into your -bility to feel for the connection between the other human because listening is out. Both for listening is something we develop a twenty weeks inside our mother's womb at twenty weeks. We can distinguish our mouths voice from any other sound at thirty two weeks. We can distinguish vita oven from Bon Jovi and the minute we bone. We come into the very active us thing bone is. We scream we wanna be noticed. And we spend the rest of out life talking to be noticed an old people want to do is to be hood. I cry. For you to see who they are. And it was a great Lleida who I worked with the set to me one day about seven years ago. If you could co defy what you do. How you listen you could change the world. And I thought about it, and it just made no sense to me at all. Because when you say the would code from the industry, come from technology, a spent eleven news marketing director, Microsoft in mobile phone companies Vodafone, it was a wise about the software. So when you side to if you could cut that will elected size how to put what's in my head into software. But what up lunches don't jump to southwest right away cut it into training coated into a bulk coated into a jigsaw puzzle coded into a set applying Qods coated into a podcast than than the patents emerge. That's where we're at. Now it comic trying to code that. Because the Mona quest the quest to create one hundred million listeners in the world because I think right now at any point in the history of humanity with doing less listening than ever because we've had more technology. To broadcast than ever before the software now head to help us to listen it as a an upgrade. And that's my quest. Goodness. Okay. Well, on that note, if you will bear with me reading from your own book, you write in the preface what you just said, you said the word craving. We are all craving to be heard. So folks, I want you to this. This is just a couple of paragraphs the world is a noisy place where you fight to be heard every day, despite the fact that we have been taught at home and at school how to speak. None of us have had any training in how to listen multiple academic. Studies have shown that between fifty to fifty five percent of your working day is spent listening..

Lleida Bon Jovi professor Grahame university Missouri Hebrew University Jerusalem Bank Netherlands marketing director Qods Microsoft Vodafone fifty five percent twenty weeks thirty two weeks Eighty percent sixty percent seven years
"university missouri" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"And by the way, Kentucky's won ten games since Tennessee has which makes us feel by the way that we put up on Twitter. We'll Tennessee when another national championship in mad Jones's lifetime and three hundred votes are in and just a few seconds. And you seem to be winning this one so far. I haven't even re tweeted it yet. Great to have you on Matt thanks for the entertainment. You guys have a good weekend. Seriously. I do enjoy this Tennessee basketball team, Admiral and at Williams are fun to watch. Okay. We we you'll certainly be welcome at the national championship parade. Nice guy. Yeah. We know great met many, thanks talk. Soon. Listening to Paul finebaum show podcast. John is in Saint Louis. Good afternoon. John all hey today, quite well. Thank you for joining the show, anyway, call I was going to bring this up by I call you. I guess the case, and we not all the time. But every once in a while, but I I is being a Missouri graduate and Missouri Tigers fan, I just think that university Missouri's really being picked on here. Okay. And I really I can just come right and tell you I didn't appreciate the the slant of commentary yesterday by your show. Particularly, you know, bringing in things that really warrant relevant to the situation as the current situation university of Missouri. I mean, I just I just think it would have to have people twist things and make any windows about the university of Missouri. And you know, we got a clean program. We're on the up and up John John Hoult, John hold on a second. John you described. You just go way laid by the incident. I don't give me you gotta clean program. Okay. I realized that tend to repeal, but as of this moment, the NCWA has not exactly given you the. Joan of arc award for clean behavior compared to what Paul. I why why does every Missouri fan have to try to compare their program to someone else? Let's talk about the university of Missouri and the problems is school has gone through. And I realized it's a lot better than it was. But I don't hear Missouri. I mean, every every every board member and every executive Missouri just wants to drop a bomb on the NC, double A. I didn't create this issue. I I'm just reporting on it. Well, in in in a way that, you know, not very I what's the right word to kill me. Well, I'm gonna tell you. It's not it's not a unbiased opinion about university the way you guys talked yesterday about the university of Missouri. Is you you were hoping he would jump on the bandwagon. And really not even have wanted invite the university of Missouri into the SE over John guide is used patently BS because I because I happened to endorse the Missouri decision. It was not an easy decision. Back Commissioner sly, I think you know that. But I think to to go backwards is not really the answer. Here. What we did yesterday. And what we're doing right now is talking about what has Missouri done since. It's been in the SEC. I think that's a fair conversation. Well, I'm not the one it wasn't my it wasn't my decision three and a half years ago to fire the chancellor to fire the president to fire the athletic director, see your head football coach resigned end up getting on probation. That's not on me. That's on you. Well, okay, you're gonna let me talk or what ball you can. You got all. Go ahead. We have to find coaches at university. We have a admirable staff, and we have great leadership of what does that have to do with anything right now while we're talking about let's it have to do it shows big and it shows us strategy towards progression. And and and being very upfront and transparent on things. Okay. I just don't really appreciate a show like this trying to bring in the our word on things, and I'm gonna leave it at that over and out..

