20 Episode results for "University Of Illinois"

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Today (June 25, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

53:01 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Today (June 25, 2019)

"Capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. Doc Graham street in bribes in the khaki shorts your GNA energy Bill went up sixty percent this month seems like want him out stand clear, the closing doors. So the Capital One assistant to catch us things that might look like increases to a recurring Bill, then sends an alert to your phone and helps you fix it. Another way capital. One is watching out for your money when you're not Capital One. What's in your wallet capital? One dot com for details. Limitations apply. Hege day to you. Welcome, SU are FD today on the twenty four th day of actually twenty fifth day of June. We are making our way through this month of June this, first official week of summer. I'm Rita Frazier here in studio. Nice gas stuff for you coming up in just a couple of minutes. Our monthly conversation with breads willing FBI FM. We'll talk about numbers and the pharma Konami also on tap, Aaron Hager university of Illinois. We'd scientists we will talk about what's showing up and how farmers are going to be able to tackle that big question of weed-management going into this growing season. So let's take a look at some of the headlines President Trump will be off to the twenty summit in Japan at the end of this week. He's scheduled to meet with China's president, gee, faced phase for that high stakes discussion on trade as well as. Other issues while most officials don't expect a long awaited breakthrough, yet it is possible that Trump could be talked into putting new tariffs on even more Chinese imports the pesticide industry asking the Trump administration to exempt. It's chemical imports from China from the potential three hundred billion in new twenty five percent tariffs. The president is threatening to impose next month on Chinese goods. Up look down. In trade. I'll be must be found if you're hearing this, you should be concerned about the Asian Longhorn beetle and invasive species. That's destroying our trees. But you can help look for the signs and out stop the beetle. Look up look down. And must be found some signs of the AL be our dime sized hole on tree trunks, a sawdust like material called press and the beetle itself with a long black body in white spots. Outlaw down. Trays. I'll be found learn all the signs and how to report them at Asian Longhorn, beetle dot com. That's Asian Longhorn beetle dot com farm. We inform week now dot com journalists Dina's stroz connects rule routes for you from the farm Bill to crop insurance to GMO labeling. Her expertise is apparent in the story. She reports here's a bit about her room routes. I get to meet interesting people and share their stories and I get paid to do it. I cover Ed policy at I'm really into keeping the farming community. Updated on these important issues. Route zord roots are FD radio farm week now dot com and farm Lee key connected. Spring is here and things are fussing farmers and pollinators are working together to healthy this, in fact, one out of every three bites of food. We eat exists, because these daughter flies and other insects, pollinators are important from the system and the ecosystem of wrong by farmers in those in the cultural industry are working together to protect. Pollinators. Educa-. Nation research and conservation is it high L for monarchs dot org. Join the buzz that's I l AG for monarchs dot org. And we're back here on RFID today on a Tuesday, Brad's willing joins us from the university of Illinois. How are you? Brad good. Read it. How are you today? I'm doing well, it's great to see the sunshine. Yeah. It is. Yeah. For sure. If before we dive into your latest numbers in your June report. Remind us how the FBI FM works and how farmers landowners get involved and utilize your service. Yeah. So we're a nonprofit that is affiliated with the university of Illinois and we are located throughout the state. We have about sixty five to seventy field staff. We work with about fifty six hundred farmers across state and farmers. Sign up with us. They have they get monthly monthly. They get four to five visits throughout the year where we go over stuff that's going on their farming operations starting with making sure their records, are up to date and. Going from there decisions on, for instance, prevented planning what I should do for cash rent for an upcoming year. Those type of questions is what we're working with people. And so there's a minimal fee in there. It's based on, you know, the size of the operation, and some other factors. And then and then you work with that work with him throughout the year. I don't know how long have you been in part of this group? Yeah. I've been working since two thousand and two. So I'm going on quite a few years already. So for sure, and now you can also talk about success stories, you know, how, how can these landowners, and farmers utilizes information? And you know, our is a working, you know, you can talk to that. Yeah. Yeah. So we work with farm operations, and we six six excess when we see farms transition to the next operation, or the third generation and, and some of these instances, I it, they really liked to work with us because we provide an independent third party, 'cause we're telling them are not telling help them make decisions by. Telling what their numbers are telling them, you know, if you do good records, this is the information you have, and with this information, you can make that we can help you make good decisions. So we're seeing people, you know, generations flourish, helping through some transitions that are difficult and helping them understand some of those opportunities that are out there and other things that they can grow their business into. Year such as this. We didn't go over when we were talking headlines, we didn't go over those weekly crop numbers. But we got new numbers out from USDA on condition on planting numbers, still and we're looking at some really important numbers on Friday this weather market, especially if there's a year that these this service could come in handy. It's this year, that's for sure Rita we, we're constantly in contact with our farmers. You know, it's, it's been a trying year for them. And so we're working with them and making sure they're up to date on. You know what, what's coming up for pre planning what options, they have what they need to do what deadlines that are out there? You know, kinda 'cause, you know, every person's decision is different depending on their thoughts their different situation where they're located based on their operation. So this, this is a place for the founding board from as well as not also providing information to them, you know, we weren't gonna make the decision for them, but we're going to help them, give them all the information they. You need to make those decisions. You know, we were just talking Nick producer, and I were just talking about the market, facilitation payments. That's one more layer that farmers will be dealing with the again, dealing with the China trade war in how those payments will come in. And you know, has we've talked about all week, farmers didn't ask for them. But they're certainly going to help. They're gonna help them. We'd rather, you know, we'd rather have a free market and understand how things work. But in this case, we, we'll we'll, you know, if there's gonna be some help to those prices that were being, you know, are hampered by some, the trade negotiations is payments are held, but it sure been nice to have more regulations out there as we've been making some prevent planning decisions to know you know, whether you know what I what I plant what the impact going to be, how that calculation is going to be done. But I know they didn't release that 'cause I don't wanna distort the market on. What's being planning? We're talking to Brad willing. SD FM, and we're going to dive into your June twenty one paper looking really back on capital purchases the past several years. What have you, would you find kind of the overall the bigger picture on this on this information? Yeah. So, so we were looking at the wins and wears of what's in wins the capital purchase, and what we're seeing the overall picture is, is that, you know, from that time period, we really didn't change. What the top purchases that we've made but we're seeing win. They're making those purchases heavens, shifting a little bit going more from the first quarter of the year when we sell a lot of grain to more towards the end of the year, and now they're levelling out so more equal purchases. Basically, probably more on need than, you know, than, you know, they're working through a capital purchase kind of plan said of, you know, just making it for optimizing packs off opportunities or win the cash is available. They actually have a cash plan to buy those capital purchase more about the study, and we'll we'll get into more in the next segment, but tell us more about that. And you know what did you use to, to come up in during the study? Yeah. So we're looking at capital purchases from Illinois F B M farms from two thousand four to two thousand and seventeen you know, we this article was wrote back in two thousand fifteen looking at that period from two thousand four to two thousand thirteen where we had increases in prices, high farm, incomes, the federal expense. Election was increasing and was up a five hundred thousand and. Now, we looked at have these last four years where you know, we've had lower incomes and but the expensive like is still higher and see what the impact has been on those capital purchases. What's interesting is what they use what they actually purchased the top three. Yes. So the top three for building type purchase our field tile grain bins and machine said machines sheds in the tile has been increasing drastically draft will be increasing a lot compared to all the other purchase in which in a year like this tile is, is going to help as much as we can't if the talk and get empty. So, yeah, so you're sharing this was your members and you're going to tell us what you learn how they farmers out there. Can apply. This information to today. Correct. Can you give us a little bit a little bit of that information? Yeah. So, so thinking about the different types of purchases in, in, in looking at those types of things, so thinking about what capital persons you're making thinking about when they're going to be made. So so you know what you need in your operation. We can kind of make cash flows and think about those things for instance for machinery purchases. We know that, you know, the top five things were needing is, you know, tractors combines trucks. Have you like pickup trucks, and then other others are different things that we use in the operation that just don't have a classification for it. I mean it used to be GPS farm, utility vehicles. But now we've got classic aced classifications for those. So they've kind of came out of that information, and then also trailers, we bought a lot of trailers over the last five years as far as the total number purchases over that timeframe. And you know, back to the tile, the return on investment seems to be huge. Yeah. And we didn't I didn't bring in the dollar calculations in there. But yeah, the return on investment is huge and you can see that from looking at that. That's why we've been buying a lot more time. I mean, from two thousand four to two of them. Eighteen twenty seven percent of our total capital purchases of the building type category were tile. And then that increased from nine to thirteen to thirty six percent so huge increase. And then and then it's kinda and stiff continued decrease from that period from fourteen to seventeen to thirty nine percent. Almost forty percent of the building purchase have been for tile. So we can see that return on investment there, because we continue to buy a lot more building, or a lot more tile Rad's willing is our guest, and we'll come back on our FD today. Continue this conversation. This is the RFID radio network. Our FD radio. Dead works Rita Frazier connects rule routes for you. Read it delivers patient and reliable information to listeners on the RFID radio network her radio. Career spans close to three decades. There's a bit about her ruled routes. I grew up on a small farm. I John today allows me to connect with people from all walks of life and experience opportunity. Every day I get to talk about what I love farming be routes or routes are EFI radio far week now dot com farm, we keep you connected or die. Campbell products and important part of your toolbox. This planting season state of has revised the cutoff date for their use. You can use the products over the jump of soybeans, until with Jeff Ruby's comes first forty five days, most planning, your soybeans reached the vehicle, or are one growth stage, depending on the product or July. Fifteenth state specific labels work in conjunction with federal labels. So make sure you read involve. Both remember the label is the law. To find out more visit I l F E dot. Org forward slash label aware. You're going to need me. You're going to need us. Going to meet our technical skills, or math or engineering skills. He going to need our help with your water, your air, your food. You're going to meet our organizational skills. Our problem-solving skills. You're going to need our determination. Our honesty, our compassion. You're going to need the next generation of leaders to face the challenges, the future will bring, and we promise we'll be there when he. Today. Four h is growing the next generation of leaders. Support us at four h dot org. Most of us like to be out in the sun. That's why sunscreen and other safety measures are key to protecting your skin from aging and cancer, the FDA recommends using sunscreen with a son's affection factor for SPF fifteen or higher. Also look for broad spectrum on the label that means both harmful ultraviolet a it'd be raised up blocked, UVA raise age to skim UB being raised burn and both cause cancer, but the perfect sunscreen does account if you use it wrong, don't need sunscreen on a cloudy day wrong eighty percent of Z race still get through the only use sunscreen at the beach. Nope. Anytime you're outside UV rays attack the skin. So you need protection and you have to reapply sunscreen, every two hours members SPF, plus broad spectrum. Helping fun in the sun is WWW dot FDA dot gov slash sunscreen. For more information, a message from the US food and drug. Administrations. We're back here on RFID today on Tuesday, the twenty fifth of June. If you're looking to buy or sell check out the latest farm, we classified advertisements, you want to place, an ad. Call them eight hundred five seven three six one two zero or you could submit that ad online at farm week now dot com. We touched upon the headlines, as we started this program and the biggest are the crop condition ratings that came out from USDA and here in Illinois. They did tell us that ninety two percent of corn had been planted corn. Emergency eighty four percent the condition of that crap? That's what we're really keying in on this week at condition was rated five percent very four twelve. Four thirty six percent. Fair forty one. Good and only six percent. Excellent the beans, seventy nine percent planted compared to one hundred percent last year or five year. Average. On being planting is ninety seven percent and the emergence sixty seven percent on the condition writing on the beans and Illinois. Four percent, very poor fourteen poor forty percent. Fair thirty six percent. Good and six percent. Excellent. Also checking on that we'd harvest as it slowly gets underway in southern. Illinois were now at fifteen percent harvested, compared to sixty one percent for last year round the phone line with bras willing, and we are talking about the FBI FM some numbers that they've compiled on capital purchases, and how that can apply what we can learn from from that several years of data put together. But as I give those crop condition ratings. Brad, that's kind of what it's all about, as far as this year is getting that crop to harvest and boy, it's been a long time coming. Yeah. It's it's been challenging season and year so far. And you know knowing what, you know, the how what kind of capital assets, I have what time does things I can do to lies making sure those are in good working condition. Those are going to help me whenever I can go or what I can do and be ready to go. And that's why you know, we're kind of looking at capital purchase, and knowing what's out there and what you should be thinking about when you've got time to think about things like that. So timing. So we are obviously, this year is so different. But when you look back at your study and looking from two oh, four two thousand four to two thousand seventeen what did you find out as far as time of year? And how can we use that? What can we digest from from those numbers? Yes. So we kinda group the, the different year brackets from two four to two thousand eight until nine to thirteen and then fourteen to seventeen and some different time. Periods and looked at those over by a quarter basis. So on the first quarter for that first timeframe from four to eight we made almost twenty nine percent of the purchases in that first quarter of the year, and that was the highest for that time period. But when we look at the fourth quarter, those the large number of purchase for the time period from two thousand nine to two thousand seventeen we were seeing twenty nine percent of the purchases for that period from nine to thirteen and twenty seven this last time period that we're looking at the, the middle two quarters of the year about the same. So right now, we're not making lots of purchases, you know, twenty. To twenty two percent and they didn't change much over that whole time period. They they're very close. So we really aren't buying a lot in the middle year besides stuff that we are needed. We know you know, it's kind of a, you know, this time of year, every year we're going to be buying this, you know, I'm, I'm, I know there's some lawn mowers and some things like that bought there, which makes sense. But there's not a lot of purchases made in that period of time now, we are looking that they, you know, we're looking at last four year period from fourteen to seventeen where those four quarters are beginning to level back out the number purchases is very similar. So we're, we're, we're spreading that out and making that plan for those Kappa purchases. That is what those numbers are telling us. And then how do you go forward? Then what are your expectations, as we go forward here in Illinois? We I what I'm thinking is I still think we're going to be buying lots of purchases. And we're looking at monthly type basis in December December's, the timeframe, no, we're making those tax planning type of decisions. We're trying to optimize that tax liability that we're going to have. So I still think we're going to have quite a few purchase in December timeframe, and we'll continue to have a lot of purchase in January, March, that's typically, you know, a timeframe when we've got we're selling grain for, you know, we're gonna have to pay the taxes, but we're also so ingrained in January. That's when twenty nine percent of the grain is sold. And I looked at a fourteen year average and the twenty nine percent of the corn, and soybeans is sold in January year. So there's a lot of cash available in that farm. So that's why a lot of capital purchase are going to be made. So I still think there's going to be a lot of purchase around the end of the year, so January and, and in December, but I think we need to make sure that we're not just making purchases for tax reasons, we need to make sure that we're out, you know, thinking about capital budget, think about what we need. And, and I think we're doing that. That's what we're seeing that trend level back off. We're making purchases that we need and trying to find the best opportunity to purchase those not necessarily just to do it to help optimize our tax liability equipment comes into that occasion. Yeah. So so we look at quit. We're buying a lot of things. So tractors or the most the biggest thing that we're buying. We're buying about eleven percent of those purchases from two thousand four to two hundred seventeen but you look at that those, those different time periods, I talked about the four it's about the same. There's eleven percent in the first couple years, thirteen percent and down to nine percent. So, so we're, we're so those are about the same, but, you know, we're seeing things like the other group other groups. That's some of the data that we in other groups are just things that farmers buy lots of things we try to classify him so we can do these studies. But so, so those are coming out 'cause we keep adding more things, but we're seeing combines are slowing down as far as the top the number purchases. But when you look on a dollar basis, we still are buying the, the number one acid total dollar spending on his tractors and combine. And then after that is pick up trucks, and then planters and sprayers, which makes sense. Those are the top pieces that are needed in those in our grain operations all is informative working. So SCO to see to complete report and get more information on what's going on over at the campus. Give you can visit the farm dock daily website, farm, dock daily dot Illinois dot EDU, and you can also visit our website at esfbf dot org, and find out more information. Thanks. Brad have a good one. Brad's willing, FBI FM when we come back we'll head back to campus and talk this O our we'd specialists there on staff Aaron Hager, we'll be back. More farm news and information ahead. 