20 Episode results for "University Of Iowa"

Improving the bottom line and patient access through eConsults [PODCAST]

The Hospital Finance Podcast

15:37 min | 2 months ago

Improving the bottom line and patient access through eConsults [PODCAST]

"Welcome to the hospital finance podcast you're go to source for information and insights that can help you stay ahead of the challenges impacting healthcare finance, and now the host of the hospital finance podcast Michael Pass not say. This is my best day. Welcome back to the award winning hospital finance podcast. ECON are becoming an increasingly popular option for offering specialty consult without the need for an in person visit. The University of Iowa Physicians and the University of Iowa health have adopted e consoles across sixteen specialties to talk to us about their journey towards implementing ECON salt I'm joined by. Beth. Jagger's administrative director for the University of Iowa Physicians in the Carver College of Madison. Prior to recurrent role Beth worked as administrator in the departments of Urology Cardiothoracic Surgery and radiology and held various roles in finance Bethel's inactive CPA NCPC license, and earned her MBA from the tippy school of Management at the University of Iowa. Beth. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me Michael. So Beth for those in our audience who may not be familiar with e consoles. Can you give us a short overview of what they are? Yeah so e consulates is a a synchronous provider, provider exchange in our digital health platforms and what Ethan grayness means is that it doesn't have to be real time. So this really enables referring providers to consult with a specialist around a specific condition You know. Minutes days weeks to be able to get care to a patient in their patient home. And Beth, why did the University of Iowa decide to implement e consoles? So the University of Iowa was part of the double AMC ECON salt grants. So we were one of the first academic medical centers to really test out this new way of delivering healthcare, and the reason why we were really interested in Eh is You know the state of Iowa is it has a population about three million people and and we're pretty rural So this is really a great opportunity to provide a patient care and specialist care to people across the states without having to come to Iowa City Iowa to see a specialist So we were really excited to be able to partner with other primary care stakeholders to be able to give our our community at. The population of the state of Iowa, the care that they need. And you've been successful in making e consoles work. So let's get some some practical advice from you on the ground. How does an e console work? Yeah. So there's a lot of different ways to set this up you know. We physicians do concerts all the time but the way the University of Iowa did it is, is we really wanted to make this have. The least amount of manual intervention as possible. So you know the old way of faxing and consoles wasn't very appealing to us. We asked ourselves, how can we leverage our electronic medical records system to really help launch sold? So we have two different pathways for. Providers to access our specialists. Three consulates one is is just through our Emr You know we. Have the ability to have other hospitals on our instance of epic, and then we also have our own primary care network on through you I-, health healthcare, and so they can simply place an order in our Emr and it's just like a normal console. They place the order it goes into the specialist providers inbox that water has a various questions to help the ordering. Map out a care pathway plan for their patient, and then typically within a one to two days are specialists of reads that order and. Maps out a care plan or you know one alternative is that they need to be seen face to face on but we're really trying to encourage collaboration between the ordering provider and and the specialist again with the goal to keep the patient in the inner medical home. If if a provider is an affiliated with Ui healthcare or is an external in in a different are we have the ability to partner with outside institutions and give them access to order set through care link, which is also an epic option. So those are the two ways that we have e concerts work in healthcare but again, it can it can be very informal like just a paper order or a fax or anything that qualifies for an order in order to To get that information to the referring provider. Beth. How do providers get reimbursed for concerts? Yes. So we are really thankful that through the work of the ANC that Medicare had at has added to cpt codes to their fee schedule in order to reimburse providers for this work. And what's really great is that they reimburse the ordering provider, which is typically a primary care provider and the specialist, the same amount So all all you have to do to to actually get reimbursed is that you have to Put In an order and the requesting provider, which again is typically that that primary care provider needs to document thirty minutes of work for creating and treating. and. Managing that patients E- console. And for the specialist they actually only have to spend five minutes of medical consultation time. So bill that as well. So typically that primary care provider bills a nine, nine, four or five, two cpt code, and that specialists gets the bill, a nine, nine, four or five one, and you can you can be in the same organization and and bill both of those codes or have one be external and and one in your organization and still bill those as well. So it's really a a great service. Invest in your experience. What are some of the best practices when implementing e Console Program? Yeah. So my number one answer to this is your you have to engage the providers to figure out what works best for them. Why they feel is appropriate e console because not everything is going to qualify for this level of care. So engaging, you're referring providers to figure out. What what things are they struggling with him their practice that they feel like if they could just pick up the phone and talk to a urologist or talk to a dermatologist and help them map out that care plan those are the kind of things that you want to help, build and create relationships to an e console provider. So. Engaging your providers, listening to your referring providers working with a specialist to really connect them on those care. Pathways is very important. I also think it's important to map out how you want this process to work before doing any implementation. So thinking about you know. Do you WANNA start this internally I like let's just say you have a multispecialty clinic. How can we test out these workflows internally, which is what you I- healthcare did on before doing an External Pavitt. and then looking at your areas of biggest mead and. On access and I, think dermatology is a great example where it may take a patient. You know three six months to establish a new relationship with a dermatologist and You know what tools can we give that primary care provider to treat that patient and their medical home with dermatologist knowledge and get them the care they need faster, and so I really encourage people to take a look at on what they're struggling with access. To care and figure prioritized those specialties. With an e consult model. And a few minutes ago you told us about how your model operates. But what resources are actually needed to implement an e console program in your experience. Yeah you know obviously it depends on how how big you want an how many specialties you wanNA cover, but in healthcare's experience I think it's really important to identify your it resources as we really embedded us in our Emr So you know making sure that this is prioritized within your within your it. Resources Important and we really leveraged allot of that work on our orders team like I mentioned before we built how? Specific orders by specialty To help. Cue the, the referring provider, the the primary care provider with the questions that the specialists need to deliver care, and what's great is the double AMC has a lot of good resources that are available publicly to help Have you think Abou how to build those orders set so? I think it plays a big role in that and then I do think that it takes a lot of time to start a new program. So what was really successful for us us is that we had a project manager that this was their entire role, and so they were able to spend a lot of time Establishing those relationships between the referring provider and the specialists and and listening to the needs and and really making sure that this was top of mind for everyone to move forward because there's a lot of moving parts with establishing a program like this. Of course, our is a pit parcel of everything we do in healthcare these days. Can you describe how providers can achieve Roi or measure it with e consults? Yes. So I think you know the the biggest low hanging fruit when you talk to providers, they're doing this stuff right now informally. So a lot of times, you know you have a primary care provider or a a general medicine. Calling a urologist and saying, Hey, you know I I'm seeing this patient and I'm struggling with Xyz how you see this in your clinic and they just this curbside consults happens all the time yet it's not documented in the Mr and it it's not a billable service and so really the low hanging fruit for the ROI is you know providing provider education referring provider education to say, Hey, you know if you just place this order and answer these questions, not only do I get reimbursed for this work is the specialist, but you get reimbursed for this work as well by asking these questions and treating your patient. So, that's a win win right there. but I think the big Roi comes in when you create relationships between primary care, medical homes and specialists to take out those lower acuity specialty visits you know primary care providers are trained in a variety of of of different specialties and it would be great if we could just hand over care plans for you know how to treat dermatitis S. You know instead of going to a dermatologist for something that may be lower acuity for a dermatologist but higher acuity for a primary care doctor let's treat them in their medical home. So those specialists are seeing really a you know a higher level of em and higher acuity of those patients, and so when we get into the nitty gritties of reimbursement. We. Really tried to aim take out those like level one and two EM's from specialty visits and and make those into consoles. And backfill bows with higher acuity visits at the level four level five, and that's where you get those higher reimbursements. On those on that commercial side of things. The other thing that that we did at you I. Healthcare when we really looked at our ally, is we time studies of providers especially on the on the specialist side of things and and what we found out is that a clinician spent anywhere between five to seven minutes. On the specialist side. Making Sison make are making medical decision making for an e consoles. But when that patient was in their clinic, they were spending about twenty to thirty minutes. So we're actually able to do more e consoles in the same amount of time is seeing a face to face visit and so You can also argue a an Roi with time as well. Best Jagger's thank you so much for coming by the program today and sharing your experiences are rowdy concerts. Thank you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss on the hospital finance podcast or if you'd like to be aghast, drop us a line at update at bessler DOT com. This concludes the episode of the Hospital Finance Podcast for show notes and additional resources to help you protect and enhance revenue at your hospital visit Bessler dot com forward slash podcasts. The hospital finance podcast is a production of bessler smart about revenue to nations about results.

University of Iowa Beth Iowa University of Iowa Physicians Michael Pass Jagger AMC partner Iowa City I. Healthcare Urology Cardiothoracic Surgery Ethan grayness administrative director administrator Bethel tippy school of Management Sison
InterVarsity and Religious Freedom Prevail

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

InterVarsity and Religious Freedom Prevail

"Two Thousand Nineteen is turning out to be a bad year for University of Iowa officials but a good one for Christian students there once again college officials are told they can't discriminate against religious groups in this time it's GonNa cost them for the Colson Center John Stonestreet this is break point purpose group in America to ensure religious freedom has a future more will be forced to take action like inner varsity did and will all have to learn to make the regarding any damages awarded to Inter varsity since officials ignored her February ruling Beckett's Daniel Blomberg who represented Inter varsity said groups were derecognised for violating the human rights policy nor were fraternities sororities or Lgbtq student groups required to open their leadership policy. Let's see she correctly identified the double standard clearly at work which can be summed up as some freedom of speech and association is freer than others fresh any students and scholars association limits membership to Chinese students and the Iowa Hawkeye Palace and Pella Group only accepts women yet neither of these and she wrote in her opinion university

Iowa Hawkeye Palace University of Iowa John Stonestreet Colson Center Daniel Blomberg Pella Group Beckett America
NASA ScienceCast 285: Lightning Across the Solar System

NASA ScienceCasts

03:51 min | 2 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 285: Lightning Across the Solar System

"Lightning across the solar system. Presented by science at NASA. Lightning is beautiful as it is powerful of violent hotter than the surface of the sun electrical marvel, but might lightning and other planets, even more astonishing. Consider this when Voyager one flew by Jupiter in nineteen seventy nine. It's imager captured areas nearly as big as the US lit up by lightning and Jupiter's clouds. Voyager also captured other less flashy signs of lightning. University of Iowa physicist Doniger net is one of the scientists whose Voyager instrument detected. Radio waves called Whistler's signs of lightning. New horizons cameras captured lightning flashes on Jupiter, ten times as powerful as anything ever recorded on earth and recently Juno flank closer to Jupiter than any previous mission found that most of Jupiter's lightning is around the planet's higher latitudes unlike earth where lightning strikes primarily over land and most intensely at equator, judo detected peak rates of four strikes per second similar to rates on earth on earth. Lightning forms because colliding ice crystals and water drops inside clouds, create positive and negative electric charges, which becomes separated by convective forces when the charges become separated enough, a lightning bolt discharges. Something similar happens on Jupiter gases, including water vapor, rise from deep within the planet as they freeze ice particles become separated from the water drops by convection building charge, which is discharge. Charged as lightning. Lightning has also been observed on gas, giant Saturn in nineteen eighty to nineteen Eighty-one Voyager detected. Radio signals called Spheriks, which like whistlers are signs of lightning. Grenade says on earth. You can hear these high frequency radio emissions on your cars, AM radio as radio static during a nearby lightning storm Cassini recorded similar emissions at Saturn, revealing that for strong storms occurred as many as ten times per second. Grenet has been involved in the search for lightning on other planets across the solar system as well. Venus, for example, has a hot dry atmosphere made up mostly of carbon dioxide suffused with sulfuric acid. Could this brew become electrically charged and generate lightning when Cassini flew by Venus twice in nineteen ninety eight nineteen ninety nine good netted a search for lightning with a radio instrument. Perfect for detecting signs of lightning spirits. However, the instrument picked up no signs at all that same instrument easily detected Spheriks during a similar fly by of earth, two months later leading him to believe that there is no earth like lightning present on Venus. The European Space Agency's Venus express orbiter has picked up bursts of electro magnetic waves. Some scientists attribute to Whistler 's, but others argue that the instruments frequency range was too low to detect the usual forms of Whistler's. Grenet has used Mars express his radar system receiver to conduct a five year search for lightning associated with dust storms on Mars that search didn't find lightning. However, images from the Mars Global Surveyor show bright flashes indus- storms as well as craters on Mars that some scientists believed to be evidence of lightning strikes on the planet surface. Stay tuned as this electric story unfolds on science dot, NASA dot gov.

Jupiter Whistler NASA Grenet Mars Spheriks Mars Global Surveyor AM radio US University of Iowa European Space Agency Grenade physicist Doniger net two months five year
10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity

NPR's Story of the Day

02:14 min | 1 year ago

10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity

"When it comes to physical activity, taking ten thousand steps per day may sound like a familiar goal. The idea was popularized decades ago by a marketing campaign in Japan for a pedometer. But as NPR's Alison Aubrey reports, a new study published in JAMA internal medicine finds a far fewer number of steps reduce the risk of premature death. Researchers suspected there was nothing magical about ten thousand steps to find out, I'm in Lee of Brigham and women's hospital and her collaborators studied a group of about seventeen thousand women their average age was seventy two and they all agreed to clip on a wearable device to count their steps. They wore it during all weaking hours for seven days, and then for the next four to five years, the researchers kept up with the women. It turns out, forty four hundred steps a Dave's seemed enough to boost long jetty, women who walked that amount were forty percent less likely to die during the study compared to women who took just twenty seven hundred steps. A day on average. I asked Lee, if she was surprised by the results, it was sort of surprising because this was below the ten thousand steps a D in general. The more the women walked the greater the benefit, but here's another surprise. There was a point of diminishing returns, the benefits leveled off at about seventy five hundred steps a day. Meaning the women who got more than that got. No additional boost and longevity so much for that goal of ten thousand steps. Yes. I think the original basis of the number really was not scientifically determined. Kathleen John's of the university of Iowa studies, how exercise influences health outcomes. I love the study. I think this is really good news for women who may not be particularly active Janet helped to shape the federal exercise recommendations. She says the message from this study is that for older women just light walking is really beneficial. They didn't need to go to the gym that didn't need to invest in personal trainer or exercise equipment. All they had to do was walk to meet the. Studies suggest that there's probably more benefit in terms of light activity than we were previously thinking that there might be. And Jan says that's encouraging Allison Aubrey, NPR news.

Lee Alison Aubrey NPR Allison Aubrey Japan NPR JAMA Janet Brigham university of Iowa Dave Kathleen John forty percent five years seven days
095: The Secret to Making a Success Out of Every Struggle with Dr. Anthony Manna

Shower Epiphanies

51:43 min | 2 weeks ago

095: The Secret to Making a Success Out of Every Struggle with Dr. Anthony Manna

"Welcome to the shower epiphanies podcast where we explore your head and thoughts and desires revealing your greatest drop the mic moment. Now, here's your host art Costello. Welcome to the shower epiphanies podcast today. I am honored thrilled excited can't even describe the emotions. I'm going through introduced my audience to dr. Anthony Mana Anthony is a well-traveled incredibly gifted writer off children's writer, even though I don't think that this has booked Lucas and the game of chance are a children's book. I believe that every human being on the face of the Earth. Thought this I'm going to let him explain the book later, but we're going to get into his story. Welcome to the show documents. Well, or thank you so much. I'm I'm honored. I just love this. Thank you so much for Thursday. Providing it's really my honor. It's going to be an honor for all the people get to listen to this. Wonderful Journey. Could you tell us how this all began for you? Well sure to question is a little daunting but I think I began my youth was spent in New Jersey. I think the thing that I remember most is my immigrant mother coming from Italia and took my father who was born in this country and carried on with in the world of boxing. He was a boxing referee and a trainer and I think he wanted me to be there and I was petrified because he would take me to these training camps and these guys were beating each other up, you know, and I'm I shouldn't put it down because I mean, I know it's a sport, you know, when they they were trained in this sport to be very, you know active and also very skilled and he was there to help them and so most of the time I admired what he was doing. Because he was we can use the word empowerment because that's what he was doing. And so many ways and there was my mother in the background who was basically illiterate but was able to tell me stories about growing up she grew up on a farm outside of Naples and I loved hearing her talk to us. I had four sisters and one brother and I I am and probably still will be the baby bombino Antonio and I I heard my father speaking Spanish because he was in Spanish and my mother spoke Italian and so it was somewhat of a mystery sometimes try to understand what was going on and they spoke spoke English quite fluently. So everything going okay and I the stories that I remember the most were stories of hardship because my father lived through the Great Depression and he had at one point. He was working in a bank As a teller in Manhattan and he lost everything and here he was you know with so many children et cetera. So it was a struggle and we grew up with a great deal of love my sister my Four Sisters still still live on and we're you know, we all support each other very very much my brother passed quite a while ago and we always talked about missing him. We're a very close-knit and we loved good food. So it was it was a great upbringing. I spent my years in Catholic schools, and she mentioned that too because I wound up after graduation from high school. I thought all right. It's either going into the army or going into am honest, you know, I thought what can I do, but I decided to go into the priesthood and I thought I could serve my country better that way I think and so I spent about five years. I studied first Tube app Parish priest and then I went into what I absolutely loved which was a monastery in Iowa on a farm and most of the time spent in silence and contemplation. I needed that so badly because as an adolescent, I was pretty much out of control. I just did not understand how to study I didn't understand correctly how to read. I remember it a lot of oral stories as I said from my father and mother but as far as getting me down into language that came much later and she came believe it or not. Some people say how could that have happened in a monastery? Well because we also went to college classes and I was majoring in biology, but I had a long more as I started reading more I thought oh, so this is literature. I love this stuff. What's this all about? So that naturally that's my segue into you know, yep. Making my way back, you know after I left the monastery because I just knew that I needed to go out on my own and prove myself possible. And so I went out and I majored I changed my major to literature with the concentration on Shakespeare because I took Latin I had a lot of Latin and a lot of you know ancient Greeks. I took courses in a Greek and Latin and eventually wound up with a couple of degrees a masters and a bachelor's degree and I wound up teaching I wound up teaching in a middle school. It was a fantastic experience. I was learning my way. You know, what is teaching all about? What do you do as a teacher, you know and what came to me right away was that I was there to let these kids know that they were good and that they had a brain and that they could think and they could think critically and we were going to go on a journey together as team. Which student and so that lasted for quite a while I was teaching around actually my first teaching experience with my Master's Degree was in his stumble turkey and I was dead for three years. And of course, how could I not say that that did that change my life. I mean, I'm living in an Islamic world. You know, my Foundation was taken away from me in a sense and I was you know home with food and people in a language and you know, it was it was really quite an interesting place to be at that point. I was married then to Ruth and who remains one of my very very close friends and my son was born there. So there are ties there that are Eternal and then I came back to the States. It was a shock after 3 years of being in a culture that was so patient and so rich constantly Rich that I didn't know what to do. And so I thought well, let me see. I heard some what is this PhD thing. Let me go and see what else And actually I I stepped into the University of Iowa to I was working on an MFA and acting I was going to be a master of Fine Arts and acting and I did that for a year or two. I had a lot of leads. I was really learning the craft which was so exciting but I felt I started thinking that am I going to spend my Years in New York City begging on my knees for work. Hey, I don't think I wanted to so what I did was I entered his PhD program in English English literature in English education, and it was good. It was good for me at that point. I had learned how to read the monks taught me how to think and read and I remember theirs and they changed my name when you go into a monastery like they change when they cost me that my name was Christian or original I know but anyway, they would say Christian sit down shut up and read em. Just the way you do it I would say yes Father. Yes, Father Hillary. Yes, Father Hillary and also Father Hillary was my first writing teacher. What a gift that was odd because he was so honest and he taught me how to craft the need to have closure in any given situation is cumin nature and when it comes to romantic relationships this desire skyrockets as your previously failed relationship left you in am in Spain, it's not uncommon for people to shy away from a new relationship after their first one fails. Miserably the fear of the unknown makes them hiding his shell to prevent any future heartbreak relatable despite wanting to love and be loved you can take the plunge if your mind and heart are still lock somewhere in the past. Maybe you aren't aware of the power of releasing the past or perhaps. You don't know how to do it art Costello and his online course teaches them. Part of moving on from bad places to happier more stable ones. This course can change your life for good helping you being all kinds of negativity on the road to Eternal Bliss sign up now before the gloominess off the better of you at expectation academy.com. So there I was at the University of Iowa getting this PhD working really hard. It was a lot of hard work, you know, and so I wound up with a PhD and then I found myself at the University of Maine. That was one of my first positions. They're at the University Inn of the original campus in Farmington, which is very close to the Sugarloaf Mountain which most of my students took in that school because they wanted to ski and so I had to constantly keep getting their attention like I'm here now and there's no snow on the mountains. You have to be here. You have to do your work as a gift and it in. Okay, so we got through that beautifully and I went into theater for children as an actor for a while there while I was still teaching and that was a marvelous experience. We did a lot of improvisational theater with people from all around the place and we went out and performed for kids. It was it was a great experience and so in the meantime, yep. Also developing my love for children's literature and for literature for teens and tweens and I started teaching those courses along with corset generating eventually. I felt the itch that I needed to to move on to a research University. I I don't know I felt that urge and so I left my tenure track position which people said we think you're not and I said, yes, I know I'm nuts. And so I left that position and I thought now what do I do while I looked around and I thought well any Universe take me after I just kind of quit. Well, I got this interview at Kent State University the famous Kent State University in and that was in nineteen eighty-two. So I was beyond the that that terrible thing that happened were those students were shot dead during demonstration. I was there I thought they were nineteen eighty-two because I went to this interview wage. I come from a theater. I was really loose and by that I mean I was I was very relaxed, you know, because I was with theater people and they were just crazy and you know, so when I was at the in fact, I remember one thing I did was I jumped up on top of the table. This is so embarrassing. I would never it's now I jumped on a table and I started this improvisation about the way that I teach and they were like, that's what I I think back now on they told me afterwards they said but that's why we liked you because you were so crazy and I say, well, I I don't know I was I was like that then you know, and so I spent that time I was at Penn State for about 30 years. And in the meantime, I heard about this Greek Exchange program from the University where they sent me there and then one of their faculty members came here and I wound up in Thessaloniki Greece, which is dead. Ancient city there of north on the Bulgarian border and I was at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and one of the things that I wanted to do and I'm glad I did it was to go I wanted to go into a school situation because I knew if I wanted to a school situation under the guise of researching that I would learn the cycle of the year. I would learn there since there is no separation of church and state in Greece. I would learn the religious holidays. I would learn the secular holidays. I would learn about family life etcetera. So I was going to go to school and I wound up in first grade and it was a kindergarten first grade on the University campus in their experimental school and it was the best thing that I ever did. I I started learning the language a little bit and I started hearing of course the kids and they're reading time were reading wage. Mythology and you know, I I knew that because I had but what I didn't hear what was then I started hearing about ogres flying beasts darkness and the desk that's where people had to go to survive like on their Journeys to find they're so little and I realized said so I said, wait a minute. What is this? And they say these are are folk tales. These are our fairy tales and I thought well, look, I've been studying children's literature for a long time. And I know that we don't we don't have very many of these stories at home. So that began the Greek folklore project and I I worked with my Greek colleagues to research and to look for the stories, you know, I just read re-read a massive amounts of Greek stories to figure out which one you know, whom we take and translate into English so that they could be available for the English speaking English reading world. And so when I return to the states two years Sure. I had a lot of stories and very boldly and those days you didn't need an agent as you do now. And so I just I just sent them out I sent out the first one and I remember it was accepted at Simon & Schuster in New York City. And she said this story is a mess. But I think I can help you. Learn how to write it down. I do it all thank you so much. And I was like, oh, you know down on my knees Manhattan saying thank you. Thank you. Well anyway, that's exactly what an Schwartz did she is now a random house and has her own line short suede books and she took us that is Suleiman Lou Who is my co-author. She took the took us and really taught us how to craft a story and she's always there with me when I'm writing now. She's beside me, you know, because she she gave me such insight into you know wage. Drawback when to move in, you know when this is too much when this is too little and when you're not being authentic and truthful to yourself in the story and so that start at the project and that's a long way today. You know what I did a few stories with Sula that were they were published at a number of different places and there was some of them were there were two picture books and there was an anthology of twenty thousand stories, but with Lucas and the game of chance I decided to go on my own and what I wanted to do was to see if I could challenge myself to take a basic folk tale because you know folk tales or fairy tales are very brief, you know, they're very economical they get right to the point. There's a struggle they go off they travel somewhere they come back they've learned something. That's the end. You know what everybody lived happily ever after most of the time well with Lucas and the game of chance, it was a story that we had included a dog. Anthology and it was called the snake tree which is an intriguing story and intriguing title. And so I thought how can I do this? What can I do? Well, I took it and I invented you know, and I'm just I opened myself up to it. And I said, all right, let me take this story and see if I can turn it into something that is going to be attractive that is going off entertain. But at the same time is going to awaken whomever, you know at this point. I was thinking maybe Middle School, you know, a middle grade middle school age is 8 to 12, but I knew I could feel that it was blossoming out into something quite different and that the character grew up and all of a sudden the character who had witnessed a lot of wealth because he became friends with the dancing talking snake all of a sudden lost everything and there you go south. Like life, you know, I mean sounds just like like and so what did you do when you are, you know, when you're given the lemon and my character I decided I needed to find his way, you know, and here he is. He's now married. He's got two beautiful kids and a gorgeous wife by the name of Sarah who was also a very talented seamstress and very much in control of her life. So what is he going to do? What is he going to do? And he's going to have to either give up because he lost everything including at this card game. He lost his family as well because the merchant who was very greedy wanted it all and so what can I say Lucas has to go on the road now, I don't want to spoil the story and and tell you all what happens but I can say that yes, it ends happily. But what must he do what struggle must he dead? Go through in order to gain back his life and his family and that's the gist of Lucas and the game of chance. Has anyone ever inspired you to discover a happier healthier and more fulfilled you it is a magical experience. Isn't it inspiration is indeed very Power full again. It's often undermined. It can lift you from the ground to the sky and no time. Have you ever thought about returning the favor by inspiring the people around you? If you don't think you have it in you we have good news for you Art castello's online course has everything you need to learn to supercharge yourself and shape your character into a powerful personality get ready to discover your strengths and unleash the creativity within don't believe it. Check it out yourself by signing up for this life-changing course at expectation. Academy.com. That's expectation. Academy.com. I think that that's what makes it so so authentic and real and when I was reading it, I can't tell you how many times I welled up in tears. And how many smiles were on my face off because the book is a journey of people's lives and the transitions that they go through in the joys and the sorrows and you know life is never never this song Easy Street. If you've lived the life of easiness, you really haven't lived, you know, and that's just my opinion and I think that you're the epitome of that and I am too because when it's some point in our life, we made this transition in our brain and choice that said we're going to step out and live life differently than everybody else. And that's really what I think is so beautiful intriguing and so genuine and authentic about it is because God You know when you were talking one of the things that I really started smiling about was I grew up in New Jersey. Oh great. I was born in Teaneck, New Jersey. I don't know what time you were born. But you know my life in New Jersey was very good and then my parents for some unknown reason decided to buy this old dilapidated Farm in Upstate New York, and I mean Upstate in just 60 miles below Rochester and a place called a mocha and when they bought it my life changed for the worse off but very different reasons, you know, my parents fell apart. It was a great stress on our family my dad got sick and almost passed away. There was just a lot of things that went on off but you know, it was meant to be it was meant to be because it's made me who I am today and all the things that I learned from that period of transition. And sorrow in my life have led me on this incredible journey that I see myself in in your story in your book. And that is the common theme because I think that there's lots of us in this life who have gone through and it's for some reason they're just some of us that make this choice to make as you call it thousand at a lemons, you know, and then there's others that have chosen and I say this because my siblings chose the opposite they chose not to let it hold them back instead of catapulting them forward and what's always intrigued me is why why psychologically what what was the seed in me? Because I was raised Catholic. I was raised by priests and in a Catholic School taught Shakespeare in the third grade, you know, and and you know people just don't belong You know that we can comprehend Shakespeare at that age, but we can and it's explained well by the priest and and we learn Latin as Altar Boys and all those kinds of things which gives us great basis to move forward from and then you have to lose everything sometimes to really make it really all a certified together and either you let it beat you down or your Rise Above It 2006. I lost my wife to ovarian cancer and it changed my life, you know because dead for three years it beat me down. I grieved very badly and in very bad ways, but yet three years later I Rose From the Ashes and really moved my whole life and a whole different way. I'm going to be 73 in August and I'm probably living the best life I've ever lived and I don't mean that financially I don't mean that any other way than wage. Spiritually and then in passionately about what I do and I see that in your story and then I see it in your writing and how you've moved through how much of your life long do you think actually corresponds to the characters in your book? Well, what a great question, you know what comes to mind right away. I was coming to mid-career at Kent State University. I was really in a bad place all of a sudden I was very lost. I had gone through a divorce and I think now what I mean, I I need love in my life don't I you know and it was most I mean and what here I was I just won a major award at the University was the distinguished teaching award and I was like being passed around like as a laurel, you know through the campus and I'm thinking oh, yeah. Yeah, but deep inside I was oh I was so sad, so I went into therapy and I loved this guy off. Was so cool. And you just said you sound like you're filled with shame and I thought how do you know that and he said well think of some of the things you just told me, you know, I'm going okay. All right. All right. All right. That's my Catholic upbringing. I'm so sorry. How do I get rid of it? What do I do? He said? No. He said let's experiment together because I'm working on the new therapy that I want to introduce to you and to make a long story short. He gave me a book called get out of your mind and into your life and it was about mindfulness and I thought wait a minute. What is this? You know, and basically what it was what it is what it continues to be in. My life is an Awakening an Awakening to what the fact that we all are going to reach a point where there's going to be suffering where there's going to be tragedy where there's going to be a shake-up and what do you do? Well you can wage Drugs, you can drink a lot. You can know I don't know, you know lead the life of a rake, you know, or you can say this is what it is. And that's what that book which took pains on my shelf and I picked it up about once every other month and read a chapter because it's all about coming to grips facing it and then trying to learn how to care of, you know, and mindfulness led me to becoming a student because I am very much a student of Zen Buddhism and it's it's Illuminating, you know, and that doesn't mean that I turned my back on to follow system. I think Catholicism it has saved me a lot and and brought me too many wonderful places, you know, and I'm sure that there are other religions that could have done the same thing. But all of a sudden, you know mindfulness leading me to Zen Buddhism and all of that was just a journey that I took and so one thing that comes up dead. Lot is the idea of loving kindness and I thought that with Lucas in my book. What I wanted him to do was to reach into that and give it back to him. So, you know and so he stands on that road before he enters the Enchanted Forest. He stands on that road. He says before God and the Spirit song. I am going to do something to get this back. I vow this to myself and that's when he hears inside himself the voice that was told through stories as a child that it is possible to go and find Destiny because she really does exist. Can I stop you right there? Sure me that to me was the most impactful part for me. Just as you said it again after reading it I still get tears in my eyes because it is a life decision that wage. All make and that's the epiphany of this whole thing is that I deserve better. I can do better. I can be better and it just isn't today. It's every single day and every single thing that we do we've been convinced that having a life of mediocrity is what what is really amounts to success and I disagree with it because I think living a life of Challenge and overcoming it and enjoying the journey that it takes us on is really living life and I just wanted to put that in there so I would say you are so beautiful because I mean that's exactly what it's about. You know what I mean? And I think that he could have so Lucas could have so easily given up. Now the thing about this though is when he goes into that Forest be brought to the ringer a couple of times. I mean, he's meeting such weird characters and their needs are so enormous, you know in there. They're even more than his, you know, and and now he's Here's he takes on the responsibility of saying to those creatures and characters that he meets that yes. I will I will take you with me and I will plead for you in front of Destiny. And then I one day somebody said Destiny. Does she have a son I said, yeah, it's the Sun what I said. Yes the Sun and then the person of a greater in my writing group said, you know, wouldn't it be nice if she had a daughter and I went oh you want the moon so now I've got I've got this family. And so all of a sudden off Lucas has gone on the road. He's in that Forest. He's meeting all these weird creatures in these bearing their responsibility, but see that's part of his change because he's looking out to others. It's like the leadership folks. This is how Dr. Mana has put this book together these beautiful little segments in this that are so impactful to your child and to not only your child but to you dead, And I just can encourage you enough to get this book because it is literally life-changing for somebody who needs a ray of the Sun in their life and we'll enjoy the moon in their life too. That's it. Yeah, and I think bringing it. I mean most recently I went into a middle school a teacher friend of mine teaches at a middle school and these were seventh-graders and I I just had such a good time with those kids because they right away saw what was going on and they right away and I said, yeah, you know, like how many of you have had times in your life when it's been really dead we difficult and I think every kid in that room raised a hand and I said, well, what do we do? I said do we do it Lucas does or do we give up, you know, we talked about that a little bit, you know, and then the joy of that too was I had a power point where I showed them up on the screen the manuscript the messy messy manuscript, you know because they said there were there were like wait a minute you went through 12 a.m. Ranch I said friends I went through more than twenty drafts. I mean, you know, that's what it you know, and so they when they sent me the thank you notes. They all said we can't believe that the person you were age would have to do so much work to get this I said what an insult, you know, but I mean they they yearned for me. You know, that writing is rewriting. You know, when that getting it down means getting it right, you know, and that there is also courage, you know as a writer, you know, and I mean, I want them to know that you know, and that's one of the one of the gifts I think I can give them because it's a gift given to me to learn that Drafting and making something better and finding the quality of it in your soul and thinking that you've done something good and Polished and you could resent it, you know is what an honor you know birth. Don't know which direction you want your life to take. Are you sinking deep down into the pit of uncertainties day by day. So what's the secret to Leading a happy satisfied life? It's taking matters into your own hands, but what if the matters in question or a total blur art castello's expectation Academy course aims to tell you exactly how you can get some clarity in your life. This course can be your savior on your journey to Reinventing yourself Well, you certainly can't plan your whole future ahead. You can definitely control twists and turns your life takes off. What are you waiting for sign up for this course now with expectation academy.com get a chance to broaden your horizons and add meaning to your life. That's expectation. Academy.com. I think would have the greatest lessons you teach them by and showing them and telling them that is that anything worth pursuing is worth putting the work into office. When you go to a manuscript twenty thirty times which we all who are writers know about that. I mean, I can write a paragraph and go through it a hundred times, you know, and it just it gets off but it also is persistence and it and it's bills this this sense of accomplishment when you see the and that's part of it for me with the awards You've Won with this book I wrote I think you're going to win many many more Awards as this book gets circulated more and more into our world because you've crafted it. So, well, you can tell that it's been put together with not only thought but with love and kindness and compassion and love I mean, it's just put together. So well, yep. Thank you. Yeah, you should write a review. I well know. You know when I think that yes, I think that that's such a good thing for kids to learn that perseverance off with something that you want to make good or that you didn't even know. I mean sometimes you know, they'll come out when I'm with them. We asked them to write and I left behind prompt and I came back the week later and then I had some of them stand up and read their writing and you should have seen it was like, you know, and it was very rough. I mean, you know very rough and then at some of it was so comical, you know, and they stood up, you know, the ones that were brave enough to stand up and you could just tell that they were showing all of their peers in that room, you know that you could take something you can take an idea and you can put it together in such a way that you feel proud with it and why not? You know, that's why I think we're here you know is to is to find them. Moments when we can show ourselves to have some strength or some character, you know, I mean that's every day when I when I meditate and I pray for my grandkids. That's what I say. You know, Anthony my grandkid Anthony and my grandkids Lucas you guys may you find may you find your strength, you know, and that's that's such a great thing for for a teacher to move through, you know, and that's that's something that I hope I can convey to them and to the students that I meet along the way one of the things that is part of my core is that I believe that there's two things that every human being needs love is the first one and validation is the second when those kids stand up and they hear their other students even laugh or synthetic you'll can be validation for somebody as long as they have the mindfulness in the proper perspective to understand that that is a reaction from somebody else. It is not dead. Drives them and that's the great lessons of that but it fulfils it fulfills those children and knowing that they have value and their love. Yes say, yes, and they you know, we did you know, I said well now how do you respond to George? You know, he just read his piece. I mean what just think of one thing we can say, you know, and I just I don't want to forget that way. You know, I really want to remember always to have them stop and give something back, you know, and that reciprocation goes a long long way. You know, I think that goes a long long way. It's like it's like getting a book review, you know, Lucas is getting book reviews, you know, and it's it's kind of like a validation, you know, and not that I not that I run around on my rollerskates. Oh gosh. I'm supposed to be 78. I can't remember but you know if I I don't want to take that, you know to take it to make me proud full, you know, but at the same time I just thought That it's it's allowing me to carry on in my writing. That's the teacher and you I think that as teachers and I consider myself a teacher even though I'm not a credentialed teacher because I know in my trying to teach people expectations and how to master them in their life and how we can really Propel you because it's so basic to our human behavior. Yes, you know wage when we really do need that love and validation that comes from other people one of the things that you know, because of the what's going on here in the United States right now with the social distancing. One of the things that I do worry about is that we're going to start to lose that connection and once you start to lose connection things can really go awry in your life and that is because of one thing that I really want to talk to you about and I want to hear your perspective on this. What have you feared most in your life. Oh my Lord gives me hope okay. Well, I you know, I think one fear and it's hard to it's hard to reveal this but I think one fear is the fear of failure. I think that that's very, very common. And I think that it's Sun-Times can strangle me and put me in you know up against the wall and stifled not me. But I tell you aren't the thing that really brings me out is learning the breathing that goes on in meditation because once once it brings me back to my senses and that's what it does for me, you know now not everybody it's meditation is not for everybody. I mean, I know that I'm not you know what I would never proselytize them ever go out and say you get over here and meditate you know, or whatever but I mean for me as I said before with mindfulness and within Buddhism and learning, you know learning as as I am. Along here that the breathing in the mindful meditation and even if it's five minutes of just sitting down and getting getting a hold on them. The fear that I have that day that the writing that I'm doing is the new story. I'm working on. I'm just going to breathe through it and I'm going to let myself open up to it. And then how long does it take it away? Well, it takes it away for five minutes, you know before a half hour or you know, whatever but I mean, it just unleashes me and brings me up, you know back from off that Walsh that I've been, you know pushed up against and I feel okay, that's good. Let me go make a cup of tea and I'll be all right, you brought up a good point because I believe that there is no difference in meditation or prayer or mindfulness or any of that. It's taking time for yourself to clear your mind of all the Clutter and to refocus on your expectations and wage. is important to you it brings you back to reality it brings you back to being able to calm that fear because fear is just the lack of Hope and home is what keeps everyone of us alive and you know in my research, I found that the one thing that all people who commit suicide are attempt to commit suicide pact that is they have lost the ability to hope once you lose the ability to hope it just destroys us and when we come ourselves and think and relax whether it's through prayer meditation, whatever it is for you to do doing don't go down that ugly path of fact, that fear takes us fear is the thing that stops every human being from being who they are really truly meant to be, you know fear just stops that I know I love the way you put that and I think wage The thing that you're making me realize too is that is in those moments of fear. What really helped me truly helps me is to recognize the love I have in my life. Absolutely. Absolutely. No and I mean, I you know that going to that going to that loving kindness going to that place which is such an odd island of hope, you know, because you know, you know that you are worthwhile, you know that you can also reciprocate that love you know, and not not not to be afraid of doing that. If not, you know, and one of the one of the the techniques and whether this is I mean a lot of people pray in a Catholic Church, you're in the Presbyterian Church, you know, this is that one of the things about the meditation that I do is that I reach out to people in my you know, in my meditation so, you know, I pray for the health Etc of my wonderful son, you know people that I meet my writing group, you know, and it's just it's so liberating. And so the filling it's a form of giving yes to meditate and meditate to help others is I mean to me it is not really a beautiful thing because you're reaching out to help other people in a I believe that we throw out vibrations. I think that we're a very magnetic it's the PCS that we throw out these vibrations and when you pray for other people, I believe that they come full circle always always come full circle and you took her know how one prayer can change the course of any situation and it's just keep praying. I just hope people pray all the time. The other thing that I do that I want to talk about is that you brought up is one of the last words out of my mouth when I meet people and I mean I'm talking about in the Subways in New York or the streets of Los Angeles, San Diego, Austin, Texas dead. Matter where you are when I leave you quite often, you will hear me more so than not these were love you. See you later. Yes. I'm just telling somebody the simple. I love you and having it be authentic and really meaningful because I Garner something from every human being that I meet. Does it matter if he's homeless doesn't matter if he's a professor at Harvard University doesn't matter if he's the pope. It doesn't matter who is I learn from the people around me off and they teach me so much and I'm so appreciative of what a positive way to go to your life. I mean, I think that's very inspiring to me hearing you say this, you know, and that that that stage with me, you know, because I have to remember, you know, I just had a conversation my author my co-author from Greece Sula. Do I live singer named off? She called me the other day and it's like she's next door, you know, and we were carrying on and at the end I just said so, you know, I love you and she said I love you too. Mom Raised Me Up Hallelujah. I have reached the peak in awakens the harp. Yeah, I mean I took that I still I'm still hearing it Echo, you know because I I need that to sustain me and also in difficult times. We are having difficult times right now, you know, and I want to know, you know, once again, I want to stain the hope that as with Lucas my character that there is a possibility of finding a way through you know, whether it's a dis ease that it's taking place all over the world or whether it's a disease within yourself. We can find some kind of as we said before some kind of resilience and then dead. And that resilience is the Hope. Well, I'll tell you what that is powerful medicine right there that this world needs right now. Yes, because we are you know with this pandemic that's going off and all this stuff. We're not getting we're not going to have that human contact that we have and I'm hoping that people are being fulfilled and in ways and reading a book would be a great way for people to to fulfill themselves and not be in serious because you know, it is really it does when I started reading this I couldn't either I mean it just moved me so much about how literature can make such a difference in this world and we don't read anymore week we have computers. We sat in front of computers off kids want videos now, they want these videos. Oh, you know, I mean, you know, I, you know in the thing to that that you're drawing attention to me. Anyways, I love the relationship. With Lucas and that snake lambros lambros the compassion and the the unity and you know, the fact that they develop this relationship. I mean when I first had the snake speak it which weird and I knew it was weird and I brought it to the writing group and I said and Lucas was like, oh wow. Oh wow, and and they said to me wait a minute. He's washing a snake dance. He's going to say, oh he dances and he also talks have terrific. Hey, hi there. Hi. Hi. I'm from New Jersey. Where are they? You know, I think we should be friends, you know, and and that's what happened, you know, and I had to research snakes snakes really stand up like that. Yes, they do. And then also I had to research a snake that doesn't carry Venom and wouldn't you know it they're in Greece in the mountain district is a snake to live off. Snake does not they they invite the leopard snake into their homes because it's a sign of goodness and Goodwill and I thought this is a gift from God that I'm finding them this story, you know, and I just blessed myself a hundred times. They said all right carry on carry. Those are you know, that's my exact point with this when you write and you start to have to researching all the characters it adds to our knowledge base so much. We learn so much from them and I'm hoping that when people read this they start to see and start to research into these things this mindfulness and and the power that Lucas has in the power of every every creature around him and the journey the symbiotic Germany they all take and he takes with him the leadership all of that thing. It's a beautiful beautiful story. You know, it's uplifting it. So, yep. Did you hear you said that because you know usually writing is done pretty much solitary, you know, you're in this room and luckily see you don't see me but I look out a window here. I live on a daycare and I look out the window and my friend found a Christ figure from a Catholic Church that they were getting rid of they wanted to replace it. He bought a Christ figure and it's about ten feet tall and it's his arms are raised out like that not a crucifixion but more like an enhancement and I look out and I see him all the time. Hi, I'm here you're there. We can talk to one another because I know something about you and I'm telling you something about me because I'm here writing. So let's talk I get such inspiration from that statue. I mean, it's it's this huge metal piece, you know and how lucky I am to look out this window to see Nature's fullness wage. With the Christ figure welcome me in it's not by accident. I don't think so. I don't think anything is by accident. But I mean this has got to be the best home. Well, we're nearing our our oh boy went so fast. It was more or less you. I mean really it's so nice to meet you. I feel like being my friend. I'm going to I'm coming. I'm coming to to Austin, Texas to look you up. You're welcome. Anytime. Love it. Yeah. Yeah when this gets better with all this stuff that's going down here anytime nice to meet up with you. I mean, I know your work I you know, I go to your site I look at what you're doing. And I know that you you are really let me say enhancing a lot of people let me pull that way the word help sounds like they're on their knees or something, you know, but I mean, I think you just made I can see that I can see that you were helping people come to a realization of themselves and and their job Because that's exactly what I'm want to do. I mean I see why no end in hands people's lives. This is your your time to tell people about where they can get a hold of you off. Oh your website your social media all that kind of stuff will sure. My website is w w w Anthony that's m a thousand and a Anthony man of books. Ww.w Anthony man of books. It's pretty easy and my my email is Anthony at Anthony Mana books.com my handle as they say is let's see, where am I the doctor Tony 4 a.m. To yeah. Dr. Tony 42 on Twitter and also Instagram, I believe. Yep. Yeah both and then on Facebook, I think it's Anthony off. Mana let me see. Yes it is. I'm looking at it right now. I have out of my my desk here Anthony. L. All lower case and that's where you find me on Facebook. And I I spent some time there. I spent some time on Facebook and Twitter mostly every day. Well, I'm going to encourage people to reach out to you because well, I hope so. Thank you. You're very gifted writer, but you have a great heart and a great spirit and that's that's what my audience is all about. Great art and great spirits. I know. Well we used to say in in Orange New Jersey when I was growing long. It takes one to know one area go well documented. It's been an absolute pleasure and we're going to do it again. We're going to schedule you back cuz we didn't even get off. So the questions that that Jonathan says, oh, well, we'll always have lot to talk about. Thank you so much heart. Okay, and with that folks, I'm gone down. Let you know where you can get a hold of me. It's at art at expectation therapy, is my email address. You can get a hold of me there. My website is expectation. Therapy.com a shower epiphanies podcasts listening and it's been a pleasure and Heather White go ahead and take us out of here. Thanks for listening to the show drop as your comments and questions with what you want answered on the show. You can subscribe on iTunes and binge Network. You can also get more information on the website expectation therapy. Com.