university of Missouri Missouri John John Hoult Tennessee Missouri Tigers Paul finebaum Twitter Matt Saint Louis Kentucky Jones NCWA SEC Williams Joan Commissioner executive chancellor director
"university missouri" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"university missouri" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Our three podcast. We welcome you back. Missouri. Officials and trustees have been coming one after another out with more inflammatory comments directed toward the NC double A than the previous. We'll talk about that in a few minutes with Dave matter who covers Missouri for the Saint Louis post dispatch also hurt hear from a former Mizzou player who is equally outraged. More of your phone calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five John is in Saint Louis. Good afternoon. John. All hay today, quite well. Thank you for joining the show, anyway, call I was going to bring this up by you know, I call you guess occasionally, not all the time. But every once in a while, but I- term is being a Missouri graduate and BIC, Missouri. Tigers fan, I just think that university Missouri's really being picked on here. Okay. And I really I can just come right and tell you I didn't appreciate the the slant of cometary yesterday by your show, particularly, you know, bringing in things that really warrant relevant to the current situation university of Missouri. I mean, I just I just think it's ludicrous to to how people twist things and make any windows about the university of Missouri. And you know, we got a clean program. We're on the up and up the John John John hold on a second. John. You just you just got waylaid by the incident. I don't give me you gotta clean program. Okay. I realize it's under appeal. But as of this moment, the NCWA has not exactly given you the. Joan of arc award for clean behavior. We'll compare to what Paul I why why does every misery have to try to compare their program to someone else? Let's talk about the university of Missouri and the problems is school has gone through. And I realize it's a lot better than it was let's talk about that. I don't hear Missouri. I mean, every every every board member and every executive Missouri just wants to drop a bomb on the NC, double A. I didn't create this issue. I I'm just reporting on it. Well, in in in a way that, you know, not very what's the right word, the owner macho man, well, I'm going to tell you it's not it's not a unbiased opinion about university of way, you guys talked yesterday about the university of Missouri. Is you you were hoping he would jump on the bandwagon. And really not even have wanted invite the university of Missouri into the SEC over John the guide is just patently BS because I because I happened to endorse the Missouri decision. It was not an easy decision by Commissioner sly. I think you know that. But I think to to go backwards is not really the answer. Here. What we did yesterday. And what we're doing right now is talking about what has Missouri done since. It's been in the SEC. I think that's a fair converse. Mission. I'm not the one it wasn't my it wasn't my decision three and a half years ago to fire the chancellor to fire the president to fire the athlete director. See your head football. Coach resign end up getting on probation. That's not on me. That's on you. Well, okay, you're gonna let me talk or what ball? Do you? Can you got? Go ahead L. Ha we have to fine coaches if university we have a admirable staff, and we have great leadership Bill. What does that have to do with anything right now? We're talking about let's have to do it. It shows Beijing and it shows a strategy towards progression. And and and being very upfront and transparent on things. Okay. I just don't really appreciate a show like this trying to bring in the our word on things, and I'm gonna leave it at that over an out..

Missouri university of Missouri John John John SEC Saint Louis university of way NCWA Tigers Dave Beijing Commissioner sly Joan BIC executive football Paul chancellor director