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The, the, the turmoil that exists in many parts of the state, which is getting the crop in let alone, taking care of those weeds. But from where you sit in from what you've heard, how did things look as far as weed-management in Illinois, probably about is diversified, as I think I've ever seen in the twenty six years, that have been here, now you can drive by cornfields, so we being fields that are just absolutely free of we looked really, really good. And literally just down the road, you can run across and the other one that maybe hadn't even been sprayed, and everything is just overgrown in it. So it it rained, his all over the place. We've got instances where we have some of the winter annuals some, some rain hills that we couldn't get controlled during the burn down, or before we planted the crop. And these, you know, some of these mayor stale plants now or appropriate. Three feet tall. We've got water him. You know let escape through the burn down now and some areas, that's over foot tall now. So we got a few challenges ahead of us this year, and hopefully, the way that the weather forecast looks for this week. Maybe this pretty decent window to try to get some of these applied products on. For sure we're crossing our fingers. And I think that the industry has done well at getting the messages out on products that are available on the expanded window of application for die, Cambe, etc. But, you know, you're very sensitive to this issue because you've been really on top of it since day one when it comes to, to die Cambe as a product. So do you feel like the industry has listened and were prepared for the next couple of weeks? It's been interesting to, to watch this over time I can remember back before twenty seventeen where you we would talk to lot in the custom retail application business, and they were very, very confident they can handle the dike but they felt like they've been able to handle it in corn for many, many years. We'll, then we had, you know, many instances of authored movement, and seventeen. We repeated that actually increase the number of complaints in twenty eighteen so I think it's really been interesting to see how. The retail sector has responded to this, because they're now various student in what they do with this. They've taken a lot of this high spray, your hygiene, very, very seriously, much more than the did perhaps even three years before this. They're very where the wind speed direction the inversion condition. So I take my head off to the industry as a whole for really trying to shore up the game if he wouldn't when it comes to making die camp applications and trying to keep the product where it's actually sprayed. And with the most recent headlines, as we talked about adding a couple of weeks. Again, everybody is very aware of the calendar date. Yeah. We director sold and decided to extend that a couple of extra weeks now into July. But again, you know, just because we have this extension element I can. But, you know, keep in mind that the, the problems associated with volatility, they're not gonna go away based on the calendar date. So we, we need to keep that in mind, we need to be able to make smart applications trying to keep the product where where we wanted as best as we can now unfortunately, some things around volatility, it's driven a lot by the temperature. And as the temperature increases, you know, the chemistry and the physics suggests that the amount of all ability can also increase again. We just need to be aware of these things. I know that the industry farmers all have developed plan b plans. He in plan d options are available. So, you know with the way that you're looking at things are there, if they can't go with their number one choice. Do we have all of those other options? Ready to go if needed. Would have understood from some in the retail sector, who were initially planning on June thirtieth to end the Di Cam applications, a lot of them have taken steps to have other products and inventory. So hopefully that will occur across the state if need be, but, you know, we, we like to emphasize reading we really can't emphasize enough. You know, don't judge success, they can be soybean by simply being able to spray die Cambe, because, ultimately the success of that can be, so we being in my simple mind. In a way, I think about it is really not any different than success with any other weed management system. And that is that by the end of the year, you don't have any weed seed that's returned into the seat Bank. So, whatever it takes to assure that, that we've got cleaned sweetening fields at the end of the year. Those I think are really what we can count for success. Minute left here in this first break, and we'll come back and continue this conversation. But when you talk about that, and the fact that there have been some successful applications in the fields that you have seen in the past couple of years that everything goes right in die. Campbell is us. What are those fields look like? Ideally, what we'd like to see you in a in a dyke Campbell base system is, is, again, a more integrated approach, you know, the idea of, of going back to a total post, we being system when life is say era was really at its peak. If we think that is what we can do. They can. But I'm I'm really concerned that we haven't really learned a lot because they can't lose not going to be a foolproof product and I, I noticed a tweet from Dr Larry Steckel earlier this week in Tennessee, and most of his time last week, he was walking fields with Palmer amaranth that had been treated with dye Cambe, but it did not die yet. We're not claiming that there's anything going on their terms of the pollution resistance. But ultimately the more integrated approach that we can ensure that the end of the year. There's no we'd see the longer that this technology will remain viable. Takes me back a little bit because it was at a conference. I think, in Miami that Larry Steckel and you you're both on that program. I think my goodness that was almost a decade ago that we were talking about these types of issues. And, and here we are in twenty nineteen so we're going to continue this conversation with Erin Hager from the university of Illinois. When we come back, this is our FD today. Week in partners magazine editor Chris Anderson connects rule routes for you. Chris shares or four decades of writing expertise by making sure each addition delivers the best information here's a bit about hurt rule routes. I raised a farm and Champaign county going corn. Soybeans popcorn pumpkins and poultry, my top priority is to inform educate, and even entertain farm bureau members via droughts or roots are empty radio farm week now dot com and farm, we keep you connected. Those the warmer weather, have you itching for a weekend getaway. Take your Illinois farm bureau membership savings with you farm bureau members can save up to twenty percent at choice hotels including favorites like comfort suites, leap in quality and suites with even more to choose from goal. Eight hundred two five eight two eight four seven or visit the choice hotels website, search all the jails ones and make advance reserv-. Contact your local county farm bureau for your discount code number. Good day. We're looking at your numbers in the commodity markets today. We started the day higher, we've turned around in the beans. Let's start, though, with the corn that remains higher in the nearby July four forty nine and three quarters September three and a half at four fifty five and a quarter and December of two and three quarters at four sixty nearby July beans down three and a half nine five and a half, August down four and a quarter of timber down three and three quarters and member soybean's down four into quarter at nine twenty eight and a half July. Soybeans were whether wheat, July wheat Chicago up to at five forty and a half September one in three quarters and December. We'd up one in three quarters were trading at five fifty four and a quarter being meals ally down eight and August down seven cents three eighteen twenty. We're back here on our FD today. Talking with Erin Hager university of Illinois. We'd scientists Aaron before the break you mentioned Larry Dekel down south dealing with some very stubborn Palmer. And where are we with that? We'd overall. Ill rita. The recommendations really round palm real annoy. We, we really haven't changed him. And that, of course, is number one first priority is to remain vigilant for this. And the reason we keep saying that is because Palmer, courses not native to annoy which means that when we find Palmer one thing that we know right off the bat. Is that the seed head to come into the state, somehow and over time we've learned of many ways that seeds could move that quite honestly, ten or fifteen years ago, we hadn't even thought of, and so once we find the population, then we can implement the steps that we need to ensure that they don't grow over time. But unless we know they're there. That's really help Homer games. It's football. If we simply don't take the time to pay attention to what we have not only in the field that even around the margins the areas of the field, mortar rose, for example, or even ditch makes. Now when you mention that down south with Larry suckling that treatment of Kemba, not really affecting the Palmer as it should. Where are you in that process as we talk here in twenty nineteen what are your thoughts? Not so much concerned, of course about that in, in Palmer here, Illinois just because we have so little of it right now. But certainly concern, I guess, for us would be more around the water hip response to that I can. But this is going to be a very challenging year for campaign water for a lot of the reasons we talked about. When we first started the interview we've got plans that are gonna range in size when treatments replied anywhere for maybe an inch tall probably well over foot tall. So we really think that there's going to be a lot of ability in water hamster response to this year we have identified populations before wearing the field. Least, you know, one x rated I can't simply not controlling all the population. So it's something that will evolve over time we fully expect a have resistance to die camp. At some point in the future, we simply have very little ability to predict when that's going to be going to be in twenty million team twenty twenty twenty one. We really don't know. But we do know eventually find it and it'll be here and with the. The, the circuits the research the industry, so, so many changes going on in ownership in industry with companies etcetera in what are you seeing as far as other products or other processes? Really too much in terms of new active ingredients that have unique target site. We, we really haven't seen anything like that for you'll going on thirty years. Now, the HP chemistry, actually was the last commercialized novel, part site, and many of those compounds actually discovered and patented clear back in the early part of the nineteen eighties or even some late part of the nineteen seventy so eventually, we will see something we, I mean, that's what industry does they bring innovations. They bring new products in the marketplace. We hope of course that with the introduction. Also comes very good robust stewardship practices, because, you know, if we, if we haven't learned our lessons down with water him, and it's ability to evolve resistance to herbicides from seven different classes, then the likelihood of something novel something new being sustainable for a long period of time. It's going to be compromised. And so everybody looks for the new solution. Hopefully we've now had enough experience with resistance that we learned the lesson that with the introduction of new of new technologies we really need to do everything we can do insure that they're stewarded properly, so we can maintain their effectiveness more years into the future. So adding everything up research in the industry. How about their on south farms and the research going on campus? What are you guys looking at? And maybe you we will be showcasing on Grammy day coming up in August. We've got the new instances of assistance that we just announced in March. We, we've discovered resistance now to what's called the group, fifteen her besides a lot of people would recognize those products things like harness outlook, did you and dual magnum? So it continues to happen. We're learning now a lot more about non-target site resistance, and essentially, what happens is that these populations are now able to break down the herbicide very, very efficiently and very, very rapidly. That's really an era of pet. We've not really dealt with a lot in the past, you know, for most of the time that I've been here they went away, we've built a lot with target site resistance. But now we're, we're having to step into the realm of non-target side and metabolic resistance. And there's a whole lot of things that we simply don't know about it yet. And, you know, a lot of this, what we're going to be learning here in the very near future. Hopefully it's going to help us formulate better recommendations to try to keep some of these populations at bay as best we can. So I know for a few years, you were very active in helping the plan that event and Shirley, lots of other things to be highlighted during a Grammy day on campus or other. We the, the format is has changed this year. I think we're we have what seven or nine different tours. That folks can participate in. So if, if there's something on the tour that, you know, if somebody can't find something that they like on this agronomy, I'd be a little surprise, because the offerings are pretty very pretty white. And hopefully they're going to be very, very inviting to a large portion of our of our clientele. Is that the twenty seconds is that the data counter that's close. Double check here. So don't tell you wrong August. Twenty second. All right. Two minutes solid Aaron Hager gold. Nugget, what is it? Higer gold nugget my goodness. We're gonna we're gonna get trouble. You know, we, we, we hope for the best, of course, and we certainly wish all the farming community all the best and the challenging year. Whether they're hearing wanna wear across the US it. It's gonna be a tough year for a lot of folks, we just like say, you know, we're, we're here to try to help us what we do here of on the extension. We'd sinus for the state of Illinois. That's my job. And that's really what drives me is, is not the fame of the fortune. I don't really care about that. It's being able to hopefully talk to somebody in bring a solution to the problems that they're dealing with. So that was a little lesson, too. So I did not get to ask him work questions with his one of my favorite things to do. But that goes back to that scouting element. You know, it's been a few years since we talked about the weed, warriors, and trying to get more and more people out there scouting, the fields we are we there in that process still doing it still doing it, right? I you know, we a lot of people out in the fields these days and I think I see a lot more out in the fields now than we did even ten years ago. I think many now understand the fact that life say is not the full proof herbicide solution that it used to be many, many years ago, and whether it be the individual farmers, the custom applicators or somebody from the seed industry input supplier, a lot of people are out looking at the crops right now. These, these are very, very expensive things to invest in terms of the acre cost to grow acre, corner and acres sweeping. And really, I think a lot of people now have gone back to the idea that since life say, there's really not full proof as it once was, maybe we need to sharpen up our skills, again, maybe we need to relearn, what it is to identify various different broadly weed, species are very different grasps, because, you know, maybe we're going to have really differentiate these here in the very near future. So and know we're here to help that we've got our week science field day, coming up on July tenth and. If you've got questions, if you got species that you really not sure what you may have. If you wanna come to him that we'd size field to bring a sample long. We'll see if we can help you what it is. So, again, that date real quick, July ten why can't we had a bulletin article posted there couple of weeks ago with more additional details about it. Always a pleasure. Aaron have a super day. Enjoy the sunshine and we hope did folks really tune in there to the great advice from such a nationwide expert on this issue will break in. Yes. We'll head back to the university of Illinois to talk weather next. Here's your livestock summary, on the r f e radio network. I'm Rita Frazier, the aug lean hog contract finish yesterday, down four point seven four at seventy four twenty two. That's the lowest that the contract has been since March six nearly four months ago, the combination of Barish cold storage report from the USDA and piling on offense from investment funds selling their positions. Brought that price down yesterday. August live cattle futures did finish the day just slightly higher. This is despite movement in the corn contract, which gained one percent on the board of trade yesterday in the futures today as we roll live cattle, June up forty one. Oh, seven thirty two August. Forty seven one zero to ninety in the feeder cattle, August down seventeen one thirty one sixty September down a dime, one thirty to twenty five Angela lean hogs up ninety five with. August up eighty five seventy five seven. How do people benefit from raising livestock here in Illinois risky, ver- Illinois farmer president to the Eleanor farm bureau? Grownup on livestock form was always interesting. And I can joy more today than I did back then. But it did give me the opportunity to have a good work ethic learned to get up in the morning and, you know, that was difficult during my senior days at high school and college stays headed tendency, nut to go to bed and respectable our, but no, it was always enjoyable in the farm, getting up before daybreak. And Milkin the cows and the chores done and go about the rest of the base business. And when only farm bureau, along with beef porn mill pork and soybean association make up the livestock confinment group, supporting the Illinois in livestock sector or more information. Checkout, Illinois, livestock dot ORG. We're back on our MP today. Talk weather on a Tuesday today. We'll check in with Dr David Kristovich. How are you David? I'm doing great. How are you today? A real super say, climatologist office there on the campus of the U of. I we do see the sun today. I guess the big question how long will it stick around? Well, be seem to be breaking until much drier time periods. So except for a few scattered storms of settle be around the area, late this afternoon into the evening, the really isn't much of a chance of rain for the rest of the week. That's us news. It is. It's a huge it's big Jane from what we've been having. So when we talk about the month of June. Now, we sit here the last week of the month, how do the numbers add up, David? Look look at it and tell us how we're going to put this in the record books. Well, the at the moment where let me look at the numbers. But at the moment, we are still well, above normal precipitation for these southern, I'd say hats, southern two-thirds of the state, low closer to normal precipitation for the northeast and northern parts of the state temperature-wise. We've tended to be on. The we've had a bigger gradient of temperature little warmer than normal to the south low, cooler than normal to the north. So as we now again, slide into July are big question, Mark for all of the farmers. And the crops in field is you know what will July do how will mother nature treat us. So we'll they you know the, the faucet be shut off, so to speak in mid-july. Or what are your longer longer range models? Look, like, well, sure. And well for these. Or we go to the climate prediction center. And right now they're saying for overall for the July, August September time period, there's a greater chance for cooler weather here in Illinois, and a greater chance of above normal precipitation in the western part of Illinois right now on the eastern part of Illinois they're saying, equal chances of normal of almo- or below normal. So that looks a little bit less than it's been looking recent the reason times. But it's still in the chances of it being cooler than than it has been. Yeah. If you don't mind, just so that we, we know that you heard you're right. I can you repeat that because there again, we're kind of really zeroing in on on that forecast, as we try to make our plans here for the month of July. Absolutely. Well, let me the talk about July the July outlook for football. For any time period, there's a equal chances are thirty three percent of moral of normal or blow normal and right now for July the climate prediction center's saying there's about a forty percent chance of it being below normal of temperatures, and more than equal chances of above normal precipitation. So right now, they're saying it's for July itself. It's expected to still there's a better chance of being heavier rain and cooler than normal. But once we get out to the three months, you know, from July, August and September. They seem there seems to be a closer to equal chances of, of normal precipitation, or above or below. So I guess that's the other thing you know, we have to have not only do we have to have a good July. But we also have to have a growing season that extends and. Those early frost fears, it would be nice if they were taken out of the forecast to. You'll see what it's unfortunately, very early the too early to say anything about the frost probabilities, but, but at least for that overall time period, it's they're expecting the average to be below normal. So tell us a little bit. So we've kind of talked about what we saw in June. And as you look at sort of adding twenty nineteen up, we ask you how it will go down in history of with the record floods etcetera. How do you as a climatologist look in summarize twenty nineteen to date? Well, yeah. Twenty nineteen eight so great question that's been in this region. It's a near record heavy precipitation for the nation. It's a record wet year from up to me for Illinois. That's pretty much same. It's way above normal precipitation ranking way up there and temperatures have tended to be a little bit cooler than it has been in this last minute. David, can you just kinda summarize again the next six to ten day fourth floor certainly, so the next six ten days are looking like a better chance of above normal temperatures? So it's going to be on the warm side, much less chance of, of rain than we've been seeing for the recent pest. So hopefully we're in for a dry spell. I know that you have an awesome website, but. Is folks wanted to see more about numbers and historic records? How did they find you and your office information? Absolutely. Go to state climate. Sorry. Let me say that, again, the state climatologist dot web dot Illinois dot EDU. Awesome David have a super day, and we appreciate it. We'll talk to you guys next month. Thanks to all of our guest, from the campus of the university of Illinois. At turns out some fabulous information today for you. Brad's willing with esfbf AM Aaron Hager university of Illinois. We'd management in there. The state climatologists office looking forward to, to Morrow conversation in studio with the one and only Kevin run he with Eleanor farm bureau going to be retiring here in just a week or so. So we'll talk career with Kevin rund tomorrow. Thanks for being a part of today show. I'm Rita Frazier. More farm news and information ahead Fe tuned for more RFID today here on the Ellen oy. Farm bureau Ray. Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the dominion, energy reliability investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns, no, maintenance fees, and flexible, online access to your money, make the reliable investment in reliable energy, the dominion, energy reliability, investment to find out more go online to reliability, investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com.