Lucas dr. Anthony Mana Anthony writer New Jersey Manhattan Middle School New York City Catholic School Greece Naples Iowa Shakespeare Catholic Church Kent State University boxing Italia University of Iowa Facebook Antonio
The History of Policing in Cars

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

28:06 min | 11 months ago

The History of Policing in Cars

"From Pushkin Industries. This is deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman are you one of the forty nine point three million Americans who hit the road this thanksgiving. Are you perhaps listening to this in a car right now? If either of these things is true this is definitely the episode for you. We're here to talk about how cars have shaped the history of policing in America. And how the space of the car has been fundamental to the definition of your rights under the fourth amendment of the Constitution. Specifically your right to privacy to discuss this. We're talking to Sarah CEO. She's a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law and she's the author of policing the open road. How cars transformed American Freedom? Sarah thank you so much for joining me in reading your book. I was really struck. The first thing that struck me and maybe they should have been obvious to me before but it wasn't is that probably cars are the single most significant technological event of the last Hundred Years in American life. I mean we talk a lot about the Internet. We imagined the transformation of social media so enormous. None of it seems to hold a candle to the car as a transformative technology. Do you by that. I mean do you think of the car is really the be all the end? All of technological change making the computer look kind of secondary in the twentieth century. We call the automobile age like the Bronze Age right. And so we've defined that century as defined by the car and how it transformed our life our culture The way our cities like the way our countryside looks so my answer would be yes. It completely transformed almost every aspect of our life. I WanNa talk about the idea of privacy and how it has evolved over the course of our century or the last century really in relationship to cars. And you say some really fascinating things about this. Starting with the idea that the idea of privacy as a fundamental right was really just getting started in the United States around the same time as the rise of the automobile. Probably initially almost by coincidence but then once those two ideas met up things got tricky because according to the pre car conception if I was inside my home I had a right to privacy and if I was outside on the street. I didn't have a right to privacy and cars. Raise the question of are you at home or you on the street. So say something if you will about how courts and a society tried to get a grip on that inbetween nature of being in your car. So what are the main famous of my book is that cars are just a completely new space and both judges and ordinary Americans. Were trying to figure out what this new space exactly was. So the way that ordinary Americans experienced cars was kind of like an extension of their homes. They saw the car as a parlor or their boudoir right. A young people Moved from the parlor to the car to date and to get to know each other. Are THOSE EUPHEMISMS? I mean. Wasn't there also just an in prior generations to ours? Wasn't there's a lot of sex in cars at a time when people live with their parents and they didn't have other places to go with. I mean the whole notion of parking and I mean it's nice to say if you're getting to know each other but that's not all right so actually on that there's a one of the first hit songs out. Cars was composed nineteen o five where The lyrics asks Lucille to come away with me in my merry oldsmobile. Go as far as you like with me and Mary Oldsmobile. Hours you live with so definitely. There is a lot of sexual innuendos in that nine hundred zero five song. The dating couples could escape the prying eyes of their parents in their homes in the parlors and go off for a Sunday drive and do whatever they like as far as they want to go And so that. There is a notion of privacy Sexual Privacy the privacy of the family going on Sunday drives together bringing the family together. A advertisements actually marketed the car as an extension of the home as a the domestic earth. Where the family got together But the way that government officials judges And leaders Fahd of a car was a bit more complex or complicated. If you go back to the moment when cars. I rolled off a assembly lines. The assembly line and Standardization really allowed a lot of cars to be produced and to be able to be sold for very Affordable price so this is the story of Ford and the Model T and suddenly. There really are cars everywhere. Exactly so this is W- what was so unprecedented about the mass production of Carson's that's so many individuals were able to own their own form of transportation. They could no. They no longer had to rely on public transportation or walk and so what happened. Was that all of a sudden. There were hundreds and thousands of cars on streets were really intended for a few carriages or the trolley And mostly pedestrians and so it created mass chaos on public streets and when there's public danger to all then that The government to exercise power to legislate for the public safety and welfare. And so the way that Lawyers and government officials thought about cars. Was they pose a threat to public safety? And so we need to regulate the use of motor vehicles and we need to increase our powers to make sure that we cut down the accident. Rate bad everybody drives in a coordinated fashion so that traffic can move and so they were seeing this as something that needed to be regulated. And so when you have government regulation that starts interfering with individual privacy. So you're saying that. The advertisers said. Hey your car is an extension of your home and certainly after dark. Courting couples used their cars as a kind of extension of the home. But you also pointed out that because of traffic regulation then that meant that cars came under the regulation of the government in a way that the inside of the home might not or might not in the same way. When are the first times that the court start grappling with the question of whether when a policeman pulls you over for a traffic violation? The police officer is authorized to use force to either. Look inside your car or to pull out of your car right away. So what happened. Was that the mass production of cars. Coincided with prohibition so states were outlawing liquor starting from mid-nineteenth century through the late nineteenth century. And then we had The National Prohibition that was ratified in Nineteen nineteen and so really. Those two things happened at the same time and More law enforcement agencies wanted to stop and search cars for liquor And so the issue of how much power law enforcement officers had to stop and search a car a because they suspected that there was liquor inside that was contested from the very beginning. And how the courts I begin to rule on that was there a trend at the beginning. That then changed or was it pretty consistent from the start. It was pretty consistent from the start. So distinguished. How courts treat a prohibition cases from the way they treated carcases Because prohibition was contested from the very beginning right people thought that they had a natural right to drink alcohol even Jesus even cheese as turn water into wine. Robinson crusoe had wine to drink to natural and so- courts were starting to Change Their Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence on Fourth Amendment Governs The places search and seizure powers and they were starting to provide more protections to individuals in prohibition cases and then you have The coincidence of mass production of cars and national prohibition and so those cases were coming together and that's when you start having the government argued. This is really not about liquor. These cases are really about a fighting crime because cars changed the whole entire Calculus on crime commission and Criminal Law enforcement. And that's when you have courts uniformly decide that they need to increase the police's power to stop and search cars so the outcome in other words is from the start that the cops have significant discretion to stop the car and see what's inside exactly now. Certainly there were vocal defense. People who thought a car as private property and the Fourth Amendment protects a private property from warrantless searches and seizures and cars fit under that protection. So there were dissents by uniformly throughout the country and I looked at State Court cases and federal court cases uniformly. They all decided that the police needed the power to stop and search a car without warrants and did the police have to show that they had any reasonable suspicion to do that. Or was it enough for them to say We don't like the look of you. So that's a really interesting question because courts have held that cops need reasonable or probable cause to believe that there was something illegal inside the car now from the very beginning. Commentators criticized that rule. Because when you say that a cop needs reasonable or probable cause that's not a standard of certainty right and so if you allow for reasonable probable cause you're also allowing for instance where the cop could be wrong Because they don't have to be certain about it and if a cop can be wrong if a standard allows a cop to be wrong then it sort of allows a cop to make things up a little bit And that's exactly what happened enforcement jurisprudence. There's a reasonable or probable cause standard found allows a lot of leeway to the police to bolster their case that they had reasonable or probable. Cause so fill that in a little bit because now we're getting very close to the meat of you know the the archetypal scene of the cops pull somebody over. Probably a young African American male in our in our archetype and the question arises of whether the COP has probable cause to search the car. Fill it in a little bit. What what counted historically and what counts in the law today as probable cause and how has that changed while so the first thing I should say about what probable cause is is that we don't really know the courts have refused to put a number on what probable causes? So if you think about knowledge or the standards of proof that the state has to have before they take action We can start from zero. They they have nothing on us to a ninety nine percent proof beyond a reasonable doubt right and The proof beyond reasonable doubt the necessary standard to convict someone of a crime now probable causes somewhere below. Vats and courts have refused to put a number on what that amount of certainty as the best way that they've described it as it's a matter of probabilities more likely than not but there isn't that let me just ask you about that. I mean when I hear probable cause I hear more probable than not and I hear fifty percent plus a smidgen. Am I hearing that the wrong way? That's one way to look at it except that the courts have refused to say that it's a Smidgen more than fifty percent and the here's the reason why all of this matters is because fourth amendment challenges a challenge to a police search of a car for instance only happens when the person is guilty when the police found something in the car and so when a fourth amendment challenge is made a judge is looking at a guilty person who was caught red handed. And of course when when you're faced with that scenario it's much easier to say. The police have probable. Cause 'cause obviously they found someone with Alcohol under cars are now today drugs in their cars And so the whole calculus is a bias towards a finding probable cause because judges aren't looking at the cases where innocent person has been searched or. The car has been searched. Will we sometimes are right? I mean we sometimes are. I mean the Sandra blend case is an example. Of how in a certain outlying as we look at an instance where somebody has been stopped and then when something terrible happens we say oh my goodness you know you should never have stopped his person in the first place or at those moments if our history where we focus on Racial profiling or other illegitimate means of stops. Then we take a deep breath and we say well wait a second. Should these stops have been allowed in the first instance? I mean I completely agree with you that on in an ordinary judicial situation if the COP searches UCAR. There's nothing in your car. They'll let you go so it doesn't come to court so I get your point. I think it's a very powerful and important point but there are moments. Aren't there where we doing gauge in the question of what should be sufficient cause for a stop in search. No I don't think we do. And thus knitting and and let me try to explain why I feel that way. so Sandra blonde to remind listeners of fat Tragic incident She was arrested and she died in her jail cell three days later and she was pulled over for a minute traffic violation. Nobody challenged that. And this is something that I cover my buck from. The very beginning of mass production of cars cities towns past volumes and volumes of traffic laws governing. Everything from necessarily traffic equipment to when a car can make a right turn and a violation of any one of those traffic. Laws allows the police to stop that car. But I feel like there is a real debate out there in the world today about whether it's okay for police departments to use theoretically neutral rules like you know you made a turn without signaling which. I think the case the claiming the central bland case and if cops are using those but they're applying them in a discriminatory fashion. They're applying them to the people who get pulled over are disproportionately African Americans. Let's say or Latino then you know I do have the feeling that people do think in the world that many people think that there's something wrong with with that that maybe having a broken tail. It shouldn't be grounds to be potentially arrested. I think many people and I can include myself in. That agree with you. But that's not where the law is. The law still assumes that if you've committed even the most minor traffic violation your it's legally justifiable to stop you and potentially to but would it be potentially permissible to search your car under those circumstances. So let me backup. The court has said in nineteen ninety six in the case run versus United States. That if a COP pulls over somebody based on pretext so the cop thinks that the driver has drugs in the car but doesn't have probable cause then the cop can't stop that car right. 'cause probable cause is the necessary requirement. But the COP can use a minor traffic violation to pull the car over that kind of pretextual car stop is a okay according the Supreme Court so the COP pulls over a car for a minor traffic violation then the next question is can the COP start searching the car for the drugs that he or she suspects and this is where we get to the fuzziness of the probable cause standard. It's really easy to fight. Facts that support probable cause. I looked at one of the best selling. Please textbooks on what they call criminal patrol how to do drug busts using traffic law enforcement and they say probable cause is actually a very capricious standard. A lot of things you can think of to meet that standard like suspicious odors right. I smelled marijuana. How are you going to prove that in court? It's the officer's testimony right. And if the officer finds a marijuana but then yet sounds right. The officer smelled it. And so it's it's really easy to meet the standards for warrantless car search because of the volumes of traffic laws that everybody violates at some point. I get what you're saying. But you're also describing. Aren't you a potential distortion? The possibility which always exists of police distorting the truth were were lying in some other way right. I mean as the as again ozark tip. I keep on thinking of the Jay Z. Song Ninety nine problems in which he's he's replicating the structure of a pullover and he says you know you think that because my hat's real low that you know you can search me you can't I know my constitutional rights I mean. I'm paraphrasing now without anything like Geez flow but the basic idea is that the cops don't have the constitutional right to search. Jay Z wants you the listener of the song to know that you know. I teach that song when I teach criminal procedure and we go over verse to verse. Two is the car stop. Bad actually happened in real life to Jay Z. So he sings a version of that in the song you know won't stop some young enough black and my hat's real do I look like a mile per hour and we and I go over what he gets wrong about the fourth amendment. Ginger share that with us. So He's right that there is racial profiling that goes on especially at the time when he Experienced it for himself. There was a drug courier profile with traits that were associated with black men that highway patrollers were Instructed to look for when they pull over in their drug interdiction programs and so he's right as a matter of social reality that they were profiled as a matter of law. That's okay under the run case that I just mentioned found other things that he gets really wrong. He sings that the companies go get a warrant to search his car. Drops O- with trump no rice. That you need a one for that and that is absolutely not true. The cops do not need a warrant. It they don't need if they have if they need. They need if they have probably because they don't need to actually go and get a warrant for their probable cause exactly but according to the textbook the police textbook on criminal patrol getting probable cause for warrantless car. Search is super easy and in fact the textbook says the fourth amendment is your tool in criminal patrol the cop or the highway patroller. Who doesn't good job doesn't see the fourth amendment as an impediment they see the fourth amendment as opportunities. And that's actually one of the main arguments of your book as I read it that Especially lawyers like to tell maybe especially law professors. We like to tell who roic stories about how the Law protects people but in fact to law that regulates search is as much a law that enables the cops search as it is a law that limits. Those are I think that's a hugely important point but it has a kind of complex interaction with the car doesn't it? I mean the car has never really been a true sanctuary. It's always an in between space that subject to a fair amount of police. Surveillance and governmental regulation isn't isn't that a fair description exactly And that's one of the tensions that animates my book is that in American culture. We celebrate the car the freedom machine but when we look at the legal history the loss treatment of cars. It's heavily regulated and heavily pleased. And You bring in You mentioned the conventional story that we've told about constitutional law about the fourth amendment and. That was one of the questions that I had when I first started this project. Is that the conventional story that I've always learned as a law. School student is that the court has been the protector of our individual liberties especially the warned court. The Warren Court was considered one of the most liberal courts in Our history that's the Supreme Court under the under the chief justice ship of her award in the in the nineteen fifties sixties. And into the early Seventies. Yeah exactly. Right and the Warren Court started what we now refer to as a deep process revolution revolution right a revolution to give individuals more rights under the Constitution and this was a progressive triumphal story that I've always learned starting in law school through Grad School. But I was always confused because I was starting to also read about problems with the criminal. Justice system and mass incarceration that disproportionately affects Minorities and the poor and I was so confused because the Warren Court's due process revolution was supposed to help those groups but a generation after the due process revolution. Those groups are the ones who are disproportionately affected in the criminal justice system. And so what happened and that was one of the questions that I had when I started this project and I've realized our conventional story history that I've been told we only looked at certain landmark cases. We only looked at the cases that dealt with invasions the home. We never looked at the cases that involved the police's power to stop and search cars. And so if we look at those cases we see quartz from state courts to district. Trial courts all the way up to the US Supreme Court they always reliably grant the police more power more discretionary power. So I WANNA ask you for a final question Sarah just to put on your futuristic goggles and picture the driverless cars the self driving cars that you know may not be right around the corner but are there on the way and imagine writing you know after your book becomes a bestseller and wins all the prizes They ask you to publish an updated edition in fifteen or twenty years with a new chapter on driverless cars and the law. What do you imagine? The big issues are going to become for regulation in a world where. I'm not actually controlling the car anymore. Well it's going to really change fourth amendment practice Not necessarily the law but practice because much of criminal law investigation than vestige of drug losses specifically happens with a minor traffic violation and if autonomous driving cars are programmed never to violate the traffic laws. They will be programmed for right Me Too then. That means that the police will need probable cause of some sort of violation other than the violation of a traffic law. They will need probable cause that the car contains contraband or other illegal substances. I want to if I want to buy drugs and Florida and drive them up. The I ninety five Carter to the northeast. What I should do right away is by myself. A Tesla exactly that never violates the traffic violations because the police need probable. Cause you have drugs in it? And how will they know unless they saw you actually putting drugs into the car? That's really the only situation that I can think of that announced a probable cause and so the whole criminal patrol. That's based on a minor traffic violation that will cease but that privacy intrusions couldn't come in and really unexpected places right so I imagine these autonomous cars will be outfitted with GPS devices and all sorts of The Internet of things Right Talk all the other cars. And they won't work unless these traits other right exactly and all of that talking to other cars contracting with a greater network that's connected through the Internet and cloud and all that And you know cars basically new cars today. Basically have computers installed them them right that are connected to Internet all that is connected to the to the greater public right And so The way that courts are dealing with questions about what is public and private that talk about in the history of cars. They're struggling with that still today when it comes to smartphones The cloud and the Internet and all of that will be bundled with a Thomas. Driving cars too. So it's going to be an issue that will have a second version So there could be a volume two there you go. I'm looking forward to reading it. Sir Thank you so much for this really fascinating conversation for your really thought provoking and terrific book. Thank you talking to. Sarah really brings into focus. How absolutely central. The automobile has been not just to every aspect of our lives but to the question of our freedoms in the United States to the question of privacy to race to almost all of the most fundamental issues that we struggle with when it comes to the definition of our rights going forward it seems the technology of cars will both be always the same an ever changing. It's always the same in the sense that just has been the case for more than a century. Our roads our spaces are defined by cars. We spent time in cars and the police will continue to observe and regulate our actions while we're in cars but slowly and gradually as our cars become self driving. The technology is going to change the way that our government and our police interact with us in cars are privacy may gradually return our violation of traffic laws will almost certainly decline and the government will have to come up with new ways of thinking about how it regulates us and we will have to come up with new ways of exploring our freedom. Deep background is brought to you by Pushkin Industries our producer. Lydia gene caught with engineering by Jason Gambro and Jason Rostenkowski are show runner. Is Sophie mckibben? Our theme music is composed by Louis. Gara- special thanks to the Pushkin Brass Malcolm glad well Jacob Weisberg and MIA labelle. I'm Noah Feldman you can follow me on twitter at no are Feldman. This is deep background a last note today deep background is taking a holiday break. We'll be back with a new season in the new year.

COP government United States Sarah Noah Feldman Pushkin Industries officer University of Iowa College of America Sarah CEO Jay Z. Supreme Court professor US Supreme Court State Court Warren Court
Is Your Candidate Racist? Apply the Gillum Test

Trumpcast

38:08 min | 2 years ago

Is Your Candidate Racist? Apply the Gillum Test

"It's openly said by the president of the United States. You know, there's been efforts to silence me in the briefing room. There have been efforts to discredit me. But you know, who I've been in who I am is who you know. I, you know, I'm an open book anyone who knows me knows me. And what you see is what you get from me. A number of public statements made by Whitaker including saying there's no criminal obstruction of Justice charge to be had against President Trump that seems president prejudicial too many. He was a former US attorney, which is probably something. He does actually have to remind people about him a loss because he doesn't like a US Tony so much as he looks like Ken more refrigerator that somehow escaped from a ceus. Hello and welcome to Trump cast. I'm Virginia Heffernan. So whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth whenever it's a damp, drizzly, November in my soul whenever requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from knocking people's hats off. Then I accounted high time to see some indictments from the office of the special counsel, Robert Muller. Okay. So I'm no Herman Melville. But I do have the enthusiasm for indictments of Trump's circle that Ishmail had for willing ships. There were rumors of indictments last week. When Trump saw Democrats cleanup at the midterms Nedeli fired. His nutty AG Jeff Sessions who recused himself from the Russian investigation and hired it true escapee from happy firms sub literate dirty. Judge Matthew Whitaker who couldn't find the law on a map and thinks the bible should serve as the US constitution as hopefully future. Governor of Florida. Andrew Gillam said Trump. Seems nervous. Indeed, he has no shield from house oversight now that the Democrats control that chamber. So he's hoping to shield himself from Muller, which is well don't fool with the office of the special counsel. It's like mother nature that way and Trump is right to be nervous. So we'd heard indictments were coming maybe related to that Trump Tower meeting, if it's what you say we love it sent American citizens, but no indictments last week, and none this week so far, but hope springs eternal sooner or later will be back in that sweet heavenly retreat from reality my castle on a document cloud. A good old DOJ indictment of someone in Trump's circle in the Russia investigation. Document clouds. My guest today is Jimmy Will Smith. He's a senior writer for Rolling Stone. His latest column Trumpism is racism, so things will get worse. We'll be out in December's print issue. It's available now unrolling stone dot com. I'll be back with Jimmy Will Smith in just a minute. But first we have a press conference with Matthew Whitaker. Good afternoon. My name is Matthew Whitaker. I'm the acting attorney general, and I've come before you today to address some allegations that I may not be fair minded when it comes to the Muller probe. Look just because I was tight end of the university of Iowa does not mean that I'm putting a tight end to the Muller probe. Have I made some comments in the past as a citizen before I had this role that were negative towards the Muller probe? Yes. Does that mean? I can't be fair minded. No, absolutely not. Okay. Do I do? I have a bumper sticker on my car. That says Muller sucks. Yeah. I do. Okay. I would bet a lot of you have bumper stickers on your car to joke. Bumper sticker is a joke. Okay. I saw car the other day with a bumper sticker. That says my other car is broom does that mean that person's a witch? I'm gonna say probably almost certainly not. Okay. It's a joke. It was a report that upon finding out that I was becoming the acting a G colleague that was in the room. Some me pump my fist and shout. Yes. Now, we can end the Muller probe. Okay. When it comes to that. That was just an outburst of joy on my part. I was happy to get a promotion. You know, sometimes when I have a particularly good meal. I shout. Yes. Now, we can end the Muller probe into figures speech. I'm sure we don't be walking around holding everybody accountable for the things that they say when they get good news. That's that's totally absurd. I also read a report somebody disclosed that I have a back tattoo giant tattoo on my back. This just Robert Muller's face, and then a circle and us strike through it. So it's like the Ghostbusters logo. But instead of a ghost. It's Robert Muller. Yes. I have a back tattoo. Okay. A lot of people have twos. Maybe some of them. They regret. I know a guy. Has got an ACDC tattoo in college. Is he happy that he has that probably not. Okay. I was practically a kid when I got that thing was three months ago. So does that reflect my goals here in the department of Justice? No, it doesn't. So I'd like the press to just step off. Let me do my job here. And look at all the facts as a fair minded person. I'm not taking any questions today. I've got a cut the funding on an investigation. Chinaman on the line is Jimmy Will Smith. He's a senior writer at Rolling Stone. Djamil welcome back to Trump cast. Thank you very much. So you are now you're writing for Rolling Stone. And this latest column of yours Trumpism is racism. So things will get worse. It's a real it's a it's an upper. It's the feelgood piece optimistic and in cheery, especially when we're talking about elections. Folks, we gauge a little bit of like too much optimism too much pessimism around this election. Time felt like a little dose of realism would be helpful. I think that's great. So let's get down to details. This kind of Trumpism around the election before and after and if you define Trumpism as racism, and we're going to get to that that means that there have been just overtly brownshirts style street kind of taunting. But this time from the people with the podium and the Mike taunting reporters taunting political foes, making obscure references to things like lynching that we thought had more or less fallen out of the discourse of the sane. And maybe you can walk us through them. Just so we can understand how much they've piled up in the last month. Indeed. And certainly we look at the campaign of rapport. Rhonda Santa's who ran against a Andrew gillum in the Florida governor's race. We have there a guy who won the primary by currying. Favor with Trump by saying that I support at my kids building a model versions of your xenophobic monuments. Your wall along the southern border of have your kids at my kids reading your your art of the deal memoir. This is somebody who realized that the only way that he was going to win was essentially if he got Trump to tell Floridians the vote for him. And so there was no real platform that he ran on other than kowtow to Trump and essentially associate Andrew gillum with any kind of negative cultural markers within the Florida community. So you have him linking him to the dream defenders of civil rights group based out of Miami who is not anti Israel per se, but they certainly are pro Palestinian, and they certainly want to get at least the two state solution f taste I think certainly Disentis made the scientists wanted to use that a pledge that illumine certainly dozens of other candidates signed with the dream defenders as grist for essentially making white people steered event. And this is just one of the examples that you know, of how he did that, of course is. Comment out of the box after the primary was telling Floridians not to monkey this up by electing Andrew gillum as the first black governor of Florida. So. It ranged from the clumsy to the to the ridiculous. Okay. I have devised something. I call the Gillam test when we said decide who's being racist. You know, what I'm going to say, it's not you who decides it's not the people who are offended. It's not people who parse dog whistles of don't really know what we're talking about the racist speech. It is racist themselves as Andrew gillum put it to Ron to Santa's after citing donors to his campaign and his supporters the people re tweet him the people who sent him bitcoin. He said, I'm not saying I believe you're a racist. I'm saying the racists believe you're a racist. I think that is suitable for Bartlett's, exactly. And I'm going to call it the Gillam test. I think we can comfortably say that Donald Trump and his Don, jR, has sun, and Mike Flynn and Mike Flynn junior his son and all the people around Donald Trump are now re tweeted and violence has done in their name often enough by racist that they've been clay. Named by their own. And that to me is how you can say what you just said Trumpism is racism. But do you think there's some way that disantle could've extenuated the monkey it up? Is there is that just straight up racism, or is there some slippage there? I don't even some of these expressions. I don't even understand. I think it's racist signaling to be most with civic are think that descent is I don't know if he has racism in his heart. But what he's doing by sending monkey this up which oh, by the way. I should know is not something that anybody really says. Yeah. Is he's signaling to the racist. That, hey, I'm with Trump I'm with ashes bene- phobic discriminatory policies. That are promoted by this administration. He said known that right out of the gate. So tell me about some of these other incidents, you probably saw Cheryl an iphone sales extrordinary. And really impassioned. I just thought totally I loved this threat of hers where she be. Begins by saying that Trump's insult of abbey. Philip. She's the journalist went too far. She he, and then she goes on to describe all the ways that Trump Trump himself, not Trump's proxies, but Trump himself directly insulted black women almost journalists and and lawmakers. And then his colleague Omarosa. I mean, what did you make of that the very strange and particular language that he used the sherline? I fall print points out is not the same as calling someone sleepy eyes or Lil Marco or wacky. She says it's part of a very specific history of denigration that subjects these women of threats of violence. Do you conferred? You what did you make of the string of attacks on black women? I was incensed frankly, thought that first of all there's no need for me to defend the journalist credentials of Michel send door, April Ryan or Philip all three or consummate professionals, and I don't need to get into defending their records. They, you know, the work speaks for themselves at issue here, though is exactly the historical context that. The sherline brings up and that you have a president who whether or not he understands that history. Whether he even knows that history spoke to these women in with such utter disrespect and. In just disregard. That he does not speak to other people with. Yeah. He reserves it for African Americans largely. But specifically African American women you see you don't see Nancy Pelosi being denigrated as unintelligent happening with Maxine Waters when the president goes to speak to his audience. It serves him and his audience to continue lead paint not just African-Americans as racist as he did with you mission or as losers as he did with miss miss Ryan. But also, you know as stupid. And as less as less than intelligent, and is not worthy of being in their particular positions. This is a attitude that doesn't just bleed into the history of how black women have been treated in this country. But also in terms of policy, you look at the -firmative action debate, this is key to that understanding of how conserved view this. You know, the the ideas that they don't deserve to be here with us. We somehow our unearned advantages in this country deserve to be here more so than someone who, you know, works and gets scholarships to these kinds of schools. Now, granted, you know, I have some experience with this of went to an Ivy league school. I got plenty of, you know, flack for you know, sort of being an affirmative action baby is they used the term it. But I never regretted that I never know. Let that shame. I certainly think that these women as much as they've gone through some hell over these last couple of days because of how the president treated them. I think in also like we should note that, you know, the president treating this what hit them this way gives license to his followers to then bombard them with tax and in harassment. And so it's not just the incident. It's the what it's what he tells his supporters to do by proxy after he's done it. And so we really have a real success sickness in this in this society in this president seeks to feed upon it. For the sake of his own political power. Yeah. I was talking to Elliot misspell style. The other day from above the law, and it was right on the heels of I think we were pretty much reading the sherline Eiffel threat together. And we we had that conversation about do black van get it worse than white women's ridiculous. Like because both of us got a lot of trolling. And I asked him. What what would it be like to be confronted by the president directly? Any you know, we should say even Kosta got this with the kind of your terrible person. You're racist care face. You know, you're you're you're stupid. You're bad. I mean, just standing there, and what he said and tell me if you agree is that, you know, you just get this like cadet like posture of it's like you're talking to a cop because you know, any reaction from you can be construed as a provocation. And I just I can't believe. The White House. Press corps has to take that. Well, here's the thing. I think one of the larger stories of the Trump presidency is that a lot of white people are becoming familiar with an an emotion, a feeling and understanding that many people of color and other marginalized minorities have had to deal with their entire lives. And I include women in this, which is this idea that you know, oh my gosh. Like there are certain situations in which I am I feel not just threatened because of who I am. But also because I feel this shock in appalling. You know, fear of being who I am in certain spaces. Yeah. And I think that, you know, why people by large getting familiar with this emotion because they are being essentially marginalized by how you know, this president is behaving and how this president is isolating. Various diff. People who he doesn't care for with regards to this. I think that you have a guy who you know, Jim Acosta who I think for the most part trying to do his job. I didn't necessarily see a deer in the headlights there. I didn't into your in the headlines with emiss- or Abby or miss Ryan. They're not scared of him. And I think that's what provokes his anger. They're not scared of anything that he has to say or does to them. I you know, I've been pulled over. I know what that fear feels like with with a police officer, you know, not knowing whether or not this is going to be the time that I ended up being, you know, hashtag. I don't think that you know, if I were walking to a room of Donald Trump. I would not feel that fear. Interesting. Okay. Why? Because he's so out of control because he is not armed. I mean, I think we all have fantasies of how we would stand up to him, and you know. Not fall under his fell or be intimidated. Why aren't they afraid? I think because they've faced bigger threats in their life. No number one. Yeah. They face talking about black women who grow into a mature age in this country. They faced a lot worse things than Donald Trump. Yeah. You know in their face. You know, you saying nasty words to them. I mean, just inevitably. So I think in this instance, I think that you have people who aren't scared of him because there's you know, he gains power from their fear. It's almost like the penny wise, and it, you know. I mean, you decide that you're not scared of this person. Then you have the power. And so I think that you know to a woman you mean miss Ryan, and Abby all did their jobs. I say this Ryan out of respect for my elders. But with MS Nelson, and MS Philip all did their jobs in that moment. Yeah. Now would have been like whippy to for them to come back and be like, well, what's racist? Mr President or the come back with like one liner perhaps. But I don't think that serves the public their job is to serve the public and get the most information that they can and they did their jobs and maintain their composure in their professionalism. I wish we could say the most the the same of the president. Trump cast is brought to you by simply safe. If you've been thinking about getting a simply safe home security system, but I've been waiting for the holidays when all the tech deals come out you made a smart move because right now, you can get a great deal on simply safe order today. And you can get twenty five percent off any new SimpliSafe system. That's an amazing deal. They rarely do anything like this. But they're doing it for our listeners. Simply safe is great protection for your home and family. They never make you sign a contract there, no hidden fees. And with SimpliSafe around the clock professional monitoring is just fourteen ninety nine a month. I also want to say that at Trump cast. We'd do due diligence on all the companies who advertise with us. So we can stand behind them. And we stand behind simply safe not just because of their great product because they really are supporting rate journalism at slate and beyond. They're also getting great reviews seen at PC magazine and wire cutter all say simply. Safe. If the best security system there is so protect your home today and get a great deal on home security. Go to SimpliSafe dot com slash Trump cast and save twenty five percent off your SimpliSafe system. Hurry, this deal ends November twenty six and you don't wanna miss it. That's SimpliSafe dot com slash Trump. Gassed, SimpliSafe dot com slash Trump past. One interesting way of experiencing the kind of trolling that other people get is to tag them or re tweet them. So that the comments on the comments on the statement are also include you, you know. So I did this with without intending to I retweeted something van Jones said or video with him after the election, and so his name and my name or his hand on my handle were joined in the responses and the responses so this is two years ago was oh, yeah. And I couldn't believe I mean, he just cleared off. He just was has been handling it for I guess for a long time. But the responses some of which came from what looked like Botts started to use the word racist in place of the N word. So they were clearly teeing up the N word, you know. You know with scum and boy and stuff like that. But then all of a sudden they said, you're a racist. And it just that seemed relatively insidious at somewhat. I mean, just like diabolical. I mean, had you noticed that before Trump used it about you make I've I've seen that happen in my life. Well, before Donald Trump ever showed up in politics, the use of racist as an epithet for black people. Oh, certainly I mean, the idea that you can turn around and redefine racism is essential to white nationalism. You have self victimization idea than white people the true victims of this world that they are the ones who are disadvantaged that they are the ones being discriminated against that they are the ones who are being pushed down and pushed out that is an essential selling point for hatred. Yeah. Other people. Mexican immigrants of black people who were maybe being promoted in your company or being accepted into your colleges of Asian American people. Even who who maybe you feel like you're taking your place or or or sending in this society faster than than your immigrant. Parents did these are tropes that are used to sell hatred. And that's why I just shrug it mostly because aside from the horrid treatment of the president's objected UB stew in that instance. I think that it's just simply a signal that he really it. He was answering her question question was about whether or not he was aligning himself with white nationalism. As response to her in the way, that he did it certainly signaled that. Yes, he is and it requesting in a very brusque in indirect way. Yeah. One sort of touch on something even more sensitive if that could be imagined, which is the history of the pentag-. John investigating terrorism is the history of it. Trying to connect states and terrorist actors with our own domestic terrorism score JR. The Kroger murders the Pittsburgh massacre at what point do we say? These things are what their enabled they're emboldened. They're encouraged. They're all but sponsored by Trump and people around him is that didn't that's a stretch. It's not at all from the FBI report. That was just released today. Hate crimes went up seventeen percent. Seventeen percent in two thousand seventeen and that's a third straight year that crimes such crimes increased in that, you know, more than half of those crimes about three oh every five targeted a person's race or ethnicity about one out of five targeted their religion. And we're not talking about Christianity here. Okay. So yes, I think it's long past the time that we say that President Trump is encouraging DM. Domestic terrorism. Not just ignoring it by directing his counterterrorism team to solely look, you know, Muslim and other forms of, you know, Brown people terrorism. No, we're talking about, you know, a guy who's used vested political his his political power is vested interest in maintaining this climate. And if the climate produces attacks produces people, you know, sending mail bombs to pretty much most of the democratic leadership. That's okay by him. He'll go on TV and say, it's not his fault. He'll blame the Democrats. And what have you and people will buy it? Because frankly, there's really cultish atmosphere on the right right now that you know, they just to swallow anything. He says that power gives him a lot of leeway to essentially get away with this. I mean, a guy who is literally encouraging these attacks, you know, with his rhetoric telling people to go out and be aggressive in not condemning them once they've happened. I mean, we didn't hear the presence say anything about what happened with the Kroger shootings because that could have been. Another charleston. Remember, he went to a church before that. And that I was locked. Yep. Okay. Yeah. The president is only comments on tragedies that can maybe affect his political power with his base other than that. He doesn't seem to care all that much. So what's to be done? I mean, I think that we anticipated that there'd be more of this kind of thing at the time of the election. Has it been worse than you think about what you expected? I mean, frankly that results of the election should be a boon to the left. You have a number of not just the statistics on diversity of, you know, youngest woman ever elected to congress and to Muslim women to native American women elected first openly gay governor of a state, but you know, I think the left should be encouraged by the fact that this stuff on which they were losing elections. I'd say maybe as recently as two years ago. I mean, Dave brat beat Eric cantor in Virginia on the strength of. You know, this tea party push and to to repeal ObamaCare, and he's out in Virginia. Ashley spam. Burger the former CIA agent replaced him because frankly, she's there to protect ObamaCare people decide they like it people had enough time to understand that these entitlements are good thing. A lot of cases. And so I think that there should be a lot of folks on the left who feel encouraged going into twenty twenty because I think frankly, you're not going to get a candidate who is going to go Michael avenue route and simply their entire time engaging Trump on his behavior, whatever he says what they're going to do is to sell people on policy than help make their lives better. Now, what they have to do is to talk about that policy through it intersectional lens. They have to really understand how this impacts affect certain communities. They can't just talk about these things he nor race gender in other forms of identity based discrimination. When Bernie Sanders said that people in Florida, maybe they weren't racist. They just weren't comfortable voting for Andrew gillum because he's black. It occurred to me that Anna far left figure like Sanders from his generation thinks about the question of civil rights from the point of view of decide. Adding between McGovern and Goldwater like two white men. And if you're a liberal, you want a liberal white man who thinks that the racist should be equal. But you might not then feel comfortable actually voting for a black, man. And when you look at the complexion of of congress on these people elected women and men, it really is astounding that this is a very different and complex time. Much more complex time for raise politics than than anything. You know, Lyndon Johnson could have imagined. And in a way that conversation the McGovern conversation are the Bernie Sanders conversation about civil rights is is more abundant. That's what you mean. By intersection -ality is that, you know, having Alexandra Cossio Cortes having having a Scott Gillam or a Stacey Abrams changes the conversation completely. It's not a just a left and right on social issues. Question it's incredibly complex, and it's not just about having the symbolism of having those people in office. But also having the the benefit that you gain by having people with lived experience with racism with misogyny and other forms of of oppression, and how and understanding how those of forms of oppression intertwined in rely upon one another one another it's valuable to have people like that in office to help me help making making laws to help. You know, their constituents understand how you know more effective solutions can be it can be put together this is not about trying to exploit folks in trying to make sure you turn out the black vote or the or women in suburbia, or what have you not about trying to you know, you you're this towards elections. It's about crafting affective policy, and if you have an interest in crafting affective policy, you're going to get more people of color involved. You're going to get more women involved. You're going to get. A more LGBTQ people involved more people who have had disparate experiences in life. So that they have the gun that lived experience. But again, I just think that it's it's important for people to understand that you know, when I expressed in my column is that Trump is them can be boiled down to very simple thing. It's espousing racism. It's embracing racism that is what it is. It's not some kind of complex of a political dogma simply going out and selling interest in the white working, and it's going to. Right. And I think that what Bernie Sanders fails to understand stiff in this is that a lot of the folks that he seems dedicated to chasing almost exclusively have already left the party Trump cast this brought to you by express VPN. So there's a battle going on right now regarding the future of the internet, and you're right to privacy big corporations like ISP's and add networks are getting rich from selling your data and congress has failed to save net neutrality or protect your privacy online. 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This what we will willing to vote for white nationalism consciously and by saying by skews ING them in saying that they're not comfortable to vote for a black person. He misunderstands what racism actually is. I think he's just unfriendly. I think it's a political move. He's unwell. He's willing to say. The people like the Santa's and Brian Kemp and Georgia ran racist campaigns, but he's unwilling to call the voters out on that racism. And that is frankly Bernie Sanders Plato flow. Yeah. Yes. When you said people in congress can enlighten each other about their lived experiences of what comes to mind is Adam Schiff told a story recently about being it is Carson from California about being threatened in hazed and teased by Donald Trump on Twitter called short or whatever little and then also getting death threats, and he approached Nancy Pelosi any said, I've been getting death threats, you know, very nervous. And she said welcome to the club you, and that's exactly what I was expressing earlier with, you know, a lot of folks or you know, oh my gosh. This is the climate in this country is it's untenable. My gosh. I do we did you know it was this race. Did you know it was the sexist and folks women of black folks other folks of color present on this? I'd like, yeah, we told you it was this racist. We've told you for years about time that you understand what we've been seeing. And frankly, I still is much as people will be experiencing that for the first time. I still don't think it's fully sunk in, and I really hope that we do not have to have another term President Trump for them to understand. Yeah. Right. Me too. Do you think it's possible for political party say the Democrats to have too much moral high ground? I mean, I've been my son asked me recently. Are there any Republican ideas that you like, and I said, what's like, what part of one of the many things that's very difficult and depressing about coming of age politically now is that the Republicans have nothing. I mean, they used to there was like personal responsibility fiscal response. Ability. There's some value to family values military discipline. But all that now is in the democratic side. Like, it's as though, you know, how when you're arguing with someone, and they you've your mounting this really complicated argument or really noble argument, and they say back to you. Okay. I'm an asshole. What can I say I feel like that is Trump and the Republicans just like, but you're racist. But you're this. But you've done this. But you failed to do this. But you lied about this, and they say all right, we're assholes. So for us anyway. Yeah. Let me put it this way in a normal America. If there is ever been one, we will be witnessing the day you moment of the Republican party. This would be the end because frankly, they have run out of ideas to sell all this trickle down economics, and and compassionate conservatism. All it was was marketing, frankly, the American people for a large part of them have seen through all that. Yeah. What they have left. Frankly, are the people willing to adhere to the Republican party because they understand what the problem with party actually does and Republican party is about is damaging in counseling white advantage in this country and also male advantage in this country and also Christian advantage in this country. They understand what the Republican party is always really been doing and they seem passed the marketing awhile ago, and they said, you know, what we're okay with that. We're going to stick with that. That's where you get the percentage of people who support this president and this party, and frankly, they are run. Being out of time. I do think that the Democrats can certainly screw this up. I do think that there are things that they can do that will help dilute their own advantage. But frankly, what we really need to focus on. What apparently looks like the new democratic house is going to focus on is addressing the institutions that dilute their advantage. How voter suppression gerrymandering things like that. Yeah. Or the or the systems that we need to be attacking we need to be radically Radicati because he can't look at our politics is a fair fight. It's just not. And it's like looking at Republicans in in believing that they're actually conservatives they're not they're simply they're simply selling it. Very very Brooks brothers version of of white supremacy that works for a lot of people, obviously, they eat it up. But we need understand it for what it is in stop buying the lines. I think you're absolutely right. I mean, I think the Republican party is sufficiently corroded that it can't last like this. It can be propped up brief. Flee with enough voter suppression and enough fakey rally getting too much airtime, but it can't last for much longer in my view. And when you have things like Trump cast favorite, former Trump, personal lawyer, Michael Cohen stumping for Michelle Obama van you know, we're at the end of the line. I mean, it just shows you get they really don't have any ideas to sell to the American public. Yeah. They don't have any real platform other than policies that help make rich people richer, and why people feel better about themselves. That's the Republican party right now. And if we wanna buy into that, then we're welcome to, but we should talk about it. Frankly for what it is. And not simply say like, okay. This part of that's promoting this like weird sort of, you know, white male macho attitude and doing it really in the service that helped make him rich people richer that party is about Christianity or. You know, serving their fellow fellowmen. These people are not public servants. Yeah. They are. They're just operators in the system. They are looking to exploit it. I just can't wait to have this in the rear view mirror, where we can you know, you and I can say oh, remember when it was all falling apart. God that was so long ago. We're so glad that's gone. Who was Mike Pence was Michael Cohen. Thank you so much for being here. It's my pleasure. That's it. For today's show. We are here on Twitter. So don't be a stranger. I'm at page eighty eight and the show is always at real Trump cast. And if you're ready to take your Trump casting to the next level, and I know you are ready to level up sign up for slate plus slates membership program, which gets you Trump cast ad free. Exclusive bonus episodes access the slate events a feeling of virtue a halo, and it's only thirty five dollars for your first year. Just thirty five dollars. Visit slate dot com slash plus and sign up today. Our show today was produced by Melissa Kaplan with help from Shirley Chan Steve Alton perform today a sketch and I'm Virginia Heffernan, thanks for listening to Trump castle.