Illinois Rita Frazier university of Illinois Brad FBI US China Aaron Hager Erin Hager university of Illin Illinois farm bureau Capital One Capital One Konami president Aaron Hager university of Illi FD Dr David Kristovich John Deere Campbell football
CBS 2 UPDATE PM 7 29 20

CBS2 News Chicago

00:52 sec | 4 d ago

CBS 2 UPDATE PM 7 29 20

"I'm Erica sergeant here. Hear the stories making news at this hour. Federal agents are heading to Wisconsin and the State's Democrats want to know why Governor Tony Iverson other lawmakers asked a federal prosecutor to clarify the role agents will play in Milwaukee the group wants to know if the feds will work crowd control in the next several weeks and who will command them. Lou Henson the basketball coach who led University of Illinois back into the national spotlight has died the school says Hinson passed away Saturday and was buried today he was named to the national collegiate basketball. Hall of fame back in two thousand fifteen. Henson was eight years old turning to the weather mostly cloudy skies with the low in the seventies tomorrow partly sunny with temperatures in the eighties, join us on CBS TO CBS Chicago Dot. com for news updates around the clock I'm Eric has sergeant.

Lou Henson Erica sergeant basketball Tony Iverson Hinson CBS CBS Wisconsin Milwaukee University of Illinois Chicago Eric Dot. eight years
Including Indigenous Voices in Genomics

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Including Indigenous Voices in Genomics

"This scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christine herman got a minute from scientists want to use the dna of indigenous is people to reconstruct the human migration story. That's the history of how people spread from africa to everywhere but many in the indigenous community who've contributed their d._n._a. For science feel that these types of studies are expletive and say they don't like being left out of the conversation. There's a long history mystery about <hes> anthropologists and scientists going to indigenous communities getting what they need leaving and never coming back university of illinois anthropologist rippin molly. I learned early on that that was the norm in science and anthropology up until recently to help change that system in twenty eleven kevin molly launched a program that provides hands on genomics training to native american and other indigenous scientists and laypeople. It's called sing summer internship for for indigenous people in genomics we discuss all week about genomics and how it can be used as a tool and how it may fit or not fit with indigenous ideas and knowledge <hes> and we have discussions on how to decolonize science and then we do a large number of discussions about ethical legal legal and social implications this year sing workshop wrapped up earlier this month crystal soci- is a navajo geneticist and one of the organizers thing has been influential lunch and training the next generation of digital scientist so that we can ensure that science is done by us for us and truly benefits us soci- says she's. She's the only indigenous p._h._d. Student in science at vanderbilt and the sing workshop has helped her feel less isolated so getting that sort of sense of community from my indigenous peers who are undergoing seem sort of challenges in academia is great seeing has trained more than one hundred twenty participants to date in twenty eighteen. Alumni and faculty published ethical guidelines for scientists on how to approach genomics research in a way that is sensitive to the interests of indigenous people and that can benefit their communities. Molly says he now approaches his work with indigenous communities as a collaboration work communities to figure out what they wanted to study as well as what we want to study and basically partner with them in her research soci- studies pregnancy complications nations among ojibway women in north dakota and how environmental factors contribute to disease among indigenous communities in south dakota. She says partnering with indigenous teaching people is critical to ensure that genetics research that involves indigenous peoples that will actually benefit us as opposed to just using us as subjects. We have in the past. Josh thanks for the minute for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christine herman.

kevin molly christine herman soci africa vanderbilt north dakota south dakota Josh university of illinois scientist partner sixty seconds
Simulated Soybeans

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Simulated Soybeans

"A synthetic field laboratory at j. p. l. allow scientists perform experiments in hours that would have required months if they were using actual plants innovation. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future, the university of Illinois and the university of Dusseldorf are joining forces with Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to find strategies to address earth's future food needs, and they're beginning with soybeans. The team proposed that a variety of soybean with lighter green leaves could be a key step to increasing crop yields. The green pigment chlorophyll gives leaves their color a decrease in chlorophyll not only makes the leaves lighter, but conserves the plants use of nitrogen without reducing the plants photosynthesis rate over time, it might be possible to breed plants that would apply this extra nitrogen to growing more beans. By combining detailed soybean field measurements with sophisticated model of JPL's multilayer canopy model, scientists were able to conduct the agricultural experiments and less time with fewer resources all without beating around the soybean Bush for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer pulling animation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace, through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR Wien.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory university of Dusseldorf Nasr university of Illinois National Institute of aerospac Bush NASA Jennifer j. p. l.
Lighter Leaves

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Lighter Leaves

"A synthetic field laboratory at J P L allow scientists perform experiments in hours that would have required months if they were using actual plants. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future, the university of Illinois and the university of Dusseldorf are joining forces with Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to find strategies to address earth's future food needs. And they're beginning with soybeans the team proposed that of a righty of soybean with lighter. Green leaves could be a key step to increasing. Crop yields the green pigment chlorophyll gives leaves their color a decrease in chlorophyll, not only makes the leaves lighter. But conserves the plants use of nitrogen without reducing the plants photosynthesis rate over time, it might be possible to breed plants that would apply this extra nitrogen to growing more beans. By combining detailed soybean field, measurements with sophisticated model of JPL's multilayer, canopy model scientists were able to conduct the agricultural experiments in less time with fewer resources all without beating around the soybean Bush for innovation now, I'm Jennifer pulling animation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H, R Wien.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory university of Dusseldorf Nasr National Institute of aerospac university of Illinois Bush Jennifer J P L NASA
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Illinois (August 8, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

27:49 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Illinois (August 8, 2019)

"Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the dominion energy reliability investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money. Make the reliable investment in reliable energy the dominion energy reliability reliability investment to find out more go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com get to old navy saturday and sunday just in time for back to school. Girls and boys polos three bucks in stores only plus saturday only jeans or ten bucks for adults seven bucks for the kids and old navy and old navy dot com valid eight ten to eight eleven limit five polos select styles only a buzz in the air and it's really exciting for animal sciences sciences because we're going to be welcoming one hundred eighty one new students and this is a significant increase from last year when one hundred and fifty four students joined our program so when everything's totaled up we're gonna have over five hundred ninety undergraduate students working towards a degree in animal science so this is yeah just a fun time to be associated with great campus like this. I would just say that you know the when we talk about this technology santer that it's being built using a a novel all public private partnership and and the drive for partners continues and we hope to have some exciting announcements on that in the future and of course <hes> the farm farm bureau is one of our partners so we just really happy to to join them in this important venture the very best and we hope to follow the progress again along the way dr ron johnson at the university of illinois. Uh hege day to you welcome to our s._t. Illinois on a thursday. I'm rita frazier here. At the illinois farm bureau in bloomington the excitement today however will be in springfield day. One of the illinois state bear the first full day tomorrow and end the director of john. Sullivan joins us again today a little bit more about the reopening the grand reopening of the coliseum. Sam is the talk about town and about the stakes there. We'll talk about that. We'll be broadcasting at the fair starting tomorrow. We'll also hear report from from the nation's capital washington correspondent mckay along today more on the very latest on the china trade war. We'll also dive into do the numbers and the projections the latest projections for monday's u._s._d._a. Crap report the loss will be along the first part of the show talking about how the projections and about the report march laura's nerd joins the las here a couple of moments and will start previewing that twenty nineteen mm farm progress show the show manager matt young men is along sorta conversation with matt to talk about who's coming. They will be harvesting harvesting corn. Thanks to a lot of help from the field and we'll have some details with matt also keep a lookout for your next edition of farm wake. It's coming to your mailbox the first part of next week and they will have a special harvest edition while markets in weather and much more coming your way. Stay stay with us <music>. Be it through welcome to the subway. He adds to the neutral body collection. How do you want to slam poetry sure italian dibaba with fresh mozzarella when hunger range you you might flavor umbrella casey garlic steak and probe alone with you might taste buds are never alone savory chicken pesto. You have my affection for you. Complete the collection thank you. That was the new collection by selling limited time only meeting restaurants get to old navy saturday and sunday a just in time for back to school. Girls and boys polos are three bucks in stores. Only saturday only jeans or ten bucks for adults seven bucks for kids at old navy and old navy dot com invalid eight ten to eight eleven limit. Five paulos select styles only headlines microphones tweets. Mike also connects rural routes where you mike has been covering farm and food would issues for more than three decades whether it's print video radio or feeding your online appetite. Mike keeps you in the loop. Here's a bit about his rural roots. I keep our communities ladies state and country in mind with everything i do. My job allows me to work toward this mission with farmers and other rural illinois ins be it routes or routes are f._d. Radio armley canal dot com and farm week connected warmer weather means a longer honeydew list your county farm bureau can help you stay on top of your project lists and save you money along the way a farm bureau membership offer includes discounts on equipment and supplies from grainger plus free shipping on all standard grainger products browse thousands of items from landscaping equipment to power tools anything. You need to get the job done grainger. Has it not a farm bureau member. Call us at three. Oh nine five five seven two six eight nine nine or visit illinois farm bureau online and joined to doug amac our f._d. Illinois laws yongki. We mentioned this yesterday that the average of analysts estimates going into monday's much anticipated u._s._d._a. Reports is for corn production just a little bit less than thirteen point. A two billion bushels an average yield of one sixty four point nine on just a little more than eighty million harvested acres and for soybeans means the yield forty seven point six would lead to production at three point eight billion bushels with harvest of acres just a little bit less than seventy nine point nine million alien. Yes report should have a bigger sample size than normal if you remember what happened in late june with the market was surprised by the acreage figures mandalay some changes here explained by mark slater sade satisfaction for our august crop before which comes out on the twelfth sample size is about the same as we've. We've done before <hes> nine hundred fifteen. I think it is in illinois but remember in addition we went back to many of the people we talked to about june acres and so for many many of them. I don't know the number we were getting an acreage update or let's call it a possible acreage update from all those people plus the nine hundred fifteen people were also also asking. What do you think corneal just going to be. What do you think your soybean. You'll just going to be as long as they're says. In most cases the people that are interviewed for the june report <music> are different than the group. That's interviewed in july mostly to separate samples just a little bit of overlap but they're they're selected independently a. and mike it <hes> both kinda random chance more than by design now with those people that we called in july asking about corn and soybean you take yield. We're asking most of those people that didn't continue into september and october and november and follow the crop through the growing season status addition marks listener a couple of the estimates agrivisor with harvest of acres pegged at eighty one point six million production thirteen point five five billion a billion that average yield one sixty six grain cycles veiled or kohls eighty million harvested acres yield one sixty five and a half total production thirteen in point two four billion for soybeans agrivisor has soybeans three point seven seven billion bushels on seventy seven point eight million acres rain cycle all three point nine billion bushels with arbs acres at eighty point eight million again that report will be released monday at eleven o'clock much anticipated his painted us grains council u._s. Soybean exports council team yesterday in a press conference called growing demand for u._s. Egg abroad jim suitors c._e._o. The u._s. soybean exports council and said their efforts to expand markets outside of china really hit full speed july of last year. We put what together <hes> an initiative or strategy. I'll call it a call what it takes and that initiative look at what will it take to replace the lost demand in china china with demand in other markets around the world so we went through country by country all of the borders of soy and we put together a plan that if we were successful we would then replace that demand now. I have to report to you that we haven't quite achieved that this year. We've had several factors. Is that have caused some issues with that <hes> we we've also seen a little bit of continued demand china so instead of going to zero shipments to china were at about the thirty percents of where we were a year ago. We have a potential plan for how we can get there. I don't wanna i don't wanna be overly optimistic and say that it will be easy to achieve that. I think it will take some years of time but the u._s. has some very strong advantages and we are out talking with buyers around the world so again trying to increase as the market share in all the existing markets for soy <hes> by talking about the u._s. Oi advantages brian to build up new markets where there's very a little soy demand today but we believe with large populations low protein consumption and growing in economic activity. These are countries that we'll be strong demand points in the future so all of that strategy put together is is what we've been working on for a while but is now really come into the limelight alight as we have the situation the trade war situation with china <hes> so we're we're trying to put that into a maximum speeds trying to get get the impact out as soon as possible tim suter of u._s. Soybean export council says one of the factors or unintended consequences in their goals to build more more demand around the world has also been the increased production and as a result availability of soybeans coming from south america. They rita has more next next on our ethnic yield all get old navy saturday and sunday just in time for back to school. Girls and boys polos are three bucks in stores only plus saturday only jeans or ten in bucks for adults seven bucks for kids old navy and old navy dot com valid eight ten to eight eleven limit five polos select styles only lounge presents an evening the class. That's ugo tickling the ivories. He just saved by bundling home and auto progressive if i leave i._r._a. Fanatic gallagher is you. Send my condolences this vaccine. There's a uh in my thinking casualty insurance company. Usually it's discontent available in all states or situations. The food safety modernization oranization act or fizz. Ma is your produce farm ready for far safety inspection join illinois farm bureau and the f._d._a. For two on-farm readiness demonstration field days don't oh mrs opportunity to walk away with tools birth successful inspection join us from nine a._m. To two thirty at the prairie earth farm and atlanta illinois on august twenty eighth or flam orchard in compton melania on august twenty nine watch will be provided seating is limited visit. I l. f. b. Dot org slash on-farm ready to register today. The illinois economy runs on on our homegrown. Agricultural products are dairy beef pork corn and soybeans road agricultural industry by nearly twenty billion dollars each year but we don't just scroll illinois we grow north america canada mexico account for over forty billion dollars in u._s. Agricultural exports and they support more than one million american jobs exports to canada and mexico to everyone in the agricultural and food industries out message from illinois farmers checkoff programs. We are back here. You're on r._f._i._d. Yellen oy i read a frazier president trump and egg leaders off capitol. Hill are deflecting blame on the administration for the u._s. China trade war and it's severe impact on agriculture are empty washington correspondent mckay reports g._o._p. Senate ally chuck grassley defended the president's tariffs against china all said some by billions in market facilitation payments when other presidents offered no health nixon freeze is the price of beef is for short periods of time but a ruined the beef industry in the united states and i was number one and we've never been number one since nineteen seventy. Two four didn't do anything to help the farmers when he put a ban on exporting soybeans because the price was getting cy when the russians invaded did afghanistan harder put a ban on exports to russia and then help the farmers grassley says trump who tweeted he'd be willing to give farmers more trade eight again next year. It's needed says the president's keeping his word to help producer. It's they also know that china's been cheating leading not only farmers but <hes> american manufacturing american services and <hes> i get a sense that farmers are sticking with the president of you echoed by american farm bureau's dale more in a fox news interview in terms of talking to our members they faith and the president they appreciate the actions that he's taken to support support them through this fight but it's something that we're really concerned about carrying forward in trying to get this nailed down with estimated losses from china tariffs feared at close to twenty billion since two thousand seventeen leaders say trump could still hold back on his latest tariff threat against china. If there's some movement before still set september meeting meeting though china has signalled it's ready for a longer fight and may be willing to wait to see if trump is reelected. The are empty radio network math k. on on capitol. Hill thinks that this is state fair week activities starting tonight officially tomorrow official first full day and tomorrow the grand rand reopening of the coliseum illinois department of agriculture director. John sullivan said they're excited at the department. I'll tell you why they're just so so much excitement. Not i mean obviously we here at the department of egg in the folks associated with a fair very excited about it but everywhere i go. I mean just almost without exception as i mentioned earlier try. I've been traveling around the state and everybody you know brings up the coliseum. So it's remarkable. It looks amazing. The crew the construction crew and then our crew after after they completed their work has been working almost around the clock getting everything ready but i'm really looking forward to having events in there of course the sale of champions is gonna be in there <hes> <hes> on tuesday evening of agd as well so just really excited about it john sullivan illinois director of agriculture state fair the ten day run getting underway later later today. August is always an exciting time for illinois especially when the farm progress show is in the state and this year near decatur were set to get started ended on the twenty seventh matt young men show manager talks with us about several key visit including one from secretary bags sonny perdue. We're really excited you know he he hasn't been since he took office and and he's kind of becoming an old friend of the show good to have him there. You know <hes> good great partnership partnership with a._b._m. They help us a lot. They do a lot of work to get you know not only that currently there but but also a lot of state records and secretaries of egg. We'll have a lot of governors there the show <hes> you know and you know it's one thing to say that you're gonna have a bunch of politicians there but but these are the folks that are doing the work on our behalf in d._c. Be so always good to have them. <hes> come to an event like the barber show and and after throwers and and really get a sense an in a feel for what's happening out there in the country and as you said really u._s._d._a. Has been listening to the country. He i think in addition to that i think i mentioned at that. There's always politicians but you know you have things like the commissioner of the f._c._c. is coming because there is with the limited amount of data coverage that we have out on the contrary be machine that that the that the exhibitors the manufacturers are making are capable of doing more than the current infrastructure can support so the commissioner of the f._c._c. is coming out and we're gonna get him in the cab of something like a prayer and stretch it out and run it and kind of explain to what we need more threes. We need talking activity out there in the field so that these producers efficiently track their their machine get information all of the all the things that they need to do author and thumper so it's nice to have something like that happening at the farm progress show where he can get the opinion of a lot of a lot of a lot of exhibitors manufacturer. They're all they're all there together together. So what a good place for him become learn about this industry looking at agriculture farm families and even though you have a lot of equipment you have a lot of new products ought to talk about for the farm progress show twenty nineteen. It all comes down to farm families exactly right. The exhibitors would like to think that people are coming in. They're gonna spend ten hours looking at brand new equipment and writing checks. That's not really what's been happening. It's all about the family <hes> that that wants to come and obviously they wanna learn about me product. They wanna see the new flashy thing they wanna check out the feel demonstrations i think more than ever this year it's going to be a lot of friends talking to friends and donald talking about this tough year spending some time with the people who really understand the trouble that that you're having and you know maybe use this as an opportunity to put two thousand nineteen th again the for two thousand nineteen behind china's big plans for twenty twenty and get optimistic and get excited and get motivated about about a much better twenty than we've had in two thousand nineteen we we'd it kinda comes down to dollars and cents to partnered with titan tire on on on a kind of a mission to make make the barber show financially better for the visitors. When you get into the game you're going to get a wristband and you take that wristband to tighten and that they're going to give you a certificate. That certificate will be good for one hundred dollars off of any tire off of anything. That's so whether it gets here irrigation rague a._t._v. implement irish factor tires anything like that. It's not by this much and get this. My talk aw one hundred dollars. It's basically a hundred dollar bill for tires so you know we're paying people a hundred dollars to come to the show. We're really excited to to have that partnership with night and then you know i think i think i think it's just something. That's that helped make that decision. Hopefully it'll it'll help folks make that decision. Shell matt young men talking about the twenty nine hundred thousand farm progress show our complete conversation can be heard later today on some of these affiliates on r._s._v. today right now. We'll break for markets in weather hi. It's jamie progressive's employee of the month two months in a row. Leave a message at the hi jamie. It's me jamie. I just had a new idea for our song. Let the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay hey hey trombone goes blah blah blah and you say we'll help you find coverage options that fit your budget then we just all finger snaps while a choir goes savings coming at ya savings coming watch out. Yes no maybe anyway. See your practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap. Break progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates pricing coverage match limited by state law. Let's say you just bought the house bad news. Is your one step closer to becoming your parents. You'll proudly ask anybody noticed you mow the lawn. Tell people to stay l. salon. Compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complain about having to motive on again. Good news is it's easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car our insurance which of course will go right into the lawn progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurers discount not available in all states or situations whether buying or selling grain protect your profits from insects from rescue treatments to long-term control centre life sciences products such as dicon g._r. sentinel easy insecticide. You're diane. Ejiofor plus can help maximize your profits learn more at bug free grains dot com with the market summary for this thursday morning. I'm jim taylor corn. Corn beans and wheat are lending wednesday slightly hires timber corn closing at four zero six and a half of two and a half december corn up one and a half fourteen march cornforth twenty three and three quarters quarters up one and three quarters august beans closing at eight forty eight and three quarters up a penny september beans up a penny eight fifty four and november beans eight sixty six and three quarters up once timber week closing at four eight and a quarter a fourth quarter december lead up three and a half were ninety one and a quarter august being meal to ninety-three even down to ten august the oil up forty eight cents twenty seven ninety six current electronic overnight writing september corn up three quarters december corn three quarters march corn four twenty four and a quarter up one half august beans knee overnight up three september beans up for november beans eight seventy and a half up three and three quarters of timber wheat in the overnight up one and three quarters december week four ninety two and a quarter up any outside markets october brent crude oil down to seventy one a barrel fifty six twenty three december gold contract down ten ninety this morning fifteen hundred eight seventy livestock market from yesterday august lean hog seventy seven seventy two up sixty cents tober lean hogs up to twenty five sixty six six eighty five august live cattle seven sixty up forty seven cents october live cattle up twenty two cents one zero six forty five august feeders one thirty nine fifty five down forty two percents of timber feeder cattle down seven cents one thirty nine thirty seven cash livestock greenville livestock steers one twenty to the top and yellow eyed rails trading one the two dollars lower on wednesday forty five to fifty two. I'm jim taylor for the r. f. t. radio network good morning. This is dan. Dan hicks from freecell too early morning. Egg weather updates on the r._f._i._d. Radio network for this thursday morning daytime highs in the eighties to around ninety continued in most of the midwest yesterday a new weather system that has been moving in from the northwest has been producing a few widely scattered showers and thunderstorms but a large part of the region has yet have to receive any significant rainfall gray this coverage of some rain occurred in some north central and northeastern parts of the midwest and also in some south western locations rainfall from the system across illinois surrounding areas will be quite spotty today into tonight with a few showers still possible in southern illinois during the day tomorrow a large which part of the state will likely not receive any significant rain from this system over the next twenty four hours or so daytime highs today will be in the eighties to around ninety across across the region temperatures will be just a few degrees cooler tomorrow into saturday with upper seventies and eighties across most mid west mainly dry weather is expected did here in illinois tomorrow into saturday except for again a few showers in the southern part of the state still possible on friday the next more general chance for some showers and thunderstorms across across the state would likely spread south eastward into the region very late this weekend or more likely early to mid next week even with that system doesn't look like major major rainfall amounts will occur in all areas of the midwest no extreme temperatures are expected across the region for the next several days highs will be in the upper seventies and eighties over the northern midwest eighties low nineties in the southern areas and it looks like six attended temperatures will likely average within a few degrees of normal in most of the midwest some additional rain chances are possible during the six ten day timeframe across the region six to ten day rainfall amounts though will still likely average near to below normal in large part of illinois and also a large part of the rest of the mid west this is dan hicks from freeze notice whether you're born in the mood for some sprucing up you're in luck from big to small or farm to front yard. Your illinois farm bureau member discount from john deere is ready and waiting to help. It's easy to think green when it's the rewards loyalty program with savings on equipment special part in home and workshop products whether you're tasks zimbabwe mowing planting or cleaning cleaning you'll be set for whatever your work requires. All you need to do is sign up. Have your membership number handy and go to john. Deere dot com plush. Hero wants to learn more about these nitrogen on your farm join eloi farm bureau university of illinois extension at area farmer's for field day friday august thirtieth. It's free lunches included beulah valuate best management practices improve nitrogen use while protecting the environment and more bottom line discussions include on-farm data dropped gross weather and disease the the day starts at ten a._m. With the field located at sixty nine hundred fiftieth street between monmouth and kirkwood questions all the war and henderson farm bureau or visit us on facebook. Hi welcome to the subway ads the collection. How do you want it. I think a slam poetry sure italian tomato with fresh mozzarella rela when hunger range flavor umbrella casey garlic and probe alone with you might taste buds are never alone savory chicken pesto sto- you have my affection for you. Complete the data collection. Thank you bye limited time meeting. Restaurants get the old navy saturday and sunday just in time for back to school. Girls and boys polos are three bucks in stores. Only plus saturday only jeans or ten bucks for adults seven bucks for kids that old navy and old navy dot com valid eight ten to eight eleven limit five paulos select styles only now there are a lot of smartphone apps is out there but did they have what's important to us here in illinois the farm week now at does and it's always at your fingertips all ag all illinois and twenty four seven where and when you need it for free go to your app or play store on your smartphone it search type in farm week now that's one word and download it today brought to you by little farm bureau where we're all about farm family and food farm league and partners magazine editor chris anderson connects rule routes for you. You chris shares her four decades of writing expertise by making sure each addition delivers the best information. Here's a bit about her rule routes. I was as an farm in champaign county growing soybeans popcorn pumpkins and poultry. My top priority is to inform educate and even entertain farm bureau members routes. Four rooms are empty radio bar week now dot com and get to old navy saturday and sunday just in time for back to school. Girls and boys polos are three bucks in stores. Only clus saturday only jeans or ten bucks for adults seven bucks for kids at old navy and old navy dot com valid eight ten to eight eleven limit. Five polos select styles only an ad from dad all right save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive. What is this wow. Where did you get this. I'm talking to you with the hair yeah. Where did you get this good stuff solid. That's not the near that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations.

Illinois china illinois farm bureau rita frazier matt young John sullivan university of illinois washington eloi farm bureau university of american farm bureau mckay jim taylor director Hill prairie earth farm illinois trump producer Sam
Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

Environment: NPR

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

"We have news about photosynthesis, the basic, biological machinery of plants. Scientists have re-engineered at creating genetically modified plants that are better at converting sunlight into stocks and leaves they opened a lead to bigger harvests NPR's. Dan, Charles has the story. There's a big old molecule a protein inside the leaves of most plants. It's called ruby disco signed a big fan of fiscal. It's probably the most abundant protein in the world. This is a man to Cavanaugh. She's a researcher at the university of Illinois Rebecca has one job it picks up carbon dioxide from the air and uses the carbon to make sugar molecules it gets the energy to do this from the sun. This is photo, synthesis. The way plants use sunlight to make food the foundation of life. So for rubel SCA has what we like to call one fatal flaw. The flaw is rubik's co is not picky enough about what it grabs from the air. It also picks up oxygen, which is unfortunate. When it does that it. Makes a toxic compound into the plant has to detoxify plants have a whole complicated chemical assembly line that handles this detoxification. And the process uses up a lot of energy, which means the plant has less energy for making leaves or food for us. So Kevin and her colleagues at the university of Illinois and the US department of agriculture spent the last five years trying to fix rubik's goes problem, we're sort of hacking photosynthesis, you could say they experimented with tobacco plants just because tobacco's easy to work with they inserted new genes into these plants which shut down the existing detoxification assembly line and set up a new one that's way, more efficient, and they created super tobacco plants they grew faster, and they grew up forty percent bigger or up to forty percent bigger. Sounds kinda remarkable that you are really redesigning nature to work better. Yeah. I mean, that's our plan me not nature though. We're redesigning an agricultural product. They're now trying to do the same thing with plants that we actually rely on for food crops like tomatoes and soybeans also cow peas because that's an important crop in sub Saharan Africa, which are really interested in making the biggest impact the funders include the US department of agriculture and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The Gates Foundation. Also funds NPR Kevin on her colleagues published their work this week in the journal science marine Hansen who's doing similar research at Cornell University is really impressed. This is a very important finding it's really the first major breakthrough showing that one can indeed engineer photosynthesis and achieve of major increase in crop productivity. These more productive crops are still years away from farmers fields, though, researchers have to figure out whether engineering food crops like soybeans, this way, actually means more beans or just more stocks and leaves, and then they'll need to convince government regulators and consumers that the crops are safe. Dan, charles. NPR news.

US department of agriculture Dan rubik Melinda Gates Foundation university of Illinois researcher Kevin NPR NPR rubel SCA NPR Charles engineer Cornell University Saharan Africa Rebecca
Kanye West's Behavior And Mental Health; David Lammy On Tribalism