President Trump president Trump Trump Tower Robert Muller Jimmy Will Smith Florida Republican party April Ryan Andrew gillum Virginia Heffernan Bernie Sanders Trump castle Rolling Stone writer Herman Melville United States university of Iowa Jeff Sessions Matthew Whitaker
Coronavirus news, updates, hotspots and information for 05-18-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

Coronavirus 411

03:36 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus news, updates, hotspots and information for 05-18-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

"This is corona virus for one one the latest covert Nineteen Info and new hotspots. Just the facts for Monday may eighteenth twenty twenty all. The two states have lifted some restrictions as of today including Iowa where restaurants gyms and salons twenty two counties on Friday in a recent paper University of Iowa researchers warned that the virus was likely still spreading and though some lockdown measures did mitigate the virus they were not sufficient to prevent uncontained spread on their own reports the Iowa Times Republican over the last two weeks Sioux City Iowa has the highest number of new cases per population with thirteen point two seven per one thousand residents according to the New York Times the US Health and Human Services Secretary suggested that the underlying health conditions of Americans was a major contributor to the death toll from the corona virus. The chairman of the Federal Reserve told sixty minutes that he expects the economy to recover but it may take until the end of next year. Thirteen sailors from the US as Theodore Roosevelt have positive for over one thousand nine hundred a second time after recovering from a first infection reports the Washington Post more than one hundred countries are calling for an independent evaluation into the origin of the pandemic release CNN. The mayor of Sao Paulo Brazil warned that the healthcare system in the city is on the verge of collapse according to The Washington. Post a flight by the Canadian snowbirds meant to lift spirits and show support for those fighting covert nineteen ended in a tragic crash on Sunday. One member was killed another injured in Italy restaurants salons and churches reopened today as cases continue to decline there the locations of hot spots in the US and country diagnoses in a moment hot spots in the US displaying faster rates of growth as of May seventeenth according to the New York Times Lake County. Tennessee Crawford County. Iowa Globally Gabon Zambia. Haiti Central African Republic. Nepal South Sudan Uganda. Mongolia and Yemen have faster rates of growth. There have been one million four hundred eighty six thousand seven hundred forty two confirmed cases of covert nineteen in the United States and eighty nine thousand five hundred sixty four deaths. There were nineteen thousand seven hundred thirty one new cases reported yesterday the ten states with highest case counts New York. Three hundred fifty five thousand thirty seven New Jersey one hundred forty six thousand three hundred thirty four Illinois Ninety four thousand three hundred sixty two Massachusetts Eighty six thousand ten California eighty thousand three hundred sixty six Pennsylvania sixty five thousand seven hundred forty five Michigan fifty one thousand fifty four Texas Forty Eight Thousand Eight Hundred Twenty eight Florida forty five thousand five hundred eighty Maryland. Thirty eight thousand nine hundred twenty. The ten countries with highest case counts Russia. Two hundred ninety thousand six hundred seventy eight United Kingdom two hundred forty three thousand six hundred ninety five. Brazil two hundred forty one thousand eighty Spain two hundred thirty one thousand three hundred fifty Italy. Two hundred twenty five thousand four hundred thirty five. Germany one hundred seventy four thousand six hundred ninety seven Turkey one hundred forty nine thousand four hundred thirty five France one hundred forty two thousand four hundred eleven Iran one hundred twenty thousand one hundred ninety eight India Ninety six thousand one hundred sixty nine for the latest updates subscribe for free to corona virus. Four one one on your podcast APP or ask your smart speakers to play the corona virus. Four one one podcast found that brands.

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#228: Kiran Krishnan - Microbiome Labs, Gut Restoration Protocol

Lyme Ninja Radio - Lyme Disease

49:11 min | 1 year ago

#228: Kiran Krishnan - Microbiome Labs, Gut Restoration Protocol

"All the golden calling only juice. It's time for lime ninja radio. Today in Germany. Well, we filled in our studies is that when you take the maggots for in the first week of four weeks, you're significantly altering the diversity of the microbiome, so you're getting a much higher diversity, which is the number one thing that makes a healthy microbiome healthy as the diversity in the microbiome. You're also wheat growing these really important, keystone strains that have significant protective benefit like at permanancy a- Fikile and bacteria. So these are really fancy backyard names. But just remember, these are like your superhero strains of naturally occurring your God. But in people who are issues, chronic issues infections, and just being in the western world alone, these train sent to be at really low levels. This podcast is sponsored by the lime ninja symptom tracker. I'm so excited to tell you about our new Lyme niches symptom tracker. One of the things I hear over and over again, whether it's talking to a patient in my office or consulting over the phone with the client is just how difficult it is to keep track of progress on their lime journey recording symptoms daily or even weekly gives them too many data points. There's so many ups and downs twists and turns at some point, they get lost and confused. The lime ninja symptom tracker takes all the guesswork out of tracking symptoms with the simple monthly questionnaire once a month is the perfect interval deceive that new supplement or protocol is working right now. When you take the symptom, tracker, questionnaire, we give you a simple composite score for the month, but we had big plans, and the data, you enter will not be loss as we roll out new features. Best of all, it's free. Just head on over to Lyman into radio dot. Com slash tracker and sign up that's lime an enjoy radio dot com slash tracker. You'll be glad you did. Join us every Thursday on I tunes for the latest episode of lime ninja radio. Hello. I'm your host and lime journey guide Maccabee, and this is episode number two hundred and twenty eight. I'm just like last week this week is going to be a little bit different mainly because Aurora is still on her countrywide tour. I thought originally she was just going to visit her sister in Minnesota. However, she also decided to visit a college friend of hers, her roommate all the way down in Arizona. So she's gone from Minnesota to Arizona, and she's gonna meet up with my wife her mother in Ann Arbor, Michigan. That's just crazy. And then the both drive home together from there. And the reason my wife is going out to her, 'cause she's driving with her father who's going to visit his son and their family out in Nebraska. It's a big country and my family loves loves to drive it, but enough about what's going on in my crazy world. I'd like to give a shoutout to all you longtime the lime ninjas. You're the reason we have half million downloads Aurora, and I really appreciate you too. Inning in, in this episode episode number two hundred twenty eight you're gonna learn three main things. How thoroughly chewing your food helps your immune system? Number two, why you should consider adding a spore based probiotic your line protocol, and number three, he learned all about megasports, new gut restore protocol, and, as, you know, gut health is the foundation of your health, many people struggle with healing. Because their gut is creating all kinds of inflammation all kinds of autoimmune setup situations with leaky gut, and so forth, and so on the gotta get your gut healed to finish your lime journey. Nuff said, today's guest is cure and Krishnan, and he's a research microbiologist and has been involved in the dietary supplement and nutrition feel for the past sixteen years at least sixteen years. He comes from a research background having spent many years with hands on. Search and development in the field molecular medicine and micro biology at the university of Iowa. Alright strapping and sit tight on no, you're gonna learn a lot from this week's interview with Karen Christian. Ho care in this McKay rep from lime ninja radio. Hey, great to be with you. Thank you so much for having me. I'm very excited to speak with you and about this topic that has really become probably the number one health issue in the US, if not the world, and that's gut health and what's going on in your intestines and the microbiome down there and the condition of the small intestine large intestine, and how that all relates to health and particularly lime disease. So thanks for giving us your time here and I'm real excited to learn from you. It's my pleasure in, you know, at the end of the day to me, the future healthier, is going to be people being empowered with, with understanding and knowledge of how their body works in how the world around them affects all of that. So thank you for doing what you do. And, and having me on it's always pleasure to be able to talk about. Signs and the microbiome and give people a little bit of, you know, some kernels of knowledge that can really affect and change their lives. Now can we talk about digestion, briefly, actually, if if you can even start at the mouth, and the stomach, and then the parts of the small testing 'cause at suckers, pretty long different parts of it that do slightly different things. And then finally the colon has really we just kind of say gut, this regulation, leave it at that. But there's, there's a lot going on between chew in your peanuts, and excreting what's left? Absolutely. And that's that's a great place to start because, you know, let's talk about the digestive process to begin with. And then we'll talk about all of the things that people may not know that are the actually going on during that digestive process in this. Like you said, there's a lot going on in there. So, you know, starting with the mouth, the whole idea is that you have these teeth that, that Massa rate, the food, and then and then there's a whole bunch of antibodies in your saliva that actually their, their job is to be the first line of defense for things that are entering your system. So you've got, you know, seecretary saliva, which is an immune globulin or immune component that neutralizes bacteria, toxins viruses, and all that. So your first line defenses, right there in your mouth. Now, the other thing in your mouth in your saliva is an enzyme call Emily's. So right off the bat. The two things that come in con-. Packed with food. In the beginning is your immune system and your digestive system. The Emily's, the enzyme that's designed to break down carbohydrates structures and then the secretly, I g which is designed to neutralize potentially harmful things that start to that you're exposed you starting in the mouth than when you chew, and UMass serrated it exposes more surface area of food. It makes the food easier to digest when it gets into the stomach, and so on. And that maceration is a really important process. That's one of the first steps what people screw up their digestive system. We don't chew our food enough. You know, we've we may have heard that in grade school in there was his old adage. I can remember about chewing, your food, thirty two times or something like that before you swallow it. And the, the lack of chewing, the food, actually makes it that much harder to break down in simulate the nutrients from it. And so that's a really important process, and that also gives time for the antibody. That exist in your in your saliva to actually neutralize any sort of toxins and viruses in bold components that may be coming into the food as well. Now, here's another thing that occurs in the mouth, that people don't really understand. Is that your mouth is full of immune tissue as well? So it's called him bucle Nikos out of bucle immune system. And that immune tissue is sampling, things that are coming in to try to figure out what is being introduced into the system in depending on how your immune system is trained it can either start to trigger an allergenic inflammatory response, or it'll trigger a tolerance, response tolerance, response means they museums, not going to do anything about it, which is what we want when it comes to food. But if it picks up the presence of pathogenesis, something that could be problematic. It starts to Rev up the immune system so that you can appropriately defend against it. So all of those things are currying in your mouth while you're chewing, your peanuts in. It seems like a Mondays simple thing that you're doing, but all of this amazing biology and chemistry is occurring. Now, as you start chewing, your stomach already knows it stuff is coming. So you start secreting hydrochloric acid into your stomach, and you and your stomach starts getting active with what we call the, the stomaching process, which were your stomach actually squish is in mixes things around as it sits in that hydrochloric acid so you can feel your stomach contracting, and that, that gurgling in the stomach all of that stuff. It indicates the stomach is getting ready to accept food in their start coating it with acid so not only does it kill all the bacteria and viruses that shouldn't be there. But it starts breaking down the food particles itself. Now, the microbiome the bacteria that live in your stomach in your digestive tract. And all that starts to sense food, that's coming in from your mouth in your stomach, and they start to prepare. Pair by producing enzymes for you in your intestines near small intestines. So when, when the food than enters your stomach it gets mixed up with hydrochloric acid with bicarbonate and then go and the Cup peps in a couple of things. And then it goes into your small bowel, where it's supposed to be digested by enzymes and then also detected by your immune system. So that's the second time your immune system starts to look at what's coming in and tries to figure out whether there's something they should attack or something. They should not if you have a dysfunctional immune system in your sensitive to certain foods, or you have allergies to certain foods. This is the point in which you're dysfunctional immune system starts at tacking stuff that's coming into your digestive track. And that's because the microbes in your gut aren't communicating appropriately to your immune system in your intestines, to tell them that, that, hey, this is a normal food component. Don't attack it or hey, this is a pathogenic bacteria. Let's get ready to rumble in attack. It in all of those intimate communications, our currying between all of these microbes that live in your gut, and your immune system, which basically coacher digestive tract. So let's let's yes sir for second because this is a little bit new to me. So I was aware that there's a lot of communication going on between the body's microbiome in the immune system further down the digestion. But you're saying it's happening, right there in the stomach, and the upper end of the small intestine yet I in fact this communication all throughout the digestive tracts of the something called the mucosal layer. Right. So that Nukus layer covers everything on the inside of your body. In fact, it's about a hundred fifty times greater in surface area than your than your skin, your dermal layer, which we used to think of as being the largest organ in the body. But now we come to know that this mucosal surface on the inside of the body, which covers your reps respiratory. Track your general track, you know, everything your eyes your ears, everything that enters your body to any orifice has to go through a mucus layer to begin with. And in that mucus layer is an intimate relationship between microbes that live in the mucus layer, and your immune cells that also existed mucus layer. So the, the buke is alive, the mucus is alive. And in fact, it's arguably one of the most important components in your body because that mucus layer is is a site of action for everything that your body reacts to, whether it's an invading virus, or bacteria, or food, particle, or it's a multi axon, or it's a chemical from the outside world, everything goes to the mucus layer. And that's where it's decided how that thing is going to affect your body and the intimate relationship there that makes those decisions are the microbes that exist and the immune cells that exists there in, in your gut about eighty percent of all of your. Immune tissue is found in the mucus layer of your gut. And then, of course, the mucus layer in your gut is covered with a hundred trillion bacteria. So the bacteria are constantly communicating with your immune system, starting in the mouth all the way through the stomach. They're, they're microbes that live in the stomach that play a role in the communication, and then all the way through the digestive track till you out that intimacy exists, all throughout the digestive system. And then there's one particular area in the small bowel, and the small intestine called him. And that's the very end of the small bowel, and there's something called the payers patches there in the pairs patches are really interesting because it's the main site of immune sampling of everything. That's entering the body. Right. So if things go through the mouth, the stomach they go to the, the beginning part of the small intestine that's called the Wadden him, and then they go to the illion sorry to the gym, and then finally the illion, and when it gets the illion most of the new. Trans have been extracted from the food that you ate, your body's should have digested. Most of what it can digest that point, the, the microbes that encounter would have done the digesting that it can do at this point, the undigested stuff is about to enter the colon words gonna be for mended by a whole bunch of other bacteria to give you all of these other benefits, which we can list as we go along. But, but prior to entering the colon that checkpoint is called it the appears patches, that's where your immune system takes a real serious. Look at what's coming into the system, and then if this anything that has to be taught or amplified, it, does it at those payers patches, and, because those payers fans are connected to a set of glandular systems, called messing tear glandular system. So any signals that are really important systemically for your body to fight infections, like, for example, lime. Viz. Which occurs typically in the peripheral part of your body, right? Somewhere else outside of the gut, but the signals in the tutoring, and the understanding of how to fight those particular infections comes from that payers patches that sampling that occurs there and your microbes in your gut are constantly bombarded, the payers patches with signals and information to try to tutor your immune system on what's good. What's not good and what it should be looking forward to fight. That's an insane amount of information, going back and forth. And I know we, we all wanna simplify this make this simple linear pathway that we can understand. But it's not is it, it's this incredible cloud of data going back and forth that self reference itself in just as ridiculously complex. And, and to try in here. Here's one thing that's I, I like about the mega spor probiotic, and the, the theory using spore based product to really kind of police this rather than trying to change. If you've got billions and billions, or trillions of, of a bacteria in your gut doing their job and you introduce say, even eleven it's eleven different strains trying to support them in, like, what, what are you really doing? Right. You know what are you really doing? So what can you talk about why using spore base 'cause we talk a little bit about the hydrochloric acid in the stock. We've, we've kinda highlighted why you need something that survives the gut, and what the difference is here. I wanna get right into your product. Yeah. So and let me give you a little back on how we even approached this. The whole idea is that the micro Biomed everything that goes on in the gut the intricacy of everything that's happening in the guy is very pro bacteria dominant in other bacteria have a very specialized role, and it's a role that we don't even really completely understand yet in a word, probably a decade away from fully understanding everything that they can en- do for us in the gut, and their role in our overall, health and wellness. We do know that they play a pinnacle role in our health outcomes, and the types. Of bacteria. We have in our gut dictate our health outcomes in large part, even how long we live are dictated by the types of bacteria in our gut, but it's so complex and as many dimensions to it. And so when we said, you know what, what is a probiotic than, you know, like, are we really making any impact by taking this product that has a hundred billion CFU's and fifteen strains in, it sounds like a lot, but a hundred billion when you put it into a sea of a hundred trillion organisms, in oh, it's literally drop of ink in the ocean. You know, it's you're not doing anything, and then most of them are dying in the stomach and not even getting to the site of action in the intestines alive. So are simple question was where did our ancestors to the majority of the course of human evolution? Where did they encounter bacteria that they consumed on a regular basis? And when you look at the look at the data on the anthropological and all that. Information you come to this simple conclusion that they interacted with the environment. You know, after you're born, and you get that first innocuous of bacteria from your mom, passing through the vaginal canal drinking breast milk, which contains about six hundred different species of bacteria after that period in the first years of life, the rest of your life. You're interacting with the outside environment and our ancestors, just smart enough to eat dirt didn't sterilize the environment that they were ended in sterlizing food supply. They drank water of rivers and streams. They dug for food, you know, and so the CAD significant interaction with the bacteria in the environment, so we started honing in on bacteria in the environment that could have a probiotic affect. And how did we define a probiotic as well? Our first thing was that it has to survive, naturally through the gastric system. So if nature intended the bacteria to function as a probiotic in the gun it has. Survive through this gauntlet that bacteria have to go through starting with the neutralization in the mouth, that we talked about in the neutralization by those antibodies, the I g a, if they can survive that, then the next thing they have to survive is a really harsh stomach acid that occurs in the stomach and the stomach acids is, so harsh in, you know, people don't really give it the credited should if you are able to touch your own stomach as with your finger. It would burn off the tips of your fingers. That's how intense the stomach acid is, and it kills ninety nine point nine nine percent of everything that enters. So so it has to make it past that really hard stomach acid. It would somehow makes passes summit acid the next thing that kills bacteria entering the body are bile salts bile salts in the upper part of the GI are really strong anti-microbials, then it makes it pass that the next thing is pancreatic enzymes pancreatic, enzymes, also have anti microbial activity that kill bacteria. So there's these four of five lethal steps. Of killing bacteria that entering through the oral route that microbe has to go through in order to qualify as being a probiotic. Right. And the vast majority of probiotics on the market cannot make it through that because they're not naturally designed to do that. So we honed in on bacteria that could naturally survive. That in our presumption was if nature gave it the capability of surviving through all of that, then it likely has some important function in the gut. You know, that's just how evolution works. And so we honed in on these spores these bacterial Endo spores, that when they're outside of the body, they have the capability of covering themselves, with the stick protein, calcified armor, like coating, and that armor, like coating gives them all the protection they need to naturally, survive through the mouth, the stomach acid bile salts bankrate against and get to the site of action in the small bowel where they start the function as a probiotic. So that was our first thing is like. Clearly environmental bacteria of the ones that have the biggest impact because that's what we're exposed to naturally, and then within the environmental backtra there's a subset that actually can survive through the gauntlet that it has to go through in order to function as a probiotic. So that was our first piece of investigation that took us a few years to find the right strains that can do that, now once we found those strains on the question is what kind of probiotic affected? They have in the gut, you know, how are they modulating the gun? Can they actually influence the hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are actually in the gut and what we're finding out from two papers were publishing in the next few months is that when you add, the spores into the microbiome, they act as a gut police, essentially, they of the orchestrators of the environment in the gut we're showing in one of the papers where publishing that you can increase the diversity in your micro-biology by almost fifty percent. By adding in these sports or imagine in an unhealthy microbiome that has very few proliferating functioning bacteria relative to what you should have you can increase the prevalence of beneficial bacteria by four five hundred species by adding in the sports. I mean that's mind boggling, to think that these sports can go in at a dose of four billion, which is relatively insignificant. When you think about the rest of the microbiome, but they can go in there, and they can change the microbiome by nearly thirty forty trillion organisms. That's how powerful they are. And as it turns out, we've outsource most of that function to them, because we can't do that ourselves if our gut is in disarray. If our, our microflora is in is dysfunctional because of antibiotics we've taken, whatever it is that we've done to screw it up. We have almost no system in dodge in this league fix that we count on these types of bacteria to do the fixing for us. And, and with our modern predilection for having everything be super clean were not going out to the garden and pulling a carrot out of the soil and getting some of these naturally. So we have to do it. Artificially, quote unquote artificially. Yeah. Absolutely. That was our whole premise in our idea was that if we were still living, a semi ancestoral life if we even if you were located in the rural part of your country, and you're, you're forming and hopefully to clean by the farm and not covered testifies herbicides. But assuming that was your lifestyle you were getting some measure of exposure to these particular types of organisms that are extremely important in, in controlling in a really designing the, the microbiome, but the vast majority of people in our country, or in the western population, don't live in those environments. And so we're getting almost. No exposure to these really important. Strains that affectively are the regulators of our whole system. And you know, and because we're not getting that exposure, we are seeing the consequences of that, where we continuously bomb. Barred, our gut with things that kill bacteria. You know, like antibiotics that we mentioned earlier, but herbicides pesticides cover foods, the chlorine fluoride in drinking water. The preservatives in all the antimicrobials found in processed foods, and also in, in foods that you buy produce, you know, all the personal care products with the antimicrobials in all that in parabens, and so on. So everything around us is designed to kill bacteria and all of those things enter our system in kill our bacteria. And so in light of having all of those negative influences, you know, our view was that we need to put back, at least one positive influence back in. To our system, and we're seeing it from the clinical trials. We're doing the result are amazing. When you put back one positive influence or back into your microbiome now, one thing that I'm fascinated about with your trials, and this combination of protocol that you have for gut restoration is that there's not necessarily a diet piece to it. Now, of course, diets gonna help, but the study you did. You didn't do a dietary intervention. And still you found that the gut was able to heal and so many people, they're having to do radical diet things just to try and get their inflammation in their gut under control. Yeah. Absolutely. And that's a really important point to bring up. And in, in all of the studies were doing. So right now were, were finishing up a pair of Dont'a, gum disease study, because, as a significant connection between leaky gut inflammation in the gun and the healthy gums would doing rheumatoid arthritis study was starting cancer study in melanoma in all of these types of different studies. The triglycerides studied the ninety day triglycerides study. We just completed, none of those studies, did we do? We have a dietary or lifestyle. Intervention are simple. Thinking is just by adding in these spores can that make enough of a change in your micro? Bio, will you can see these beneficial clinical outcomes, and the idea of that is, is because, you know, it's one of the hardest things for people to do is change our lifestyle right into change their diet and make those interventions in their daily choices until we want to see can we impact their overall. Health and wellness just by adding in the spores. And so, yes, none of the studies that we're doing have any dietary intervention at all. I would say that if we could do a nice control diner invention where if nothing else we're just shifting them. No organic eating or increasing the diversity, what they're eating the, the results are probably be even more profound. But it's really shocking to see how profound the results are without any sort of Dieter intervention at all ending our first leaky gut study it was done mostly in college students in so we know they're not doing it for themselves. You know, that was actually a fear of mine. I'm thinking, like, you know, all they're doing taking four billion of these a day. I know they're out drinking partying eating fast food, you know, being stress staying up late all of the things that we know are bad. You know, I was very apprehensive of whether or not we would see any change or impact in the degree of leaky gut in their inflammatory markers in all of these things. And we were really shocked to see that the that the changes were so significant. Now, I want to go over for your product. So the, the main product is the mega spor probiotic, the spore based bacteria than you have mucosal healing product and prebiotics, which is food, or fertiliser, quote, quote, for the beneficial bacteria. And then you have an I g product as well which I know my listeners will wanna hear about. So can you briefly go through that, and how that they worked together? Yes. So three of the four products are part of what we call the total gut restoration system and the three steps to that total got restoration system, and they're easy to remember, because they all start with ours, step one is recondition. So the idea there is you're using the probiotics are you start with a mega spor. And the idea behind the mega spores. You're reconditioning, the gut environment the population in the. So what we what we shown in our studies is that when you take the maggots for in the first three to four weeks, you're significantly altering the diversity of the microbiome, so you're getting a much higher diversity, which is the number one thing that makes a healthy microbiome healthy is the diversity microbiome. You're also re growing these really important. Keystone strains that have significant protective benefit like Akron SIA killing bacterial, so these really fancy bacterial names. But just remember, these are like your superheroes strains that naturally occur in your gut, but in people who have issues, chronic issues infections, and just being in the western world alone, these trains tend to be at really low levels. So during that reconditioning phase the, the spores are changing the environment within the within the gun. They're suppressing the growth of the pathogens suppressing the growth of the overgrown bacteria, and they are increasing the diversity in increasing the beneficial bacteria. So. Now, they're starting to make a population change within the gut now. The next step we call reinforce, and the whole idea. There is as you start to have this new looking microbiome, that's more diverse that has a higher number of the superhero, strains protect you against all these disease conditions. We wanna reinforce those new microbes by providing them food that specific for them. So our prebiotics is a different take on prebiotics. We actually call it a position, prebiotics. The idea there is that we carefully selected a legal sacrfice that have been clinically shown to specifically feed those good bacteria. One of our concerns with prebiotics in general was that if it's a General Foods for bacteria, it's gonna feed bad bacteria as well as if it's good bacteria in. Also, you're gonna end up with the situation where it actually makes your dysfunction even worse because, now you're bad Becker, happily feeding on these. Prebiotics. Proliferating. So we have meticulously developed this precision prebiotics that has prebiotics at specifically feed. Good bacteria in your large file. So, so you start with a recondition you're starting to change the population than for the next three or four weeks, you come in with the reinforce where reinforcing those positive changes by giving it those specified prebiotics now after the end of that three or four week period than the last step is called rebuild, and the whole idea behind the rebuild. Is now that you have this new population bacteria that's more diverse, that's protective that helps your protect you against conditions in repairs. Your system. You gotta give that bacteria the tools that it needs in order to repair your gut lining your gut mucosal structure, the digestive system. The nervous system in the digest track, and so on. So the what's in that reinforce is a is product, mega mucus, and that has. Four key amino acids, that are the building blocks of that really important mucus structure that we talked about. It's got a bovine immunoglobulin, which is also in the g product which meant which I'll talk about. And then it's got a really important polyphenol. Phenol mix now polyphenyls are going to become the next most important thing that you start to hear about when it comes to gut health in the micro, volume because, as it turns out, polyphenyls, which are these compounds, they call polyphenyls, meaning you know, the these are chemical compounds natural compounds that come from fruits and vegetables and plant based materials and poly, meaning many different versions of them, and they are essentially used by the microbiome for fuel for producing things like vitamins producing things like anti inflammatory compounds for producing things like prebiotics. So they're really really important for the health of the ecology in the microbiome. And they are tooled at a healthy microbiome uses to fix the immune response in the gun to fix the gut lining to help grow other parts of the population of the bacteria, and so on. So these, these tools are part of the rebuilding phase. So again, this three phases to the total restoration, the recondition with a mega spor biotic. That's the spore Mace probiotic. And then after four weeks of doing that you add in the reinforcement phase, which is the prebiotics and then after four weeks of doing that. And the, the mega four together, then you add in the rebuilding phase, which is a tools your micro bio needs to rebuild that whole gut system in the gun immune system. Now, the fourth product, you mentioned, the mega ID is an absolutely fascinating product. It's one of my favorite products that I've ever come across ingredient wise. We did not develop the ingredient. We got to partner with phenomenal company based in Iowa. Call in terror health that has been doing this and working. On this for the last, but sixty seventy years, what's phenomenal about the product is it acts, as an intelligent Neutralizer of all things that seemed to cause significant inflammation in damage in your gut in things like mold toxins, viral components or viruses, themselves bacterial components bacterial, toxins, all of these things that enter your system even environmental toxins that come into your system through your digestive. Tract that seem to break down your intestinal barrier that seem to cause inflammation in your intestines in Dr dysfunction, this immune globulin product, which is a product that comes from healthy cows. They basically pull out the serum from the cows and they spin down the ceremony. They isolate the antibodies in the serum and those antibodies have this amazing neutralizing power. So that's one of the products, I use every single day as one of my basic protections. Against toxic world around me. You know. And so when you add that product in, that's a whole layer of detoxifying, the gut neutralizing all of the things that were exposed to create significant inflammation, significant damage. So that's the system in general. So the way you would use that fourth product in the total got restoration is if your gut is really messed up, and let's say you you've been dealing with lime disease in. You've been through several courses of antibiotics and, you know, your gut as messed up, you would start that I g product when you start the recondition phase with the mega spor. So you would added in as as part of the first phase of your total restoration. And then when you bring in the pre biotic in the second part, you can either stop that idea g or if you're really doing well on it, you can continue it. It's one of the products, I take every day, along with the spores, and I a since I've done the total got restoration myself a few times. I actually disuse the prebiotics in the Mikasa intermittently, which is step two three. I use it in a mentally throughout the year. I don't throughout the month. Sorry, I don't need it all the time. But the thing I take all the time is, is a mega spor. And then the mega, high, g g which is the, the bovines globulin. I know that was a lot of information. But hopefully. It's awesome. And since you take that daily, what do you notice? Since taking it. And what you notice if you miss a couple days. Yeah. That's a great question to let me talk about. I'll talk about what I notice what my wife notices to two very different things all end. It's quite interesting. You know. So what I noticed and part of the reason I take it every day because I travel a lot, so I fly almost three hundred thousand miles a year, I speak at, at almost fifty conferences a year. Many of them are now international. So there are weeks, where I'm in two or three countries in one week, you know. And so I spent a lot of time in planes time, eating out, a lot of time in different time zones, and that wreaks havoc on your body. So the biggest thing I notice is my ability to adjust to changes in time zone ability to not have any disruptions in in how might gut functions no matter what world or country, I'm in, and I can eat a very, very diverse in diet can virtually. Eat anything in almost any country and not have any issues and my sleep. That's one of the biggest things I noticed that. What I don't take it by sleep kinda gets really disruptive. My body's a little more amped up a little more inflamed, dealing with more toxic and that disrupts my ability to sleep and go to sleep easier when I take it regularly, I sleep like a baby. That's one of my things that I noticed because my body, every time it's under stress unders any degree. Toxicity, it manifest itself in, in, in a poor ability to fall asleep. Really easily now my wife on the other hand, you know, her the wage, her body, manifest toxicity, and all that is through stress in being anxious being a little worked up in also, she's got that very kind of worked up personality when, when her body's going to inflammation toxically and since she started taking she only started taking in about three months ago. You know she's. Keeps asking me. I don't I don't quite understand. What's in this? She's not a scientist. She's like this is like the most calming thing I've ever taken in it. It has just brought down her stress in exile level, five notches from where she normally is. And, you know, in that to me is the most rewarding thing because, you know, they say happy wife happy, life. And so if anyone is going to be taking that every single day is going to be her because that has such a big impact not on her, but on me as well. So manifesting into different ways everyone's body is gonna react differently to talk city into inflammation. Some people it's gonna be skin issues. You know if you your body's going through toxin inflammation, you're gonna get a little bit of Exeter. You're gonna get a little psoriasis or you're gonna get red kinda patches, or bumps other people, it's going to be cognitive issues. Some people gonna be brain fog other people's gonna be tiredness, you know inability to. Focus so we all manifest differently. But those are the kinds of things that you'll start to see change when he utilized that product now, this is not a fair question because I didn't give you a heads up, and you may or may not know the answer to do you know if this, I g product has any influence on the m one versus 'em to express macrophages in the gut. That's a great question. Now, I I've, I've read virtually all of the studies on the G product end. In fact. In fact, they've done a number studies. And this is what actually got me interested in the products in the first place. They've done a number of studies on HIV patients because HIV patients, of course, have completely dysfunctional immune system, and they have very leaky gut. In fact of the NIH published a study in twenty four teen that that showed that HIV subjects die. Typically, from leaky gut. In fact, they concluded that the degree of leaky in their gut was a better predictor of their mortality rate than the than the viral load that they that they have no inner city, right. Is that the now they didn't use the term leaky gut? They said barrier dysfunction in HIV rapidy in, but it's the same thing described the whole process, how the gut becomes leaky and permeable, and the mucosal inflammation takes hold all of that stuff. All the stuff we've been talking about in the integrative medicine world, and these guys were some of the first guys to. Do studies in that respect to see if they can improve the immune response in Costa, and the leaky nece in the gut in HIV subjects, which is a really a radical and intense form of what other people are suffering through. And because of what they've shown in the ability to up regulate CD four t cells might guests is it may, it may have an impact on the macrophage response, because macrophages sponsoring part of the innate immune cells stem, does lend itself to increasing expression in CD four t cells, whether it's the, the fluctuation between M one them too. I've not seen that in a research paper, but my guess, is it does have impact on both macrophages dendritic cell responses while also thanks for that below technical insider talk there, hopefully didn't go over to my peoples head, but if it did, don't worry about it. What it means is the IT is common things down in helping your immune system function. Actually be flexible occur in trying to get the idea of a flexible immune system out there in the world. And I think that's that's really what we're talking about. 'cause it's not you know, whether you know, you're only inflammatory side or the repair side. It's can you can remain system appropriately respond, you know, ended tissue in the damage tissue. And within the infection itself, or whatever's going on, and not get stuck on one phase or another like we see in cancer, or autumn unity, or in a severe inflammatory diseases. Yeah. And you, you said the right word stop in that flexibilities key. Because when, when people have the conditions inflammatory conditions cancers autoimmune disease, the influence, the immune system is stock in a process, and it's not shuttling through the next phases of immunity, which is the adaptive side. And so on the regulatory side of the immune system and more and more as we. Understand how they mean system work. We come to understand that the micro by critical role in, in, in shuttling the immune system through those natural steps and getting it out of the stuck mode in a one of the ways, I explained the immune system to people is the think of the immune system as an army that has all of the soldiers all of the tanks, all of the bombs all of the equipment to fight a war, but it doesn't have a general right to the immune system is not set up from the beginning with information on what the battlefield looks like what the enemy looks like who should target who shouldn't target that information that general the tutoring of the immune system comes from the micro bio, it's the job of the microbes in our gut, and in our body to train are immune system on how to function, which is really, really interesting. Because imagine our one and only defense system in our body. We. We have naturally turned it over to bacteria to control. He does, so it's, it's mind boggling from a biological standpoint. But, but it absolutely makes sense. When we think about the complexities of the immune system in one all it has to deal with in also in order to get your immune system to function properly did not get stuck in anyone mode, and to, to be dynamic, and be flexible. We need to make sure we have a healthy microbiome, and that, that basically, in a means you need a diverse microbiome you need to bring down pathogen growth in problematic bacteria you need high levels of these hero. Strains you need the production of things short chain fatty acids, and all that, that goes on in the colon so you need just proper functioning in your immune system, old will do its job. Karen, thank you so much. You've been incredibly generous with your time, and your knowledge, and I can't believe that you're traveling like that. That's just insane. You're definitely on a mission, and it's a good mission. So thank you for your work. My pleasure. Thank you so much of what you do as well. I always tell people that in the future of health is healthcare is gonna come in people being empowered with the knowledge to help themselves. Right. We can't count on medical systems to do it for us to take care of us. We have to take care of ourselves in our loved ones, and shows, like yours, where people can come in. Learn about how their body functions in what they can do to help themselves are really, really important to people's outcomes in, so it's my honor and pleasure to be able to join you on your show in, in program in talk a little bit about that knowledge. And again, like you said, I'm on a mission in that might might focus is educating the doctors and practitioners. And that's why I go to as many conferences as ago too. You know, I take any kind of speaking opportunity, I can physically muster myself to get to among all the other ones, because this kind of information is so important. So thank you for having me on a really appreciate the opportunity. Man, I am continually blown away at how important gut health is to overall health and healing. And I could you this is an era. You really haven't taken care of in terms of your journey your lime journey back to health. If you're struggling, even with dealing with the antibiotics, or killing off the bugs, whatever you may be dealing with in terms of infections or you kind of past that stage and you're not a hundred percent healthier. You have to look at your gut health. You have to have to have to. It's a critical piece of your healing from Lyme disease and the after-effects of the modern scourge that we're dealing with. All right. If you like what we're doing here at Lyman into radio hit the subscribe button, so you won't miss an episode. And if you really like what we're doing. Leave us review on your podcast app. It helps us reach more people just like you. You. And if you really, really like what we're doing here at Lyman into radio, share this podcast with friend. You just might save their life as always. If you have any feedbacks suggestions for a guest really anything at all just send an Email to feedback at alignment, and injure radio dot com. And as you all know. This podcast would not be complete unless we left you with the lime ninja fact of the day. Did you know a ninja can pour pancake, so thin it only has one side. Injure radios purely public broadcast and is not intended to be personalized medical bites her any individuals specific situation each individual, his smuggle, situations, unique and Limy radio should not be relied upon Endro considered as personalized medical advice on into radio's, not licensed render medical and should be considered simply the public opinion of lime ninja radio and its guests recommendations on specific treatment options are not intended to address any listeners particular medical situation, as always contact your physician before considering any new treatment.

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Our Road to November series on the U.S. election stops in Iowa

The Current

22:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Our Road to November series on the U.S. election stops in Iowa

"Flood lines is a podcast series from the Atlantic about Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. It follows the lives of four people who lived through the flooding and its aftermath and shows how government failures and misinformation led to tragedies far beyond what the hurricane cost host van newkirk shows, what we can learn today from that disaster fifteen years ago you can listen to flood lines wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. Together, we will make America Great. Again. Vote by mail those early but you don't hear the talking about Kobe I say hundreds of thousands of lives only thing you can tear America part is America. and. We cannot make that happen. The US election campaign is in full swing in thirty nine days. Americans will head to the polls and so here at the current, we have gassed up our radio RV stocked up on snacks and we're hitting the open road started in. Minnesota on route to Louisiana following the mighty Mississippi River our series road to November and along the way we're speaking with. Americans about what this election means to them. Last week we were in Wisconsin we have now taken the I ninety four down to highway sixty one crossed over the river and we're pulling into dewitt Iowa. Dan snicker is the chairman of the Clinton County Republicans. He also runs a sheep farm. He taught high, school, Agriculture for thirty nine years Dan good. Morning. Good morning and how are you? I'm well, thanks tell me how you're doing in the midst of this pandemic, your in the midst of. A lot of change in your part of the country. How do you see Donald Trump helping farmers like yourself in Iowa? Donald Trump is very aware of the situation on the farm, which is a lot different than most people other than a mid western politician. trump is entrepreneur he understands of production agriculture, which is entrepreneurial. and he understands when you fact foreign trade, you take away part of our markets. What did you make of him when he entered the Republican race five years ago? Nobody really knew what to make for sure two things happened I think that drew a lot of people donald trump number one he's not a trained politician number two he's not from Washington DC A lot of people in the centre part of the country do not really believe or trust a lot of the politicians from the coast because we've heard all kinds of promises and things said, and we see very little if any results we kinda voted for Donald Trump on a hope and a prayer Let's give him a nice. And see what he can do nobody ever dreamed. It would come up with a novel idea of actually doing what he promised. And here's solidified his base in the centre part of this country because he's actually doing what he said he would do you say that he solidified his base if you talked to two people in Clinton County, what do they tell you about about trump and how they're feeling about him for years in okay. We're supposed to be a Democratic County and trump on this county by twelve hundred volts. Okay rate now unless something drastic enforcing changes I think he's GonNa win this county by more. It's really interesting because last time around, I, think a lot of people dismissed Donald Trump's of winning and you're suggesting that that. From what you're seeing people are doing that again at their peril. All Yeah. I mean. I don't know how to turn this. So I'll just term it The opposition party has a and I'M NOT GONNA say to campaign, but there is a number of activities going around to try to steal our campaign, signed each out of our yards and fence rows. we've had a a huge number of signs taken burned destroyed and to me that tells me that the the opposition is worried to death. At least in this area If you have a strong candidate, you promote your candidate. If you don't have a strong candidate, you do something to less than the other candidates. Are. You put off at all by people call him divisive and that he pits people against each other that he has people believe said some racist things some sexist things are you are you put off by that at all? Well, these in the eye of the beholder. We just don't believe he he's sexist or racist or homophobic or. You know he he's basically telling the truth and he's not trying to hurt people's feelings, but he's telling the truth as he sees it. We were talking about the pandemic and and and what this has meant for the economy two, hundred, thousand Americans have died and and there are. Recordings of the president earlier this year understanding how serious covid nineteen was. But then he was telling people that this was just like a flu and it would go away. What do you say to people who point to his failures when it comes to containing the pandemic that we're in right now do you see his responses as a failure failure and maybe success I mean yeah we've had about two hundred, thousand people die from Colbert nineteen or or less for like this one they died they possess the virus. obviously that was A. Characteristic condition that help their demise. In most cases, they also had underlying causes. Maybe you know we started off saying we're going to have three million deaths with this thing. Or Two, hundred thousand. Now. If you start off with the premises of having three million dowse and we up to two hundred thousand is the president successful. Despite the fact that two hundred thousand people have died. One hundred thousand people have died in every one of those. Why is precious? and. It's extremely regrettable. But like I said, maybe the president save two million, eight, hundred, thousand people to Dan it's good to talk to you. I appreciate your time this morning. Thank you so much. Well thank you you have a good day. Dense maker is the chairman of the Clinton County Republicans. He runs a sheep farm. He was in Iowa we pull back onto the highway from dewitt and away from dance farm we had Iowa City home of the University of Iowa, where in any other year he would hear this. I O w a the University of Iowa as part of the big ten athletics league. There are lots of different sports involve the Crown Jewel is football big ten football season was called off at first because of covid. But then just recently the league championship, it's mind and the first Games are actually set to start next month Jim Renault's Family has owned the airliner restaurant. And Bar since nineteen forty four sits in an old brick building right across the street from campus. Over the decades, it has been a fan favourite come game day Jim satis down in his booth number seventy two. There's no problem snagging it though there are just a couple of customers grabbing a bite and Germany says, that is a big change typically the airliner any other year. There'd be college kids coming in and leaving back and forth there might be some Krugman events for the Greek system whether it's sororities or fraternities that were going on in this building or other university organizations there might be. One or two classes that stop in professors. Unfortunately. The volume in the building is down due to this Kobe Concerns. The football season is like Christmas for us. It. It makes or breaks your whole year. Before the pandemic, the airliner football. Friday night we pack this room in and we start moving tables around. Everybody gets squeezed in elbow-to-elbow people that never met each other. You know we've got tables and you might see a table here in table here and there's no. Time, we'll be eligible to oboe, and then the beer band will come in and they'll stand on top of the bar stand on the table sustained on the chairs, and they'll really get this really going good music and they'll play the fights. Off. Becky merchantable two more weeks and we're going to be up and running two more weeks figure out by maybe we'll figure it out. And that didn't happen and I thought. Okay we're GONNA have a slow summer. and. That got we're going to be up and running August the students all come back and then when they started to postpone a delay. I started give real worried over the last six months since the pandemic started our revenues been down about ninety percent. We've been closed three out of the last six months. This has been the hardest to try to figure out how to WANNA, business sensibly. In some very, extremely. pleased. That the football season, he's looking like they're going to have some games. And anything anything's better than zero. It's the difference between losing a lot of money and potentially at this point maybe eighteen even and breaking evens a big win. In this environment. Jim Manella owns the airliner restaurant and bar. Throughout the nineteen eighties a strange phenomenon sweeping sweeping north. America. They were in a panic and like people in a panic, they want solutions, allegations of underground satanic cults torturing and terrorizing children. The thing is. There were no satanic cults preying on children and nearly thirty years later, the people touched by it. All are still picking up the pieces. Isn't a work of fiction. This is a work of history. Satanic panic. The latest CBC I'm cover. Available Now Hi. I'm Dr Brian. Goldman haven't heard my new podcast the dose. This is the perfect time to subscribe each week. We answer your most pressing health related questions right now we know you're grappling with covid nineteen on the dose we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own get the latest evidence in a way that's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose. It's your guide to getting through this difficult time you can find the dose wherever you get your podcast. Joining me now are Lynn and Greg Morris Lynn. Works for the visiting Nurse Association of Johnson. County Greg is the equipment manager for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes football team good morning to you both. Good Morning Greg. How big is football in your town? Football football drives a cadillac. There's no doubt about it. and. In the thing that football does in our community, it brings people together from all over and put smiles on their faces in probably the most. Troubling may not be a fair word but. For people not to be able to gather and get together and smile. Our world needs at right now. Terrible. I was just GonNa say I mean, what does it mean then given how important it is just for the morale of the city in the midst of a pandemic to have football coming back. Well it. It'll help because although as right now the big ten, it's not GonNa fans in the stands. People will still be able to gather. I, mean whether it's downtown I was city at local restaurants and bars I'm sure they'll be killed gate events around the stadium might not necessarily you were property but people people get together and gather and smile. So that's not all bad lynn, how are you feeling about football getting back going just like Greg said people will be able to gather and enjoy chuck again and has the same. You know it'll feel a little bit normal, which will feel really good. You work in healthcare and you had covert yourself. Yes I did how you doing I am doing very well. Thank you. Do you worry that I mean? Greg was talking about the idea of they'll be tailgates and stuff like that. Do you worry that having these games than having something for people to rally around good for the spirit but that that could you know raise the risk of the virus spreading again of course, of course, I do worry about that and I just have pure faith that people will be smart and they. You know when we talk about rally and we're not talking about shoulder to shoulder interaction to talking about being people people being respectful to their distancing and just it'll how they gather will change but being together is important. Hearing some of the commentary around this. There are some people who are suggesting that. This is about the money that football makes for college is more than than keeping people safe when you hear that Lynn, how do you react? I don't know how to explain this. I have a husband who works in the program I have. Both of our boys did play football So I have passion and a love for the game and the healthcare provider. I also. Hope people are smart an us the information that they have to maintain their safety, and by that I mean the testing of the players, the test enough to staffs and making sure that everybody does the best that they can to prevent it from. Spreading I. Wish there was a way to say that it was gonna be gone and this wouldn't happen, but we're not there yet. So. It's a kind of struggle with that. How do you feel about the way that politicians both at the state and the national level have dealt with this pandemic Lynn? I will be very honest having had the virus and having been very sick. I, just read my journal the other day after I invited to participate in this. I do not engage in a lot of the news because I have been through it and I think that. There is so much misunderstanding of what it feels like when you go through it and it's a personal thing and everybody has a personal the action to politicize it. Not Quite the way viruses and diseases should be treated in my opinion. What did it feel like you wrote about this in your journal if you don't mind me asking, what did it feel like when you were really sick? I felt like I had to how do I say this? I had to come to terms with my life and whether or not I would be alive the next morning for my children and my husband. To think about how I live my life making decisions I believe they came out of it a much stronger person understanding. How important? Every day is. Given what's gone on in your own life? You see this happening across the country there are real pushbacks to peop- to People's restrictions on their daily lives, and we saw this earlier in the pandemic where people push back against the lockdowns. You now have the issue of masks being this this political flash point what do you make of that Lynn? I believe that masks will prevent the spread of virus I. also believe that everybody has their own right to make a decision as to what they want to do and if you choose not to. Make. Healthy. Choices. There are consequences for it, and as long as you are educated than you're making an educated decision that is you're right in. That is your choice. Greg we heard from Dan. Earlier and he was talking about wh what the appeal was for Donald Trump to him and you voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen. What was it about what trump was saying back then that spoke to you. My big deal then was I just didn't Wanna I wanted something different. That was all eight non-politician. What was it about politicians? I, mean again, Dan talked a bit about what was it about politicians traditional politicians they kept you right. I think at the end of the day it's trust. It's easy to look somebody United States. We're going to help you and do it I. Think it's another thing they try and get it done i. was my hopes were it would be refreshing and change. It wouldn't be maybe so decisive like it is now Republican Democrat good and bad right and wrong I I think that part of our country is really sad. How do you feel four years into it? How do you feel that it's worked out I? Don't know that I have an opinion of that yet know one day I feel good about the other day I kinda scratch my head. I I don't know I it maybe confusion might be the best best word for me right now it's still upon. We the people. To make this country. Good. To help each other. I don't know that a politician any politician. Can really if you get right down to it, can can make all the appropriate changes you know stand on all their promises unless we the people want to understand the good and bad right and wrong would you vote for him again or will you vote for him again if you? I'm undecided right now. Okay. simply because I wanNA wait another month and see what both candidates have to say coming down to the end. I, probably won't make my mind until I walk into the voting booth. What about for you then you voted for Hillary Clinton for years ago. What are you thinking now I will not vote for Donald Trump. and. So that will that be Joe? Biden or? You, what are you thinking? There's always the option to write in I'm the only thing I can say for sure as I will not vote for Donald Trump. One of the neat things in this little virtual trip that we're doing through parts of the United, states on the way to the election is that we're hearing kind of what's at stake and we heard a little bit of that from Dan in terms of. Where the country is. In this moment, but also where it could go all, ask you both this I mean Lynn. What's at stake? What do you when you think of a casting her ballot on the third of November? What are you hoping for? I hope her good. I. Think Greg and I did not agree on who voted try and twenty sixteen but we agree on the goodness of people the country unifying the. Communities not being so politically divided and the longer people doing things that are right and doing things that are good because that's the correct thing to do becoming a country that. I'm not going to be your friend because we're politically we don't agree I would like to see this country become united where people do things because it is the right thing to do greg same question to you. What are you hoping for when when you go to Casper Ballad given where your country is right now? You I take a quick little interesting story in our community. Right now we're we have a pretty good fire department. and we're in the process of raising about four million dollars for new firehouse. And what what this process has done for our fire department is brought us a lot closer. both as members in his family's. And I I I look at that and hope that that is the model of what our country can get back to helping each other caring for each other that to me the election is, is about some of that and whether it's it's somebody at the local level, the state level or the national level who you choose to vote for. I hope. that. That people have that in mind we need to get back to helping each other caring for each other, not the the big dogs in the fight filling their pockets, but maybe all of us helping each other so we all can benefit. Maybe. That's the goal. Big Football. We're we'RE NOT GONNA put seventy thousand people on Stanza. Kennedy. But maybe by having big can football we might put if we might bring a few people together and let's hope my hope is that our election does that When people get closer to that date November realized that you know maybe we are a little runamuck here whether it's Republican or Democrat or independent or whatever. But let's check all that at the door and let's all look at each other and think about those three simple words we the people. It's a real pleasure to talk to you. Both your optimism is is quite something in this moment and I really appreciate you taking time to talk to US I. Wish you the best of health as well. Thank you. It's it's good to speak with you both. Thanks. To speak with you guys, we appreciate the opportunity come city sometimes, I, would love to I want. I want to be in that stand with seventy thousand football. What it'll be the experience of a lifetime and we all need some of those. I'll be knocking on your door Great to talk to you both. Thank you. Thank you. Have a good day bye-bye Greg. Morris's equipment manager for the University of Iowa Hawkeyes football. Program Lynn Morris. Works. For the visiting Nurse Association of Johnson, county, that is it for us in Iowa. Next week, we're hauling this old but for comfortable radio RV across the Mississippi River into Illinois, you can catch up on all our pass stops at our website CBC dot ca slash current, and that is where you will also find out how to get in touch with us. For more CBC PODCASTS, go to. CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Greg Morris Lynn football Donald Trump Dan it Iowa Clinton County United States America Mississippi River University of Iowa Hawkeyes president chairman Nurse Association of Johnson dewitt Hurricane Katrina Wisconsin New Orleans University of Iowa Lynn Morris
Conference replay: How to create a content performance culture

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

35:10 min | 5 months ago

Conference replay: How to create a content performance culture

"The business storytellers. Thanks for joining me. This is a replay of my content performance culture hog that. I've given the number of summits recently. I'm basically it's the audio version but I'm just talking. There's no our point. There's really no visuals. Hopefully you will enjoy this special episode of the business storytelling podcast. If you have not subscribe please do so on any other podcast channels and I hope you check my blog is will storytelling that netted. Let's dive in how we can create content performance culture. Hey everyone it's Christoph trap thanks joining me My pleasure to be part of this summit and I want to talk about how to create that content performance culture and I care about that topic so much just finished my third book. Two hundred twenty thousand pages of how do you actually create that content performance culture? What's the content performance culture to get started? The biggest thing to remember is when I started in journalism. There was no such thing. I keep joking that back in the day people would say to me. Kristoff how many people read your article and I would say eighty three thousand. And how would I know that? Eighty three thousand. Read it simple enough. That was the subscriber number eighty. Three thousand people got the print newspaper so certainly they all read my article. Why wouldn't they right because they got the paper? That's kind of what you do with it. Of course today we can measure everything and everything should have goals and even when we don't write them down unfortunately people do expect performance of fortunately unfortunately I guess At sometimes the problem is that we're not very clear on what the goal actually is. They just exist in somebody's head. We didn't write them down. We didn't have a strategy but then when the time comes where we look at the success of a campaign. People are still looking at what they thought. The goal was so really super important to to kind of follow the framework of a content performance culture to be successful. So there's a number of pillars that. I recommend that you focused in the first one is that you have to embrace that there is a performance culture in. Here's what that means. You actually have to look at the numbers and you know we talk about dashboards. Put up a dashboard. There's so many different ways to put up a dashboard today. Google studio other tools. That can tell you how your content is performing especially on the channels that you care most about so if you're mostly on social media make that your top priority if you're focusing on the website make that your priority. If you're focusing on something else figure out what the best way is to measure your goals. It's it's really that simple in theory but you have to embrace and you have to make sure the goals are in front of you so you probably see that with a lot of companies. Now when you go into their offices they have DASHBOARDS UP. And you can actually see goals on those dashboards. So whatever the goal is anybody that walks in there and can't see them and I find that a fantastic way to do it because if you don't look at your goals if you don't see them if you don't know what the progresses how do you know that you're accomplishing anything. How do you know you're on track? How do you know that you're trying? So but the thing is you have to tie to your goal so if you call is not to reach a certain number of audience members or to saturate the market to a certain extent. How do you know what to go after the joke about this sometimes is I was a football player had a scholarship to play at the University of Iowa Lineman so wait a lot because Lyon eat and they're expected to be big and basically when I was done playing football I lost one hundred forty pounds and the reason that's important bring up to lose weight? That's one strategy to to gain muscle. That's another strategy right. So if I WANNA get more buff I should lift. If I WANNA lose weight I should run and eat less so just something to think about that. This also applies in a content performance culture. Set Your goals and then go after them and you have to embrace that. You're actually wanting to do that. The other thing is anecdotes. Sometimes they do help so for example. Let's say you're talking and interviewing an expert in your company and you share their story and all of a sudden you can't measure whether or not people actually if it worked right if they take it off line for example let's say they take it off. Line there read the article. They call but they didn't use the phone number that you're using for tracking and you can't measure it but the anecdote from that expert telling you that it seemed like the campaign worked that also matters but the but the end of the day we have to be sure to measure what we're going after and then we have to look at that so those are some of the strategies to do that the second pillar is innovation by all. And you know. Here's the thing. There's a lot of barriers to overcome for true innovation. I mean the latest. I just talked to Michael Brenner. The other day. He's the author of mean people suck and I asked him Michael. Why do we even need this book? Nobody disagrees with that statement and he said the era of smart jerks needs to be over. And that's a very good point right because it used to be bosses could be jerks and bosses. Basically this is how you do it and it's okay to have leaders hold you accountable but innovation happens from everybody and so it's really important that you know leaders and really anybody who comes forward with the project talk about the goal. What are we trying to accomplish? And then the team can innovate together and that also includes like blessing right so if somebody says hey we wanNA reach this audience. How do we do that? Don't come to everybody with all the answers. Come to them with the problem. We're trying to solve and then give people a chance to innovate. That doesn't mean everybody has to love every idea you ever present. But you do want to make sure that you think about How do we innovate as a team? And how do you? Innovate on a personal level. All right the next pillar is next. Play mentality and so that certainly is a term that came from playing football and for over a decade or roughly a decade and neck. So what happens? Sports teams run a play. Something good happens or something. Bad happens doesn't really make any difference. What happens they have to run another play right so we want that same mentality when it comes to content marketing when it comes to count in creation social media strategy all those sub sections of digital marketing and inbound marketing? We want to talk about. What's the next play? Run the next play. That campaign didn't work run another play. Run another campaign. Try something else so I was asked that question recently. What would you do if a client says we We to do this and you disagree with that that we should do that. And the traditional answer is argue and talk about it and try to get them to change their mind and some people argue that you wanNA compromise. I don't think compromises necessarily a good way to digital strategy but really what I would recommend is okay if you think that's a good idea. Let's get it in a close to perfect shape and you know done. Most of the time is better than perfect. Plus perfect is really impossible to achieve user experience. Of course but then what you do. Is You test their idea for a week or two weeks or whatever you agree on right. Don't just shut it down but try it. And that's the beauty of digital marketing today. We don't just run a campaign and that's it running campaign test test test test test if it didn't work run another campaign run another campaign and you know they build on each other of course but that is the next. Play mentality if you don't have to be stuck in in only one answer you know. Be Stuck in trying to keep going for that goal. And that's what's interesting when we talk about automation right. We'll talk about that a little bit later here that you can automate. Thanks but you still hold to oversee you still have to think about the strategy the next pillar that is really really important. Is the right players in the right seats. And I hate to say it guys but this is like not. Everybody is good at everything. And you have to have a well rounded team What do well rounded teams have What do they do? They Complement Each Other. And they're also complement each other because they love each other's success. They work together. They they grow together they build things together so keep that in. Mind that you need to have the right players in the right seats just because somebody worked out in that same seat. Ten years ago doesn't mean they will work out today Right and things have changed so just something to think about. You need the right players. Who are the right players? Typically most teams I would say need content creators somebody that creates the content. Whatever that might look like a probably that means you need to have some people who can write You know everything comes back writing. I mean even I made notes right for for this It's not a script. I'm not reading a script but it's still written out and in all honesty The the sections really just chapters from the book. So I'm talking about what I also purpose in the book and now I'm repurposing again. Good teams do that. They re purpose content they throw content parade and they use it everywhere. So counting creators. We definitely need them. They should be able to write whether it's for video whether it's for podcasts. Whether it's for articles of the other thing when it comes to canton creation I you know I probably publish a blog post day but a thousand words or so. I'm not saying you need to do that. But I currently do that. Because of the strategy implementing and I write very few of them and by writing what I mean right. I have my keyboard and I'm writing on my keyboard. That's not how I do it. I most of the time voice dictate them so I'm standing here and I have my iphone and voice dictating directly into the wordpress APP. And then the wordpress APP will transcribe it. That works well most of the time. Sometimes you have to go in and updated but think about the different ways you can produce content and the different ways you can create content. We'll talk about video a little bit more here and also podcasting but there's other ways to create content. I mean so today to to do some of those things. As long as you're a good storyteller you still have to create a story line and you still have to be willing to try new things. Then the strategies or syndication specialists and this is important. Because I've seen teams that create average content racket when they have rockstar syndication strategists right. Because they do such a good job getting it in front of people that at the end of the day the average content worked because they were in front of a lot of people so enough people is a numbers game unfortunately but enough people saw it and enough people clicked now. That doesn't mean we shouldn't go after better content rockstar content. But when that happens it's just an indicator that you need somebody on the team who's really good with syndication. Of course you can't totally break that out further to also you know you can have email marketing strategies you can have social media specialists you can have SEO specialists you can have all these different things. Some teams. Don't have that kind of budget to to have all those different areas. But you need to have somebody who is good at that who is good at writing. Subject lines who is good setting cadences on email? Who's good at distributing it on social? Seo I've seen more and more writers you know take on the Seo task as well and but definitely email is a fantastic syndication tool also remarketing. Right people come to your site. How do you come back? You hit them up with some good content. That's that's worth consuming So definitely need somebody like that. The other role that I would highly recommend for the right people in the right seat pillar is to have analysts. And this really hit me over the last year I was speaking at a conference in San Diego and I said who your team not send you. Anaheim. California who on your team should be the digital analyst and there's all these answers flying around but when I turned that story that question around and ask who on your team should be the writer everybody says the writer right so because that's not a new thing. Everybody knows what writer is but we do need somebody in the digital analysts rope. Who is not everything else digital analysis and it's also setting up and tracking goals is actually a relatively advanced skillset of and also. Sometimes you know I've had some discussions with analysts about when things can't be measured so the analysts would say that Exa can't be measured. What's your goal? What are you trying to measure? And based on that collaborative discussion you can then figure out how to measure it but it is important to have those roles now sometimes can play multiple roles right and fill multiple of those needs. But but I think it would be hard to think that one person can be good at everything so the digital analyst role also goes into the final pillar of that I want to mention is on going evaluation and I am still amazed how often this doesn't happen and ongoing evaluation. Is We look at the numbers so you know. We talked about having a dashboard up looking at the dashboard knowing. What's working knowing what's not working and every once in awhile people have said well. Why are we report like so? Let's say you have a print and digital right so I just talked with Joe Patsy on my business storytelling podcast. We've record a and Jost theory is that they will be more brand print magazines coming out and I think he might be onto something. So basically brands produced these magazines. They ship them to people every quarter or whatever it might be and then they used them as lead generation and awareness campaigns right like just like e mail except that comes in print. And what's interesting about that is you can only measure that impact every quarter or every whatever however many times it comes out you know and then I might take a while because people don't read it the second you send it s still get there through the mail from the printer etc etc. But what's interesting is and digital. You can measure things all the time right in fact some of us have gotten addicted to check in. If something's working or it's now working the numbers going up not yet give me five more minutes there. Ten more minutes. You know that kind of thing but you do need the numbers and you need to look at them and you need to look at them daily and if we don't it's really really truly hard to make work but you know that's why the ongoing evaluation is harder and harder to do so. Let's dive into a few steps on how to create that content performance culture. One thing that we have to keep in mind as we WANNA come up with a plan and I know some people will say that's nothing new but so it's nothing new that why are there so many companies out there that don't have a plane. I look at teams. They're like Oh we have a plan. Here's what we're trying to do okay. Is it written down really recommend writing it down? This is a goal. This is what we're trying to do. And here's how we're going to do it and even if it's just one page and that even if you update what you're currently working on the goals can change and they should change because it's a dynamic environment but once you have that in place The only way truly to win through content is you have to publish content. Now the question is how often and that all depends so I was talking to Andy Christie. Who's one of the the fellow instructors here on this summit and you know? He said to me. He publishes something in-depth weeks and basically his company can't be hired to do website design. And so how often do people need new websites every three to five years and one? They decided that they needed to website. How long is the buying decision? The decision cycle about two months so if he publishes every two weeks he can tap a mind most of the time when people need help he can't be top of mind at least four times right or at least two times and four times if the timing works out so for him that's fine for me currently authentic storytelling that got a little bit different goal. I'm trying new things. I'm testing new things. I'm a marketing really marketing myself. So I'm doing podcasts. Daily doing blog post daily. And that's kind of my strategy for the time being. That doesn't mean everybody has to do that. Daily but think about what is the Cadence you should be on. Probably should be more than once a month in my opinion. Probably should be more than once every quarter. You know if you really go in depth and you really hit that nail of an important topic that people care about you might be okay going less I do. I have seen content campaigns where people create less content. But it's so in depth and it's really hitting a pain point and they do a fantastic job with syndication. Sometimes it works but you know all the studies I've seen from and others is frequency and quality. And all those things do help with. Seo So just something to think about doesn't mean we have to do daily but we have to do it and then get on a schedule and do share that content and keep measuring things and building on each other. Let's talk about podcasting so I'm a writer by Trade Emma journalist by training. I guess and when I grew up everything was writing. You know like this. You write an article like there was nothing else and now we have podcasting and podcasting is really taken off and from what? I'm seeing more and more people half podcast. They're fairly easy to produce. I'll talk about that live. And then how do you tied in to your overall create once publish everywhere cope strategy that Cope Strategy? Which I'm sure many of you are familiar with. So basically what I do. Is I set up to podcasts? One is the content performance cultural book podcasts. And this is an idea. I got from Joe. Poets see he. He put out a novel. And it's only being released as a podcast so I thought hey I have the book right. I got the print book but I also want to distributed as podcast so literally wind chapter by Chapter and there's about twenty four chapters roughly and there's GonNa be two bonus chapters that all have their own episodes and they're being released. There's still currently being released through about middle and marge tool week and so people can listen to them. So I set that up because I want to maximize building that audience and then you know driving awareness of the brand of the concept of You know helping people to be more successful drive performance through content and then I have the business storytelling podcast and what I do on. There sometimes is just me talking like now. I'm just talking sharing my own knowledge and thoughts and opinions to extend keep that in mind. Somethings they work today. But they don't work tomorrow or you might find another way of or doesn't apply exactly to your situation so that does happen but I got the business storytelling podcasts. I do talk on their myself and I also have guests already mentioned some Indian Joe and Michael Brenner and others. And the way you record it is so simple today. Let me just open it up here quickly on so I have my phone and I got the anchor APP and this is not sponsored honestly but I got the anchor APP and log and it's so easy I mean you literally just invite friends to the sun is kind of in the way you there and you invite friends to record as long as they have the APP super easy for them to just hop on you can record it. And then when you're done you trim it and then you put it on you get it scheduled for publication and it goes live now what. I do a lot of times. Is I take podcasts. Once they get published. Sometimes I'd do at the same time but not always I take that content and I also write an article for authentic storytelling dot net. So that's cope strategy right. You have a piece of content. What are the other channels that you can share a two and you know a podcast is a great way to do that? Especially for your guests. Let's say you invite expert from your company on the show and if you're at the same location you can literally talk to you. Talk to the phone. Hand the phone back and forth. I wouldn't handbag. I would appointed like this and just for the record. The microphone on an iphone is down here right at the bottom of the phone now at the top so use the might use the iphone almost like a microphone like that. That's what I would do. Make sure you can see that. It's recording so. When the screen goes dead can click it really quickly but then I use that as another way to get more content out there and get ahead of the schedule. You know a thirty minute conversation. You can easily right. Twelve hundred word article from that no problem at all. Do it all the time and you know that's one way to do that. The other one. So I use anchor for that And really just talk like like you. Having a conversation I do edit. I do music I do sometimes so every once in awhile I will lose connection with somebody so I have multiple clips at that point. I will add Like like commercial break. I guess you know. Check out my latest book Blah Blah Blah and. I could do that even if there wasn't a break in the recording Usually don't but you can do things like that. The biggest problem with anchor is if you have external guests and for some reason they they need to be given the opportunity to review the audio. That's currently not possible. They have to log into your account so just something to keep in mind but certainly you can record other ways but if you mobile only. I'm a mobile only creator that help the other tool that I wanted to mention really really briefly is artificial artificial virtual reality video and this is such a great way to also share stories that are visual so for example. If I'm just standing here right you don't need a vr video of me standing here in my office. Just this works just fine right but if it was a visual area you can now buy cameras that you can put a copy of phone. They're like bucks more expensive ones like two hundred dollars and you put him on here. You can walk around with those attachments and you can shoot your video and then people can actually watch them on their phone with a headset and they can look around the room. You know with their headset. So it's really cool to do that now. The Way to think about that is make sure. It is actually something visuals so the couple of examples that I've used before I was at a in a show room in Chicago and very very visual right. It's so you could see something. And then what it is I sean all these takes and then I interviewed some of the experts about what was going on and it was about Acoustics. Ride what was going on here. Why why was this looking like that? What's the student at Cetera et Cetera? And then I cut it together. Then we cut it together. I didn't do it. The editor did but You know so you can use that as a centerpiece for all your content creation. So you knew the video you do the podcast from just the audio you can write an article you can do social posts you can take it all these different places so those are some differentiator and the reason. I bring those. South is because different intiative happen when teams find new things to do right so for example. If I'm the only one in my market to VR video is a differentiator and of story life audio another one. I almost forgot about that one so a lot of times. What I do is I do live for life audio broadcasts record on my phone and I'm recording the video right now on my ipad. So that's my ipad and basically I do the life audio on my phone. I do the podcast recording on my ipad and then I can differentiate I have a podcast but I also did a live livestream in my life. Streams have a few hundred listeners. And there's very few companies and brands and people who are actually doing live audio broadcasts. People do live periscope. Facebook live those kind of things but life audio is relatively unused tactic. So when I do that it's a differentiator so think about. How do you use new technologies to stand out? I still remember. This is like a ten year old story now but ten years ago the United Way. We used augmented reality for print piece. And it's Kinda hard to explain today because today Auburn realities so much further along than it was back then but basically you had a print piece and then you held you phone over it right. We used to layer APP. You hold over it and now you can. It goes directly to video. War goes directly to a podcast. They'll we didn't have podcast back then. But you know what I mean. You can link to different things and have a multimedia experience and didn't didn't cost too much or really any extra cost to get that started at that time so think about. How can you share your content differently? How can you be? How can you help it different? She'd the last few Sections here I WANNA talk about getting in the weeds and you know I would highly recommend that all content leaders get in the weeds. Sometimes don't just work on the strategy but try it see if this works. It's really easy for me. I still remember this story. Really easy for me as an executive to say oh can just shoot video and pictures and interview people angle live and do this and this isn't like eight. Thanks content takes time so any leader of any team you know. Please go into the weeds. Try and and see how it works. See what's working. What's not working and also the members on the team try other tasks that doesn't mean you have to become an expert at everything. Nobody can be an expert at everything. But it's good to know okay. Why is this not working? Or How do you do that? Or how? Lona Zack? Actually take What's involved here so keep that in mind. Finally as the last topic I wanNA talk about automation fantastic content performance teams. They have and use automation to their advantage. And here's how that typically looks email marketing. If you're still putting together your emails by hand that is probably not the way to do it. In twenty twenty. There's ways to do it through a that. That happens automatically. You just say pull content from here and here and here. I had the chairman of Raza I o on the show not too long ago. The business storytelling podcast. That's one way to do it. Another way is I mean. You just have a simple. Rss Feed Right. That sends out things things you can also set up cadences so traditionally what would happen is People when they sign for your content they only get the latest condom but why waste all the other content why not send them previous content pieces so put them on a cadence. There's plenty of tools out there that you can use for that too. Do Social Media Lots of ways to automate social media as as you're probably aware so just something to think about the things you can automate automate them. If they're repetitive tasks. Why do you need to? Why do you need to do it? Manually some parts of automation are real also badly images for example. You know like I mean when I hear. People still have cheat sheets with image sizes. That's crazy just run a script or just have a make sure it's automatically resized to the right size image for whatever network you going after so content performance has never been harder and the first to admit it. I know it takes time. I know it takes work so hopefully these tips. At my five pillars of a content performance culture were helpful just as a quick review number. One you do have to embrace it. You want to write if you don't embrace it. You can't do it. I mean I cannot lose weight if I'm not embracing the weight loss journey and that's just a fact of life. Innovate I don't care. If you're the specialist. I don't care if you the intern. Everybody has a place to be innovative in their own. Regards and make sure that That you bring your ideas to the table. That doesn't mean your ideas have to be run all the time but I also would be worried. If only the bosses ideas ever move forward. We'll just something to keep in mind but push your ideas forward. You know be a vocal. But of course professional member of the team next play mentality You know run the next play. The next play is already over. There's another play just waiting Friday. You go home. It's the weekend the game is over. Monday's a new game. We need more place the right players It's okay to be in the wrong seat but then let's find the right seat and let's find the right makeup and finally we have to look at the ongoing performance and that's a nonstop thing happens all the time. So keep that in mind Good luck I hope you have a chance to create that content performance culture and get your content to do for you you wanted to do. I'm Christopher Trap Please connect with me on twitter. At Sea tramp authentic storytelling that net. And of course the author of content performance cultures. Good luck in reach out anytime. See tramp and G MAIL DOT COM. Enjoy the rest of the summit. Oh content from happening to performing. That's what everybody wants. Nowadays in content and content marketing and marketing and all those related fields check out of my new book content performance culture. The number one new release the public relations category on Amazon Dot Com. When it came out I hope you take a look. It's available as paperback kindle worldwide.