Here & Now

41:52 min | 5 d ago

Kanye West's Behavior And Mental Health; David Lammy On Tribalism

"From NPR and Wbz I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here. Now negotiations continue in Washington over the next pandemic relief bill there appear to be not just major differences between Democrats and Republicans, but also disunity in the Republican Party on their proposal. Meanwhile, emergency unemployment benefits expire on Friday Democratic Senator Chris Van. Holland of Maryland joins us now. Senator Welcome. Jeremy with you. Well, before we get to the pandemic relief, I've got to ask you about some big news this morning the president says he plans to withdraw nearly twelve thousand troops from Germany. A move that our allies are concerned will weaken NATO trump has accused Germany of not spending enough on shared defense. What's your reaction to that? This is a terrible move. It undermines the credibility of the NATO alliance. It calls into question our commitment to our NATO allies. Exactly the thing that will cause Vladimir Putin to pop. Champagne or vodka bottles in Moscow and it's the exact wrong direction to go. Do. You have any sense of why the president is doing it. Well, he is set from the beginning He questions NATO and the utility of the alliance, and sadly we're now seeing that sentiment put into action some of his supporters keep trying to say, well, he didn't really mean it. He really does support NATO but now we're seeing actions that indicate that. He is not a strong support of the alliance and he is taking actions that essentially bring smiles to the faces of our adversaries and great fear to our allies. Let me ask you about the relief bill. How much are you willing to compromise other Democrats willing to compromise with Republicans to get something passed before some of these benefits run out. One of the critical issues is whether. There should be an extra six hundred dollars of weekly unemployment benefits, which is what Democrats want or Republicans have been proposing two hundred dollars. Well, the loss of four hundred dollars per week for struggling families is going to be devastating. I mean their bills have not stopped their rent payments of not stop their mortgage payments are not on hold. So we need to maintain a large level of support. Are we willing to sit down and talk with our Republican colleagues about this? Of course, BUT WE'VE BEEN Waiting two months in two weeks now since the House passed its bill and now we get this proposal from Republicans. That's an adequate does not extend. The Eviction Moratorium has not a penny for state and local government does not create additional funds of for the nutrition programs So this is totally inadequate to the needs that are out there in the country. All those things in a bill in order to support it. Well. We need the basic elements of a proposal of a response that meets the needs of the people who are hurting most around the country, and we need to address both the health aspects and make sure that we have adequate testing which the Republican bill does not provide for because they don't have a mechanism to increase the supply and we need a robust safety net for people who are hurting through no fault of their own and The Republican bill provides. Neither Republicans have been focused on liability protection for businesses, basically making it so that you can't sue a business if you get cove there is that something that you could get behind. No it's outrageous on the one hand they're pushing people back to work, and we want people to go to work to the extent that it's safe and what Republicans are saying is that employers businesses have no obligation to ensure a safe work environment and that they don't want to be held responsible or accountable. If people come back to their worksite and sick because of the negligence of the company, what we really need to do is establish clear safety standards for the workplace, and then we can talk about whether or businesses that meet those standards whether there's a rebuttal presumption that they impose the protections required or not so. But what the McConnell Bill does is essentially say to businesses You can go ahead be negligent. You know don't provide safety measures in the workplace and you know we're GonNa look the other way you cannot be held accountable. That's outrageous. It sounds like you're pretty far apart though at this point, this doesn't sound like something that's going to be resolved in. A couple of days well, first of all the Republican caucuses split and they're far apart among themselves the number I've heard is half the members of the Senate Republican Caucus don't WanNa do anything which just means it's all the more important for the trump administration and Mitch McConnell to work with Democrats to get this done we have been waiting. Two months and two weeks since the House passed the Heroes Act, and all we get is this bill that is totally inadequate to meeting the needs and actually does harm by putting workers and consumers at greater risk, and at the same time I should point out there bill they want to reinstate the tax break for three Martini lunches, they ever proposal which they. Call emergency to get one over a billion dollars for the FBI headquarters at its current location, which would be great for the president because it would avoid any competition the future to his hotel. It's really outrageous what they put forward. So would you support a short term extension of these extended unemployment benefits if no deal can be reached in the next couple of days? Well, we want to use this opportunity to sit down with our Republican colleagues and do what we've been trying to get them to do for two months and two weeks which is come up with a continuation of a safety net. For the American people. That is Democratic Senator Chris, Van Holland a barrel and senator. Thank you so much for joining us. Good to be with you. Thanks. There's a resolution apparently site two weeks of nightly confrontations between protesters and federal agents at a federal courthouse in. Portland Oregon this morning Oregon. Governor. Kate Brown announced that federal agents will begin to withdraw with us. Now is maxine Bernstein she covers federal courts and law enforcement for the Oregonian. And maxine what can you tell us about this resolution? So Oregon's Governor Kate Brown announced this morning that federal officers are going to start pulling out of Portland tomorrow on Thursday in a phased approach and instead Oregon State Police troopers will move in to back up the Federal Protective Service officers to safeguard the federal courthouse in downtown. PORTLAND. Okay. So troopers will replace those federal agents just this morning president trump called protesters, anarchists, and said agents aren't leaving Portland until the city is secure let's listen to that. Job. Who are? Forced to. Deal with. Okay. Thank you. Maxine, how has the presence of these agents at the courthouse escalated the situation over the past few weeks and will it be different with having the troopers there versus the agents? Yeah. They said role officers, many of whom or clad in camouflage fatigues. Triggered, a huge escalation in the number of demonstrators who would show up and come out in the street and the focus of the demonstrations turned from. Black lives matter to demands that the feds go home and oftentimes the large demonstrations during the day would devolve. At night into violent clashes between some in the some outside the courthouse who were just intent on driving federal officers out of the city and would be thrown fireworks and other objects that officers trying to to cut down or tear down the fence outside and resulted almost predictably with federal officers responding with tear gas and firing impact you initiatives into the crowd that led to numerous injuries of Peaceful demonstrators of journalists of legal observers of many in the crowd, and it sparked multiple civil suits against the federal law enforcement. Yeah I mean this we're we're just hearing more about federal agents withdrawing but what's being said about the administration's decision to to then send in troops? well, Oregon's governor the Portland's mayor they all rejected and called on the administration to keep the federal officers out of the city and despite their pleas That the officers arrived and there about one hundred and fourteen here that were based at the courthouse and federal trump administration argues that the officers were here to defend the Federal Court House but there were questions about whether the officers exceeded their authority under the Homeland Security Act because there were times when the officers left the property of the courthouse and would push demonstrators blocks from from the building and would make arrests outside blocks away. So. There's there's lots of developments here, and as you laid out for us, what feels like a very much a chaotic scene you being both inside of the courthouse and outside of Your House of course, this is a developing story that we will continue to follow maxine Bernstein covers federal courts law enforcement for the Oregonian newspaper. Thank you, maxine. Thank you for. What tribes do you belong to? For British member of parliament David Lamb there are many he has Guyanese roots. He feels connected to the United Kingdom and as a politician to his party. The Labor Party. But in a new book, he says sorting ourselves into groups can also be problematic. It's called tribes how are need to belong can make or break society and David Lamb joins us once again from London. Welcome back. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much for having me. As Well and let's go to where you begin this book, which is you got your DNA tested. What did you find out? Well, my parents are from Guyana at the top of South America the bottom of the Caribbean I've always known. I, guess that my descendants were it's like people who came. From Africa across the middle passage brought by probably the Dutch but may be the English to guy on it was a Dutch colony at one point. I took this DNA tests and what it told. Me was that on my father's potential line, I went back to ban to South Africans and Angolans. And on my mother's maternal line, I went back to the ten day tribe in Sierra Leone and Trois bags in the country of nausea and I've got a little bit of Scottish me. You said that it gave you something that you had longed for, which was a genetic sense of self and I wonder why did you want that so much? Well, I think like a lot of African Americans who are listening. Like. A lot of folk who stemmed from the Caribbean? All. Latin America we are. Hybrid people, and if you are the descendants of enslaved people, you know at a certain point that was a dramatic traumatic interruption in which your descendants lost that language. Lost their culture lost two they were I'm because of those slaves were captured as really sort of teenagers that chain and not link back to wherever you came from Africa. Was Broken. So there is a longing and a belonging. That isn't quite there. So it's an intriguing process to take your DNA test. If you the descendant of enslaved people and that's the Janney I went on and it took me to Asia and I write about that experience of going to a black Muslim country spending time with these. Wonderful. Muslim people praying with the eating with them sitting with them and I felt deep a deep connection that I said to them at the end of the ceremony. They did for me that you know I will stand up in the House of Commons. In London and I I will will You know stand taller than I was before I came here because I have a great sense of who I am as I stand in that historic place speaking truth to power. And how does that connection that you had there compared to the connection you have to Britain compared to the connection that you have. Let's say to your neighborhood in London or to the Labor Party, which is the party that you are a member of how do those tribes compare? I thought it was important if I was going to write a book about the new tribalism that is gripping our world that is making politics deeply partisan that is meaning that people fall into these rabbit holes and echo chambers that I need to explore my tribe. So you're absolutely right. yes. I'm the descendant of Guyanese people who were formerly Africans, but in the end I grew up in London and in the city of Peterborough in middle England. I was very fortunate to go to Harvard Law School I am. A black, middle-class, mine here in the UK. and. In in getting to what I wanted to write about it was important to explore my tribes and and I explore those tribes in the Book Hi talk about what it meant to go to a boarding school in Peterborough I. Go back to that city I speak to people have strong views about immigration people who took me into their homes who fed me who loved me because I had friends. from that city at scored who lived in the city, but nevertheless have very different. Views to me these are folk in the UK that would be like folks you would meet in the the rust belt's in in America, that would have voted for Donald Trump and feel very strongly against folk in the city and in in Washington and I spent time with those people and talked about my affection for those folk even though we had very different views on how I belong in that city and how that makes me English and how there are things about me despite being a. Black Britain, you know things that are quintessentially English my humor the food I eat and live in the the things that I grew up about with and indeed my party that the Labor Party and the traditions the Labor Party has is a senior British politicians. So I, explore all of that and I tried to write about these things in a way that's not judgmental in a way that is trying to listen and. To hear and to bridge divides married to a white middle-class woman my children are Biracial and I have large white extended family some of whom do not hold the same political views as myself. So that's the I I'm not I'm writing in trying to write in a generous way to arrive at a point where explore the divisions that we're all living with the same. So powerfully strong in wider society at this time. And when you talk about some of those things, you see the. Sort of charming side of tribes but you also talk a lot in this book about where tribalism becomes a real problem and I want to go through a couple of those let's start with politics because in your country and in this country, there are some politicians who martin such lockstep with their party that it does seem like you know the party is more important than even their own views on on things. How did politics become? So tribal you're absolutely right. We're living in an age of pop populism we're living in an age where. There has been a deliberate attempts in parts of our politics in the UK on the extreme left and the extreme right of politics. To deliberately divide us to to to to deliberately take people's off the bowl. The Issue Times is not artificial intelligence automation or deep inequality across the site. The the issue of our time is building a Mexican ball. Is Fighting with the European Union is. Imron who just arrived from a Muslim country and wants to take your job, and that stuff is stoked on social media, and indeed there aren't even external countries Russia, very famously manipulating this stuff. Those are the Times wherein deliberately playing the worst instincts of tribalism and whole swathes of the population. Happy to such a deep dive into this, and it doesn't end in a great place. You know the challenges of all time climate change a global pandemic actually require global cooperation. Ranch the point. When you talk about tribalism and Islamist extremism in a conversation that you had with a taxi driver who told you about his son who had been radicalized by Isis tell us about that and what you learned from that interaction what it was a trip that I was I was innocent of. taxi on the way to Heathrow. Airport. And it was just a painful story because a cools in examining how this had happened. We touched on the loneliness of these young men sitting in that bedrooms the Internet what was going on at the local mosque, the ways in which these young men were seduced into this violent extremism that a now had catastrophic. Effect on their family and I linked that theme of Loneliness. To another individual who sent me and Five other members of parliament here in the UK, a serious death threat. And I went to his trial, and despite the fact that this man had called me, the n word had had held abuse I had threatened to kill me sitting in his trial I realized that this individual was kind of pathetic. I was lonely He was lonely mean racist. Able. To sort of exact revenge again seduced into extremism. This is far right extremism the source of extremism that killed my fellow MP and colleague Joe Cox a few years ago here in the UK and. These same things coming up that I thought it was important to explore. People are lonely and they need to belong. We have an innate need to belong, and I think the other thing that I explore in the book of Cools, the theme of our times identity politics here. I am as a black member of parliament, of course, cold to defend and speak up for minority black communities here in the UK and globally? To be in solidarity with movements like black lives matter but at the same time. So recognized that if. Race is the start and end of every conversation. Then we run the risk of not finding common purpose and a shared humanity. David Clammy of member of the Labor Party in the British parliament. His new book is called tribes are need to belong can make or break society. We'll have more of our conversation tomorrow. Today Boeing reported a two point, four, billion, dollar quarterly loss and announced. It would slow production of new aircraft. Another sign of how the pandemic is devastating. The airline industry jet blue also reported a huge lots this week and said revenue in the next quarter is expected to drop by eighty percent as air travel demand plummets. Let's bring in here now transportation analysts, Seth Kaplan, and set. Let's start with Boeing, which was already in financial trouble before the pandemic and second quarter earnings are worse than expected. What does that you Is it more of a longterm concern for the industry to see a problem like that at Boeing then at an airline? That's exactly what it is. Jeremy if you're looking for good news and how could there be any good news about two point four, billion dollar loss as you said, well, that's a smaller loss than Boeing reported a year earlier nearly three billion dollars for the same quarter last year. The difference though Jeremy is back. Then it seemed like sort of a one time thing that was right after the second Max crash the first quarter after that and Boeing sort of thought hey, we'll get through this. Setting aside the obviously the human toll there. But in financial terms that we get through that, go back to selling delivering airplanes. Now, it's dealing with something very different a world that doesn't really want nearly as many airplanes as Boeing, in its competitor Airbus thought, they would want if you're looking for actual good news Boeing's defense business at least the other side of the company relatively stable. And what about jet blue and it's a loss reported? How does that week performance compared to the other lines and they all kind of in the same boat at this point? Yeah. I've never seen numbers like these before. Jeremy. So jet blue reported a negative one, hundred, ninety, one percent operating loss margin. For Prospective Germany, usually like negative double digit margin, you see an airline with negative twelve percent somewhere in the world. That's terrible that negative one, hundred, ninety, one percent was actually better by that measure than most other US airlines which were in excess of negative two hundred percent. So this is just off the charts compared to any other environment jetblue fortunately to be mostly domestic airline. Delta United an American to a lesser degree, which of course, can't fly too many of the places around the. Fly. When it comes to, Delta, it is updating its policy for face coverings. What it allows in what it demands and what it doesn't allow what's the latest there? Yet delta has taken the lead in many regards jetblue actually was the first to mandate masks but Delta now enforcing mandate very strictly it actually Jeremy stereotype about the parents telling a child a car. Hey I'll turn this car around. Don't behave delta turned the plane around the other day not one that had taken off but. DETROIT Back to the gate made a couple passengers get off because they refused to wear masks. According to local news reports. They're also now banning masks with exhaust valves. You've seen these masks with the little the little valves they say, look that's not about preventing the spread of this virus that's for industrial reasons he can't wear those either on Delta. And what about Amtrak they're cracking down when it comes to face mask to. They are basically no exceptions. If you're in a regular seat, you have to have your mask on a pretty much the whole time. So the only exception is if you're in an individual room, then you can take your mask off but other than that they're gonNA ask you to get off the plane the train perhaps ban you from traveling just as back to Delta. They've banned more than one hundred people from flying Delta because. Masks. We'll see if they take that kind of action when it comes to enforcing the quiet car Seth Kathleen here. No transportation analyst at. Thank you. You gotTa Derby. Back in two thousand, seven Kanye West was at the top of his game. Flatten inside ten artists. All right. Ready. Cayenne West. West was a well respected producer and rapper his third studio album graduation debuted at number one on the billboard charts and it was around that time that West started declaring himself the voice of a generation. Music journalist Naima Cochran Remembers West definitely being a major cultural influence I remember people. Enjoying a solo artist, his production was were already familiar with his cadence has Kinda tongue-in-cheek snark and sarcasm it was it was it was refreshing energy and and something that wasn't all the Way New York. But also wasn't all the way down South and had his own unique flavor to it, and she says, it was perceived that his sometimes outlandish comments and behaviors were part of the shake it felt then. was his very different now like Kaya. was kind of in on the. Joke which was part of was actually part of the persona in twenty eighteen west revealed. He has a mental illness and some mental health advocates are now pushing for the media to reexamine the way we cover West's actions, his comments about slavery, our current president, and his running for President Bossy be is one of those advocates. She's also the author of I'm telling the truth, but I'm lying where she writes about her own bipolar diagnosis bossy started our conversation by sharing with me how her own experience of being hospitalized his impacted her view of Kanye, West. It's difficult to watch Kanye West I think that. Every time that he's come out in and done something that's caused this uproar in the news or in conversation I've been able to recognize. That it's a manic episode almost immediately The same way that. WHO has experienced? Let's say diabetic shock or you know another sort of invisible illness, they can recognize it and somebody else. So I always feel immediately compassionate and then on top of that when people have these conversations about him, the does upset me because what we're saying is that. We only care about mental health when we'd like the person who's experiencing it right and we're able to say we. As a society, we're able to speak about him in ways that are so unkind and lack grace and math lack empathy and justify it because he's saying things we don't like. What I've been saying lately is that Connie is never going to hear you he's not going to log onto twitter. tweeting and be like Oh they made a good point. The person who sees you your neighbor who's experiencing mental health crisis sees you your your sibling who has not been able to tell you or find the language to tell you sees you. So all these people that you do have an impact on our seeing the way that you treat this person and they're either going to hide from you, they're going to dismiss their own feelings or they're going to know that they're going to feel as though they're not worthy of empathy and kindness and grace and forgiveness. This is so powerful because what you're saying is. How we outwardly talk about people of influence like Kanye West really speaks to then how people in our lives may interpret how we feel about them if they're dealing with mental illness but by I want to ask you how can we also hold people with mental illness accountable and in an ethical way? How can we differentiate between someone's? and. There's sometimes hurtful actions Kanye West, for instance has been called a misogynist. He's been called attention seeking. Well, here's a the the the problem with that is that I'm not saying that he's not a misogynist. I'm not saying that he's not an attention seeker I'm not saying that he that he isn't saying harmful things I'm saying that. It's heightened by his illness. I'm saying that you cannot hold. I'll go back to using the diabetic. As an example, if someone is experiencing diabetic shock and needs insulin before you help them, do you say well, first of all, before I help ya want to say that I, do not agree with what you said about ABC Andy No you just help you just hope that they're OK, you know holding him accountable is is something that I would people say often I don't really know what that means because if you if you say in your knowledge that I say which is it's not an excuse mental illnesses not an excuse, but it is a reason it is a reason it has to be contextualised. It has to be framed so that people understand that that the way that one behaves. Is What is the literal definition of what a mental illness is. It does affect the way that he behaves. It does affect the way that he thinks, and this is the part that I think that unsaid someone who has access to the best medical treatment in the world who was not using it. There is a resentment that shows up how can you have all this money and all this fame and all this celebrity and all this access, and still have the nerve to be crazy. That's what's being said that no one is really talking about. There's no space for accountability when the person isn't hearing you and I mean that literally not hearing you 'cause he's not present but also not hearing you because the illness is a block between whatever sense you're trying to make and whatever you're trying to communicate to them bossy how would you like the media to cover Kanye right now what conversations do you want to hear you can't ignore him because he's he's too big. More or less, but because he's been so open about his diagnosis. When you speak about him, you have to also have a simultaneous conversation about mental health bipolar disorder doctors should be spoken to about the symptoms that are listed as I've also realized over these last couple of weeks that people don't know what the symptoms are using myself as an example, I, don't have the access or the resource or the personality to. Put together a rally in south, Carolina. But my version of that is tweeting for hours and days on end non stop. My Paranoia doesn't show up in these right wing conspiracy because that's not my personality start with, but it does show up in calling someone. Hundreds of times because I'm worried that they're that they're mad at me. You know I it shows up in different ways and I think that we tend to get really stuck in these definitions that. For us to decide whether or not somebody is worthy of empathy. So in thinking about all that you said empathy yes, we should all have it but really you want all of us to be open to having real conversations with the people in our lives who may be dealing with mental illness and Kanye West just represents that for us. Yeah. He's the most visible person with. Bipolar diagnosis in the world right now. So he represents more than just someone that people are projecting onto. He represents represents all of us when you were first diagnosed with bipolar you you say you were looking for people to talk with who had a similar experience especially in the black community but you had a hard time finding those connections. It's part of why you believe visibility matters yeah. I have a level of privilege. It allows me to to be vulnerable and I know that not a lot of people have that show what I can do is be transparent and vulnerable. So that someone can either a say, this is a mirror. This is someone that feels the way or seems to feel the way that I feel or it's a window. This is someone that looks like what my sibling or parent or co worker that I don't like or the guy that cut me off in traffic or. Whatever this is a window into what they possibly could be going through. It's not exact, but it's always for me about opening up the chambers of empathy that are not predicated on pity. But if we're trying to have really honest conversations about mental illness and the way that it affects the black community, especially because we are pathologies and criminalize in ways that other people are not, we have to keep having these conversations and put them in context of the bigger picture as opposed to these very personal projections that I. Don't think are fair to him, but also not fair to us as people. Bossy be is a Nigerian American author. Of, I'm telling the truth but I'm lying in a mental health advocate I, really appreciate this conversation. Thank you. Thank you. And if you or someone you know is dealing with the mental health crisis in WanNa talk, you can call the National Alliance on mental illness. Their help line is one, eight, hundred, nine, five, zero, six, two, six, four. The Washington DC football team that just got rid of its name, which was widely considered to be racist and offensive to native Americans is just one of many sports teams dealing with that issue but as residents of my hometown of Champaign Urbana, Illinois no well retiring in name and an image doesn't always mean that it will disappear in the long haul league gains of Illinois newsroom reports. On. February twenty first two, thousand, seven thousands of people watched as a white man dressed in native American regalia danced hiked and jumped across the University of Illinois at her banner. Champagne basketball court while marching band played. He wore a feather headdress and blue orange and white face paints. As the performance came to a close the crowd cheered and some had tears streaming down their faces. Walks off the court for the last time at the University of Illinois. The event was to be the end of a tradition which dates back to nineteen twenty six and it came after decades of calls for the university to retire the race based Mascot. But some traditions don't die easy today thirteen years after chief Allina Weck was officially retired by the U. OF I the symbol indoors people dress like the mascot still pop up at Games. There are facebook groups with thousands of members calling on the university to reinstate the Mascot and. Merchandise with chief Allina Wax Image is still sold I'm not certain that the university can move beyond she lying Wak anytime soon that's Matthew Sokaiya Stuart Gilbert, he spent thirteen years as an American Indian studies professor at the UA vie and now heads the department. Of American Indian studies at the University of Arizona Sokaiya. Stuart. Gilbert saw chief Elena Weck perform at a football game in two thousand, six, a woman next to him asked what he did. Then she asked if he was an Indian and I said, I'm Hopi Indian from northeastern Arizona. And I, I. Always remember what she told me. She says, why don't you go down there and be the chief and you know then everything will be okay. By that time, the chief had become an extremely divisive issue on campus. The university was fighting to retain the mascot while the NC Double A. was pressuring institutions to get rid of racist native. American. Imagery Debbie. Ries is a Pueblo Indian who taught at the university at that time. She's an expert in native American imagery in children's literature. Remembers protesting the chief outside football and Basketball Games lewd goto silent protests at the Games where you do put yourself at risk of being spat upon of being yelled at of being cursed at. Those were always very uncomfortable things but we felt important. So get them re says, the chief is a misrepresentation of native people. The honoring that people say they do with mascots like this is not honor earning it's integrating. It's demeaning. And it's an insult, the intensive of chief Alana work was always to. was to hold a culture in reverence encouraging people to learn about it Dan. Maloney was the last person to officially portrayed chief Elena Wack on that University of Illinois basketball. Court. Back in February two, thousand seven he was a graduate student then Maloney says, the reverence fans have for the character is one of the reasons it has endured long past its official retirement when that's removed especially when it's such a a strong source of inspiration to many many people over many many years, it can be tough to. Tough to to move forward and many who oppose the chiefs say the university is to blame for its continued presence because nothing ever replaced it. It's basically for a lot of people still the mascot of the University of Illinois. That's Vikram Sardana he graduated from the U. OF I last year and he served on a commission intended to heal the chief Allina wick divide sir says. The university should have created a new mascot years ago and I think that the lesson people should take from this is that not acting can make a problem worse than in each via the at some point, you have to rip the band aid off a spokesperson for the university. Of Illinois at our banner, Champagne says that administrators are working on a plan to move the campus. Forward, which will include a process to establish newsra dishes but Matthew Sokaiya Stuart Gilbert is skeptical that a new mascot can end the years long controversy and he says that's because of all the alumni and fans who still cling to chief Elena Wick I. Think this will continue to be a controversy. This will continue to be a burden on the university especially the native students have. To deal with this on a daily basis, we're enrolled at the university Sokaiya Stuart Gilbert says time may prove to be the ultimate solution to the chief Mina problem as years go by there will be fewer people who remember when a white man in a feather headdress and face paint danced across the university's basketball courts and football fields at halftime for here and now, I'm Lee gains. Here now is a production of NPR and Bjarne association with the BBC World Service, I'm Jeremy Hobson. Im Tanya Moseley. This is here now.