writer Joe Patsy football Michael Brenner Google analyst Christoph University of Iowa Anaheim California Amazon Chicago Facebook twitter Exa Jost
 Criminal Intentions

Cybersecurity Effectiveness Podcast

24:08 min | 7 months ago

Criminal Intentions

"Welcome to the cybersecurity effectiveness podcast sponsored by Barrington. The Barrett insecurity instrumentation platform is the only business platform for security. The helps you manage measure, improve and communicate security effectiveness. I'm your host Brian Koto, so we've got a really special yesterday joining me is Cindy Murphy? Welcome to the podcast Cindy. Thank you Brian. It's good to be here. I appreciate the ANDROID. Now, no thanks so much for coming on and you know I have a lot of things I'd like to get to, but before I. Do you have a really interesting background and If you could share sort of the path that you took that led you into cyber and you explain a little bit about what you're doing today I appreciate that sure so I started my career in law enforcement. Way Back when I was eighteen which has a lot of years ago now and. In the military as an MP in the army, and at that time, obviously in the mid eighties Computer crimes weren't so big thing but We were certainly starting to use computers. More and more functions in terms of law enforcement. after the military, I worked for the VA, as police officer for three years, and then moved to Madison Police. Department where I was a street cop, and I actually literally fell into doing digital forensics work. I was injured on league in a foot chase after. An armed robbery from a bank I leapt over offense after suspect thought I had successfully. cleared the fence, but had lacerated my hamstring on. The downward aw, and actually caught up to the guy got him under handcuffs tackled him to the ground up that island that order right, but and the responding officers who tend to back me up pointed out my injury to me, It was a long term recovery, and I. Am Not good when I'm bored so on light duty. I was assigned to help A detective John McCain he who was working on a case involving. Stolen signatures out of our state historical library, which were being sold on. A newsgroup via postings to bulletin boards. Our way back in. Probably two thousand. Nineteen Ninety, eight. That would just. Fight O net? That's a yeah. That's going back a little bit. On the other end of that investigation Was One Chrissy. Su who was working at Mit at the time and so I struck up a conversation with them and worked on that investigation, and it sparked my interest in computer. Crimes ended up going through national record. I'm centers side trainings back. Then basic data recovery houses was the first class and. it built on knowledge I had already learned from from my father. Who was scientists at the University of Iowa and so I grew up in server rooms and and Watching him, watch him calculate data and and at that time with punch cards, but I learned file systems on his knee at the age of six so I was pretty well prepared for her this sort of work early I worked with a on on that chase. went back on the street after eight months of light duty, and within three months, was in another foot chase with. Some graffiti artists and ended up blowing out my right knee in a ditch as part of that foot chase. Oh! Right back in surgery again and had some long her discussions with my family and decided to promote detective and. And try to do some things that were a little easier on my body and so the natural fit was to do forensics. We were getting more and more cases in that required that sort of knowledge and experience and so i. took all that on and. The rest is history. I worked for twenty five years at Mashpee seventeen and a half of them, doing digital forensics built out there. I digital forensics lab alum. And I. And? In the distort of SKIMP is scrimped and saved. And backed borrowed and stole what I could do. The John Needed to do because there were yet and and no precedence for it, so carved out that position and as part of A. Training, I got hooked up with the Sans Institute who was interested in some of the criminal cases I was working in terms of experience, and so I started doing some presentations on what we see in law enforcement at least at the state, local level and. Then from there, began teaching mobile device forensics for them. Help them to develop a course mobile device forensics. and then three years ago Just one year before retirement age, which would have been fifty I received offer from from go where they wanted to start a forensics. And after. In awesome after some soul searching, I moved over to the private sector and. And then you know we've just grown from there. I'm doing very different cases now than I was in law enforcement, and there is some overlap by but it says it's a very different career. law enforcement is very focused at least Since about two, thousand, six or seven or eight on mobile device forensics, because every bad jerry check every bag carries a cell phone. Her and in the private sector. That's not really so much the case so. So very different faces, but Growing I don't know we started with the two people we're now at. Thirteen, I believe maybe fourteen now. got to come on this week one coming on next week and And It's. It certainly Certainly a success story so far. Yeah well congratulations. That's always nice building building business like this. It is clearly successful. You're you're hiring. You're going in the right direction, so that's great to hear exactly. So, you know, I'm curious. You know someone that's been in this arena. Forensics for as long as she happened. Twenty years I I didn't WANNA say it. I DIDN'T WANNA. Say If. You had a headset. So you know, Co two decades in this space you know. What's maybe one of the most surprising aspects of digital forensics and incident response that you've seen and more to that point you know how those two things differ forensics in response from your perspective so? When I was in law enforcement, I didn't do a whole lot in the incident. Response Space AH CIPHERS of some insider threat investigations, and some data, theft, exultation or two cases incident response. And forensics are are very tied together but incident response is a little more fluid and there are a few less hard and fast rules in terms of getting the work done. That needs to be done to to secure the network that's been affected and to and follow the trail of that bad guy. and we want in a first and foremost to to change nothing to keep everything static and in incident. Response s not really. Really possible you're in an active network. You can't shut everything down and yet you still need to identify where that compromise happened and and get to the bottom of the cause secure things, and and helped that organization did back up and going and so part of incident responses, documenting all those changes and then once those changes have happened. You know making making sure you get good evidence to work from for the forensics and that investigation, so it's. The, two are are definitely different, but they are intertwined. Here killer! We were As as a team, and there are pupil who are more focused in that incident response at arena, but everybody handles a little bit of both and we we No engage in a lot of teamwork on on both sides. Of biggest surprises I think I mean when I. When we started working in the ransomware arena, and and really almost immediately, this became one of the one of our main focuses because so many small to medium size organizations are hit with ransomware or mafia, three sixty five breach and they need help, but they can't afford. The big guys necessarily so so a so if they if they've got insurance or they or they don't have insurance. They're still going to have to deal with the problem in in some way, and at first I was really bothered by these ransomware cases because. We were in Beijing with ransom irs and of course I was coming from law enforcement where I automatically thought of them as absolute criminals, and I quickly came to figure out though that a lot of these guys and I'm not talking about the nation state actors talking more about the less professional ransom ours, our work nine to five jobs for somebody else, and they think they're doing of security. Job and so I think there's this cultural divide across which sort of weird the right side up world, or maybe they think they are, and there's this alternate shadow word world at the other end where we think of each other as As the bad guys. By a many of them think they're providing security service, and that the the ransom they're charging is. For payment of those services and And they honestly believe that. I was very surprised when. When we were. Getting answers back like hey, you know. Just ransom to Church, oh well. We Love God to so. We'll. Will reduce the voice of that ransom. A. Was Really surprised. At the the the sort of cultural divide. That exists there and it's a lot gray than good guys versus bad guys which is which is how I always thought of it. It's it's still an intractable problem But there I guess it's. It's surprised me that that black and white response can't work because of the problem that encryption is and we. There are businesses who don't have a choice. They either pay that ransom or they closed their doors, and their employees don't have a place to come to work and and no paycheck so it's I it. It really is a hard heart problem. Yeah and I've worked with a number of organizations overseas especially what we consider a facet of critical structure that pay and they pay regularly. They don't have the ability to fix up. Yes, and there's a whole insurance industry that's built up around the risk from both ransomware cases in from And from the the office refit, sixty five or email breaches and in as those attacks have gotten more and more sophisticated and Nastier. I would not want to be then insurance business. You know we look at these attacks. Against the managed service providers where they take one zero Dave honorability, or and you know a little known vulnerability, and are able to breach the the a managed service provider, and then hit you know. Thousands of downstream customers without any wrongdoing on the downstream customers are rightly. There's no they. They didn't have their open. There are pe- open. They didn't. They didn't do anything wrong. and And they're victimized anyway. and I don't think anybody ever anticipated in the insurance industry, having to deal with the level of those cases that we've seen in the first and second quarters of of this year, so it some and they're definitely becoming even a bigger problem. Yeah and certainly government involvement as well so when we look at things like GDP are as irs, relating to cyber attacks and data breaches, and these are surfacing more often as issues of. What's your perspective on the approach, cybersecurity legislation should play in this and you know. How do you think government should pursue this? Yeah, I think that that my view of this is that that coming from a local law enforcement standpoint where I used to have this black and white thinking. We would always try not to blame the victim and here we are with black and white thinking in in. Outside of law enforcement and were blaming victims and finding them and taking the few resources, they may have to put into improving their networks, updating their their hardware and their security posture. I'm in terms of of people power in terms of equipments and software, and after their hit with something like this we throw on top of that. You know this the huge monetary fines. I don't think that's really gonNA. Help to resolve this problem in the future, so I I don't necessarily agree with the approach agree with the goal which is to to make people understand how important it is to take security seriously. but there are probably better ways that we can get that that message out I come from a community policing background Madison. We need to teach people in general about these risks, because oftentimes until they're hit by them, They're not even aware that they're out there or if they've heard about it, it's always on the sort of thing that happens to somebody else who wasn't being careful and there just isn't enough information out there, and of case studies, enough presentations enough community awareness about the nature of these problems, and why it's important to invest in the people and you'll notice I'm saying that people. To do this work are. Not, only keeping network secure, but But doing investigative work after the fact. Yeah, so let let's consider the the business leader, the non security nontechnical business leader that's from his teams. Look, you know we've got cyber security handled. We've got information security. You know technology in place we've got. It teams to conduct you know some red teaming and look for vulnerabilities and do patching and this this this and check these boxes and then these business leaders I mean they're probably walking away, thinking okay, we're we're doing. We're doing the right things. We're doing enough know what's what's the right approach to this? What's the right approach that you know? What should business leaders be thinking about? What questions should they be asking? Oh. I think they need to be digging beyond. Beyond, the the simple answers here because. It's very easy to come through report and say hey. We've deployed this tool and this tool and they're keeping our network safe but there is no perfect security and and when it comes down to it, we need. SMART and flexible responsive human brains to look at. The data sets that are out there and decide whether there's a new threat that were that were not protected against and. We end up walking around WACK and one problem on the head, and and then the next problem on the ED and applying a tool for this, and that and we have this Patrick Quilts or whack a mole game going on to try to to cover every threat and I would say that to the business later that that's just not a sustainable way to to handle this problem. They again needs to be investing in In their security, people and they need to be Beijing that into their organizations From every employee up and if that means Saying to people, hey you clicking on that email, or not getting that email mix the difference potentially between us. act. Close our doors right like this is not. This is not a minor decision. Every time you open, investment, and and also. Things like around killer. If we have employees, come to us and say hey I got this phishing email and here's how I caught, or here's what I I think. It's phishing email We actually reward the so the they'll get. It a a small bonus for every at every time They they catch that sort of thing and then it becomes. A more positive gain, not A. You know you're. GonNa get in trouble if you do it, but a hey, here's the here's the potential impact and the here's. Here's the reward. If you you know, there's a there's a bit of carrot for your for catching that before but for attacks, network a I think. Keeping in mind that there is no perfect security, and there's no There's no one person or one piece of software that's going to solve this problem that it's everybody's responsibility You know if you see something, say something it's. It's sort of a criminal to that right where we look around and if there's a problem it's. If we let all of our employees have ownership of keeping US safe We're going to be in much better shape. Absolutely absolutely well stated. So you know. You you've been doing this for a couple decades. What's what's the next ten years of our industry haven't store. How do you see this evolution progressing? Well I, think we're GONNA continue to have challenges? And ransomware is GonNa? Be among them. I think hopefully I. The message is out there amongst security folks and amongst managed service providers that that the software they use. is honorable and the providers of that software aware of it and hopefully You know. We spent some time on prevention. And and getting these things pash before. Before the bad guys find him and exploited them I don't think that that's necessarily a panacea of because obviously it's it's a game. We've been involved in for a long time. I. Just I think that we're GONNA. Continue to have these problems it's it's easy to say any particular problem whether it's encryption or whether it's a new operating system or a new whatever is going to be. Be the end of of all of us. It's not we. We find ways to to proceed forward, but but we do need to to keep an eye on those those up and coming threats, and an on the conflicts that arise both culturally and socially. They caused people to do things they would otherwise to social engineering We're GONNA. See more of those attacks as well so. So those are the things we need to guard against okay. We'll very interesting cindy. as we wrap up here, there's a question we like to ask. Everybody on our show in. That's WHO's your favorite super hero or Super Villain and why? I love cats US everybody from the hunger games. I love on the Keita. I love her her by any grainger on. And so I think it's more of A. archetype of That sort of Feminine Heroine who comes in in this token world and From her instincts and problem solving skills sort of attacks, tax problem in ways that done. That they're not attacked. By sort of the male counterpart. In finding side finds ways around that. I was just watching one last night. Another one lucy from two thousand, fourteen or something. Yeah, where you know, she ends up ingesting this this drive that gives her access to a more and more purser brain until she meets the singularity and becomes everything everywhere. But but the approaches are a little bit different and from my trauma, more feminine place and I really appreciate those those sorts of heroines out there. We need more of them in the movies for sure. Yeah, you know it's been a while since I've thought about Lafayette to KITA and the television series not and I know they rebooted at the bitter several years later put the original television series that was based on the movie of course but ITERATIONS, but you know every one of them. They're handling their own battles. There's this this. Conflict between sort of good and evil in it's all kind of ambiguous about really is good art really as well as your point earlier, do they really work for the good guys or do they work for the bad guys there? Never really sure right I I don't think that there is a true dichotomy out there. Everybody is working under Their own motivations for what they think is is good or writer in their best interest, maybe on, and they've not everybody I think there there probably is true evil out there, but but we try to simplify things a more than than we maybe should. Because it's easier to understand that way so so I do like these these stories that that that bring that complexity in there Yeah captain. You know her solution to that whole prowl. was. was really a great one so absolutely well, thanks much cindy and thanks to our listeners for joining and be sure to check out other cybersecurity factors podcast sponsored by.

John McCain Cindy Murphy US Beijing Brian Koto irs Barrington Barrett University of Iowa ransomware arena Madison Police theft Su
What Trumps COVID-19 diagnosis means for his health and the election

The Current

25:44 min | 2 weeks ago

What Trumps COVID-19 diagnosis means for his health and the election

"Hi I'm Dr Brian Goldman if you haven't heard my new podcast, the dose, this is the perfect time to subscribe. Each we answer your most pressing health related questions, and right now we know you're grappling with covid nineteen. On those we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own get the latest evidence in a way that's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose. It's your guide to getting through this difficult time. You can find the dose wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast. US. President. Donald Trump's surprise supporters yesterday with a drive by visit outside Walter Reed Hospital waving in a mask from the back of an SUV doctors say he could be released as early as today after being admitted to the hospital. Friday for treatment for Covid nineteen couple of weeks back during our US election series road to November we met a man named Dan Snicker, he is a sheep farmer in Iowa and the chairman of the Clinton County Republicans. We call Dan back for his reaction to news of the presence hospitalization. The president has to deal with a lot of people unfortunately, his job sooner or later he's GonNa get close to Calvin unless he wants to hibernate in a basement somewhere. I think he's anymore oblivious to the danger in anybody else. It's just a chance. You got a date like I said, he kinda completely came up and on hidden basement. For Prevention measures are conducted. presidential requirements is usual. We've got a very good vice president. Mike Pence to fill in. Why wouldn't say worry the you've always got to be concerned. You know you just have to wait and see what happens. People in the United States and right around the world are waiting to see what happens. Josh. Wingrove is the White House correspondent for Bloomberg News Josh Good. Morning. Good Morning. What do we know about how the president is doing today? Well we know they're mixed signals. If you ask the White, house doctor whose credibility has come under strain over the last forty, eight hours, the president is improving and facing discharged soon as today to the White House where his medical care would continue. But on the flip side, the White House continues to be quite misleading about. The president's condition. For instance, they said, Saturday, that he'd knocked received oxygen on Friday and then later admitted that he had received oxygen. They still have not said how high his fever went there being unclear whether he got oxygen again a second time on Saturday and they have now prescribed three drug. The most recent one is steroid but just used mostly in more severe cases. So you know the bread crumbs of the details are pointing to what is still a pretty severe case and we're early on yet usually things get more serious between seven and ten visit there yet. But in the public thome, the president himself is leading the charge on positive line. He's been tweeting away furiously this morning I lost count the number of tweets that he had issued many them all. Steroid. Tell me more about this. What was going on with the doctor this was fascinating yesterday and you've written about it where the doctor said one thing and then there was reporting that was done to suggest that the doctor perhaps wasn't telling the whole truth or was deliberately not telling the truth what was going on there? This is he appears to be trying to tweak. The rules or the the the assessment I should say to please president trump trump habitually hates shows of weakness or what he perceives to be shows weakness going into hospital is not something he wanted to do, and so it looks like they're frankly lying about or misstating about certain parts of it to make it look better and so on Saturday as I mentioned he. Indicated that trump had not received doxorubicin and a day earlier the white. House joined in I mean they all they were saying that trump had mild symptom but we know now that in fact he had a fever that spiked to quote high fever is all we know about it he had been on oxygen and then he was about to be hospitalized and they. Spent all day calling it a mild fever excuse me mouth symptoms and so you know broadly I think this is all sewn distrust in it. So that brings us to today and his potential release You know we'll see we'll see I suppose a Saturday they thought he could be you know another several days in hospital yesterday potentially released today shortening the timeline but. Other. External doctors are saying that if it was up to them, the president would stay in hospital he needs to be monitored. He's not out of this yet, and in fact, is still coming up to the most critical window of time and we're learning right now that he's going to be meeting with medical team today in the in the morning to assess his progress and the team is optimistic that he'll return to the White House later on. Monday. He left the hospital briefly yesterday for this motorcade appearance that was. Baffling to a lot of people including doctors who work at that hospital, what is your sense as to why he would do that? Yeah this plugs into his desire to sort of put on I, get the strong faith, and of course, you heard the gentleman from Iowa. Just before me you know trump says, you know he doesn't want to hide in the basement, but he's also demonstrating what is not best practice. You shouldn't be leaving your hospital if you're a infectious or you know. Amid stage Kobe patient, you should be wearing masks. The president almost never wore masks before this, he had massive rallies would bring the press to them. You know we would be in crowds of thousands of people almost none of them wearing shoulder to shoulder I mean really just flouting own government guidelines. government's guidelines So last night he took this drive by. The question of the US Secret Service Agent in that car. In sort of hermetically sealed vehicle with an active Kobe patient. The US secret service isn't saying now those. Agents have to quarantine. So you know. This is what we're seeing, and then potentially if he comes back to the White House raises, the same issue is he still actively shutting the virus and it's so will he be confined to the residents of the White House, this is put his own staff at risk the resident staff at risk you know we'll see of course, Melania trump for self is recovering. Isn't quite as bad. A condition we understand and has been at the White House that's full-time but there's a lot of moving parts to this one. The president appears to try to be sort of rushing his way back to the white. House in part presumably because an election is under a month away what does this mean for the election campaign of Donald Trump? It's too early to tell historically kind of situations president some time see a bit of a bump in approval but the election of anyways underway doubts being cast by mail or advanced in many states already the polls that have come since the debate but you know either before or around the time of illness have shown Vice President Biden maintaining or expanding his lead on the president. So you know trump's in trouble but I think mainly what it will. Do is focus the news cycle as well as the voters attention on Kobe, and that is bad news for Donald trump he wanted to talk about the economy Kobe is a is an issue where pulling doesn't really favor him American think he's bungled it and so that alone focusing on this alone will be a bad news situation for him because voters think Biden would do a better job in handling attack. There are other leaders around the world who have. Caught covid nineteen do you think of Boris Johnson in the United Kingdom? You think of Higher Balsa lateral in in Brazil how did that play for them in terms of of how their electricity received that news and received what was going on in the midst of a Pandemic Missile Crisis Johnson saw but was very early on in government and in the but still about hasn't evaporated bonar gotta bump but it was more correlated him sending out checks spin it was his own illness trump's national security advisor who himself had in has recovered said today that he was going to visit Boston Arrow. So they appear to be sitting up these. You know meetings with folks that have had it and recovered. To try to, you know continue the positive spin I alluded to. But yeah, they saw bombs little mix but whether it was their cova case of the stuff that went with it but you know the need a case, it's totally equal to the president scenario. As we know this has been a deeply polarizing presidency You know there's not a lot of undecided voters as you can imagine people either. They're either take or leave him with President trump and so I I personally have a hard time imagining how many voters might be swayed by this one way or another and as I, say the campaign themselves trump's campaign did not want to be talking about Kobe, they wanna be talking about reopening. So having their number one campaign asset both a rally. And as a fundraiser at a time where they're trailing Biden in cash to is just as any way you cut it can he do those route I mean is there any expectation that those rallies would resume at all if he is able to get into the hospital in the next few days? I mean, I don't think they would resume immediately but absolutely I would expect them if he had recovered and had met potentially the CDC quarantine guidelines but you know maybe not. that that he would resume the he thrives on those things he loves them and his supporters really don't seem to be all that worried about coq when they attend the MIC. Almost, no precautions when they go in the meantime, they might have Mike Pants continue unclear looks like the vice president debate this week ago although there now haggling over the rules to make a bit safer but I fully expect that the minute that trump can either strong arm his doctors to allow it or that they think it would be palatable politically that we will see him in some form or another back on the campaign trail whether it's rallies or whether it's more, you know socially distanced type events he loves being at the podium and he believed that's the way he will win. This is a wildly unpredictable disease what happens if he gets even sicker in the coming days. Yeah I mean I should know the buy in and his people are among the people that are you know praying for the president first lady to recover this rare point of sort of nonpartisan issue in the states But you know if it's really serious if you know the other words incapacitated than the twenty Fifth Amendment comes into play in Mike Pence takes over pens assisted negative repeatedly despite attending many advances including as recently as yesterday but the president has been really against talking about this the White House. Will not discuss contingency plans because of course discussing it might be an indication that things are worse along to indicate so you know Like the National Security Adviser with asked about that earlier this morning. He said the president has been chargeable I'm there's no question about that our adversaries knowing our allies know it. So they're very uneager discuss the scenario where things go south in terms of the President's health where for instance, Boris Johnson was put on in an ICU bed oxygen and had to transfer power to his foreign secretary for the nearly two weeks if I recall correctly. So that that sort of scenario out of question but they just simply don't want to discuss the president has said that this disease the pandemic will just go away that it will dissipate when the temperatures change that it's just like a mild flu he put a video yesterday saying he now. When he's talking about the virus and then he went on that motorcade, right what do you think we're going to be speaking with Dr but this in a moment but what do you think given how divisive this is being in the United States that this will do for the way his supporters see the pandemic. I think that As an always bins the facts to his views, and then Ben's them to the narrative he wants to build. So I think he will seize upon and presuming and hoping covers. I, think that he will he will try to use this as a campaign. Roy being like look you know, I'm moving ever American heated by this I do not for instance, the expect him to start wearing masks more frequently in if I if anything he might think it is antibodies put them at risk I really essentially don't see much change at all. He is there sort of throwing the kitchen sink at him like he's like a three drugs he's taken so far one of them is not approved even for Emergency Ucla. Given that almost immediately not they mentioned the most recent one, which he's still on is for higher cases you recall earlier in the year, he took hydroxy chloroquine, which he thinks helps with it but which the FDA has since issued a poisoning warning for so they're really giving him sort of everything they can and I don't expect a chess and donald trump to emerge from this if you didn't even even if you make full and quick recovering Josh. Thank you. Thank you Josh Wingrove is a White House correspondent for Bloomberg News. Seven of my cars is GonNa for the police. APP running up and down the street and telling us that we need to get out. I major in lamb. By climbing hosts for the CBC podcast world on fire. Our latest episode were taking you to the western United States where fires are burning unprecedented rate and we're finding out how it's affecting us here in Canada get world on fire on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. You know you're smart funny friends who always seem to have the best celebrity gossip. I'm talking about the ones who always know where you should be watching or reading or listening to or what if you could pick their brains every week pop chat is a brand new podcast but does exactly that and feels like spending time with your best friends. So join me Levin Mood and a panel of the smartest culture critics that I know as we dissect the discourse but also have a great time doing it. If. Anything is going to bolster the actions taking. To protect myself and others from the coronavirus maybe can. Totally changed his narrative about it people who follow him can see like it's a real thing dealing with the virus and those who don't wear masks is down to a belief level. So it's going to take a lot to sway them either way. Hopefully, it will open up their eyes for them that this is something very serious that anyone can get even the president united, states but I think some people are kind of have made up their mind about. His core, I think a lot of the rest of us have been kind of on board with it to varying degrees. My daughter wears a mask but if she's all walking around outside, she told me last night I, take it off and I told her, I don't think that's really good idea. You're meeting someone on the sidewalk you should have a mascot if the course of the disease is mild to moderate for him, it could amplify his disregard for precautions if it's really severe but recovers He may come out with a different message for people to take the disease series. That's how some people in the streets of Iowa City are reacting to the news that the president has been hospitalized with cove in nineteen It's a state Iowa is that his being hit particularly hard with more than ninety thousand cases on Friday alone more than a thousand new cases. Her Salinas is an infectious disease experts and hospital epidemiologist at the University of Iowa hospitals and clinics Dr Good morning to you. Good Morning Thank you for joining us what went through your mind when you heard that the president was hospitalized. unfortunately, this this is something that could happen to anyone articularly to to people that are not following all of the public health recommendations. So it's not totally surprising. There has been some confusion as to how serious the president's condition was have listened to something from Sunday's briefing. This is Dr Brian Garibaldi of Johns Hopkins Hospital. He's part of the team treating Donald Trump. We've been monitoring for any potential side effects and he has had none that we can tell has liver and kidney function of remain normal, and we continue to plan to use a five day course of severe in response to transient low oxygen levels. We did initiate decks and Methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday, and our plan is to continue that for the time being doctor. What can you tell us by listening to that? well, there are several. Questions about. How long has he been sick? Depending on how long he's been sick you know it may be too early to fully SSD extent of illness We now know that people can get seeker out about five to seven days after the onset of symptoms. So he may just being at the beginning of that face, but it's still unclear whether he will get worse or not but the same terms and the medications that they described meaning the high to the low oxygen levels and and the medications that were even if it were sold about the next medicine speak of potentially being on. that. Stage there's five to seven days. Of Illness. So I would I would still be cautious kicked clinical conditions can change in the next few days steel. He will kill break because that's a medicine that as a side effect anyone that receive the methods. Field feels very good fever center to go away. You feel great. That's doesn't mean that it has necessarily changed the course of the disease something else that is interesting about covid is that people may have low oxygen levels are not notice it. And So I think that all those things can play a role not him feeling better than than he really is people are watching this around the world and I mentioned in in your state perhaps watching it particularly closely because of how. Badly hit Iwa has been by covert nineteen on Sunday. The state was reporting that there were more than ninety thousand confirmed cases. Why are the numbers so high so far into this pandemic? A serious factors we've had of both outbreaks in congregate settings as well as transmission in the community the algorithm in the in the congress settings including Factories and meat processing plants had to do with crowded indoor conditions conditions that are now. Well known to excess Beta transmission of Kobe's and transmission the presence as well. colleges as in the rest of of America as well as the transmission in the community Fortunately, our state has been very lax in the implementation of Public Health guidance even coming from the White House We don't have a face mask mandate, for example, there are. Virtually. No regulations when proteins physical distancing of frequent hand hygiene and one of the biggest recommendations. One of the most important recommendations to avoid large outbreaks avoiding credit indoor places. has not translated officially in to limit the number of people that can gather or closing off a bar or restaurant. How much do you think people are influenced by leaders like the president who perhaps to your point don't always follow those guidelines Think that they countries, states, provinces, etc. that have have had a better response to. Are those in which everybody from the same page that the leaders and The People Follow Public Health Guidance on science if if we try to make science and public guidance debatable or not applicable to to oneself. either. It becomes more problematic. Various needs believes mistrust in those recommendations in the of the guidance goes down and therefore the effective. Mr Fight independently. So the president said on Sunday in this video that he now gets it when he's talking about covert, then he immediately left the hospital. To go and greet supporters in his motorcade before returning what effect do you think that could have what you're talking about in terms of how people see this this pandemic. Unfortunately I was I was very hopeful I remain hopeful that that leaders including the precedent will you change. Their mind will will modify their their public health, messaging and lead by example, unfortunately, that doesn't seem to be the case and. It May Help persist. These. Debate or lack of trash public guidance luck of of adherence face masks, for example, physical distancing, and it could just prolong the the outbreaking in the United States. Many people many countries are unfortunately experiencing a second way. For example, the United States has never left the first ways. and There's no end in sight yet is there the possibility that if people see that their president can get this that anybody can get it and then people will act differently. There is that possibility. Yes. I think if anything these These days the outbreak of the White House shows that nobody is invincible or immune to it. And perhaps hopefully, people will understand that if you follow. RIC On the basis you can decrease your risk if it's been very clear that. people at the White House were not following physical, mentioning my facemask within the station and avoiding crowds Therefore, hopefully, these with an example as many other outbreaks that we have seen throughout the world to modify behaviors both leaders and and the public. Now, we also need to recognize the outbreak is still evolving not everybody's. Of their incubation period that can be up to fourteen days. So other people can get sick. Even if the president which we all hope recovers and eventually. Older people that were exposed in a in that outbreaks. are also at high highways because of their age and communities and may also have outcomes. So again, and also I I believe there is already evidence that they are More, there's more transmission happening from the people that were present at the White House. They may have given into family members or to other people. So again, the White House is just part of of chain of transmission So I think that this whole example, this whole scenario, this whole outbreak could help educate the public on. What can happen if you don't follow public guidance so in just in the last minute or so that we have in the best case scenario given how divisive this as being in your state and across the United? States. What would you want to hear from the President? He's just gone through this. He's still in the hospital would you want to hear from him? I wish he followed bobby guidance from the Centers for disease, control and Prevention, one of the premier public health institutions in the world and and he would lead by example, and where face masks in every public event avoid crowded indoor places avoid. Crowded rallies and and practice physical distancing I believe that some of. The the white. House is already started has already started implementing some of these measures. I hope that that we seen a change in the way he and his team conduct themselves Li like sample expect to see that. I hope that. And that's something that we have to continue you know hoping and perhaps again, these outbreak is not over and he can sells he's not out of the woods yet no matter how he feels today. And again, there are other people that are still turning positive and so we don't know yet what they the the final outcome of this outbreak is there still the possibility that somebody will get severely ill even if not, the precedent that somebody could die from this outbreak. So I feel hope the dead people that are very close to visitation will learn from these experience Dr Salinas is. It's good to talk to you about this. It is a moving story and we will keep our eye on it in terms of what develops over the course of the next few hours the next few days and then meantime. Thank you. Dr. Haze Salinas and infectious disease expert and hospital epidemiologist at the University of Iowa hospitals and clinics he was in Iowa City. For more CBC podcasts go to. CBC, DOT CA slash podcasts.

President President trump White House US vice president Iowa Kobe White House correspondent Mike Pence White House House Dr Brian Goldman Walter Reed Hospital University of Iowa fever CBC Boris Johnson Iowa City Josh Wingrove
Episode 8 - Syllabus Week