Kanye West Jeremy Hobson president Labor Party NATO Portland Boeing UK Washington Oregon maxine Bernstein London University of Illinois Delta chiefs Senator Caribbean Tanya Moseley Basketball
Virus-Infected Bees Practice Social Distancing

60-Second Science

03:24 min | 3 months ago

Virus-Infected Bees Practice Social Distancing

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkins. If there's one thing we know about viruses it's that they love to spread the novel. Corona virus is happy to use US humans as its host other viruses fancy bees but like us B.'s. Fight back in the case of one particular virus called Israeli acute paralysis. Virus study shows honeybees. Actually use a form of social distancing to prevent transmitting the infection within their own colony of course not to be outdone. The virus manipulates the bees in a way that spreads the infection to the colony. Next door move studies in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Honeybees live in large communities that contain tens of thousands of related individuals in close quarters so researchers got to wondering how can keep infections from spreading like wildfire while a graduate student. At the University of Illinois Champaign Urbana Tim good not developed an automated system for continuously tracking the behavior of thousands of individual bees and he watched what happened when he introduced infected bees into the hive. Entomologist Adam Dozo. Who worked with good Described what they saw. We found in this study that within their own Colin context when they are interacting with their nest mates usually they're sisters. Infected fees experience fewer contact behaviors fewer mouth to mouth feeding contacts than bees. Who are not infected. The researchers also saw the same sort of social avoidance when instead of infecting the bees with virus they artificially activated the bee's immune system so the behavior is driven by the virus but by the bees own immune response which Dole says make sense if honeybees are going to protect their colony in their queen from disease sick. Bees need to keep their feelers to themselves. They have to they live in these really large colonies. Where everybody's touching each other all the time. They're all closely related joke. That honeybees have been doing social distancing for millions of years at the same time beezer under no pressure to keep infections from spreading to other colonies. And that's where the virus gains the UPPERHAND. Amy Jeffrey who worked on the project. As a graduate student found that the guard bees from other colonies were actually less aggressive toward incoming infected bees than they were to uninfected bees as a result that infected beezer accepted into the colony at about twice the rate of control bees or immune stimulated B.'s. The virus it seems alters the chemicals that bees produced to communicate who they are and where they're from and so we think that One way that the virus could be gaining entry to these other colonies is by changing the bees physiology in a way to make it more acceptable to other colonies on guard bees. Let's bad news for beekeepers who tend to keep tens or even hundreds of hives right next to one another to really ripe situation for bees to be able to move between colonies relatively easily and bring pathogens and parasites along with them. Seems you gotTa Carefully Mind Your Beeswax. And keep kept colonies. Healthily socially distanced for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Karen Hopkin.

graduate student National Academy of Sciences H US Karen Hopkins University of Illinois Champai Karen Hopkin Adam Dozo Amy Jeffrey Colin Dole Sixty seconds sixty seconds
Why Two Moonships Were Better Than One

60-Second Science

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Why Two Moonships Were Better Than One

"In this scientific American sixty seconds science I'm Christine Herman July Twentieth Marks Fifty Years Since human human beings I landed on the moon that momentous day in Nineteen sixty-nine made astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin household names but years before that a lesser known figure was on a mission to make that first moon landing possible. His name was John Kobylt. The son of Dutch immigrants cobalt grew up on a farm in Joliet Illinois. He studied engineering at the University of Illinois and eventually worked his way to NASA it was there in the early sixties that he put his career on the line to champion champion what was at the time an unpopular idea but would ultimately be critical to getting Apollo Eleven to the moon and safely back. John faced a mixture of indifference at times abuse and at times ridicule that he never forgot. Not until things started to change and engineers started to realize his data might be right todd's Willik author of the new audible original spoken word book about Holtz Life. It's called the man who knew the way to the moon so what was whole bolts unpopular idea. He championed what's called Lunar Orbit Rendezvous. The concept involves sending a spacecraft into orbit around the moon and from there sending only a small lightweight craft down to the moon's surface instead of the entire ship is will excess. Says while Holt didn't invent the idea he was the one who started to apply it to the technologies that were within Nastase grasp at the time most of the people who know the most about this mission feel that without lunar orbit rendezvous Apollo couldn't have succeeded exceeded and without John Kobylt you probably wouldn't have had lunar orbit rendezvous will expose also explores the kinds of challenges NASA engineers face today as they make plans to get back to the moon and ultimately to Mars when you talk about Mars Gosh one one hundred fifty million miles orders of magnitude of a bigger problem. Do we do some form of Martian orbit rendezvous. Do we send a station build a station in Martian orbit that we can stage down to the surface to manage all that mass a lot of problems.

John Kobylt NASA Buzz Aldrin Christine Herman Joliet Illinois Neil Armstrong University of Illinois Holt Holtz Apollo todd Nastase sixty seconds Fifty Years
Babies Want Fair Leaders

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Babies Want Fair Leaders

"This scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christine Herman. Anyone who's ever been with a toddler can tell you if they're upset about something. They will let you know. Scientists interest had been aware of this behavior what they did not know until now is that if babies as young as a year and a half old see someone else being treated unfairly they expect the leader the parent or the caregiver in that situation to step in and do something about it. Babies evaluate others constantly rene by. Arizona's a psychologist at the University of Illinois. She led the research on baby's expecting fairness when these transgressions occur babies evaluate me wait parents and other leaders and say well. You saw this transgression. You know this is not fair. Are you going to do something about it. If you don't then you are shirking your responsibilities and it makes you less leader less of a parent. That's right babies. <music> are judging you by our own says it seems babies are born with these expectations of what a leader is and how they should behave the work is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers used bear puppets to perform skits for seventeen month old babies who sat comfortably on a parent's lap in one scenario the puppet. Puppet leader intervenes when one of the other puppets hogs all the toys in another the leader does nothing to address the injustice by our Jones says such inaction that allows an unfair situation to persist bothers the babies and they stare longer at that leader as if waiting for him to act in puppet scenarios when there was no clear leader babies did not have this expectation of an intervention patrols of they expect a leader to not just use power for his or her own self interest to use their authority to regulate the morality of their followers. Aaron Fisk is an anthropologist who studies human relationships at the. A University of California in Los Angeles he was not involved in this study. He says many people underestimate what babies are capable of understanding and figuring out about the world world since they're just barely learning how to walk and talk and so you might think they didn't understand the world because you know they don't seem to be very competent at doing things in the world but oh you know amazing things are happening there and they understand an enormous about buyers zone says the study supports the idea that babies have an innate understanding understanding about power dynamics that then get shaped by the culture they grow up in. Maybe we should lower the voting age to seventeen months for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christine Herman.

Christine Herman Aaron Fisk National Academy of Sciences Arizona University of Illinois Los Angeles University of California Jones sixty seconds seventeen months seventeen month
Big news for the biodiesel industry

The Big Show

33:29 min | 2 months ago

Big news for the biodiesel industry

"In. Eleven o six on the big show clock Bob in the big show. Big Show clock is. Today Friends Whoa it is close out there. The day I got young Andrew. I spent some time. Outdoors yesterday quite a lot of time outdoors We have a kind of A. Project that we've UH undertaken and by the way I do want to mention right up front that yes, I have been looking at the painted lady butterflies. Madison County last night now. People are are being urged to scout their feels, but these rascals are really tiny right now I mean. You can see these these. These caterpillars. you know out in the field, but they're only half inch or less right now. And, so they're, they're just not. There's hard to see, but they are out there. We're GONNA talk more about this. Later on and maybe tomorrow as well. But that was. What was my point here oh? Yeah. Project going on now. What what project? It's now bailing? Hey, you. No that that's I wouldn't call that a project that that's put itself on the schedule and. You See. It is juicy right now and it. It is waiting an. HABE and made a lot lot of Habe, and may workout calf contrary, and you can imagine a lot of Hay. Being cut right now. And is it earlier than last year? Maybe but you have to remember that last year. We're still planning soybeans. UH, so. This this time of year, so we have some time to make make hay right now and the hey, the first cutting looks looks absolutely excellent. Back to my project. We're are. We have pond on the on farm there and. It's it's been gathering weeds over the last. Couple of seasons and we were trying to get rid of these under under water. We'd you know and kind of did a poll on. How to do that and good friend of Mine John Glen. I take advice from John Because. He's the clean water guy i. mean he he he? He's not going to do anything. It's GonNa foul the water I mean that's what he does for living. Right rasping rural water. Association, so I figure that he's. He's pretty close to two who I should be talking to. And he dies his pond. And I guess I'd heard about this and I I had assumed that maybe a lot of it was for aesthetic purposes. Because it looks cool, you know you can have a kind of an aquamarine, green water, or Bluewater, or some of these files, even using almost a a total darkness die, and then you get a reflective type image off the top of the water, but you use that for weed control you see and we put some blue in there here back in late March and what it does, is it? It filters the light. That would allow these plants to grow. It sounds Kinda if he doesn't die the water blue. And I it's it's working. And so it's coming up for the second die time so it's like a food coloring gray die. You put in there and you toss it out there and a couple days later. I mean you have looks like Coca Kabbage is blue water, beautiful blue water, and it does it controls me. It's I. Mean I'm looking offshore here and a couple of feet deep. It's clear crystal clear water almost so. It does work, but we were out. Last night. Scouting are weeds in the pot. and is hot. I gotTA. Tell you there's no other word drive. It was hot and half of me was hoping that I'd slip and fall into the pond. Would've. It would've. It would've cooled off quick, but it's warm out there. They friends I mean. I was lathered up and usually I get in the truck and hang my arm out the window and drive back into town. Yesterday we had the air conditioner on full blast and was thankful for it. You could grab the air and squeeze water out of it. Is How juicy it was, which brings up another point today we did have some pop up thunder shower activity. Day before yesterday picked up about. A third of an inch of rain. At all the farm locations from Adele all the way down through Saint Charles, but today. I I noticed. Andy Iowa city. There was a thunderstorm that just wouldn't quit. And if you travel further into Missouri, our listeners in Missouri are saying yeah. We're living that nightmare right now because they picked up some monster amounts of rainfall. In some areas of northern Missouri yesterday. But, yeah, original point was. It's hot out there for. For some of us, this is the first dose of heat we've had really. Any experience extended period of heat and humidity for a wiles. There and all of a sudden I couldn't see out of my glasses hitting. Running down. Off of them, so yeah, it's it's. It's warm. Be careful out there. It's time to hydrate and Make sure that you you don't let things catch up with you because all the sudden. If you're not used to it and don't have bottled water with your or something like that, then you start feeling faint in the afternoon. We don't want that to happen, so the watchword is hydration today, so and we're GONNA. Talk more about what's going on with the weather coming up, but Andrew Right now. We need to get to some important stuff here and that is the three big things we need to know today. Going online the four H. shows through July in Illinois University of Illinois extension has come out and directed that all in person events including four H. shows bland through July thirty first. We'll be online or postponed the move to online for eight shows, a combination of policies implemented due to the corona virus pandemic and Dr Lisa Ds. There is the director of Illinois four h stresses, health and safety are paramount. Many considerations have gone into a decision of this magnitude. Conversations about what our facilities will allow in terms of crowd control group size. How many solves we have or are animal exhibits social distancing guideline? Unfortunately, even with the phase decision, it's a little unclear, and at the end of the day can really only plan on what we know today, and not some projected point in the future. Now that's what's going on in Illinois of course. No statewide decision has been made. It's kind of been left up to the counties and some like until yesterday like Lynn. County, you're going online earlier affairs while the pushes on certainly to import events for those July Fares in Iowa. Releasing the data USDA providing update Shaw. Payments, so far, in fact, nationwide so USDA Secretary Sonny. Perdue announced that the agency has approved and paid more than five hundred forty five million dollars in payments to this point and received over eighty six thousand applications. Iowa does not make the top five states at this point that would be Illinois, Kansas Wisconsin Nebraska and South Dakota, but as far as Iowa's specific numbers go over twenty, two thousand applications have been made in over nineteen million dollars so far has been paid out. Discussing the pandemic and taking a look at what it's going to mean for the pork industry, going forward as the national pork board and President David Newman had been updating policies on biosecurity employee, health and other needed resources here as a result of covid nineteen, protecting pork brand is critical as well as we move forward. We are launching digital ads that target producers and target our commitment, caring for animals and the environment now trite trying to do both the course during the covid nineteen spread, he says the pork checkoff is also focused other top priorities that are impacting the swine industry like forty animal disease, which African swine fever continues to spread overseas eleven fifteen. Fifteen on the big show clock, and those are the three big things you need to know I. We take a look at what's going on weather. Wise here, being brought to you by the coalition to support Iowa's farmers coalition support Iowa's farmers are presenting sponsor, the work and good farm neighbor award. We were on the road earlier this week, making a presentation in Audubon all, we had a great time now. These folks are the experts when it comes to livestock rules and regulations here in the state of Iowa, and they also have a very very good and informative websites. You can check that out as well. Nate before we get too far gone up, the let's. Talk a little bit about what's going on weather. Wise I want to zero in on harvest whether South America Brazil Argentina corn soybeans. What's happening for starting there in Brazil some scattered showers today tomorrow and Saturday? In, the rerun of powder Nah areas as well as some isolated showers expected on Sunday, but then looking to be dry on Monday, Mata Grosso and Goias MONTEFUSCO. The soil will see some isolated showers. those will just be in the far southern reaches of those provinces there also looking at Argentina's soil moisture has been Kinda lacking in the region and is causing some stress in the developing wheat crop assistant GM is moving through the northern parts of Argentina today and tomorrow and more. More showers possible early next week. Though southern areas of Argentina should still see stress occurring there on the wheat crop, looking at whether on big show brought to you by the coalition support Iowa's farmers Bob Quinn here for the coalition support. Iowa's farmers. The coalition provides their services at no cost and completely confidential to help farmers successfully and responsibly manage changes on their livestock farms visit support farmers dot com to find out more the coalition to support I. Was Farmers Your Farm? Your family their focus. Friends legislature extended the fuel tax incentive program yesterday. We're GONNA. Talk about that coming up. To the minute's commodity prices and market analysis that makes sense. This is the big Joe. Levin Twenty three on the big show clock by putting the big show with you today and Andy on the telephone line with us right now is our good friend grant. Kimberly and grant is the guy we talked to. When we talk about bio diesel here in the state of Iowa grant first of all welcome back, the big show boy spent a while, and we are certainly glad to be talking with you and maybe getting things back here. In. Agriculture a lot of decisions have to be made, and one was made yesterday regarding the fuel tax incentive. The biodiesel. Tax Incentive program. The state of Iowa has extended that. What's that me for for Producers Grant? What's that mean for the industry? Thanks for having me Yeah, this ASTAB. Exciting news to this this bill passed up at the Iowa legislature late yesterday, we want to commend the legislature for taking this up as one of their parties as soon as they resumed, and and really just acknowledged the fact that they understand the importance of the bio fuels industry to the state of Iowa to agriculture here in Iowa so what this means. Means basically the bill we had in place a fuel tax differentials, so for biodiesel blends, be eleven and higher blends so the the fuel be taxed at three cents less per gallon rate if the blend contains at least eleven percent biodiesel, and that was in place set expire the end of this month, and so it's really critical that we got this extended. For now another six years, and so, what this means that we're GONNA be able to see more by these be used within the state of Iowa at the retail level. It just makes it very economical for the retailers to provide it great for the consumer all the way round. It's providing opportunity for the by these producers here, an awfully our farmers, which by using a lot of feedstocks like soybean, oil, corn, oil, and animal fats. Now grant you mentioned. It's a three cent per gallon, a reduction in the cost of the fuel tax for blends of eleven, percent, biodiesel, or higher, so it's not something that would graduate up. For higher blends then. No not at this time I mean what we what we've done over the last decade or more we've had various policies place to gradually stair step increase usage a biodiesel. Initially! You know probably fifteen years ago. I think is when we have passed the first by a tax credit program, and that was just for two percent plan, and then we moved up five percent blends, and now it's up to eleven percent higher blends for bio-diesel, so you know, and that's kind of the standard now we're seen on state of Illinois with eleven. Percent Blends. Blends and hire us there and Minnesota. They have their mandate, so we're seeing gradually blends the by increasing sentenced for for those higher blends. Ultimately, that's how we use more of the product here in state, and they get more of our agricultural feedstocks used so yes, it's just for be eleven in higher blends, but it's the same whether it be eleven or fifteen or between. Hey granted sandy good to visit with you here again. give us a little bit of a crop. Update there in in the Kimberley farm. How are things looking at this point? You know overall I would say thanks. You're looking really really good We got things planned it in a very timely manner this year probably. One of the best planting seasons that I can remember and I think my dad with agree one of the best ones that he can remember his career as well and so. It was pretty unusual. I would say we're. We were pretty much done with everything by May first so That's that's something that you always. That's the first step of the process. Now it's in the ground in a in a good condition and timely manner, so hopefully we can can can continue to have a pretty good weather. We got sub soil moisture out, but we are GonNa need more rains throughout the summer now to. See this crop through and continue to move ahead. We're out there spraying and doing those kinds of things right now. Yeah! always something to do, isn't there? Yeah it's. It's This the stages of the of the crop cycle of course it through different seasons, and you just go from one to the next and and There's there's always something there that you to keep working. Are you optimistic On the rebound I guess in in biofuel demander I. Guess, that's an interesting point or a question. What have you seen demand wise here during the covid nineteen. Yeah, that's a good question. certainly feel the man did drop off during this period of time when you when you had a lot of people staying at home, a lot more probably was impacted more so on the gasoline, and and the asking all sides was the diesel and biodiesel side, because by sold diesels more of a commercial fuel. We still had to be shipping those groceries, and and do those other things when it came to you know moving products and so diesel demand was awesome as well, but probably only about ten percent is what a lot of the estimates were looking at, so that did hurt by these demand We're estimating that. Maybe it'll impact by about three hundred sixty million gallons out of a you know two and a half to three billion gallon by the market, so there's certainly impact there, but we think it's going to to rebound air pretty fast Well appreciate the hard work on behalf of us. Grant has always. Well visit with you again soon. How's that sound? Sounds great guys, stop appreciate that and yeah, very exciting day for by the State of Iowa to get get this key piece of legislation true absolutely thrilled to hear that news also Grand Kimberly Charges Diy biodiesel board here with us today with the latest update on on key legislative win for agriculture here in the state of Iowa Hey we're gonNA. Talk some markets here. We continue to see some strength. Garrett Toy. We'll be along our expert. Market analysts win. The big show continues in just a moment. Sit Tight. Eleven thirty, five by the on the big show clock by going to the big show with you today on a hot day for Agriculture Cross state of Iowa we are poking our heads above ninety degrees. It looks like again cross lot of the state. We'll talk more about what that might be doing. Crops and also have an update on some insect activity here in the state of Iowa, but Andy on the telephone line with us right now is our good friend Garrett type ag trader talk Garett. Let me ask you a question here to start off. We are seeing a rally in soybeans. November has brushed up against eight eighty. What you think about nine dollar soybeans here in the not too distant future. we're on the cost you know. In our note to clients this week. You know we know what that November being during the growing season. Really don't spend much time below eight fifty. and last week going home on Friday the church look Kinda dire and they they try to make. Try to make a run lower early in the week and boss, but you know the no, the no beans are looking great We had the technical the technical up breakout your today. You're actually yesterday. Break out that trend line off those march thirty highs You know I think. Nine dollars I think eight eighty five is in the carts where that next resistances eight, eighty four, and a quarter is the one hundred day moving average, and then we have online. They're about eighty five. I think we go and try to test those especially if we can get a balls list eight eighty seven level after that you know then we do have that gap from nine dollars to two nine. Nine nine three. That would be the next targets, but you know that wedge you keep in mind that wedge that went from. March thirtieth down to I guess March eighteenth at S- the measures about thirty six cents I'm not age sixty level that would. Get as close to nine dollars, not quite about eight ninety six level somewhere in there considering a thirty ten feel measuring thirty from the breakout. So so that's it's. We're going to get close. I think technically if we can see some follow-through in here. It's really kind of helped us that a You know we've got the you know you've got book to China. There's been a lot of talk about the rhetoric, and are they buying being? Are They not buying being? I can tell you this. You know what the export sales this morning. you know. The New Crop Bean Book to China's is the highest in three years that helps and the fact that we've had a pretty major rally in Brazilian reality speak your traded five. It was and five five here. Two three weeks to go. So that Ralph drink has has made the south, American, beans, more expensive We're about A. Twenty two twenty two dollar a ton discount. The Brazilian being so that that puts us in the Ballpark the cheaper beans and economically old they they should be buying beings. Long as you know you'll talk Asians. Don't you know kitten so? but that's the way that's the way it looks right now. Being be market extra on corn kind of following. The, rally. The rallies and beans, and the rallies and wheat and You know it's. It's kind of Nice to see the products going around. You look at the meal chart, you know. The military has not done anything for two three weeks now it looks like we kind of have a rounded bottom. And he had the spark this morning with the big Philippine sales. We knew about it, but we have big export sales Yeah, they're now actually also nude sale physical spare, but our kind of a catalyst to kind of turn this market in a in a rounded bottom on that meal chart, so so beams have support from meal. That's that's a good thing. and you know it looks like we're gonNA. Try to move higher in in for the near term. So. Yeah, that's what I'm. GonNa. Ask you a here Garrett is i. kind of remember last year. And it was going great guns, obviously at higher levels and then. was report came out here in June that pretty much went kaput after that as we watch report out next week, right, so are we looking at that type of situation again? And why we got a couple more weeks until the laws before excuse me June thirtieth. The report next week that you thirtieth report, I. I think that if you WanNa have things, soul, you know in beans or market. Your target prices in on this rally the L.. Cheesy I'm of the belief that you know we. We did buy back. Being acres from March number is I think the more important report for the market near term end a month, June thirtieth, report and if you. increase not my temper some relics. Hey Real quick, you're! You're back working in the office. I understand I am. How I, we gone. Everybody seemed kind of comfortable with that. Everybody seems to be fine I think you know I think everyone feels good to be back. living more Christmas and and and focus and things of that sort in back in the office, but yeah, we're all back in in in in one hundred percent. School. How do we continue the conversation directly your because we're going to talk to you again an hour and ten minutes or so? Sure. They can give us a call at five, one, five, eight, one, five, seven, four, five, two, zero to. Go Garrett Toy AG trader talk expert. Marketing analyst today. How about that Bob? Back in the office and and working away here at at egg trader talk? How about that and he is celebrating? And soybeans is. A Andy. We need to find. Yeah, yeah, we've been watching that and like I say. I know what the chart guys are saying, but emotion Kinda grip she doesn't it and and you're hoping we do blaster that nine dollar mark here We need to find out any of the three big things. We know brought to you by your Iowa soybean farmer. Well take prevent plant. That's the advice from Gary Schnittke University of Illinois Extension Agricultural economists to as he says the whole Midwest reach the crop insurance prevent plant date for Korn by the end of the week, and if you haven't planted yet unlike last year where there was more profit in planting corn this year, that is simply not the case. Our prime news are two hundred bushel. Yield eighty to eighty five percent coverage level, but the primaries don't matter much into the decision. If you get to June fifth, haven't planted corn and take can take cramped plant payment. You probably should yeah. He says the simple look at the numbers suggests that the price in his corn budget is three ten of Bushel again at that price, even those who have applied herbicides and nitrogen are better off taking prevent plant, and that remains the case if you throw in a hefty. Payment. Jackson have gone out speaking of. M. F. P. But. But see fact. The Coronavirus Assistance Food Assistance Program as a sign up of course began on May, twenty six then Secretary Sunny produce announced that he has approved more than five hundred forty five million dollars in payments to producers over eighty six thousand applications, so far have been filled out including over nineteen thousand here. In the state of Iowa now I would not make the top five states so far. With Illinois Kansas Wisconsin Nebraska and South Dakota on this list, but so far nineteen billion dollars has been shipped out to producers here in the state of Iowa. Making the decision from the top in Illinois where they have come out now and said four eight shows there through July will be held on line extension, saying that all in person events plan through July thirty first. This applies to the director of Four H. in Illinois is Dr Lisa D. S. and she stresses that health and safety are paramount in many considerations. Go into way decision of this magnitude. Conversations of how what our facilities will allow in terms of crowd control group size. How many stalls we have for our animal exhibits social distancing guidelines, unfortunately, even with the phase decision. It's a little unclear, and at the end of the day we can really only plan on what we know today, and not some projected point in the future. And at the same time of course Iowa here we've got no direct decision from the top, but some counties announcing mainly the earlier ones that they will be virtual shows while other counties or going to try to hold it in person events in July and August eleven forty four on the big show clock, and those are things you need to know the Iowa Soybean Association is driven to deliver soybean demand biodiesel made from a broad range of feedstocks, including soybean oil, and almost one dollar to the market value of every Bushel of soybeans bio-diesel grow. It ended. Use It. Whether you're in the big show brought to you by the Steph s group, selling land, and the equipment to farm it since nineteen sixty big, thank you to the Steph ass- group update on whether the S- morning and nate. Let's take a look at what's going on in the Delta region. We know it's hot. But something tells me they're still wet. In a lot of the Delta, they are sauce seeing some isolated showers in eastern Arkansas right now also some more isolated showers in the western parts of Arkansas getting some rain showers there today, scattered showers also expected tomorrow and more isolated showers. Saturday and Sunday. They're also tracking the potential for rainfall with tropical storm Cristobal expected to reach a the coastline of Louisiana potentially by Monday so could be a nother wet week down there in the Delta seeing temperatures above normal all the way until Monday. A look at weather on the big show opens you buy. Group Bob Quinn here. My friends at the Steph group have been selling land and the equipment to farmers since nineteen sixty. If you have land or equipment, you need to buy or want to sell Goto Steph group Dot. Com Right now, celebrating sixty years in business in two thousand twenty steps. They're the best. Hail forty. Eight of the big shot clock and you and I were discussing a little bit ago a deadline or a date I guess that I had forgotten about, and I think here in the state of Iowa. Time is running out on use of dicamba. In many cases. And can't wait. Here's the deal tomorrow. The I talked to I I. Put a note in to the department and They are working on that right now. They're awaiting some guidance from EPA on possibly extending or not extending that date, but you know what. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Nag is going to be with us tomorrow on the big show so I would imagine that that's going to be topic but you. You haven't keeping track of that and it, so tomorrow's the day is that. Is that what you're saying for? April twentieth planets, soybeans, which you know would have actually been a day before I. Think the insurance date right around there, but yeah, if planted on April twentieth forty five days, his craziest ad is to believe. Isn't it and how we been five days since then but. The here we are and yeah. That would be tomorrow forty five day station deadline and Certainly the wind hasn't helped. But there's no the hero. Yeah because the cold snap so. All of the highlights of the big shore on our Goto Iheartradio, dot com search. They'll big show. Eleven fifty five on the big show clock by one of the big show, and we are talking about summer events right now, and we're talking about county fairs and we track. County fairs and a lot of them have changed plans as we've talked about. In fact, two more added to the list list is now forty forty county fairs in the state of Iowa have changed plans one way or another do the covert outbreak. Most of them have postponed their fares as we know them to next year, and they're still struggling with what to do about livestock shows youth shows and youth events Andy. You had a very interesting piece on in the three big things we noted today from Illinois and the Illinois like I, l like every state has an extension service that is coordinated to the university and the four. Four. H. Programs as well and I. It seems like Illinois has come out with some guidelines. We have not seen any guidelines I i. don't believe from Either Four H. FFA in Iowa although FFA had their convention their state convention as a virtual online event, so they have been working in that direction I know of but my. My Gut tells me. We're going to get some direction I and I think that's a lot of these county. Fairs are probably hoping to see some direction on how they could hold these events my wrong here. Well, yeah, something or another and what you're talking about over in Illinois is four H.. Come out. Ironically. Just before the big show started so you know just in time for us to to get Johnson on that. They are directing everybody requiring everybody to go virtual, as that is certainly a tough decision and one. That's sparking some great controversy. Certain places around the state. Now of course we talked about. we talked with Jd waybill and Lynn County yesterday about her virtual experience back during the avian influenza outbreak right, and and and that worked out okay, and so that serving as a model in some of the earlier fares, but I can also tell you that I've put in. An interview request with Iowa Four H. and not heard anything back yet, so we'll see what we can find out in terms of if there's going to be some direction from a state level if One way or another What what the thinking is been hopefully have some answers for you sooner rather than later, because especially for these June fairs. I mean we're talking about events that were and are currently or scheduled. For a couple of weeks, you know. Just a couple of weeks away. Believe it or not, so there's there's not much there's not much room. For Adjustment Shall we say at this point for those folks? Yeah, no I. Think people would like to see and whether they. Use. Those guidelines at I I don't know, but I think everyone would like to see maybe some guidelines just so everyone would be standard, and and they would be kind of the same all across the state with their their procedure and moving forward with these virtual programs. Hey, we'll talk about that coming up here. As we continue on the big show.