Political Party Live

1:11:10 hr | 3 years ago

Episode 8 - Syllabus Week

"Thanks so much everybody for coming out. So before he formally began. I want to give a couple of shoutouts Simeon mentioned one of our producers, Veronica Tessler in the back who is an entrepreneur and social activists and all around bad ass, but we are also helped out by Maddie, bro. Who is a producer of ours. And really keeps the wheels moving on the train. So thank you, Mattie. We appreciate all your work. We appreciate the work of our sound engineer. Sam alexandra. I wanna give shout out to high ground for letting us take over their space. This is the second time. They've let us take over. Right. Yeah. Thank you guys. Come here. Patronize local business. We appreciate it. We got a couple elected officials. I think here with us is Senator rob Hogue here somewhere. There is in the back. The good Senator. The mayor of Iowa City walked in is he still here Jim Throgmorton or year? There is. We also have the nighttime mayor with us. Angela Winneke Angela. I love that. We've got a Representative from the Johnson county. Democrats Elizabeth dential is she here. Did I see her? I thought I saw Elizabeth somewhere. Okay. She's back there. And we also have with us who will be a guest later on in the show Lillian Sanchez, who's the vice president of the university of Iowa student government. So thank you Lillian for joining us. All right. We got a great show for you. All coming up. We've got some awesome guests, we are the political party. And we are just a group of millennials offering a fresh take on all the craziness. That's happening in the world. We have a strong, focus and emphasis on politics, culture society, and fashion because Simeon is with us and. Just just all things bad ass. And so we really do appreciate your support of this effort. So to get going. I want to introduced my co hosts you heard from Simeon tally earlier Simeon is the co founder of the Iwa fashion project and fly over fashion fast and just about every festival that you hear about I wo-. That's dope. Simeon has something to do about it. So semi-in thank you again for sticking with us. One of our great co host. I also want to introduce to you misty Rebic. Who is she's literally the star of the show and she live. Misty is helping run Kathy. Glossies campaign is a deputy campaign manager. She's got a long history of starting awesome nonprofit, organizations and social movements that are really impactful and meaningful here. So thank you misty for sticking with us. What what up? All right. So we are going to die in to the damage report. And as you see we have a guest with us today who is no stranger to certainly to Iowa City and to Iowa we have with us Zach walls, a graduate of the university of Iowa. Words are hard a graduate of the university of Iowa and advocate for LGBTQ writes in a co founder of scouts for equality, the national campaign to indiscriminating in the boy scouts of America. He was successful. By the way, I say you worked himself out of a job, which is a good thing. His testimony before the House Judiciary committee about growing up with gay. Parents was YouTube most watched political video of twenty eleven he is the author of the bestselling book, my two moms lessons of love strength. And what makes a family is? Currently a masters candidates studying public policy at the Princeton University. And he has come back to Iowa to do some really really cool things and a note that people might not know about Zack is he is one of the original founders of the political party and mission. I was city. So we love to have Zack walls back with us. Give it up for Zach walls. Thank you. Good to be here. So is that you are off being awesome at Princeton doing some wonderful things doing work with Jason candor. And you've come back to I was city why tell us about your back. So I'm back because I'm currently in my enjoying the final weeks of my summer break the two year program at Princeton in the year in the summer in between your first and second year, you have to go work somewhere in the world. I spent a summer working with Jason calendars new project, let America vote it's a new voting rights group. That's trying to make sure that there are political consequences for politicians who make it harder to vote instead of making it easier to access the ballot box. I'm back in Iowa City for a few weeks to see friends and family and on Monday. I'm not sure once his being released online. But for the people who are here in person. I hope you'll come out to this on Monday. August twenty eighth seven PM. I'll be giving a talk at the anger theater on a new approach to ending homelessness. It's a part of an exciting project called the green room. Dave who is leading that class is going to be on the program. Later. So let him talk about it. But on Monday, I'll be talking about housing first, which is a cost effective incredibly powerful way to end chronic homelessness. It's coming to city y'all be highlighting the incredible work. That's been done by Christie kanga Nellie in her team shelter house Iowa City, and I'll be talking about the national kind of movement move us towards housing first. And why it's such an important issue. And why people who should care about it is act. Thank you so much for that, man. That's awesome work. I'm really excited to be here. All right. So we have the chore of doing a damage report. And there's been a lot that's gone on in the world. Since we last spoke with you all. Charlottesville. Somebody went to kick that off. I'll try there's so much happening, and there's so much there. And I guess this is probably just a great opportunity to get everyone on this. What we're seeing from the president is sort of this normalization. Of white supremacy and white nationalism something that is shocking to most. But I think what I was most shocked by not not sort of the president equivocating white nationalist protesting the counter protesters, but how open in a row some of the people marching in the streets where these are people that were talking and saying all types of racial epithets, all types of hate speech, and they weren't wearing any cloak or sheets. Disguising their faces. And we've talked about how Trump has kind of Imboden in this fringe element of our society. If if ever there was any doubt that his candidacy in his presidency has done that I think during the Charlottesville incident, we saw they're just it's not a majority, but they're awful lot of folk who harbor these sentiments, and that's just incredibly disappointing me from someone who fought we had made a lot of racial progress over the past eight years, and specifically to Trump's response to what happened in Charlottesville. I think that one of the things for us to remember is that a lot of the outrage really came from the fact that he said that they were very fine people on both sides and Charlottesville. Right. And then you also said that the statue of Robert Lee was a very important statue. Now, why does Donald Trump was born in queens thing that statue of Robert he Li Charlottesville Virginia is a very important statue. Right. I mean. And I don't have a clear answer as to why he came to have that believe, but I think what you saw from the president was the very clear normalization of what was happening. The both sides ISM. The what aboutism, you know, where he basically put the people who are protesting Neo Nazis, and the KKK on the same level as those exact people, and then he said that the confederate statues are very important, and I don't know how much history he really knows about those statues. But the history is actually really important in terms of why the statues were put up, and it's really important people to understand that these statues weren't built immediately after the civil war. These statues were built during the late eighteen nineties and early nineteen hundreds during the beginning of Jim crow, and then again during the civil rights movement in the nineteen fifties and sixties these statues are a message of white supremacy period. That's what these statues are about. So I have I have a lot of. Sort of well-meaning moderate Republican friends who are struggling to understand. Why why this is an issue for so many people I hear the retort, you know, they're just statues. I hear people say, well, are you going to tear down statues to everyone in history or Washington and Thomas Jefferson who who may have had some moral deficiencies? And I have to have this conversation over and over again because they're literally lost as to why this is this is an issue, and I want to hear everybody else's take. But the approach I take is this when the former imperial grand wizard of the KKK shortly after the president gives remarks comes out, and basically endorses those remarks and takes them to mean that the president supports their efforts, and their movements that that's just a problem because we aren't country that should dignify white supremacy or the supremacy of any race over the other fact, we fought an entire war over the concept of whether or not human beings should be treated equal. Yeah. So what's the approach that you all take and trying to have a reasonable conversation with people who who may be well intentioned, but just can't get it. I want to hear from misty. Mri gave me a look. And I have an idea as to how it goes over and misty. Well, first of all, I think that one of the things that isn't being talked much about an isn't popular to talk about. So I'm really aware of that is sort of the the miss information about the confederate flag and these monuments. I think that some of the things I've heard from rule Iowans as I'm going across on the campaign trail, I've been listening to lots of folks on lots of different sides of the aisle. And I really think there's this huge disconnect in misunderstanding of the relevancy and the meaning of the relics that that people are trying to take down and putting museums. And so I think we have to be willing to lean in and have conversations with people where we're not telling them, they're wrong. We're not Keinan sending to them. But we're really trying to understand where the disconnect is happening because I honestly truly believe the people that we saw. Aw out in Charlottesville, the white supremacist. I should be very clear don't wanna pull a site. Ism thing. Are minority. I don't think the majority of Americans think like that. However, I do think a lot of people are confused about the history of this country because we have educated ourselves for very long time on lies like I think a lot of people don't even know what the confederate flag stands for. I was recently asked by a relative. This is a really honest conversations a very close relative. Like, I don't really understand what the confederate flag means a native Iowan, right? The version of the sort of civil war as being a battle over only representation. States' rights which states rights, which is infuriating to hear. Because people like me were counted as three fifths of a human being. But yet they maintain that the civil war was over something else. I think it's really do things here. The first is it's really important understand. There was a deliberate campaign of misinformation that was put forth by a group of private citizens who are the kind of sons and daughters of the confederacy starting almost immediately after the civil war during reconstruction, which is a woefully under covered subject in American history and most public educations. But then you follow that all the way straight through the rest of the eighteen hundreds and into the nineteen hundreds. And then you had to deliberate effort, not just to build these statues and monuments as a message of white supremacy during Jim crow to rewrite the history books to talk about the war northern aggression, which by the way, like the original fake news, right? The war of northern aggression is not a thing. There was a war that was fought over people who and you can go back and read their founding documents. They were fighting to create a slave Republic. That is the words that the people in the south who were actually seceding from the union at the time. And I think the second thing to the to the point you had about understanding when you should be taking down statues changing the name of an institution. People some people might remember this back at Yale about two years. It seems like a lifetime ago, but two years ago, there's a big row over the naming of a call addresses, the John Calhoun college John Calhoun was vice president United States and who's best known for this idea that states should be able to nullify federal law and therefore be able to in this case maintain the gallery of slavery. And so they went through this big process and tried to figure out why should we change the name of the college or not changed the name of the college? And they basically came up with the two part framework to try and understand what they should do in the in the two things are what is the principal legacy of the person who is being named the statute that's being built. And then why was the statue built in the first place, or why was it name that in the first place is if you look at these statues, these people these confederate generals, I mean, that's how we're talking about their confederate generals that is their principal Agassi. And these are people who went back on an oath swore to defend the United States constitution to rebel and start a civil war that claimed six hundred. Thousand American lives have all half of all American military deaths occurred during the civil war that is their legacy to divide for for white supremacy and for slavery. And why were they built these one thousand or so confederate statues were built during the lead up to Jim crow? And then during the fight for civil rights. They send a message white supremacy. And that's why they were built. Yeah. I'm going to to answer your questions as and this is going to sound super bad. I know this. I do not have conversations with Republicans. Let alone a moderate Republicans at all. So I have not had a conversation with Republican who's sort of trying to figure this out who doesn't get. Why confederate flag is bad or why it's -fensive or why confederate flags or confederate monument should be taken down. But the thing is that you don't have to be a Republican to not know. Issue here in like the thing that I'm really frustrated about over this whole entire thing is that it's it's being like party dominated in. The fact is there's people in this country who do not identify at all with the current political structures that are like Republican democrat independent like the people in my family, for example, from rural Iowa have no political identity. Right. So like, I just like I think we have to be careful about things. Well, the Democratic Party, you know, not that long ago had many, Andrew Jackson dinners. Jefferson Jackson is right. Celebrate the legacy of Andrew Jackson. Right. That's something that we have to own. But I think to your point that deeper issue here about race, and this notion of white identity, and and to kind of maybe a little bit generous with a lot of the people that were marching in Charlottesville. This this notion of white loss of white grievance. I think what what Republicans are what people that are that are sympathetic to that side of the argument have done. They've they've come flighted this notion that the south losing the civil war. It's not principally about slavery. It's about this loss of certain heritage a certain way of life of humiliation in that the resurrection of of these these monuments was the further that white supremacy. And I think what you've seen a lot of people do rather cleverly. It's kind of conflict that with white economic, thanks and exile. So now you have and and you said it was a minority. It's a minority. But I think it's a lot more people than we than we think a lot of people a lot of white folks all across the country. I think are looking at TV screens, and San I kind of feel I kinda I kinda sympathized with the folks in Charlottesville. I don't feel economically better off for the last thirty forty years. All we've heard is civil rights. Affirmative action women's rights feminism advancements for the LGBTQ plus community. Right. What about me? And I think as a as a on a deeper policy issue, we're making arguments about the future and the economy whatnot. We really haven't figured out how to how to speak to that. Well, and that's why dog whistle politics is so effective and you begin in the late nineteen fifties with the southern strategy employed by this sort of remade. Republican party to capture and capitalize on those sentiments. And you heard Donald Trump recently talking about they're trying to take away our heritage. I mean that was a that was a dog whistle that was him using a Bullhorn as I've heard it described to just to just shake people into furthering make great again, that's. Donald Trump does not have southern heritage. That's not a thing. But he is populous economic nationally. Your point earlier about the kind of economic stagnation, and how that manifest I think you're absolutely right. It's no secret economic stagnation for especially the bottom half of all Americans, the nineteen fifties is very well documented in this gets to the point that you were also making you and misty were even agreeing on this to some extent, it's not about whether you're a Republican or democrat. It's about the signals that our political leaders send not just to their Democrats or Republicans. But to all American people in this, look, if you're not doing very, well, here's what you should blame this person or that person that started with the election of President Obama, right and Trump was deeply involved in turning the narrative asking for the birth certificate or absolutely right went. I mean, I know I'm not ignorant to the oppression and the racist infrastructure that exists currently in our systems by any means by think, that's when this public narrative. Release started to bubble up. And then it's like so the election of Obama springs this this. My point is back. Trump has been leading this while now not just since he started running his campaign, which by the way happened after several people were murdered in church just two years ago. Right that same month Trump launched his campaign in what did he do in that speech? He blamed who Mexicans all the things that are happening this country. Right. So scapegoats people I wanna pivot real quick to get to one other topic in this segment, and that is about what people are doing. How are reasonable people responding to this? What is the resistance doing? And are there any silver linings from all of this stuff that is happening? Is seen on face. Activism. I think I'm going to turn off demus. I do think there's a silver lining here. I think a couple of in that and that sort of exemplifies itself on a couple of ways, I think you have seen a lot of albeit come far short of what's necessary. Lot of white allies fundamentally make decision that beat on the side of Saint against white supremacy. Right. Not a difficult thing to do. But publicly disavow white supremacy and say, I'm not racist. I think that's a I think that's that's a good thing. But I think it has to go further, and we kind of discussed this in our meeting earlier that it's that the discussions around race in white supremacy in the history of the confederate the confederacy in monuments and the flag and the white people. Lots of people are talking about race in our country right now. Right. I think that's in an inning of itself a good thing. But it has to go deeper because overt racism while it being bad in and dangerous and viscerally offensive. We have to dress structural. Problems that lead to massive unemployment disparity in health. The incarceration of black men in certain communities decimating, you know, certain certain folks, we have to really address those things and in hopefully, this conversation know the discussion of race in this heightened awareness around race. And all these people being woke now, maybe it can kind of lead to that as well. Yeah. So we so we talked about this in our pre meeting, and one of the things that was apparent to me is that I have never seen so many public figures, whether they are elected officials or other sort of thought leaders actually waiting into this stuff. And and it's easy to say that over racism is bad. Right. Like, that's the easy thing to do president. And do it. Right. Right. President can't do it. But it's, but I've never seen so many elected officials do that. And that's it's unfortunate that you know, it's it's this day and age, and I'm I'm impressed by elected officials who stand up against hatred. And bigotry and all of these things, but it hasn't happened before. So for me, it's like, I'm celebrating these these little winds. There are some some pretty dicey things that I think for racially motivated that happened in in my town, Cedar Rapids, and I literally had to go up to different elected officials and hand them a copy of Martin Luther King's letter from Birmingham jail where he was making an appeal to white clergy to say, hey, look, you you have to you have to help in this fight because to be neutral is to be on the side of the oppressor that that may be my silver lining is that we've got woke politicians now I'll like say about that is because referring to my comment about Facebook is it is easy for liberal progressive white allies to come out and make these really rates Stanton. Solidarity comments on Facebook or go to a solidarity protest and hold a sign. I'm hoping. We don't continue to fall flat where we have which is daily action on pushing back against the systems of oppression that we benefit from. So one of the things that is sort of deafening for me is like seeing elected officials make these comments or seeing white allies come out and and stand in solidarity against overt racism, which is super easy to do in my opinion, even though yes, we know our president can't do it. But what it's hard is resisting every single day and those systems in going out of your weight every single day to educate, your fellow white allies about the shit that they're doing that's racist and about how they benefit from it. Right. That's the hard work. And also what's hard as being an elected official. And ignoring the fact that for example, and Johnson county, if you're black you're eight more times likely to get pulled over that shit is what makes me upset and like I am I'm hoping. Being out of this. Me, and my fellow white allies will get to work because there's a lot to do than just posting on Facebook. Yeah. I mean, I think that there are. I would say two things I think is unique challenge in the midwest for white people here because there are not a lot of non white people. There are some for sure but compared to other reaches the country, especially outside of urban areas. This is a real difference from this out where even though you might not necessarily live in the same neighborhoods. You will have people who are white and non white living in the same communities. And so a lot of the ways that we talk about race and privilege, people were white and living communities that are almost exclusively white Gary confused privilege over who there's no other non white people here for us to have privilege over and so one of the things that I think is incredibly important, regardless of how you feel about that kind of language did make choice as a white person in this country that you have to continue to educate yourself. And that what you learned in school was not enough. You need to read another book. I'm sorry. But you do there are a lot of great ones out there to choose from. But just make choices. I'm serious make choice that what you learned in school about race was not enough that you should go. To learn more the issue of race in this country race in this world, this frankly, this realization for me only happened in the last couple of years, and I started to realize I had to do more to educate myself and actually learn about what the history of race in this country is which is not a knock on my high school history. Teachers because my teachers AP APS history at west I were amazing. However, that's not enough and you have to learn more. And so if you've watched what happened in Charlottesville, and you feel horror, and you think that like this is shocking. And this is something new in America read, a book, they're bunch of rate ones out there. I won't tell you which ones to read you should go find that out for yourself. But there are a lot of really important because there were you can read you can watch them. Great documentaries, and it's making active choice to educate yourself and learn more about the history of race in this country. I agree as read a book, watch CNN. Amenities. But if if for whatever reason reading isn't your thing, or or you don't have audiobook audio book, I'm gonna make another radical radical suggestion in the radical suggestion is go knock on your neighbors doors and start talking to them, you know, and especially if you live in any of the four five sort of population, heavy places in the state of there are plenty of people who do not look like you do not act like you who have practice different cultures than you in the best thing that we can do as white allies is to listen is to listen and learn about other people, and I you know, if there's anything that I've learned in my life of organizing is that I knew nothing from reading books, and I knew nothing from the education that I got about injustice, I learned injustice by hearing stories from people who were willing to share their Travis. Their trauma and their life experiences with me, and that is what shaped me, and then reading is a great supplement because then it can give you some background on how to deal with that stuff. But really just I really encourage people to talk to folks who don't look like you a quick poll the room real quick. Can you is your hand? If you know what a carpet Bagger is. Or like you learned about that in school as it applied to like the reconstruction. Okay. How many you like would redeemers are? Right. And like so that for me like the history of reconstruction in this country. Why don't you explain those times per sure so carpetbaggers term somebody who moves to run for office something that's pretty well documented, and the reason that happened during reconstruction was because there are people coming in to run into south because there were requirements replaced on south by the north during reconstruction white redemption on the other hand was the movement to throw off the shackles of northern reconstruction and to reclaim southern heritage white supremacy segregation of society, and this was a deliberate political movement that happened in the south in the United States after the civil war, the very first anti-terrorist law in this country was passed to try and shut down the KKK. Right. That is the history of terrorism white supremacy in this country, and it's something that we all need to do a better job of teaching ourselves about Zach walls. Thank you so much for joining us. Really? Appreciate it. So as you guys made no here in Iowa City. It's become quite obvious students are back. We are back to school season. So we're going to be focusing on some higher, Ed pieces and here to my left. Lillian Sanchez is joining us and so Lillian is in her fourth year at the university of Iowa. She's been newly elected VP of the university of Iowa student government. With with represent twenty four thousand students. That's a pretty big deal. Lillian isn't a lot of things including human rights, social Justice and equity issues and Lillian is a Spiring go to law school. So welcome million. You think you were having so recently, the board of regents have been discussing what's going to happen with our public, universities and tuition, and I think that you went to one of their task force meetings. And I think during that task force meeting they voted on a bunch of tuition hikes. I assume you were there talking about how that might affect students. Can you tell us a little bit about that experience? And did you feel like the border regions? Listen to you and took into consideration. What you're saying? Yeah. I can definitely talk a little bit more about that. So to give everyone a little bit of contacts us to what the tuition task force really is. And what the rule of the border regions really is is this fall our studio. Are facing tuition hike? That was unprecedented. It came up without warning. And so are in state students are facing a hike of about two hundred sixteen dollars. And then our non-resident students are facing a much higher hike of about one thousand one hundred ninety six dollars. And so this occurred very quickly. A lot of our students were unaware that it was happening until it happened. And so what happened was the board of regents was they convened a group of about five regions to go to each region school. So I I was in you, and I to talk about proposals us to how we can make tuition. More affordable or a period of five years. And so the regions came to the university of Iowa they talked amongst themselves, and they allowed are you? I administration to to present a proposal for the university of Iowa to see what the tuition would look like for the next five years. So currently the UI administration is proposing a seven seven percent tuition hike for the next five years, and we had we had time to talk to constituents. We talked to our students. We had legislators come in and speak on on the issue. We had professors come speak on the issue, and like misty mention I had the opportunity to talk about my personal story to really humanize how this is a factoring students at a personal level. So how is it affecting you? Yeah. So I I can tell you a little bit of what I shared with the regions in that meeting. I'm the first person in my family to go to college. So no one in my family has done this before. And so I had no idea in Roman looked like how to apply financial aid was going to be available any of that how to go through it alone. And so with the help of my mentors, I was able to figure something out how to apply to schools and see if I could afford it. And of course with that. I come from an immigrant family, we emigrated from Mexico when I was seven years old and ever since it's been my mom single mother my sister. And I knowing that my sister would eventually want to go to college. I knew that I needed to pitch in and I needed to work just as hard as my mom Weiss doing to make sure that if my sister needed the somehow we were able to help her out. And so I was able to explain to the region's really not my story, but stories that are shared among other students, regardless of you know, they come from a major in the background or low socioeconomic background. But. You know, it's not necessarily easy to be living in housing that is so expensive. It's not necessarily easy to be living in a place where you can't afford healthy, food and all of that. So I was really happy that the regions at least had an open session are trying to open up that channel of communication. So what did they decide? And so right now, we're the process is still ongoing technically the tuition task wars has already stopped in September. They are going to deliberate, and they're going to have the prince presentation over all of their findings and then an October. They're going to be doing a first reading of the proposals. And then finally in December. They're going to vote on those proposals. I have a completely different question. So if anybody else wants to chime in on the tuition say something more about tuition because I think you're right Lillian. That's your story. Unfortunately. Well, fortunately, because it's a really proud story to come from. I guess what I want to say though, is that I'm also I wanna ration- college student, and I think a lot of people are these days believe it or not. And so I personally worked fulltime all through college doing my undergrad. And so I know what you're talking about the struggle of of coming from a low socioeconomic background and trying to make it school for the first time. So I what I do know is I think the proposal is a raise of seventy seven excuse me seven percent onto wish in the next five years which acquits to about thirty five percent or more in the next five years. Thirty five percent increase onto wish in the next five years. How do you think that would affect someone like you? Would they be able to come to college? You know, I've talked about this. We've talked about this. And by we I mean, our current student government administration have talked about accessibility. Because I mean, the reality is we're faced with two very difficult issues. Right. We see excess ability as a problem as these increases intuition, not just happening in Iowa, but happening across the United States making it very difficult for our rising first generation students to be able to go to college and all other students to be able to go to college. But at the same time when are sick continues to disinvest instead appropriations we're losing out on quality of our education, whereas our world class education, and that's impacting people who are graduating, and they are no longer no longer as competitive in the marketplace us, it could have been or for example. They're degrees are being devalued. So it's a it's a very difficult balance of how can we make sure we have high quality education, but then also accessible education. You said something interesting that people this government keeps disinvesting from public higher education. Seems like every candidate that we see running for office talks about the need to support higher education that they're supportive education. But once they get in office, or when governments sort of figure out their budgets. It always seems to be that when tough decisions have to be made education gets cut, right? How can students collectively organize themselves? In high school across campuses and the state to be a more effective political bloc of voters to be better advocates. So that you know, when people when when when when politicians are making some of those five choices they know that they're going to have to answer the students come when they run again. I mean, I think it's very very important to be involved and for those who can vote to vote to get out there and to hold our elected officials accountable and to participate in this process of democracy. I think it's also really important to be educated because with these tuition increases, there's an accountability measure to also ensure that financial aid is increased proportionately in that they are other avenues that will ensure that students have access to education. And then, of course, one thing that we think a lot about in at the university level is we focus a lot on student activism. But then also we forget that parents have influence, well, especially back home in their districts, and so hold your family members accountable as well like that old your pas and mom's accountable, even if you can't vote, you know, I'd like to offer this to the political science department feedback here, or is it just somebody throwing a party above us. The party. Okay. It's friday. A syllabus week. That is even if you can't vote there are things that can be done. And I think we have to do a better job as citizens of rewarding those elected officials who do the right thing and punishing those who do the wrong thing. And I'd love to see a class. Called organizing one on one on college campuses to help students. Get more involved. Lillian? So I wanna kind of shift gears here a little bit and ask you you've been a student here for four years. Now, you've been active involved read a little bit about you. So you kind of know the ins and out of campus. Have you seen a change in culture? I guess during this last presidential cycle where you had characters like Donald Trump and the far-right sort of. Emboldening? These sort of white nationalist movements has at any of that matriculated down to the campus level. Yeah. I mean, I there's definitely no doubt about the fact that everything is happening much more overtly. And we've seen these over actions of racism, and bigotry and discrimination and harassment. But I also think it's important to remember that a lot of this sentiment has existed over history for decades. And really it is up until now that we've come to the realization that it exists. And that people are no longer scared to hide how they really feel and they come out and do it. And I think that I mean. Yeah. To answer your question. See we've we've seen much more over hates of acts of hate wasn't recently. Wasn't there? A group Li Li Li fluently you say that handing out flyers about a white supremacy rally, and they like also did some vandalism and we hear about that here on campus. I know there was something and I was state university for sure. Sure there relief. Let's there, and I think in our editorial meeting there was a hawk alert recently sent out about some supremacist action here on campus. So this stuff is real and it's hitting close to home. And I just you know, I hate to go here with you. But you are a minority in a leadership position at the university of Iowa. I want to ask how does that make you feel question and then? What's what's next, right? Like, how do we move forward? How how do you mobilize students to understand this stuff to wake up to the stuff? And then move forward. To be honest. I really haven't thought about that a lot. I think I'm honored to be able to be in a position like this. And to say that my Pierce believed in me, and that they were able to support me. And that they think that my leadership is needed at this time. And I think I I recently found out that I'm the first thing to be in this position. So I really see that as an opportunity for my peers, and for people across Iowa, and for people across the United States to see that there's hope and that there's changed that can be done. And that there's opportunity for people like me to take on these roles and to be unapologetic about it. And then your second question. Remind me again show. It's it's if you see this as a problem, and I'm sure you do, you know, how how are we how are you going to mobilize students to move forward? In a way, that's constructive. In a way that resists these overt acts of racism, and bigotry and a way that brings people together. So MRI talked a little bit about my background, and I have some human rights background. And I always like to come back to the idea that we need to humanize experiences. A lot of the time. When we listen to the news about numbers it's about masses, and it's not about the individual. And when we are vulnerable enough and open enough and have our both our minds and our hearts open to share each other stories and to talk about the reality that people face, I think it's important like Mississippi to, you know, knock on your neighbor's store and get to listen to their stories, go out and try something new and don't be afraid to do it. And I think that that's really really important to make sure that we bring it back. And remember that it's all about maintaining humidity. So Lillian have you thought about becoming a community organizer? I mean, it sounds like you are. I'm not sure how you got elected VP. Imagine it has something to do with you knowing how to listen to people and see people for who they are. So those are really good skills. And I think that that's a important way to continue to lead. And we're very lucky at the university of Iowa to have the first Latina leading your group. Great. Thank you. I'm gonna go back to the discussion about funding of higher education. And I have a very serious question for you Lillian like very serious. These you answer, honestly. This'll be the. Do you like avocado toast? I mean, it's always a serious. Do you like avocado? You like it. I like well first off I like avocados period. Yeah. So anything overly fascinated to know where this is going. Pain. We got to get into fashion, right? Doesn't know about this pink millennial pink yet. You know, Melania? Man. It's like my favorite color right now. No, it's not it's like baby pink, which I was really against all of my money's. All right Stacy's catch up. So there was this article written about millennials Hamalainen economically responsible because you're buying avocado toast and not buying houses or card or becoming adults right there on groceries and make. So what the reality is though that suits are saddled with so much student debt right at a time when the price of tuition and into the no be able to go to college keep going up and up, right? You have to borrow more money to be able to get into college. And so people are now out with twenty thousand plus dollars in debt on average right on average, right in some cases, a lot more than that. So people can't buy houses. Right became become. Can't do the adulting. Right. All we have is our coddle toast. That's that was the point Stacy. Are ruining everything. Exactly. Right. Yeah. But but but to be serious here for a minute. When you're having discussions in student government, or among your fellow students about the prospects your economic prospects. Once you graduate like what's that conversation? Like, are you you say you went to school. But are you deferring or not considering certain avenues because you're looking at well, I have this amount of money to pay back. You know, when I graduated does it sort of alter your sort of decisions once you graduate it does. And I can tell you from experience I came in. I was lucky enough that my high school offered dole degree credit. So I commend with a lot of credits and financially looking at it. I could have graduated in a year and a half. And that was the plan because I just could not like the goals were to go to law school. But how could you do that? When you still have to pay for undergrad, and then you have to save for grad school at the same time, and I feel like with increases intuition, and how unaffordable it's becoming you also lose the ability to have experiences. So if I would have graduated in a year and a half. I probably wouldn't have been involved in wouldn't have stretched myself and been able to find myself through my identity as much through experiences that are really only available to people in college. And so in some ways, you know, there's always a division between time and money, and unfortunately, money usually wins. And when you can't afford, it sometimes you have to make sacrifices, and I can tell you that a lot of my peers are unsure about their futures. They're unsure if they're going to find jobs after graduation, they're insured if they're going to be able to pay their loans, and so it is a very serious conversation that needs to happen at all levels. I can't thank you enough for everything you're doing how involved you've been on campus. I think I I met you through Oliver who I've worked with on a few campaigns. And I'm just impressed in thrilled and excited for the future of the university of Iowa because people like you, so thank you even Mahan. I have the stink pleasure. Introducing our last guests last, but not least Dave gold is in an administrator university of Iowa. He's instructor at the Belen blink center for the honors. He's a friend to most a mentor to so many everybody show some love for David gold. Thank you. So the reason why we wanted to invite you to the podcast. This is back to school issue. You want to get into discussions of of higher education funding of of what what's happening on campus. But you're doing you have a really interesting project that you're embarked upon the green room where you have a very impressive lineup of speakers. And you're not just allowing your students to talk to them or you're not just inviting them to your classroom. You're inviting the community back the school what you've caught this to the green room. Did you tell us a little bit more about that in? Why you decided to open up open up that to the broader community? Yeah. Thank them. Thank you for having me. And this is this is pretty wonderful. I guess it might be my whole professional career. But certainly you could say the last decade of my life could be defined by really a a sentence or two and that is the interest in how to make higher education, more meaningful and community engaged. That's really been what my work has been lice like for at least a decade, and it has resulted in a series of classes, I in the fall of two thousand ten I created a class called life design with the idea of using the university as a laboratory to help young people find what what makes them come alive. With makes them keeps them up at night. The things that they care about into trust that to feed it into the world something larger than themselves. I then taught a class called reimagining downtown, which took upper level students who had found their passions. And and working interdisciplinary how to invest them in communities, and we spent a semester actually designing and building something that we then went to Las Vegas execute. I then was had the opportunity of looking at the green room in the first go round was last fall of the kind of the inaugural class. If you will small group of students, and it was based on the idea, and I say this gently because it certainly certainly not universal. True. But it was the idea that higher education may not be any longer asking the right questions anymore, and I don't propose to have them. But what I did is I brought thought leaders in and brought them into my classrooms, each you them to bring a sentence that that they believe that young people should be struggling with and higher education should be helping to inform the first day of class. I put quotes from all these individuals, minus their names around the room with chairs underneath them. And I asked my students to read the walls, and the sit underneath the words that resonated the most and that became the person that curated in the class, they hope create they wanted to expand it they wanted. It was like thirty students we dinner together, which is to me and active bringing community opened the classroom up to people in the community. So you know, it wasn't a universal kind of a promotional kind of thing. I just if somebody wanted to bring the roommate or their girlfriend or boyfriend people brought their parents when they were in. Town. And it was just a just an open open invitation. By the time, we got to the end of the class. I had as many guests that were traveling with this as I had students. The idea the idea then was they wanted to open it up and have it touch more students on our campus and two numbers of eighty ninety now from thirty and I knew that I knew that that intimate kind of conversation was no longer. We're gonna have dinner together, we weren't going to be able to do those types of things. And so my thought was we had to redesign it, and the redesign was began to kind of think of it become a maginitude of is is to think of the idea of opening up to everyone to bring these wonderful people as Zach said he's our opening act on Monday night. But it's a host of people from Lisa Lucas is active director of the national book award to Peter guero. From the moth, two Jane Elliott, if you remember from your high school class Brown, I blue eyed study to Mr. Khan, if you remember the con- parents from the democratic national convention to Stanford the magician who will talk about wonder, I mean, a host of people and the ideas, why would I? Number one to share them with my students if they're seat so we could have make vailable to others. But also the idea of how does a community, and this is when I define community, I'm talking university. And I was city. How does it? How does it gain knowledge? How does it learn how does it take that knowledge and put it into action and actually use it to serve the lives of, you know, not only myself and inform the life decisions I make. But but serve, you know, my neighbors, and I would argue the most vulnerable among us and lift us all up and then share with other communities. So that's that was the premise of the idea that we've started in and the first one's Monday night. So Dave, you you listen to our opening session. The damage report where we kind lamented about all the terrible things that the Trump administration is doing I know you can't get to political. But I do have a question for you. It seems like we're living in a post truth world the administration often. Labels the media as fake news. Regularly attacking journalists and members of the media. We've heard things like alternative facts. I imagine many people are questioning do facts exists. Do you teach backs in your classroom on almost seem silly to say that doesn't it data question? I I I'll be honest with you. You know, when I first thought of Stephen thought of the green room the first time in I started thought high was going to expand it. The idea of opening it to the city to make it much. More of a community minded thing was my initial inspiration right but fast forward, but I said with my students on Monday night. I have to tell you as I sat with them. I said, you know, the world world has really changed in that year. You know, the conversations were having in how we're going to have them are are feeling much much different are much much different. I you know, I I will tell the people Monday night. You know, this this agenda. This idea is not a town hall meeting. It's not a open such a city council, which by the way, both of those are wonderful things. But this is a classroom, and what makes classroom special what makes them kind of sacred ground is that we're all gathered as learners myself included. It's a it's a place where ideas can be challenged. It's a place where new ideas in the spirit of generosity and open mindedness can come about. It's where a space where sometimes what I hear. And I think that I've I wait, and I read and I study might strengthened by convictions. Sometimes it might help me see that the world seem very black and white terms have shades of gray. And I begin to start seeing that that my my my viewpoint needs a little bit of expansiveness, and sometimes sometimes my paradigm shift. I think of myself when I was Lillian Zayd nineteen twenty twenty one twenty two years old and. I will tell you that from the world I came up with with all of us this the small world of the people around me, and the influences, my ideas, and few points have evolved. And I hope they will continue to Volve as I listened to new information. So yeah, I mean facts exist at facts, also as we gain more knowledge and evolve they change, but we need to go. With the best information. We need to go with the people that are studying, and they're trying to make sense of it. And we're foolish not to one of the one of the topics that this group tackled in an earlier podcast was this this idea this disease if you will of anti-intellectualism this assault on academic. Really that has in my opinion, and in my view has become partisan. There seems to be a faction in a certain party here. That is assaulting education academia, literally by stripping money out of the budget for education, and by debasing and devaluing what it is that our professors in our education do. Your classes tend to be a little more innovative. I'd say, but do you do you feel that is is it your perspective that academia has come under assault in the past five ten years? There's there's so many things that could -demia is struggling with right now. I mean, the model of higher education that we talked about is a huge issue. It's a it's. I mean, I I need to preface this by saying I've spent my whole adult life on a college campus. It's in many ways of sacred ground to me where ideas can be shared in new things can be explored. But I also recognize that no longer is serving our young people the same way it did. And I mean, we talked about this this debt heavy we have students, and my colleagues will say in closed doors that were created a generation of indentured servants of people that we put them so deeply in debt that it's very very difficult for them to find their way out. You know, I think of it this way we need to kind of reframe the question and restart to change the conversation. You know, really within a half a block from where we're sitting are people that have spent are spending their professional life studying stuff. That matter studying stuff that we need to know studying stuff that needs to be part of of our decision making and often for reasons not so much to blame them not to blame any. Anyone that information is not sticking? It's not connecting academia's geared. So much often. This is put in publications that they kind of gets lost in these publications at small people read small groups of people read, and and we need to figure out a way to connect that just. Just one fall up though. And I'll I'll yield my time to the gentle lady to my left. There was a survey that recently come out. And I think I remember it was like a third of all Republicans had an unfavorable view of higher education, which is astounding to me. And so I know you were doing a masterful job of threading the needle and not being political at Meyer you for that. And I wish I had your ability to do that says a political punt though, it is. But how do we change that? And why is that bad first off wise that bad, and how do we change it? So I know that to be true. And what's even scarier to me is that there are people that are doubting the information and the research that's coming out of academe it gets to Touche's if they're now not believing that. And so I absolutely recognize. So there was a guy I met a number of years ago, Mandy artist Lustig, and our Starnes Lustig was a hold of cost survivor that I had the pleasure and honour of speaking to an interviewing he he ended up coming to American University and dedicating his life as an academic. Writing largely fictional stories about the whole cost. So that would never be those stories in the sentiments would never be forgotten. And I asked him after hearing his life story. I asked him, you know, we were talking about Viktor Frankl and his man search for meaning book, and I asked I asked artist how he would define what what spirituality meant to him in in in context to the life. He had lived. And he said to me that he believes with all of us bird to flickers these two flames if you will one with from concentration camp the ability to do incredible executed nece seeing people that just as sofa sleep gave away the meal that they had in order to allow you to live another day at the peril of myself. And then this other flicker this incredible -bility to do harm horrible nece to to literally to to sell out your own family into your neighbors for another night in that hellhole and. And he said that spirituality to him was the recognition of those two possibilities in all of us and to defend one and suppress the other. And and I think that that I recognize those are in all of us. It's in me, and you right and what I see happening. All too often is that we're not suppressing the right instincts, and we're fanning the wrong ones. And so the answer is the only thing only solution. I have is to begin to advocate and begin to do a lot more fanny a lot more suppressing encourage finding northstar that you begin to lead people forward on an education can be that education doesn't I mean when it comes to things like generosity when it comes to things like empathy for others and understanding the lives of others wanting to care those to me cross political Brown grounds. I'll follow anyone who believes those things in truly tries to live lives. Like then tries to lead with that. And I think as. Academics. We can begin to you have to teach empathy. You have to teach understanding Lisa Lucas who I said the national address the national book awards. She is a young African American woman who is leading a legacy organization, right? And he's about thirty nine years old. She's African American what her to stances are is number one that the canon American literature should represent the diverse voices of our country. That's number one. You don't. So that we begin to hear these number two two two night a generation of readers young do readers, not because reading is good which it is. But because it's through and misty said this because it's through the stories of others that you begin to develop empathy, you begin to hear the stories of people that are unlike us, right? And when you connect on a human level when you begin to empathetical understand who they are in the shoes at their walking in then that notion of other falls away, and that's what you can do. Well, so one of the things I'm really curious about as a community organizer. You're in Johnson county for a while when I was working with the center for worker Justice and working with members of the center who are mostly low wage workers. You know, they were like often terrified even come downtown make they felt so unwelcome because it was university. And they didn't really I mean, this is their words. This isn't mine. I mean, it was really hard. We would to have meetings at the public library, and they would not wanna meet at the public library because they didn't feel welcome. And so I love what you're doing. I love this idea of the of the series that you're putting on sort of two questions here. And the first one is. So what like what is I hear it through what you're saying? But what is the value that common every day people bring to the classroom in the way that you're you're presenting and the flip side is in what how do they benefit right? Like, how do you convince some? Buddy who is a everyday person who lives year round in our community. And maybe fills this franchise or marginalize certain ways. How does someone who might have a relationship with them convince them to come to your to your class? I guess I guess I I have a foot in both both of those worlds. I have spent thirty years living here in a community. These remind neighbors on my friends, and the people I know I also every day of walk among the twenty-somethings millennials. Zach was I was his adviser when he was a student here, you know, and you look at these two so this this is obviously these are exceptional Lillian Zach we've already heard from exceptional people. But at the same time, there's a lot of exceptional students. I tell you the reverse story. I did a thing with my students. Once I thought would be a fun bonding thing, right? We're gonna make t shirts, and and often t-shirts represent kind of the place you live, and you kind of have. Something that I said, let's design a t-shirt about living in in Iowa City. Right. If something that we have in a place like this. And an interestingly enough, they couldn't do it. They did feel connection to say they could do it for the university. They had all the inside jokes and all the inside information. So the first answer to question is the green room is going to be designed to number one to have the people joined together. So so it'll be sitting with the community and the students together, and they will see people like Lillian, and like a younger version of Zack, and they will say man, those are pretty remarkable people. And I'm very glad that the world is in their hands. Okay. Or is going to soon be in their hands. And and at the same time, my students are going to and by the way what they have is. You heard when Lillian was sitting here is they have idealism, they have energy, these wonderful qualities. They there's a purity Ivy Lillian has no agenda other than to do. Good. And that is refreshing and wonderful thing for guys. Like me to be reminded of the on the on the other side, what Lillian will see as she will see community members are mentors that care that have experiences, and ideas and stories that are going to go to make her path forward easier and deeper, right? And those two worlds together are better one. I agree. I don't. So. So so that's that's to me just even low hanging fruit. So what's what's the fifteen? Second elevator speech to get people to come to the green room who are not students. So so it's a pretty simple design, even though sounds by some complicated. The fifteen second kind of pitches is we're going to come together my students security in the class, which is that number one is unusual. They're not spectators are actually going to be active participants. In fact, they start at five thirty with the sound check with the folks that are becoming at six o'clock, they bring everyone all my students sit on the stage. And so whoever the guest is next Monday. It'll be Zach we'll be sitting on the stage, and they will have to be able to have a real green room experience of of getting to know each other the format has has often lectures, which I love lectures, often lectures, have this component of you go you hear you get inspired you go home and it gradually fizzles. Right. But what this is. Connecting and trying our best to connected to action. So the notion is that every single one of our events is connected to a local nonprofit community organization somebody on the ground who is doing the work people who are speaking. So that hopefully will get people inspired and be this wonderful, Keno, which I know we will Chrissy will come there and be able to talk about the work on the ground and invite people to join her come to the community table and to be able to be able to chat with her. And if able to say how I can help and then and then what do we do when it's over? We we walk a half a block to the merge, and we continue our conversation as neighbors students and university like was longer than fifteen seconds. But you know, I everyone here is like mesmerized out you talk. So they one more question really really we have. I think it's very interesting that we haven't on this podcast. But oftentimes when we we talk about education, we talk about it as an economic imperative economic goal. Or an end economic into. We talk about educating the next workforce in economic growth and whatnot. But that seems to be missing something about the real purpose and potential of higher education. Some things you talked about creating empathy and suppressing baser instincts because we all sort of have that duality. How do we get past in recognize that higher education has sort of higher calling and potential to really create the society that we automatically desires of talk talk. In other words, talk to us about Plato, right? I talk about Plato all the time. I do I I will say this. So so the thing is is that I want everyone to be -ployed. Right. I want everyone to be able to have leads. If you if you are. You are sleeping at night. And you're worried that your car is going to be repossessed or you're not going to be able to make at the end of the month and take care of your kids, and that is not a life. I want for anyone. So so the notion of my students finding work and be able to be employed at great, and but the answer your question is that start even half the equation? That's just a part. That's just the baseline. Stacey was kind of joking about Plato Plato who obviously started the first academy. Right. Had wanted to have his his students to ask what he called the eternal questions. Why am I here? What's the purpose of my life? And quite honestly, those kind of questions the perfect time to ask right is in this in this twenty something years when you're thinking through who do I want to be what I wanna do in the world, where do I wanna leave my Mark? Now, quite ASI. What also argue is those questions never go away. And at the age of whatever I am fifty seven fifty eight years old. I have to count. I'm still asking myself those questions, I don't think they ever changed and higher education is a perfect place. You can be an English major today in a history major tomorrow, and nobody cares. Right. You made me feel so much better about myself. Everyone's still trying to find themselves even in their late fifties. They do. All right. I love it. It has been wonderful having you. Thank you for everything. Really you for having me. We're going to we're going to close the show because misty's got get going here. But very quickly if you feel so inclined please make a donation to a party. So we can keep this podcast moving forward. Zach is heading is raising the bucket in the back support local entrepreneurs like Veronica Tessler through persistent tease. You can follow us at what's our hashtag. What's our live Iowa? Dp live Iowa this podcast will be live soon. We're not doing a wrap question. Are we guys? No, we're not doing something to tell people about that thing that we're working on. Oh. We got we got a big thing thing where we wanted to guys. I don't know if anybody remembers, but political party actually was founded back last October. And we really took it off big because that's what we like to do when we like the part Tae. So we had a big party downtown. And we had a bunch of speakers come out we shut down like three blocks and three hundred plus people came out, and I always city, and we talk politics, and that's what sort of kicked off a little party life. So we're having our one year anniversary, and we are launching what is going to be called the political party block Beal, oh see party where we will be having all the gubernatorial candidates, come out and talk to you folks at one of our favorite venues England. Hitter. And because we don't like to just talk politics, but we like to do culture, and we like the dance and we like saying like to get down. We're also going to have some entertainment for you folks, inbetween hearing the gubernatorial candidate. So it's going to happen on October six at the England theater. Are you guys ready to get political because guess what? Next year, we have the opportunity to elect a progressive governor something that I think all of us are here for so Mark your calendars Tober six England theater p p L block part hope to see you guys there. And if you happen to have a special talent that you'd like to share on stage one of us, and we'll get you in between those candidates. All right. Good night. Thank you.

university of Iowa Lillian Sanchez Iowa Charlottesville Donald Trump president Iowa City official United States Zach Simeon Johnson county America Dave gold co founder Elizabeth dential misty Rebic Princeton University
Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:24 min | 2 months ago

Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

"Just. A few months ago college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now, because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst generations when members of the class of twenty twenty half landed jobs, the experience is odd NPR's Berlin reports. Twenty twenty was shaping up to be a great year for Golden. DACA, he be the first member of his family to graduate from college not only that he was the Valedictorian of his school. Morehouse College. ATLANTA. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement it was postponed I wanted to give that huge speech onstage with my family friends and loved ones who made it very possible for me to go to it came to an abrupt end been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead he landed in the pandemic, it's been a really difficult transition you know and it's been one that's a mocking allies with. A lot of uncertainty. A lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native. Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot dako landed a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews. So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate through pollock is a Labor economist with the job sites Ziprecruiter. So compared with fee labor market in February before covert hit, we have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by seventy three percent. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring eighteen million jobs have been posted. On ziprecruiter since covert struck, what has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired interviews or evolving from those zoom skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person that all the lack of face to face human interaction that's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan she graduated this spring from the University of Iowa, and moved in with her mom it's been fine. But with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I, feel like my interviewer singing a different background, every single time with them. You know this is a very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work at a startup in. So I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months felt unreal even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people. Virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me all that is about to change this weekend. Kaplan will load up a rental truck and moved to a new hometown. Kansas. City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Berliner NPR news.

Danielle Kaplan Morehouse College Kansas City Twenty twenty NPR Zambia Berlin Berliner NPR ATLANTA Labor economist Illinois Kansas pollock University of Iowa seventy three percent
176: Radio interview replay - Are we just burned out with all these Zoom video meetings?

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

07:06 min | 2 months ago

176: Radio interview replay - Are we just burned out with all these Zoom video meetings?

"This is the business storytelling podcast with Christopher tra- available on Google, spotify apple, and Dora and other podcast channels want to play it on your iphone. Just ask Siri to play the KRISTOF trap business storytelling podcast also available on Alexa. Here's Kristoff today's episode. All Right Chris Trap, you've waited long enough. Let's bring on the program via the newsmakers line on newsradio six, hundred w emt a transplant from Germany and an offensive linemen back for the University of Iowa in. Right. Right around that time late night not saying you're old that your diploma had to be was they had to carve it in stone in no I'm kidding I graduated from college back in nineteen eighty nine. So I still got you by a few years. So as a university of Iowa graduate, I would imagine that once Hawkeye. Was There Hawkeye thing what was it like to hear Luca? Garza say I'm coming back I want to try for a national championship. Well now we gotta do it right I mean it was great news to hear. But of course, you gotta get on the court and and get down there certainly as a chance down. But. First of all, we gotta play we have to play basketball and. who knows what's going to happen? I mean, just look at Major League Baseball which is about the least contact. You know there's no contact between people and and they're they're struggling. So I can't imagine basketball and football I. Hope they both happen and hopefully the Hawkeyes have a good season exactly no, that's something that the right they're gonNA have to actually be able to get out onto the court and play the thing running across yesterday on twitter. After the Garza decision, who's they everybody and I will wear your damn mask. So we can get this basketball season going meanwhile some other things because of the coronavirus pandemic that have changed significantly Zoom Microsoft teams, all these different platforms that are coming up there as far as virtual work environments and I guess the big question that you may have an answer to kristoff trap. His are these virtual meetings working for people or is it just an absolute dud? Interruption. Do you need how digital marketing for your small to medium sized business reach out now and drop the message at sea trap and g mail DOT COM Well. They're working to an extent, right but but it is just like in an office, you can't have meetings for seven hours and you're going to get anything done. So you have to be really really cognizant of what's a meeting? What's an email? What's this slack message and not everything needs to be a meeting and you know even when you talk about conferences really briefly there is an overabundance of. Conferences, there's an overabundance of come on the Soom call video, and by the way I've worked for a while and the whole thing of being on video. It's a new thing like I never would go on video I'm on the phone you know call in, and now everybody is expected to be on video and then you know people walk in and what's the point in having ninety a little boxes and? You can't see him anyways. Yeah. It's smaller than postage stamps for for some them I. Think it's part of it's just proof of life so that they know that you're still alive be you're not being held hostage one of the things that I've noticed for people when they're doing these meetings is. You have a lot of people that are doing that and just walking away they just opened up and they just go away part of the things you look at the students out in the Los Angeles Community School district when the school systems shut down, there were forty percent of the students there that never even logged on. Do we have workers that are able to get away with just not logging on or if they do they just log on and walk away. They are trick to do that I'm not recommending. Off. To not, work today. Alex? But but on zoom you can do virtual backgrounds and I think they're Kinda cool because what I do and sometimes like with you know in a conference, I'll put my book the background. So it's like it's promotion rights almost like a press conference and there are zoom backgrounds where you can literally have a picture or video of yourself nodding. and. So you can't do that. The problem is when somebody actually calls a you. Or if there's Nothing not at just not like no matter what they say. There's there's too many political things that I can. Go to university career fairs, career fairs of mood move zoom as well. There are a lot of tunes for people to take advantage of these online tools because maybe could make these things before they've gone virtual. So you have access to them all really from wherever you are no matter where you are. And you know the one thing I do want to say the former journalist wants a journalist always journalists, right? Yeah. I you know I a lot of public bodies have done do meetings online and even like my my pool right in cedar rapids they have bought beatings on zoom and I would highly recommend to keep doing that the lindmark school board meeting the other day has like eight hundred people watching. Wow. When was the last time? When was the last time? You had eight hundred people at a board meeting like probably never right from public records perspective from that perspective they are working. Well, they were probably waiting for somebody to go off like happened in that New York City Board of Education meeting that just went viral somebody became an in general. You saw that one that was. I'll I'll send the link to it. It's something else I you know what I think. In in Joe Biden probably I think he needs to get a new background presume somebody else's basement other than where he? Could he go to your basement and and do a video there? Oh. I'm happy to send him an image but right now we're quarantined at home so nobody can visit. Just sending the image that okay send him the image. It's not a bad thing. Kristoff trap authentic storytelling dot net. You've got another website you WANNA promote as well. Yeah. If you. If you're thinking about traveling neck dear, travel reviews that online check it out the latest travel tips on how to do that and they gain. Yeah. Still trying to figure out if we're going to be able to go to Europe this fall, we may just end up doing a tour of national parks instead. So. Distance Way Hey kristof. Thanks for joining me. You're on the W.. Mt Morning Show have a magnificent Monday. Sir? Thank you to sixty degrees now seven, twenty, eight on newsradio.

University of Iowa Garza Hawkeyes basketball Chris Trap Kristoff Alexa Siri Germany Christopher tra Major League Baseball Europe Microsoft kristof Google Dora Luca Joe Biden apple
Hour 1: 6/15/20

The Paul Finebaum Show

36:26 min | 4 months ago

Hour 1: 6/15/20

"Is your money, not sure what to do with itself right now at ally, they'll help it save for the future with their smart savings tools. Bucket your money for the things that matter most analyze you're spending and save automatically all on top of a competitive rate for all things money. You deserve an ally. Visit a Y. dot com slash savings for more INFO ally. Do it right ally bank member FDIC. But cried passionate and patron tree of college. Football leaves here. The Paul Finebaum show our one podcast. Welcome the program on a Monday and there is a lie to dig into today, so bear with us as we work our way through the next couple of hours. Many many guests starting at just a few minutes, your phone calls of course, but let's get to some headlines that you may have missed over the weekend. Important headlines was the first one involving Ohio stake. The buckeyes, asking college players who were there for voluntary workouts to sign a a waiver. Lot of interpretation on what does this really mean is a liability issues at something that the university is is is taking. Putting his hands up the university. is saying that this is really just for education that's according to Jean Smith, and we'll talk to the person that spoke to Smith a little bit later on, but this store getting a lot of people's. Attention as The coronavirus. Spikes continue meanwhile. The University of Iowa has said goodbye to its coach the strength and conditioning coach and. Among, claims of bias behavior, this is a story that has been percolating really for a couple of days now, and it was finally taken care of today. Kirk Fair and the other day, the longtime head coach there has been there about twenty years said he has to do a better job and we heard that one before. Meanwhile. There's other stories making the rounds. Meanwhile Jay Bilas out there. Talking today about a couple of things, including will there be a college basketball season. He said football is definitely going to happen. But he's concerned about college basketball being compromised, that is certainly an interesting story and meanwhile South Carolina. Playing a role as well in the march over the weekend. Clemson had one South Carolina certainly taking. And we talked to. About that story the other day we welcome you to another program and the phone number here of course is eight, five, five, two, four, two, seven, two, eight five, and we will talk to a number of guests including Alan Green from Auburn University coming up here in a couple of minutes he will join us and give us the latest, not only on the college football season, but on how his campus dealing with the social unrest. In this country, we'll talk about the NFL situation with Philip Stutz and many other guests, including Heather Danish and Gary. Patterson joins US again. The TCU coach of last time he he was with. He said he had a record coming out. And I think that record is now so We'll talk a little bit about that as well, but the newly arrived many of the same issues. Certainly unrest out there and concerns about the college football season as I mentioned with with covert nineteen spikes, being heard and felt the country, but we will get our first guest Alan, green in a moment first your phone calls eight, five, two, four, two, seven, two, eight, five, and always great to have everyone here, and let's start with Pat. Who is in Georgia? Hey Pat Welcome to the program. Good afternoon. Hey Paul! Thank you very much. I wanted to talk about race Chard Brooks for a minute and then ask the question about the football season he. Is the black man who was shot and killed by Atlanta policeman I believe it was Friday night at a Wendy's. He had been drinking and had passed out in the in the dry line. And the Atlanta policeman was fired. The Atlanta city police chief resigned the Fulton. County district attorney has announced the charges. Whatever they all will be filed on Wednesday. And the Wendy's is now. Now. I don't guess. Why. windies is burned down And I don't care what will die says I. I'm just. Won't be difficult to explain arson to me. Everything well. Let me jump in her second before we get to whether or not. A material building was burned down or not I. Don't think there's a person in the country that thinks that's a good idea. Okay, can you? Can someone explain to me why an unarmed man! Shot and killed. Was this man going to be going to be hard to find him? You had this car. You had US plates. was a threat to anyone on the face of the earth other than himself. I agree with everything. You're saying and and and I think this is another case of murder I. Just I just don't understand you know why Wendy's was. Listening there's no way under the sun would justify but I just simply trying I, think to go in order here and I can't I wasn't there. That's that's a cop out, but it's also a factual I know. Of course it shouldn't have been burned down. That's that's ridiculous, but on the other hand. I'm more concerned about someone's life. Than I am about a building that can be rebuilt. Well I I am too now What do you think I'm changing subjects? What do you think and all use the term over and under? With everything that is going on right now and there's there's too many things to mention in short telephone conversation with you, but from the corona virus to to spike in cases, what's going on in college football and the fact that black lives do matter, and it's I guess it is possible that people may decide. There's things they don't WanNa. Do the first weekend September maybe college football players. walked the. Scott legs. It really does fall. I was yeah pad. I will tell you I'd be less than honest. And I try to be as honest as I can be on this program if I didn't tell you that. The News right now from from the corona virus is fairly negative. and again we're talking. The numbers today are not the most important numbers to keep in mind but I think two to three weeks from now those numbers are going to be critical and if the numbers keep going up. Do, you think college presidents are going to feel good about letting students back on campus. That's number one and I think the football equation is a long way from being done we're. We're going to talk a little bit later about colleges. Asking players to sign waivers. I mean they can say it's education. I think that's BS. There, clearly trying to. Draw a line in. The sand. In concerns these these these young people and I don't think we're done with this conversation and I sense from the Tony Your Voice. You don't think we are either. Not No I don't and and I think there's another. There's another x factor in the equation, and that is black lives, matter and and I. Think, it's entirely possible that that unless something is done. in a very short period of time. I think there could be protests. I'll hear there. You're right I mean there's already a story developing out of Oklahoma State. We'll try to deal with in a minute. There there is a lot going on in the college football sex. Thank you for the call. Appreciate it. JIM IS UP NEXT HEY jim. I'M GONNA. Be As long as I can, but I'm going to be as forthright as a should be. Ready should be about the situation with going on in the country Paul Week. This one hell of a bad miss and I understand everybody's Can't you know about racial so forth? Obviously, it's there. I don't know what's going on with with with the racial tension I talked to a police friend of mine. I've known all my life. Was Played Ball with him and I mean he's a sharp guy. used to be with the police force and he's been an investigator. He's a smart guy on stuff. He thinks that the cop course, everybody we. He thinks like I do the. Stupid wrong and an irrational to shoot a man in the back. Running but at the same time he's also aware that the the guy was resisting arrest. That's gotTA. Be pointed at you. Know that and. You don't run from policemen. You know that all you don't run community I know you don't from policeman, but if you do run from the policemen and the only crime you've been questioned on whether you. You were under the influence. Then police have use better judgment. Finish I'm. Really WanNa let you finish. Because what are you saying? What I was telling you about? Point and okay. Okay Follow The twenty eight thanks. The COP got pissed off for for the guy running from him and. Acted absolutely wrong and irrational wrong and no better will happen to the guy the COP now, but it's causing. This is causing racial, taking beyond believed him and let me ask you a rational question. Why why? Why are we having all this racial tension? Number one because policemen I continue to kill people that are unarmed. Can meet it. How should I know why? I'm asking you a rhetorical question. Answering question for you We didn't have protest and we didn't have things being burned down when policemen weren't suffocating. Black men in Minnesota, nor were they shooting an unarmed black man in Atlanta. That's why we had what we had Saturday night GM. That's exactly why okay, but the point is. Done all the. Listen to this. Place, the declining police, not supporting the please turn declined to do away with the police. Come on. Don't give me some rhetoric up from some crazy place. That's not happening in this country, and you know it I don't know it. What do you do what what answer them? It's this fall. What's going on here in Seattle? What that? They've already done away with the police in Minneapolis advocate? Jan this is first of all. This is no time for the two of us to the yelling. We need to become and I'm GONNA I'm GonNa Become Rutley all ever. You never failed. Interrupt me. And talk but I can't talk. I can't get those. Up to me. You're talking now. Bought made my point the. Craziness going on, and it's. Okay do me a stimulus favorite. How do we? How do we solve this problem? I don't know. I don't know all I know, is it? Something's gotTa be spits this craziness first of all, I think everybody I think people are blaming people that's. How I don't know I mean this is beyond me. It's a May, but it needs to be discussed with with with a rational. Things being said on it out, not a few, and I like you screaming at me interrupting me because I'm trying to make a point about what you know what I thank what I'm doing going. Shouldn't be scraping a you about I. heard the topic I. Heard the COP. In Minnesota, was. I don't know what to say about it but I. Heard it was not it was i. don't know that, but when I do know is this. All. We have to go to. A break is not because we're upset with each other we we are. We have a guest coming up here in a minute we'll take a short break back with much more as Monday as often running. Listening to Paul Finebaum show podcast. We welcome you back to the program and great to have everyone. Hear more of your phone calls in a moment right now. We WanNA bring on Allen. Green, who is the athletic director at at Auburn University and someone we. Have tried to keep in touch us over these last thirteen or fourteen weeks and Allen thank you for the time, and it's always great to catch up with you. My pleasure Paul. Thanks for having me on. Thank you very much I've seen a video or two that you've put out. I, know you've been very active in meeting with not your coaching staff, but student athletes across the Auburn campus. Over these last couple of weeks since and during the aftermath of. The tragedy with George flooring so many other things continue to happen. I'm interested if you could update us just on the dialogue, and and how you think it's going because college campuses right now are very uncertain and very unstable, sometimes in relation to people understanding what's going on? They are Paul Yeah in one of the things. We've been doing this trying to make sure that that dialogue continues. So much of what we're seeing. Play out in on news or on the national media. speaks to a lot of the history of racism in our country and I don't say that very cavalierly essay that because that's that is the true experience particularly for people of Color this country and The, people who asked to in our department, our coaches, our staff, our new leadership, our student athletes. Everybody's at a different point in how they're digesting. What's going on in our country? And it's really important that we back when we listen, and we try to understand where people are coming from so that we can continue to educate and continue to to move on and find meaningful ways to have positive impact. Alan I. I can't tell you how many times over the years I've been on campuses and. It feels like maybe the students were not. Engaged but I. There's no question. Students are engaged today maybe more than any time in modern history. Maybe you'd have to draw a line back more than fifty years when there was so much unrest going on the country. I'm interested in what what you think and why you think. The engagement is there and what you hear specifically when you when you visit with your athletes down there. Well. A very good question and I've had that conversation with lots of my white friends and colleagues about why the engagement now and. I think I've made this comment. Before to someone else's Kobe nineteen has brought. A an opportunity for us to sit back and reflect an obviously, there's a time things are happening with cloven nineteen that are been tremendous disrupt to disrupt to our our daily lives. I think the absence of sport particularly in our in our smallest fear, and the distraction of sport. Because it's not there, our intention is solely focused on the things that are happening in our country and around the world for that matter. And so when you don't have to worry about practice or preparing for a game then then I just think that there's a heightened sense of awareness of what occurring and I feel that our student athletes in particular white black indifferent I want to make a difference. I think they see that the world is not this Utopian world that they thought that they were in, but yet that they that particularly this generation has an impact to to have meaningful change, and I applaud Austin. Athletes for wanting to do so I think collectively as Americans want to make sure that people have the basic human rights. to be able to to live and thrive in this country as the other person would. Only, get to the the other issue out there. The one that you're dealing with and dealing with every day since early March, and that's getting The athletes back to a position. Where we can have the beginning with football season in every other season. I Dunno about Auburn does this, but we're seeing reports. Around the country of SMU Today Ohio state were restored net where students athletes are being asked to sign waivers. Is that at Auburn and can you explain why this is going on? Yeah I can't speak for what's happening on other campuses. I know we had some very preliminary discussions on. If we wanted to do something similar we chose not to and not just we felt that was the best thing for our situation at the time. And beyond that the health and safety of our student athletes and our coaches, and our staff, and our community is critically important, and we make sure that we're doing the best. We can to educate all constituents so that we can have the best opportunity to have a normal fall for for everyone involved as normal as we possibly can be. I know you. You've already answered the question that you decided not to, but. For instance for those of us who don't understand what this means, what is? The rationale to even consider asking. them to sign, waivers. Again. It's hard for me to speak on on on what other campuses want to do for us? The important part is that we educate educate our student athletes and help their families understand the precautions that were taking as as we. Open up our facilities for student athletes to participate on voluntary basis and That is a position that we've taken from from day. One in terms of the health and safety and wellbeing of our folks, and will continue to work to make sure that that we can provide the safest environment we possibly can. Do you feel any more optimistic or less optimistic, a weekend to the voluntary workouts about us, getting to the college football season. That's a good question and I. I I would say I'm optimistic. You just don't know and you know. We're inside three months from from the style kickoff football season, and still there's so much that we've learned from this point in time since you know mid early mid March. Into Kobe. Up At our world, and they're still a lot to learn. Until were planning were preparing for. Foreign uninterrupted season, but we also have to take the necessary precautions to have contingency plans and we're trying to do that as well. Allegri and director of athletics at Auburn University Allen. Thanks for making time always a pleasure to speak. My pleasure Paul look forward to seeing you in the fall. Hope, so thank you very much allen joining us from Auburn. University, we'll take a break I'll decide digest what he had to say with more of your phone calls when we come back. You're listening to the Paul Finebaum show podcast. We welcome you back so great to have you here on a Monday and let's get to the calls if you don't mind and Logan is next up calling from North Carolina. Hello Logan. Ape All, it's great. It's ought to you as usual. Thank you so much. Yeah it's man. It's getting really heavy out there. I I I was hoping we have turned a corner We had seen all these peaceful protest And then what happened this weekend was just. It's just tragic You know my friend I tried to block out the media on the weekends. I don't like to see it. Twenty, four seven, and my friend called me and explained to me what happened. See the gentleman in in Atlanta. And the way he described it. Was You know the guy had had gone after the policemen. he was in danger But you know after watching that video I just I can't see it that way. I just can't see the reason wow! You know he was. He was killed For me this Logan, if everything, the police chiefs in this country you're saying is true. Then why didn't they just? Drive him home. Exactly I mean I don't understand if I think. Negotiate for thirty minutes is say listen. We're GONNA. Help you into the car. And by the way if I. I I understood he I understand that the gentleman. took the tasers from the police. Not that that says very much for the two policemen that a guy under the influence can can take away from two men, but I wonder but. That doesn't matter. I mean and and again the guys running away. Where's he going to go? Exactly, I mean they had his. I D. Why they didn't cut them to start with you know. By the way Can can to sober policemen. Outrun a man who was under the influence. Exactly I mean it's ridiculous I. think that you know we have to rethink the whole police training from the ground up and I made a lot of people. Are you know they're saying de-fund police and they're they're making. You and I know that that is a phrase. It's not happening, so let's not get. I don't I don't mind people things and using them as as as as their subject, but that's not. That's not realistic at the moment. Let's not waste a lot of time on it. Exactly I think it needs to go back to training I. Mean you know when they're high when they hire, these guys is there. Is there a psychological test is there? Is there some way to weed? Logan there is, but I will tell you I'm as guilty of it. As the next person I lost my cool talking to a guy a minute ago. Twenty minutes into the week, so you put my situation. On a Saturday night in a hostile situation in a hostile environment where the person that we should have just Put in cuffs, or at least taken in custody not only gets away from us, but steals our tastes Taser. I would imagine your emotions are running pretty high. Are they running high enough for you to kill him? No. That's absurd and that that's that's indicative of all. The training in the world usually does not help when you are in a situation of accelerated anxiety. And that's a good point. You know the one thing. I would say all. You don't have a gun, so that's the difference you know we. The one thing I will say is I realized that midway through the call. And I tried to calm myself down and colored down and I think we got off with just a minor hostilities. Yeah. I mean I think it's A. I think he did a great job. Understand everybody's. Is it a heightened state right now? I mean anybody that's watching. The news is gonNA. Be On it I. Am and you know like you know I? Watch your show because you do have both sides on it. I I really look forward the rest the today, because I imagine there's going to be a lot of people calling in and saying you know. That was justified that they killed the Guy I don't. Think. That's okay, yeah I I'm sorry that we we. We're into this conversation. But you and I didn't create it Logan. Some hothead officer in Atlanta created it and I'm sorry that's how I feel. I, don't need to have a preamble that I respect the police. I don't respect with this guy did I can tell you that right now. Nobody should. Absolutely, not tall and I appreciate that and that's why I love your program. Thank thank you for doing what you're doing. I really appreciate it. Thank you for the call a nice of you to be with us. Alex is up next. How are YOU ALEX? I'm doing great Paul. How are you? I'm doing well. Thanks a lot. Have you been? I've been well. I survived a tornado here in chatrooms where I live. And I live forty steps on a third floor, and the only thing I lost all my plants in my strawberries that grow in everything now. My car was pretty messed up, but like the old joke. Two tornado hit my car, but it did five hundred dollars with improvements. and. I don't mean to be cynical but I i. don't know if it's the same car that I. You took me home in, but. I don't think you could have done any more damage that car. But I I wanted to say something. Right at the beginning, an old friend of the show was hank. Williams Junior Yup. And and I'll tell you. He had a tragedy happened this week, and he lost his daughter. I saw that I'm sure I don't know what the circumstances were, but I am terribly sorry to hear that. It was a traffic accident okay? And I'll tell you one thing you know. He was one of the guys that called into the show Wehrley. We didn't call him. He called A. when when it was his time to be on the show, and he asked me I don't remember if I told you this or not, but he I don't not to mention this. But. I'll put it this way without violating what he asked me not to do. Anybody that's in the military of man or woman that's been overseas and have been. Severely injured. They. Don't have a better friend than Hank Williams Junior. He, did a lot of things anonymously, and he never wanted credit for it. And I'll just leave it Dan but. I haven't talked to hank in a while, but I I'm glad. You mentioned that I may try to reach out because that is a terrible terrible thing to do, and that's a family that has. As we all know has been beset by by a lot of tragedy. Well I'm sure his heart aching right now and just everybody sending well wishes but. Yeah we. We've lost a lot of coaches as we coach dying coach majors. And you. You know Alex I thought about you. How many times did you dial that number to get a hold of coach die when you were working with the show. Oh, you know he over the years. He and I became pretty close. And and he is a matter of fact he invited me to. He knew I knew nothing about farming. But. He invited me to come to the form one weekend, but you know I had my mother so i. I couldn't leave her. You know in her condition, but anyhow I've got a story about coast I in in getting back to coach majors, one of the greatest calls I ever had and I can't. You know what I'm talking about. It wasn't PG thirteen. I know. I know exactly what you're talking about. Well I've got a great coach die. Story and I, don't remember if I told you this or not, but he and Nancy worth form one day, and this dog shows Do you remember this? No, I don't. Okay I know Dallas would know it, but anyhow. This dog shows up at the farm. Any had a rope around his neck and he'd chewed through the wrote to escape. Somebody could use. The rope is a leash the. Dog In. So Nancy and coach. You know as we all are. Doglovers took care of this of this dog. And, and it had horrible abrasions around its neck were tried to get away, and it had to be nursed back the hill. So this went on through the football season and every time I would call coach. I would ask about rusty coach named him rusty. And you got better and better. Course Albert has a great veterinary school I. Believe, don't they? That is correct. Yeah and so I'm sure I'm sure rusty was taken care of so anyhow. Rusty became a member of the families slept on the bed every Sunday. So. Is the football season went on? I would always ask coach about rusty, and he was getting better and better, and then one day you know after a while coach and I started talking about stuff on the farm and he knew I knew about as much about farming is is quantum physics, so he would always take time to explain things to me. And, and so anyhow one day he mentioned to me that he had a bunch of chickens missile and he couldn't figure it out whereas chickens were. you know so a couple more weeks go by and. I, you know he was on the show and I called him I said coach Rusty doing. How's his name? Is he healing in coaches? He always called me LX. Not Alex but Lx you know a lot of my southern relatives did that. LX Let me tell you. I found out rusty's a wolf. In Rusty was. He was living the high life on the form. Let's just put that way. That's amazing I would agree I had never heard that well. I. Guess I just in Table. Day We need to get Alex back here one day, and just doing our on all for those who don't know the Alex Bell used to. Be Behind the glass on this show took the famous Harvey Updike. Call and so many other famous calls, but You. You got enough for thirty for thirty Alex on all the encounters you had with. Our callers in our guests. Well! Thanks! That's I got a challenge for you Paul. I know you're friends with Brad Paisley. He loans you. His cowboy hat remember. Did you are correct about that? So I was thinking about the coaches. We've lost I mean we've lost a coach die? We've lost coach majors. We've lost on Shula recently. and. There was no rochester brothers song. If there, what what what what was it? If there's a rock and roll band in heaven or something you don't talk about? Of course it was. It was fantastic song. We'll do. You always wanted to write a country song. You told me that years ago. Will you and Brad Paisley should get together and write a song. Not like that, but about all the coaches in you know coach Bryant. Coach Joredan ways in these guys, the Heck of Great Coaching Staff. They've got up there. That would that would be. That would be an amazing idea. Know I I. Did spend a little bit of time in Studio? Couple of years ago up in muscle shoals. And we, we scribbled out. We did have a little bit of fun, but This would be a much better idea I. I totally agree with you, Have quite a Finebaum show in heaven. Oh. My goodness it would be, it would be amazing. Speaking of muscle shoals remember when we had chuck Lavelle on the show, absolutely yeah. One one of the highlights of my life. You know the name of the Song I. Think Is Rock N Roll Heaven Alex. That's it and I believe it was the righteous brothers. Song wasn't quite as famous as unchained melody, but It was one of their better ones. No is. Listen. We're up against a break here as you well know, but. That's a really interesting idea I could see. WHA-. Phasing Song You. Give me a great idea. We'll bring you into the studio Alex. thanks to call. We are heading to a break a few minutes late, but better than ever. We'll be right back. Listening to about Paul Finebaum show podcast. Another intersection of the world of sports and politics is bubbling over right now. Coming out of Oklahoma and we'll go there in a little while, but shove Hubbard one of the top players in the country certainly the best player out there under my cupboard, has been reacting to a picture seen over the weekend. Mike Gundy wearing a tee shirt. Say on the t shirt and said Oh am which stands for the one America. News, network it is a small fringe news out network, which happens to be. Favored by President Donald Trump these days and When this stuff when this picture of Gundy. BEGAN TO BUBBLE AROUND A couple of players started offering. Words of dissent and now travel has come out and I will not stand for this. This is completely insensitive to everything going on in society. And it's unacceptable. I will not be doing anything with Oklahoma state until things change change being. Capitalized A. The coach out there. Gundy has been very critical. Of, the mainstream media saying he favors a away N. and It apparently is going over very poorly with his players, so a really interesting story among other stories currently making the rounds and we'll have a guest on shortly to discuss that issue. Let's check in with Brian. Who was up next Abe Ryan Welcome to the program. Hey, Paul, how you doing man. I am well. Thanks a lot. Appreciate the call. I've been listening for. Fans. How twenty years? Along town. And you know I. Love Your Show. Sometimes I don't agree with. Everything you say, but you know we don't have to agree. Do we but as long as we're talking. That's listen whole. You are right about that. and. I You asked a question It's been a couple segments ago. You know. whose life. Was You know this guy you know putting endanger whose lives was threatening. Before. I answer it. And and I know. You'RE GONNA. You know, agree with me that you wouldn't want this job with all your multiple you is you know on the road? You know your family or anybody else. You know so. They were doing their job at first. But for them to kill this guy, and that's what it was mark. It. Was Wrong, and they were wrong. Whoever he? Pulled the trigger he murdered. been. There's got to be a way. To weed these people out that are driven by fear. that. And that's what it is. They're scared. And and the first thing they want to do is they're gonNA. Shoot somebody man. They cannot be leaving.

football Paul Paul Finebaum Atlanta Alex Bell COP Alan Green Logan Auburn University Ohio Wendy Allen Oklahoma State Minnesota basketball University of Iowa rusty Football FDIC Jay Bilas
GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 241: Interview with Michael C. Bland

GSMC Book Review Podcast

41:45 min | 4 months ago

GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 241: Interview with Michael C. Bland

"Golden state media concepts. Bring you book, Review Podcast, haven for bookworm of all ages and the whitest genres from mystery to memoirs romance to Comedy Fantasy Scifi. If you love to read, this is a podcast. It's the Golden State needed concepts book review podcast. Below and welcome to. The, you podcast brought together. GMC podcast network I am your host Sarah and as always I am very happy to be with you here on another Tuesday, episode of the Podcast, and of course that means I do have an interview. I am speaking today with her. Michael C bland about his new novel, the price of safety. I kind of crazy hectic weekend and Was it crazy and hectic or did it just feel crazy and hectic I'm not sure. Does it matter but. That we can just went whooshing by, and I had too much stuff and not enough time, and all those wonderful things that actually is going to. Play into part of this interview later. I'll get to that later Yeah. We'll get to that later. I have to shake my head and confess things to you. At any rate. The interview is with Michael. C Bland about his novel the price of safety. By twenty, forty, seven, no crime in America goes unsolved no wrongdoing goes unseen. When Drake Quintero learns his nineteen year old daughter. Raven committed a heinous act. He covers it up to save her life. This pits him against the police. He's respected since he was a child and places him in the crosshairs of Kiran, a ruthless federal agent to survive dray must overcome the surveillance system. He helped build, and the technology implanted in people's heads for everyone has a microcomputer in their brain and computer screen lenses in their is. Forced to turn to a domestic terrorist group, protect his family as they're the only ones willing to fight the government. Drey tries to resist joining their cause, but can't avoid it for his adversaries have a level of control. He's unable to escape that no one can hunted and betrayed with time running out. dre must choose between saving Raven and dismantling the near perfect. He helped to create. So there, you have the description of the price of safety again. The author is Michael C Bland. You've got a little bit of a futuristic book because it is in twenty forty seven. That's only twenty seven years from now which is. I. Don't know that sounds a little bit crazy to me. Sometimes, I think about it. You have got a little bit of science fiction. You've got. I don't know if you would call this. A dystopia and our Utopian society crab probably depends on which part of it you're living in. It's one of those books where you may think it's you type Utopia until you come up against. The situation that dray and Raven and their families find themselves in, and then it's probably GonNa seem a lot more dystopia into you. There is of course science fiction aspect in it as we have lots of interesting technology, and you know the implants in people's brains and eyes and. I. Don't know I will still be alive. Hopefully I can't say that for sure of course, but I potentially could still be alive in twenty forty-seven. I won't be that old and I don't I. Don't want this to be the future I don't want. I don't think I want a computer screen lenses in my eyes or of computer in my brain. Maybe that will change, but right now just not sure that that is my cup of tea. The book is It's. It's got levels of thriller like I said it's got levels of elements of science, fiction and family relationships. Those are very important in the book as they struggle as a family to overcome everything that they are being thrown into. They had a family issues actually before all of this even started so those play into the family dynamics, and there's just a lot of different levels going on here in the book, but essentially it's It really is dre figuring realizing. That this this seemingly perfect society that he helped to create by designing a lot of the tech, for it is maybe not as a perfect as he had thought or hoped in the beginning, so let's go ahead and turn it to that interview with Michael C Bland again. The book is called the price of safety. Hi Michael Welcome to the podcast. Thank. You thank you for having me on our appreciate. I am happy to have you here and we are going to talk about your book. the price of safety before the book. Though if you could just tell us a little bit about yourself, so my listeners can get to know you. Turn Maybe start with a couple of facts My first job out of college included repossessing cars, which was very entertaining. Yeah Yeah, a lot of stories from that I took three years of Russian in college and lived in Russia for summer, which included seeing Lennon Tomb and generally drink. Water. and during a visit to west point I snuck into summer. Stick Mary's I think even a photograph. but as as far as a writing assignment, started writing a little over ten years ago, I took classes at the University of Iowa on I'm also a founding member of pot, which is a group of freshmen, writers, filmmakers editors. We've sort of rights as nanny. has reported what he maker lot of incredible people recipes, my first novel, which how the sails need a finalist, recently by the any book awards, and not one two categories, science, fiction and thriller. That's that's wonderful congratulations. And I WANNA I WANNA go off on a on separate engines. No We can we can the whole podcast talking about your your three fun facts, but. The now I'm picturing you bounty hunter, even though he that's not what he did, but I don't have hope the other mullet I don't. Come on. Because I can't pull it off. I don't know that. Anybody does but. I know okay, so we will actually talk about the book. That's what you're here for so. When you give an overview of the price of safety. Absolutely, the press safety is set in a world where technology is so prevalent that no crime goes unsolved. wind-driven tears and eighteen year old daughter Raven commits a couple of crime. He covers it up to save her life. Starts in rabbit hole where he discovers that nothing is as he thought it was. Actually it takes place in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Ya and that you know that that is an accurate description and yet. Wow, there's so much that happens to the family and You know that's kind of kind of the premise of of most stories like this is that you're living your life and you think you kind of have a handle on world until something happens and then. Everything goes crazy What was your initial inspiration for the story? When when I lived in Chicago I would ride the L. Subway almost every day and other passengers were just staring at their phones like you just walk around naked nothing. Anyone would want that, but. and. No one would would see notice yet on the ceiling of the cab our cameras so while nobody's watching. Someone's always watching and monitoring and tracking them especially more and more nowadays, and that was the what inspired me to. Come up with the price of safety and. As a as a society, we've accepted really kind of be watched and tracked and monitored virtual times, and I mean right now and comes with a price so far it seems to be some targeted ads. Okay? Yes, I like the hike and so you want to show me ads. I can choose fine. You know, but one day that price is going to come possibly can become too much. yeah and I really liked your your phrase. Well. No one is watching. Someone's watching and you know we just. We don't think about that much. Especially now with I mean you know we're not gonNA. Get into politics and crazy, but the world is right now, and you know someone is. Someone's always filming. There's cameras. There's you know stuff that that record most things these days. And and to as a very quick tangent with that on to add onto that is talking about tracking software and I. Know you know apple and android. They're talking about having tracking. Suffer to in some areas in some countries are using them and South Korea actually use that in a very effective way to contain some of the spread of the virus to started opening up, and while that is green, and it's a positive use of technology in the back of my mind is I'm reading about these efforts, these plans and and patient kind of thing. Is this kind of the starting point of possibly what becomes I story? Yeah it's a it's a slippery slope around. That's a good. Use of that technology to okay, where does it end? Yeah how far does it go? Yeah. This book is set in the future, but not that far in the future at set in twenty forty seven I could still be alive and twenty forty seven, so. I, I hope it doesn't look like this and twenty seven, but. you know why? Why did you choose that particular year? Well, one of the one of the reasons is exactly what your response was. In terms of you know this actually could I could still be alive and possibly experienced this but also I wanted to have a story that was relatable that it wasn't so far in the future where they're dealing, there's all this technology to you can't relate to. And then I was like okay well. I want to go in the future. How far and Used was okay. What was life like thirty years ago thirty years ago? Amazon didn't exist. DVD's didn't exist for also watching movies on VCR tapes and going to blockbuster. Palm pilot you know didn't. Out Cell, phones were bricks, and all they do is they made calls? Look how far we've come in thirty years to where in power hand we can access the depth and breadth of the Internet and we can track where we are finally we a map and reach out to people in multiple ways. Video calls textiles up. And the technology also is increasing speeding up as we get better and better with the with these. With the technology so from there, when what could it be like in thirty years speeding up? So that was with the the original inspiration of you know with no one watching it. Everyone could be watching. You sit there and go well if The technology does speed up and technologies. A talk us for Israel right, so of course the story is boring if it's used for cut so that's where you have to take kind of dark side, too, but that was what drove me. That was the reason why I chose twenty seven, because it was a far enough in the future where the technology could get past our ability to control to avoid. You gotta be relatable. We're going to go ahead and take a break here, but I wonder what you think about that setting of twenty forty seven, and what you envision the world to look like you know people keep making jokes about. We don't have flying cars. jetsons look like this or you know. All the movies and sci fi shows that came before that depicted the future, and we've passed those those future points, and you know things may or may not have come to pass, and then he'd look at Star Trek and some of the technology. You see there you see now i. don't know I think it's fascinating, but this is only twenty seven years in. In the future, what do you think will? What do you think the world will look like? What do you think technology will look like? I'm curious to find out you? You can definitely hit me up on social media or in the comments here and tell me what you envision the world to be in twenty seven or thirty years if you want around number. Let's go ahead and take that break when we come back, we'll be talking more about this. The price of safety Michael Bland. Are you tired of the same news. Are you sick of the seemingly endless political spin negatively? The MC America's still beautiful podcast is a weekly newspaper gas, covering all the top positive and uplifting news stories. We cover stories that will inspire uplift and remind you love the good in the world tune into the Golden State Media Concept America still beautiful podcast to get all the great and positive news stories of today download the empty America's still beautiful podcast on I, tunes, stitcher, soundcloud, Google, play or anywhere you're bond. vodkas just tight. Diaz Mc in the search bar. Welcome back to the. podcast before the break, Michael had just finished talking about the timeframe for the book, which is twenty forty-seven and we're going to talk a little bit more about that and some of the things that of course happened in this book, So let's go ahead and get back to the interview. Yeah I often think What what are our children going to experience? You know what's technology going to be like when they're middle aged you know. How far is it going to come, and and are things going to be implanted Can you talk a little bit about the? The technology that is. Part of all human in this story, and how you came up with those ideas. Absolutely part of my with. Watching people on their cell phone and I'm as guilty as everybody else, but you know the more that we've gotten to the point where Paul Ryan, we can access everything. With technology, continuing on what's where's that leading to? It could get to a point where in. Google Class KINDA had idea with it where it's just protect the screening process. Taking it out another step past that and you know if you're familiar with surgery where you know you're lenses in your eyes, get covered over film. There's now and we've been doing this. For decades I believe where you can pull out the lens in your and put a new one in well, what if that one has a clear computer screen, and then you can broadcast under that screen? and. With that is a very small implant in your temple. That basically becomes your own personal peter. It has everything you learned in classes in college hoops to your. Your employers network. Allows you to have this depth and breadth of ability, even more than we have right now so it ends up being woven into the fabric of your life, and how you act, and how you interact, not only with each other, but with your employer with. Your your knowledge base everything else because it's all in. A smoke very computer in your head. And I you know I. Don't WanNa to give too much away, but a point when the. When something happens to draze daughters implant and they're talking about well. She is maybe going to be hey. Her you know everything that was in her implant her passwords her. You know all these things her calendars. This stuff that we have on different devices is now gone And so you know her memories are still there, but all of this information is gone because her implant is not there. Right. It becomes a part of you. It really becomes I mean to in a way nowadays if you don't have your your smart device phone. Might feel Kinda lost well. If this implant that emerges everything in how you interact with almost every facet view is. hands-free it's a heard of you is literally a small piece inside of you. How much do you rely on it? And then you lose that? How how difficult is that then to interact and to live in this world? So, let's talk about drake the main character. Can you talk about him a little bit? And what might what about him might resonate with readers? For for drink on the big, the biggest thing is how much he cares about his family is family means everything to them. And protecting them is what drives him and I wanted that to be. The core of him. Because not only drives the story, but that's it's a universal desire you know, and it's something I also wanted to be very relatable with with readers and then in. My! Own Humble opinion is one of the biggest areas to that biggest struggles in terms of SCI FI novels in general. Is it going to be relatable You know whole bunch of strange worlds in technology. That isn't even. You can't even really fathom. All that's passing away. It's hard to relate on a daily basis, but. One of the things I really wanted with. The story is to be set on family and with the main character, his need and desire and want to. Protect his daughters over everything else. And so that was that's what I crafted. The whole story around and and many of the people that have read my story have talked about just the heart that's in the story and. That was key to me because the technology is great and fun, and all that it is almost like star wars, which I of course love Star Wars, and while the lights there was which I still would love to actually haven't lightsaber. technology's really cool, great and everything, but if you don't have the heart of the characters in it just becomes. Kind of basic story. So for me. Having having someone who cares that much about his family that was important to me, and now he would also that has to is that he actually helped create this world. He create some of the the software that is the technology that to use to track everybody so. Not only is in this position retirement to. Protect to save his daughter protect his family, but he actually have created. Yeah so, that adds that that extra layer of Complexity I guess would be a good word for it right? Yeah, he has to confront what he's created and battle those that are using against him. Yeah. Now the older daughter Raven is A. The catalyst in a lot of ways to this story but I want to ask you about the younger daughter who? I think needs our own book. Her. I don't know what to say more about her, but she just needs her own book. Appreciated that I will. Remind yes, she's. A lot of fun. She's she's. Been One of those characters as I would write her, she would definitely. Take over a little bit, which is always fun and Polaris so. I can imagine it and I think that she gives her fictional parents gray hair on a regular. Yeah I think they both do to different degrees. I definitely wanted them to be their own characters, and with their own opinions, and and desires, and you know I didn't want any character in the story to be a wallflower. They're all opinionated of an active and resourceful. Yes. How much research than did you do for the book? Because we're we're, we're talking twenty four seven, we are. Science fiction so that that's obviously where focus a research. I'm really dug into the latest achievements in robotics, technology, computing visit, technology and fusion research to knowledge based on where we are, but then to get ideas of where we would be in twenty four seven, because then you're taking the what's known and then leap into the unknown and. I wanted to make sure to avoid that leap. Where some stories. It's like the author. Stretched a little too much or Easy or just didn't work for their pot. Where you just, there was as leap that. As a reader, I would lose that. World that the author created and really wanted to try to avoid that, so I want to try to make it as believable and as. Connected as possible to where we are now now I admit I did also read some articles that predicted the future, and you know not to read about. The flying cars were all supposed to have, but together ideas of what might be possible. also dug into their is dark matter which is something that also just fascinates me because we don't know much about it you in such a large part of the university, so I crafted somebody on theories based on that research, and then he's building restore. Yeah where are are flying cars? I! Know. Everything predicted the jetsons had flying cars. We do not. Then? We'll disappointed in I, think we. Also. Don't know, do we? Do we really trust people with flying? I I kinda. Try to picture traffic with a whole bunch of playing cars academic being really ugly. Are there any autobiographical elements within the book? not myself directly however I was inspired by by my grandfather's because they're both engineers. One was a chemical engineer that with bill bill bombs during world. War Two Texas and the other one was a structural engineer to build battleships in New York City harbor during world. War Two Really mired them. Both are both extremely intelligent and so. DRE The main character. He's an engineer pearly and march to them, and also probably cause. It worked very well in the story. Okay and did. Did you mentioned what what do you do in your daily life? for for work when you're not writing so my my daily life I'm actually in finance chief operating officer for a company that provides millions of dollars of loans to businesses across the. So yeah, definitely you know the numbers finance side on one part brain, and then writing on the other, and there's nothing about finance or or loans or anything my book, 'cause. That's really interesting at all. They're doing it for of it. It's not that interesting. I was just curious if you had followed in your grandfather's footsteps and become an engineer as well. You know I I kind of wish that I that I had I really I think it'd be fascinating, but also I think part of the tribe with this book is to have a character who is an engineer. have the ability to take things created. Improve it. Know how it works. Make it better is fascinated me and I did have a good friend of mine is an engineer, and so I had him as one of my readers my Beta readers for this book to. Make sure there's some authenticity with engineer inside as well as the attitude, the engineer that. All right. Let's go ahead and take another break here for the podcast when we come back. We talking about what's next for Michael What he is working on now, so stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC book view podcast and I'll be right back. Tired of searching the vast jumble of podcasts now listen close and here this out. There's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searched. The golden state media concepts podcast network is here nothing less than podcast lists with endless hours of podcast covered. From News, sports music fashion entertainment fantasy football, and so much more so stop lurking around, go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to build that podcast is. Whatever it may be, visit us at www dot. Jesus MC PODCAST DOT COM follow us on facebook and twitter and download on itunes. soundcloud and Google play. News! Welcome back to the MC book view podcast and my interview with Michael Seib about his novel, the price of safety. Let's go ahead and return to that interview. Are you working on anything right now? Yes, I'm actually in the midst of the sequel for the price of safety. but we're on the pot for over a year, and and in the middle the traffic Max after Does interview. I'M GONNA, go back to that and so and the. When I first started creating the prices day I didn't plan on IT BEING A. Trilogy I just playing on IT AS A. Story beginning Middle End, and it wasn't until as I was created in fashion, and then I realized that I've started. It's a starting point of a larger story I mean. Don't get me wrong. Cliffhanger it's the beginning middle and end. But. To me. The algae is in my mind at least. Is You know the movie the Matrix where the becomes the? Ends up winning in the end. On any has a call, the phone booth and says hey, I don't know worth. Is GonNa. Go I. Don't know what's GonNa Happen next, but you know. Hang on basically so, and that was kind of the Emmy. The analogy is. dray goes through this journey him and his family, and then at the end he's. Completed that journey, but then there's what happens next, and that's what the sequels about. So, so we will get more Talia. Any more you know, obviously more of story. I know she just intrigues me. I can't help. I love that that's. That's a compliment, if someone. Character resonates. Yeah to yeah. On your website, you have a another work. Called lawyers can't fly. Do you WanNa? Talk a little bit about that sure alerts campfire. It's an action comedy about a young attorney who gets tricked into becoming the exclusive alert for superiors because they get tired of getting sued every time they superstars and destroying property, and he doesn't want anything to do with it because well, people are getting smarter than her and everything whenever they're around superheroes. Large Superhero. SPANDEX is kind of hard to ignore, and so they took and come their their lawyer and then. Ben's life quickly turns down as he's tried to their crazy world, but then superstar to disappear. One is a dead before he knows it. This young attorney becomes their only hope for survival. So it's has elements of the boys you know the a series of it was on. But not in like a jaded way, so the superheroes in this story on mighty man and woman and splinter others. Yeah, they. They mean well. They want to help, but you know just 'cause you have sewer parasitism in the year anymore emotionally or psychologically balanced and the rest of us, so you get someone you know that deserve a really bad day and they can you blasts over there? Is You know I mean that's always gonna go well, so there's no really instruction manual for being a superhero that was kind of a weapon, and it's a really fun huge take. And I was able to got had the opportunity to pitch the idea to Columbia Pictures. So, it was really kind of a fun thing It was through this was it rolled fast, and you could apply line to Smith forward and in three different cities. Portland Columbus and Philadelphia. And I was one of the ones selected for this just one of about a dozen people, and then after I did the Pitch Session you know? They give you five minutes and actually I still about seven but You know there was a great fun experience. They laugh at the jokes and they went on the parts that I hope they would, and and then about a week later they asked for a copy of the whole thing so. I was my story right now. Wow. That is really exciting and actually I I. Love The concept because whenever you watch. A Superhero movie. It seems like the big battle at the end. There sent me. Stuff is just destroyed everywhere. New York City is destroyed Washington DC all the monuments are destroyed, and seriously I mean thanks for saving everybody, but could you maybe have not been quite so destructive? Exactly Lewis destructive. You know maybe try to get cars to see who wins. But, yeah, exactly so that and especially with then at falling on this this young attorney. This guy who you know doesn't just know personally you me, and and he's now the only one that could possibly trying to save these superheroes. Really fun kind of way not. They're all dependent on him. Yeah I'm. Still You You mentioned that you know you, you do finance in one part of your life, and you write in another part of your life When did you start writing something that you've always wanted to do? Or did you pursue that later in life more later in life, especially estimate after going through college and getting my first job and Involving repossessing cars for living, he you, Kinda go, what might do if my life? Go, to your college which was a great college in win, but yeah, it definitely makes you kind of reevaluate a bit and obviously I'm not. Currently more, but it's still didn't make me take action. What is really important to wasn't going to do and and. Storytelling is. Is What I've always enjoyed and gravitate towards, and it's to the point now that you know. If even five wanted to stop I never got published over again. I would still right just for for me. That's my enjoyment when the lottery tomorrow. This is what I'll be doing his writing. That's what I love From your particular perspective then do you have advice for aspiring authors? One of the biggest things is to I I would really recommend that they get at least another fellow writer who they can work with to hold the craft. While I was doing well, I was blessed to become really good friends with gentleman by the name of Robert Quebec whose novel Bernie came out last year history. Book recommended, and he's had dozens of stories published one of his adapted to a short film It was a professional for twenty plus years. We became friends at one of the University of Iowa workshops and My relationship with him has really elevated my writing because. For these spirent author, you really need to get someone who now as a fellow writer knows what you go through, but can give you the most honest, blunt clear advice feedback of your writing. Because writing is can be great can be fun, but you really need to push to that next level, and not getting feedback, and not getting the one on one, or you're part of a smoker, and you can trust each other that you are there to help each other. That's what pushes you to the next level. really elevated my writing and you get to a point where you're pushing each other to consider every sentence, every word that's used, and it can be painful but it really pushes you writing and improves you. Thank you for that. When you take the time to read for yourself, who are your favorite authors or genres? Do you gravitate to? Do gravitate more towards science fiction, with something and my my father group huge science fishing deconstructing that. KINDA! Pro reason why I got into it so much you know he would have Isaac Asimov. You know also Heim Lynn, you'll stranger in a strange land, and and others just laying around the house and so that's what I would read starting a young age I still a fan of as also Pierce Brown the red rising series fantastic series. Recommend that especially the tone of the main characters just. Amazing been is not just science fiction, Terry, kind of the sort of true series, I'm a big fan of that. haven't read the last two or three, but read virtually everything all the other one. and then. Those are the main ones that can jump to mind. Well. Let me just say that. That is an impressive commitment to Terry. Good kind because they're. Those are not small books. They. They are not and they each like. Wow, I can't imagine writing the story that large. CI. Keeping Track of everything and Yeah It's IT I. It is impressive. listen I. Haven't read the last few just been. Like, you said wrapped up in own writing between that and life and everything else, but they are the two main characters are two of my favorite great pushman killing. Yeah I know you have a website so if you can share the address of your website as well as where people can interact with the on social media if you have any. Movie website is easy. It's MC, BLAND DOT COM. which just a very quick funniest side because you know. I published as Michael Bland. Because if you Google Michael Bland, he's prior rubber for Prince, and I'm not nearly that cold. So that's why. Wow, see bland right. I know. I was like seriously. That's pretty impressive so and that's why I haven't see bland. A DOT COM I'm facebook MC Blaine writer twitter at MC Bienne. Writer instagram good reads are you can link it from the website Hamas well as learn about being and hopefully by copy and Oh, that yeah or books, also prices safety is also available, not only Amazon Barnes and all that should be your local bookstores well, if not always just ask for it and Get there. All right well Mike. We've talked about a variety of topics, but is there anything that we haven't talked about that? You would like to mention now in terms of your writing. Are really proud of the price of safety. It's the beginning of of it's a story, and the beginning of a larger thinks really going to resonate with people fast paced, has heart reflection of where we might go as a society for the NFL? I is. All right well. Thank you so much I really appreciate you taking the time to talk to me about the prices safety and all kinds of of other fun time Thank you so much. Thank you for having me on. This has been great. I really appreciate it. Thank you once again to Michael for joining me to talk about the price of safety of course I always appreciate all the authors who come on the podcast to talk with me, I appreciate you as well. My listeners okay, here is my confession my. I'm so mad at myself. Okay, so I said the last week was weekend was pretty crazy. The week before was a little bit crazy hectic as well and I got over scheduled, was my own fault for interviews and got behind on my reading, so I hadn't actually finished the price of safety by the time that Michael and I spoke over the weekend. So. If you've read the book and You were listening to this interview, you were probably thinking. This woman is an idiot. How does she not know? X. Y. and Z about this book. Michael was very kind. He did not correct me on the part that I was confused about because I had not finish the book he was. He was very kind to not point that out to me I appreciate that. But my apologies to him for not knowing what I should have known in this interview and I know that's vague, but I do not want to give away what I did not know If you have not read the book if you have read the book, you probably know what I'm talking about and. Feel free to roll your eyes totally totally understandable. Yeah okay, I got that off my chest. Thank you for your patience Michael, and for joining me for the podcast as always. Thank you to you my listeners. If you are a fan of this podcast, even though the Horse, the host can be a Dork and doesn't finish books on time. Please do give us a nice review whether that's written or a five stars as always that helps us to get the podcast out to more people who love books as much as we do. Also, follow us on social media, facebook, twitter and instagram. You can tell me what you think. The world's going to look like in twenty forty seven. You can tell me what you're reading. You can tell me that I'm Dork. Whatever it is that you feel like you need to tell me although. Maybe please be kind about telling me I'm a DORK. I don't need any trolls in my life right now. We'll really who does. If you are someone who welcomes trolls in your life. Hey, that's interesting. I am not one of them at any rate. Please interact on social media. Hope you're having a wonderful week so far. Please join me again on Friday, when I am speaking to author Pat McKee his new book Aerials Island the book. We just talked about today. The price of safety is that in twenty forty seven areas, island is more contemporary, but it deals with Maybe not completely similar issues, but this does involve technology and artificial intelligence, and some interesting questions about artificial intelligence, so it's it's a legal thrower, so join me on Friday as I speak with author Pat Mickey in the meantime once again I hope you're having a wonderful week. Hope that week continues to be wonderful. Too Hot wherever you're living. It's definitely getting to be summer here. not my favorite time of the year. Like the air conditioning. I guess so. I will stay inside and I will read I. Hope You can do the same thing and get yourself lost in a good book, thanks. You've been listening to the Golden State Media Concepts Book Review Podcast, part of the golden state media, concepts podcast network. You can find this show, and like it at www dot p. stem see podcasts dot, com download our podcast on Itunes, stitcher, soundcloud and Google play this type in Jesus, Mc to find all the shows from the golden state media concepts podcast network from movies to music from sports entertainment and Evens Weird News. You can also follow twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope enjoyed today's program.

Michael C Bland Michael Google Raven engineer facebook dray America University of Iowa twitter New York City Michael C soundcloud Drake Quintero Drey Sarah writer Kiran
Traditional M.B.A. Loses its Appeal, Forcing Programs to Close

WSJ What's News

15:11 min | 1 year ago

Traditional M.B.A. Loses its Appeal, Forcing Programs to Close

"Whatever you and your employees are working for ADP, designing better ways to help you achieve it from HR talent, and time management to benefits and payroll. That's ADP always designing for people stock markets. Soar after the fed hints it might cut interest rates. It was a pretty sharp rebound. It was the biggest one day gain for US stock markets and many universities are shutting down their traditional two year and the over ever since I've been on this speed. I've noticed that applications have really been falling and falling at a faster and faster clip. Plus, Senate Republicans threatened to block President Trump's tariffs on Mexico. This is what's news. From the Wall Street Journal. I'm Kim Gittleson? Let's get started. Now, before we get into our main story this morning, the decline of the traditional two year and be a degree. Here's what you missed. It was a big day on Wall Street yesterday. Stocks rallied in the wake of dovish comments from Federal Reserve chair Jerome Powell. Here's some of what he had to say from a conference in Chicago. But I like to say a word about recent developments involving trade negotiations and other matters. We do not know how or when these issues will be resolved. We are closely monitoring the implications of these developments for the US economic outlook, and as always, we will act as appropriate to sustain the expansion, many interpreted, Mr. Powell's comments as a willingness by the fed to cut interest rates are markets. Reporter Steve russillo explains. Just why investors were so pleased. So investors got their strongest indication yet that the Federal Reserve could actually lower interest rates in the coming months. Should they deem it warranted? And so therefore, you had a huge day in the market. The Dow rose over five hundred points. The SNP was up over two percent, the market, hasn't fully recovered, what it lost over the past several weeks here since the beginning of may. But it was a pretty sharp rebound who was the biggest one day gain for for US stock markets since January. One of the reasons why investors are so excited by this development. Is that fed chairman Jerome Powell could've very much said, no we're not going to cut rates and been very definitive about that. And then that would have been a negative for the market. But when it comes to these fed speakers investors, and people really do a lot of they read the tea leaves, and try to figure out exactly what they mean. And basically Jerome Powell left open the option for a rate cut should it be needed. And that's important because there's a lot of concern about what's happening with the trade tensions. And if he had said, no, we don't believe we believe that the economy is fine. And we are not going to cut rates. I think that would have stoked a lot more fear in a lot more concern about what was coming because there are a lot of economists out there that are predicting that things are going to get much worse than they currently are Mr Powell. Did not say that a rate cut was imminent and did not did not use such specific language. But on the other hand, he left the door open that something could happen should it be warranted. And while that might sound kind of obvious. I think the fact that the market got to hear that explicitly from him was signed enough that perhaps, you know, the fed will step in should it be needed. Elsewhere in Washington, Senate Republicans are threatening to block President Trump's efforts to impose tariffs on Mexican imports. Here's Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell, speaking to reporters yesterday. Not much support in my conference for tariffs. That's for sure. I think I can say fli save most of us hope that this Mexican delegation, that's come up here and discuss the. The challenges at the border and what the Mexicans might be able to do to help us more than they have will be fruitful. And these terrorists will not kick in. Prompted Democrats to suggest that, perhaps the White House acted too hastily and suggesting that it could impose tariffs of five percent on all Mexican imports by next week. Here's Senator Chuck Schumer, the democratic minority leader squier, that lots of people need ministration didn't agree. And I believe that he will back off when faced with the opposition among business among his own Republicans. And when he sees what a dumb movie is made in terms of dealing with both the border the American economy. And with any kind of trade agreement, he might try to get a high level delegation from Mexico is set to meet with vice President Mike Pence later today to see if an agreement can be reached regarding Mexico's handling of Central American migrants to the southern US border and the board of Reynaud will reconvene for a second day of meetings after failing to come to a decision about a proposed merger with Fiat Chrysler, to find out more, I rang. Our reporter Nick Kostov. He stepped out of the meeting onto a Parisian street, so apologies for the honking, Nick, is it likely that the merger will be approved. Likely. I mean it seems to me that they've come to fall note to approve it and the finance minister, who has a big sadness different state has a big say was saying this morning on regular he supports the deal as long as he can get a number of guarantees. So they're still working on those govern teas. But if they can't find an agreement I would think that the board would approve it a majority of the board, obviously, Chrysler is not going to agree to anything that we can directional for the manager, but it stuff like the French state's getting a guaranteed seats on the new board or whether the French state would have a say in picking the CEO down the line. It's also standstill clauses to make sure this is an stays merger of equals doesn't become a takeover of one to make a by the other the final bits of being negotiated the French state probably wouldn't get everything. It's been all sinful. But it feels the if they at least get some of it than the deal would be easier to sell politically here in France. Now, our main story this morning, the decline of the traditional two year and the I degree several schools like tippy business school at the university of Iowa have announced the closure of their programs. Kelsey key has been speaking with Charlie Turner about what's led to the decline. The degree it was once seen as one of the most popular and profitable parts of universities kills me, first of all, by traditional MBA, we generally mean the fulltime on campus degree, or they're also part time degrees. No by traditional MBA. We are really talking about the two year on campus program, where you enter in the fall and you graduate, you know, two years later in the spring, and there are some prominent schools that are shutting these down. Yeah. Ever since I've been on this beat. I've noticed that applications have really been falling and falling at a faster and faster clip. Why is this happening? Is there just less demand by perspective students who, who might wanna otherwise pursue this degree? Yeah. I mean it's. It's a complicated set factors that have all worked together to make a really tough dynamic for most graduate programs in general. So grad schools, not just MBA programs are facing tough issues, bringing stints out of a strong job market. You could get a masters degree, you know and, and decide to study public policy or business and test out a few new job opportunities or you could stay in this really strong economy and find, you know, a connection at that company or, you know, use your friends of friends to, you know, interview on your own and more students are going that route. So it's a combination of the economic factors. But also an MBA is very expensive. It can run up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for this two year degree at the most prestigious schools like Wharton and Harvard at some smaller schools, especially be state schools that I've been focusing on it's more like sixty or eighty thousand dollars for the two year program still a lot. But that's still a huge number. Yeah. And. Is as generation. I mean, we have more student loan debt from our undergraduate education, as it is than ever before in history. So when you add that amount of debt in the background to just the decision making process of, is it in the cards for me to be able to quit my job for two years, and taking no money in addition to, like taking out, huge loans in order to pay for this MBA program. A lot of people are saying the answer is just know what kind of programs are replacing the traditional MBA at this point. So a lot of schools that I've talked to have introduced shorter or more flexible program, so students can pursue part time degrees, or online degrees, in particular, that they can do for a few hours at night, or on the weekends. And that seems to fit with a lot of other people's schedules, despite this downward trend in demand for full time MBA programs. You've talked to one or two people who really. Like the traditional MBA program, and they've given you some reasons it's a great point. This is a program that people seem to really, really love afterwards, and feel extremely grateful and privileged to have gotten the experience of spending two years out of the working world in the sort of hustle, and bustle of daily life, just a focus on. What is it that I really want to be doing with my life and my career? I talked to one of the students who was in tippy is last MBA class university of Iowa and her name is Jade, and she was just so bright, an aspiring entrepreneur, who's in the process of setting up these really cool coffee shops, all around rural Iowa. And she was saying, you know, I entered into my business school program because I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do with my life. And for most people in this generation, that seems to be the case you may know what you don't want to be doing, but you don't necessarily know it would be a better fit. You may not even know what a consultant does. Every day between nine and five so business school, and the NBA in particular is a really good opportunity for students to learn those things. And so a lot of the students, I talked to who did have a traditional MBA just feel very sad to say goodbye to a program that has done a lot of good for them. We'd like to know have you considered delaying or forgoing and NBA altogether? And what do you think about the value of an online MBA? You can Email us at what's news. All one word wsJcom or tweet us at WSJ podcasts to find out more about Kelsey story, you can head to wsJcom. Capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created Iino the Capital One assistant that catches things that might lef- wrong with your credit card, you know catches over tipping, duplicate, charges, or potential fraud. And then sends an alert sheer phone helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching after your money when we're not Capital One. What's in your wallet? See Capital, One dot com for details. On to markets that sharp rise. We saw on Wall Street yesterday was followed by gains in Asian and European markets this morning. It's also prompted some people to ask our stocks undervalued from New York. Mike were store and has more on whether now is a good time to invest in the market, should there's a very popular metric that the investment community at large uses to determine the value the stock, and that's the price to earnings ratio, which basically compares the stock price to the future earnings out of the pastor earnings or the current earnings, you know, if we're looking at the S and P five hundred based on it's forward earnings that multiple stands at fifteen point seven times that's lower than where it was an early may. There was around seventeen times, then, and that puts it about where the S and P five hundred had been trading at say list full. So in a big way, for, for investors that saw the rise in markets earlier this year, and we're sitting on the sidelines waiting that out unsure zte. To win to get in. This is a better time to get in than it has been in a wall. And that was some of the buying action that you saw that on Tuesday, you know, the, the fed is willing to do whatever it takes to keep the market and the economy and solid footing. And if you're a equity investor who likes buying say, growth stocks like Facebook and Amazon, lower interest rates helped those companies attain higher valuations, the, the price earnings ratio. We were just talking about before, but that said, you know, there are, there's a large group of investors who believe that it's, it's a bit, too. Premature to be thinking about an interest rate cut. We could smooth this all out in some ways, especially if trade tensions get resolved without that right now. I mean you do have a number of investors that are just have very different views on, whether or not this multiple means by or if it means it could just be more trouble head right now. And now the Scud, here's what to look forward to later today. President Trump concludes his visit to the UK with a trip to Portsmouth, to commemorate the seventy fifth anniversary of the d day landings. He's one of sixteen world leaders whose nations fought with the United Kingdom during the war who are making the trip to England's southern shore. However, before he left London the president sought to clarify comments, he made yesterday regarding whether Britain's national health service would be part of the US UK trade deal. Here he is speaking with Piers Morgan on good morning Britain on ITV this morning. I don't see it being the table. Somebody asked me a question today and I say everything's up for negotiation because everything is but I don't see that being. That's something that I would not consider part of trade. That's not trade on his way back home. The president will also make quick stopover in Ireland to meet with the prime minister or as he's called their T shock Lee overawed car, and the SEC plans to vote today on what it calls regulation best interest. It's a rule that says, brokers can't put. Their own paychecks ahead of customers needs the agency's proposal for the rule says, brokers should disclose and reduce financial conflicts of interest. Whoever the role doesn't mandate how to limit those conflicts. Finally, a new letter from Dwight D Eisenhower to his wife, that's never been written about before it was provided exclusively to us by the Weisenthal center archives general Eisenhower wrote to his wife on the day before launching the greatest amphibious landing in the history of war that he was going, quote, on a series of trips that will last without interruption for six to ten days. End quote, he asked her to please not take it personally, if he didn't write for a while historians believe he was worried that interception could have marred the surprise of the landing. That's what's news from the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

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How Our Laws Make It So Americans Have To Drive

Daily Detroit

17:23 min | 1 year ago

How Our Laws Make It So Americans Have To Drive

"Growing up and being able to walk to school walk to go meet up with friends or go ride bikes in the neighborhood that in retrospect is <hes> was kind of radicalizing experience because i realized later on that's become increasingly rare. That's the voice of gregory schill a law professor at the university of iowa and today's guest on your daily detroit for friday august twenty third two thousand nineteen. I'm spend gust of and i'm jerry states today's episode so does all about cars specifically about how the law has paved the way for their dominance in our everyday lives shaping the way we live in fundamental ways professor shall recently wrote wrote a piece in the atlantic headline. Americans shouldn't have to drive. Put the law insist on it and we'll of course linked to it in the show. No it's an especially germane topic here in detroit. Where there's there's been so much controversy over adding -tective white plains on busy roads and the recent decision to permanently close the spirit of detroit plaza to vehicle traffic conversation with professor. She'll is coming up right after this daily. Detroit is brought to you in part by lawrence tech traditional four year students love lawrence technological university's thriving campus life but lt has always met nontraditional students needs to lawrence tech offers over one hundred degree and certificate programs that can get adult students started or back on track and most classes are conveniently offered evenings at lt is beautiful southfield campus or online so you can balance your social family and work life even while you power up your career find out more at dot e._d._u. Link in the show notes our guest today recently wrote in the atlantic. It reads in part quote in a sense america. America is car dependent by choice but it is also car dependent by law professor gregory. She'll grew up in ann arbor and says he grew up going to the detroit. Auto does show he joins us from chicago via skype kind of just to set the table. What got you interested in this topic of sort of how the american can legal system reinforces our car dependency. Well i think in retrospect growing up and being able to walk to school walk toco go meet up with friends or go ride bikes in the neighborhood that in retrospect is <hes> was kind of a radicalizing experience because i realize is later on that's become increasingly rare things to how he designed in our communities and our transportation systems. When i went to law school school and then later entered academia. I started thinking a little bit more systematically about this. I think there's a general awareness of how public public policy tilts towards the car <hes> the fact that for example you can drive across the country on government financed freeways without paying any charges other than the own the gas and and so forth for your car but if you wanna take a bus down the block you have to pay. That's just one <unk> of probably hundreds of examples. Would i was interested in with this. Project is the role that law plays as we've had. We've had this discussion in for about a century actually for longer than really have been alive. I went back and looked and the rule of law is pretty consistently neglected yeah and you write that this kind of reinforcement of car dependency is firmly rooted in the federal state and even local levels wonder if you could kind of talk through those and give us sort of an example of each. Let's start with vehicle design law so this is hell your your car what safety features it has. This'll be federal law federal law set by nitsa. Which is the national highway transportation safety administration. It's a d._o._t. Eh agency and they say things like left. Have seatbelts nafta. Look like this and you have to air bags and so forth. I that's great. Nobody's saying that they shouldn't be doing that in in other words to be worrying about the occupants of the vehicles of course they should be. That's most of us <hes> much of the time but for irregular that has public interested in my they should also be thinking about the impacts of the vehicle on other people people outside the vehicle so that's people walking using wheelchairs bicycling waiting for the bus. It's also people in other cars there no regulations that speak to that so they're all around. They're all designed to ensure crash worthiness of the vehicle itself but there is a regulation called g._t._r._i. Nine that at last count forty four of our pure countries have signed onto that requires cars to be designed in a way to minimize impacts on people outside the vehicle like one quick example. There is a minimum amount of space required between the engine anthony anthony hood of a car so that if somebody you know few hit somebody and they fall on it the hood will crumple without hitting the engine block there a lot of other examples like this this <hes> this seems to me like common sense and we don't do it because we have a system built around cars how about at the state and local levels start at the state level so oh setting an adjustment of speed limits speed limits are set in the first instance by statute but then they're adjusted and a lot of us aren't aware of how that happens in in most cases it's done according to something called the eighth percentile method and this is a method that's designed to ratchet speed limits up so that no more than fifteen percent of people are violating them so to give an example. Let's say the legislature says speed limit on a residential street by default will be three miles an hour but people are your residential street is on the way to the freeway and people tend to go. Let's say eighty five percent of go thirty seven miles an hour or faster well. The local department of transportation kano and some states is obligated to raise the speed limit to either thirty five or forty miles an hour so so that eighty five percent of the motorists will be in compliance with the new speed limit of course that's probably going to precipitate an increase in another increase in and how fast people drive things people see the one that's forty. They know that law enforcement will give them you know a window of forgiveness so the mega forty five or forty nine so this is a process that is tilted heavily not just towards driving our cars but to reckless speedy driving speeding is responsible for over ten thousand deaths at this year <hes> this is not some not a harmless thing and it also doesn't take any sense at all of what it's like to live in your neighborhood when your street becomes a freeway so it doesn't take neighborhood impacts into account doesn't take pedestrian or bicyclist impacts this federal manual that states have implemented and that localities often administer at the local level. The predominant problem is zoning. None of us wanna live next to a factory. Okay right <hes> but i think think that's what we have in our mind when we think about how zoning work the history of zoning is is interesting and has more complexity than we probably have time to get into today but it is deeply deeply entwined with white supremacy it initially advocates of zoning encoded explicitly racist language in to zoning codes saying that african americans couldn't live in this part of town that kind of thing bright housing government says they're often referred to here in detroit. That's been a big issue in the history of detroit. Absolutely there's a whole history of off of housing policy. A lot of which is racist and zoning is a part of that now i don't wanna say zoning intrinsically racist but it has as racist origins and it has racially discriminatory effects today it also just makes our lives a lot. More complicated can't walk to the corner store store because it's illegal to build a corner store in many most neighborhoods america. Your kids are grown and you wanna down size to a condo. That literally may not be allowed in the town at your end. You may have to move twenty minutes away and you may or may not like that place much if you've lived in your town for fifty years. Maybe it just as soon stay but it's clearly illegal so it's not a matter of demands of market nor consumer preference. I and many of your listeners probably grew up in a single family home and may be enjoyed that but nobody's calling for abolishing that what's curious is that our zoning codes from coast to coast including in big cities leeann new york san francisco and most of those cities it is unlawful to build apartments and this is a big issue as in matter fact on my way into the studio this morning. I was listening to n._p._r. And they were discussing affordable housing and the issue of single family zoning and cities and right now i think minneapolis just three. They're talking about it or they're actually getting rid of single family zoning as a way to encourage more affordable housing these issues seem kind of interlinked linked they do. They're very interlinked. Link is as follows many cities and suburbs require. The houses beyond really big yards multiplied out across the city number one. It's impossible to walk anywhere and if you spent time in suburban detroit you know that that's true and a lot of places lucky can walk to a gas station to get a jug of milk in a pinch pinch but a lot of those neighborhoods don't even have sidewalks so it's just it kills walkability. It's not very done so it's not impossible but it's much more difficult to add sufficiently frequent transit that people will actually take it easy to add a bus but the problem is if you're not very many people can walk to that bus. Stop then. It's just it's not as useful all through this land use mandate. We've locked our region in two generations of car dependency and the affordability level. It's expensive to maintain a a single family home. Yes sir they're big. They take a lot of energy to replace the roof every so often. You gotta take care of the yard. It doesn't have to be that way and again again. They're really nice parts about it but it would be nice if our laws didn't require only that kind of use <hes> they're very few places where it's lawful to build an apartment building and often even when it is lawful developer has to build housing for cars as well which is a whole other layer of car dependency but also expens- underground parking spaces or garage raj parking can cost fifty thousand dollars space. If your apartment is only two hundred thousand deaths you know twenty five percent of the cost right right. I mean we see that here in detroit. I live in ferndale. I don't know if you're familiar with ferndale but it's pretty progressive suburb very pedestrian and bicycle friendly place you know they're they're very pro transit the local government but they still you'll have parking requirements that they tack onto every development project that comes in the door in the city like how did we get here like how did the legal system become such such a reinforcement tool of our culture here in the united states. It's a great question. There's no one <hes> there's no one story. That could be told about that. The first first thing i want to say about that is that this is a system. It's not an ideology <hes> so it's written into law i call us automobile supremacy z. because it it's not just that we're dependant on cars but owning a car is a condition of full first class citizenship in almost every place in america it said of incentives. That doesn't really care what your philosophy is and so how does that come about well in some cases. There's a story of lobbying and industry influence and here. I'm not just talking about the beloved big three but also the oil industry tire manufacturers highway builders so forth they got together together in nineteen twenty s there is a popular backlash against the car about a century ago because it was killing large numbers of people principally children grin and people who lived in cities the basic dynamic was it rich joyriders were driving around at reckless speeds unregulated by the police and striking killing children children in the street and so there's this national backlash. There's a federal conference convened by the white house in nineteen twenty four their front page editorial in all of the newspapers. There's a particularly particularly colorful one in the new york times that has cartoon of the angel of death in a car running roughshod in his car over children's bodies. It is a major problem that was called motor killings at the time now. We don't even have a word for your getting hit and killed by a car. It's just a thing that happens yeah. The pendulum has swung like it's now just sort of an accepted part of automobile ownership. It really is in something. I wrote about in the atlantic. Article is the first person i remember knowing who is killed in a car crash on ninety four in nineteen ninety-five one million americans have been killed in car crashes since then so i wonder are there any sort of significant movements afoot to kind of reform the the legal system and you know chip away at the premacy of the the primacy of the car at all and what kinds of things are they calling for if so either there is a budding movement there are basically i think two broad approaches that were seeing and they're they're interlinked. The first is a policy of promoting what are called complete streets greece and this is the street like what you're describing in ferndale where folks can walk bike bus or drive and it's actually pleasant pleasant walk around and pleasant to go from business to business on foot you don't have to you know there's a long wait a restaurant. You don't have to jump in the car. <hes> go to another one. You can just go around the corner. The problem ms that's not possible if the speed limit on that street is forty five miles an hour and people are going thirty five and the police tone for that so that's the name of the movements. It's is closely related to something called vision zero which is a vision of having of eliminating traffic deaths that u._s. Department transportation and dozens dozens of states and cities have committed to that goal. They put less muscle behind it then they have the pledge itself but yeah these are efforts to change the design of the street so so that it doesn't feel safe to go fifty five miles an hour very few people would go fifty five miles per hour on a residential street where there are cars parked where there might be children brin playing even on the sidewalk we'd stiffly slowdown right so there are a lot of changes that can be done at the at the st design level and some of those are implemented by law aw so some cities have adopted vision zero design standards at the federal level. There is a new bill called national complete streets act that was introduced last week that would tie federal highway money to save for street designs and there's another federal bill called the green streets act that would prod states to reduce driving and reduce greenhouse gases so it's not just enough to declare climate emergency for example as my city of iowa city is is currently debating it's you actually they put muscle behind that and changing the way streets work is is a good half. You mentioned the minneapolis reform. Their oregon just abolished single-family single family only zoning statewide that doesn't mean somebody can put up a fifty storey building next to you believe what it does is legalize four plex so i'm greg right basically for you know a set of four townhouses that are attached basically all of their areas of law that i defy they can be reversed so the design in standards for example those can be updated to include g._t. Are nine. We can change our tort law so that people are incentivized to take more care when driving than they are currently can change our insurance law which that's not even really working for people who rely on their cars right believe michigan has the highest. Oh ya insurance rates rates in the country the up a lot of that is because the insurance laws is not that they promote the interests of drivers if again. It's it's somewhat the opposite they promote driving. You have to make cheap to get into a crash in the sense that you don't pay all that much <hes> they don't reward people people for safer driving. They don't require municipalities to implement proven methods to enhance safety that sort of thing right. His article in the atlantic is headlined. Americans shouldn't have to drive but the law insists on it will link to it in the show notes. Gregory schill is an associate law professor at the university of iowa college of law professor. Thanks so much for joining us today appreciate it. Thanks so much for having me and that's going to do it for today's show friends. We'll have a link to professor article in the atlantic daily detroit dot com. If you like what you're hearing on the show show consider supporting us navy coming petri members help us push detroit's conversation forward by visiting patriarch dot com slash daily detroit and don't forget to tell your friends friends about the podcast and it's the weekend so our thanks are to cheyenne no serena for all her hard work behind the scenes. Thanks also to randy walker walker and fletcher sharp for their contributions and of course thank you for listening and thanks to the narrow way cafe for having us this week absolutely laptop scott. I'm jerry stays and i'm spending take care of each other and we'll see you round detroit.

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