Iowa Illinois Andy Iowa Bob Quinn Andrew Right Nate Madison County director Missouri South America Secretary Garrett Illinois University of Illinoi Argentina Brazil South Dakota China Coca Kabbage
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Illinois (August 5, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

29:17 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Illinois (August 5, 2019)

"You'll do it right to make refreshing updates to your bathroom. Lows is here to help can help you save stop in today. It's smart core. Ultra vinyl plank flooring starting at just three dollars was twenty eight cents. It's one hundred percents waterproof and we'll never swell when exposed to water making it the perfect replacement for your bathroom floor finish off your project with a new vanity and save on select like models now up to forty percents off whatever updates you have on your to do list do it right for less start with lowes vanity offer valid through eight seven u._s. Only critics agree yura and the lost city of goal is the family film. You've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will not your boots on on lifetime gold friday great things happening here in the state and it's going to happen with us or without if you just you need to make the decision. How am i gonna do how wanna participate. That's really the opportunity that i get to work with every day. Let's close with your contact info so how do folks <hes> reach you. Only live stock dot org is a website that you can go to but you can reach nate through any of your commodity organizations corn soybean pork beef dairy. Sorry farm bureau if if you're working on some projects if you need to contact me directly to one seven six two two seven four nine one and we can start start that conversation and i have some resources that i asked a lot of questions you might have already asked yourself and how do i get through the process. And how do i develop my plan lance. Oh i have a good plan moving forward and we've had all those things out to say this. This is the direction we're going to do. It and we're going to do it right and we'll help you. Try to be be successful in that process sanderson illinois livestock development group here on our f._d. Livestock report <music> j._t. Welcome to our f- dealing away. I'm rita frazier. I'm delong ziani. Hello there. Hello now listen here. Oh yeah you know what i'm about to say. Don't you i. I'm not sure what you're doing here. We go. We're friends were best friends. You and i talked about our bucket list. Hey i'd always i've always drive or i i said dr or you know just being that pace card harness racing or whatever so you were with one of our good bodies down netting thing him and what happened last week i was so sorry affiliate k. j. country they live broadcast during the harness racing events <hes> uh-huh and there's a guy with the effingham county fair who's in charge of you know speed he's in charge of of the horse racing and i was just down there was going when i learned mine and my own business can set up for profit watch down in country partners and the guy says you ready to go and i thought thought they wanted me to come upstairs like what do you want me to and he said no no base cars right over there and so i got into pace car and i went around and and <hes> mm-hmm and got to see that and i was walking we're going to this. I was glad to do it but part of me was like oh. This is this is this is rita's. My best sees her serve bucket lists. This and it's pretty cool so having done it. We have to get you in one of those cars and better yet. Do it do it together. I think we're gonna the do it yeah yes. Yes we call mike now. You have the car now. We'll get it up. Lots of great news coming your way plus markets sinn weather. This is our f._d._a. Illinois curb appeal you know when we see the home depot today the day for doing boost your perv appeal with the best brands at the best prices from new garage doors colorful flower exterior lights to a new coat of paint inspiration to installation. You can do it or let the home depot do it for you. The homedepot dot com slash services services for more information on stalling. Your next brought more saving more doing u._s. Only see store for details say metro by t mobile at the the best deal in wireless and it's all you all for me to switch quickly 'cause metro has to lance for eighty and to samsung galaxy j seven stocks bonds for free it plus amazon prime included. That's the way while it should be only at metro. Sales tax inactivation fifty dollars plus rate plan required for numbers currently on t. mobile network on metro and past ninety days offer subject to change offer valid for new amazon prime members amazon prime has a twelve nine per month valley restrictions apply see store for details and terms and conditions with this this week's edition of farm week the early word here's to law shonky the u._s._d._a. Crop report saugus twelve will likely show a dramatic drop a bit corn acreage and lower yield estimates. That's the prediction from university of illinois. Economists todd hubs learn more about the upcoming reports and crop conditions in this week sedition a farm week. Four finalists have been chosen for illinois farm. Bureau's young young leader awards turned to farm week to meet these active young members and learn what fuels their passion for agriculture arriving soon in your mailbox no other farm weekly has as many people on the ground inevitable. I covering agriculture for you with the depth on key issues to help keep you profitable and don't forget you can get daily or even more frequent updates online anytime at farm week now dot com welcome back to our f._d._a. Fifty illinois. I'm de las yongki friday. We talked with brian. Satori is about the field day. He was hosting in monarch johnny about wass cobs. One of the guests friday was the director of the environmental protection agency john kim well. It's a really impressive soda. The farm bureau was kind enough to invites are they just got to <hes> pity part in the presentations and there are a number of different organizations that are making presentations. I had a very nice conversation with brian satorius. Who is the host farmer and a member of the tiny farm bureau and it's just <hes> it's it's really great to hear how <hes> <hes> this kind of effort is being actively pursued and with a great deal of interest by farmers <hes> it's good that <hes> it makes sense they would be so position to try and <hes> you know everything they can to improve their their <hes> their breath of their farmland and have a practice in terms of conservation even though <hes> you were just a few months in the position as director director you've been with illinois u._p._a. For almost two and a half decades so hopefully a long time. There's been a good relationship on sure you dealt with agriculture in many different situations situations <hes> over those years yeah exactly <hes> you know it's the most important industry in the state gets <hes> something that detector. Everybody's lives doesn't really matter where you live here and <hes> i will say this about the cultural community <hes> remind tire todd on working for gay <hes> industry as a group. They've always been interested in working with the fate trying. Find find good solutions. If there are problems or situations that arise can everything we can to work with them and we've we've always been met with love a positive response and <hes> so it's a group that <hes> yeah i got nothing. History was and today's just another example as long as illinois e._p._a. Director john kim from the farm in menard county hosted by brian satorius. The field day about laws calms was was put together by gilderoy farm bureau menard county farm bureau u._s._d._a.'s in our c._s. Us college viagra cultural sciences as well as illinois in iraq back now to dc and who's from our washington correspondent maj as says the president's plan new tariff on remaining chinese exports to the u._s. is not going doing overwhelmed with american agriculture by the patience of many with pair so far a new ten percent tariff on all remaining three hundred billion in china's exports to the u._s. Starting september first after china gave no ground in renewed trade talks failed to buy more u._s. Goods as promised just spurred president trump to act but american farm bureau trade adviser. Dave solomon says it's not what farmers had in mind. We'd rather see the negotiations association than tariffs terrorists bring on more retaliation. I mean right now. China's basically retaliating with higher tariffs against almost all of u._s. Exports but of course so you can say well. What else can they do well. They can always raise you can always increase their ups or you could impose some non-tariff barriers sullivan's and says the president could still delay the new tear of again if there were positive developments though the next round of talks isn't until after trump september first tariff deadline fine meantime attention is also focused on japan. Now in trade talks with the u._s. We've been hearing some positive news that we hope very soon in fact things. I said maybe next month there would be some action. We could get a deal with japan focusing on agriculture approving beef pork and a low of variety of other product exports exports into japan. They're really time is of the essence as as every month goes by we falling behind our competitors who were getting better tariff treatment and lower tariff all the time farm bureau meantime praised senate passage of the family farm relief act to raise the chapter twelve bankruptcy dead cap to ten million dollars colors allowing more family farmers to seek debt relief a if b president zippy deval says the bill now headed to the president will help farmers deal with rising ising bankruptcies amid many years of weak commodity prices and falling profits but the r d radio network mad k. washington johnson did have a bounce back in friday's markets but when you compare where we were on july twelve where we were this past friday december corn dropped forty nine and three three quarters since and three weeks in november soybeans lost sixty three cents a bushel rita's up next than r._f._i._d. Curb appeal you know so it will you see and with the home depot. Today is the day for doing boost your appeal with the best brands at the best prices from new garage doors colorful flowers lower exterior lights to a new coat of paint and inspiration to installation. You can do it or let the home depot do it for you. Visit homedepot dot com services for more information on stalling. You're next statement more doing u._s. Only see store for details white now komo get an awesome iphone. Ten are on us when you bring your family over trade in your old device because whether you have mom dad or a friend on your mind its gifts if so bold and brilliant you want to keep it for yourself the most importantly it's on us. It's six hundred plus with unlimited everything from c. Mobile awesome iphone ten. Are everyone snapping streaming contrary to their hearts content all year long no way it's only limited time so visit. Is it a store or call. One eight hundred t mobile to get iphone ten are on us congested customers using more than fifty gigs per month. May notice reduce speeds deprioritization. The twenty four monthly bill credits ball by customers plus tax qualifying trade importing service and finance agreement required contact us before tampering or credit stopping remaining balanced sixty four games. Yes you're down thirty. One twenty five per month or twenty four months free credit price seven forty nine nine zero percent a._p._r. One offer broke out the food safety. The modernization act or is your produce farm ready for a farm safety inspection join illinois farm bureau and the f._d._a. For two free on-farm readiness demonstration field days as don't miss this opportunity to walk away with the tools for a successful inspection join us from nine a._m. To two thirty at the prairie earth atlanta illinois on august twenty eighth or flam orchard in cobb in illinois on august twenty nine months will be provided seating is limited visit. I l f._b._i. Dot org slash on-farm ready to register today. The illinois economy runs is on our homegrown. Agricultural products are dairy beef pork corn and soybeans logie agricultural industry nearly twenty billion dollars each year but we don't chest grove illinois. We grow north america canada mexico account for over five billion dollars in u._s. Agricultural exports and they support more than one million american jobs avs exports to canada and mexico matter to everyone in the agricultural and food industries a message from illinois farmers and their checkoff programs are your commodity is protected from the ravaging effects of stored grain insects whether buying or selling grain protect your profits with solutions from central sciences for pennies bushel. Grain protectant fetches his diet. Can i g ours sentinel e._c. Insecticide or that kind you are plus can help maximize your profits from rescue treatments with the knockdown of broad spectrum insecticides that long term control of an insect growth regulator. Keep your greens clean with central life sciences learn more at your local dealer at bug free greens dot com. We're back here on r._s._d. Illinois i'm ready to frazier. Phil johnson is executive vice president of the illinois beef association. Jill said with more fake meat campaigns. Mhm pains making headlines. The beef industry strikes back with sound science nutritional facts and the power of flavor her. It seems to be a lot of attention on the plant based prada. You know their their marketing campaign is is really build on our cattle farmers back but doing so in disparaging our product and that's the most frustrating part of it and i think when we talk about you know what's great about this country. Is we have options then then. We have a great food supply but you know you. You shouldn't be saying ones better than the other and that that's where <hes> we we get a little frustrated us with the headlines. That seem to be catching attention. You're bored. You've obviously talked about. This isn't industry what what's your takeaway. What should we be doing as proponents own into agriculture so yeah to anyone listening. This is definitely on our radar as an industry and the topic is of conversation that we cover most often. I and you know it's creating a lot of emotions marketplace and the question really becomes how much potential markets could we lose as an industry and then what are meat industry organizations nations and trade associations doing to protect that market so with that plant based protein and mine we certainly do as the illinois association nations than the national cattlemen's beef association of a pretty robust he our campaign riding right now on social media and print platform to really introduce the facts into the discussion and that's where we're seeing the biggest challenge for our industry. It seems that the talking point of these plant based products really center around environmental sustainability for whatever reason seattle seemed to be routed into that climate change and environmental ability humber station quite often but according to the u._s. e._p._a. Tattle actually contribute less than three percent to greenhouse gas emissions and so trying ain't gonna make sure that we're addressing that rhetoric and making sure the facts are presents has become incredibly important so industry organizations are certainly <hes> putting their the best book forward to to share that information you know the the best things that we do and and this is what the beef checkoff and that check off investment really focuses on and taste is king when it comes to taste and the flavor and taste the second to none in terms of beef as a protein products and then you know protein <hes> there it's hard to find a better protein source that beef and when we talk about health and wellness and frank the nutrition beef is absolutely a key component joining of that and and we like to think should be included in part of a well-balanced diet. They're really focusing on all of those factors joel johnson illinois beef association association. The association of illinois soil and water conservation districts recently held their seventy first annual meeting and summer conference runs grant hammer is their executive director and talks with us of bowed their award presentations and their message the annual. Oh meeting provides a really nice opportunity to recognize achievement in the realm of conservation throughout the year. We had a nice group of award winners. This year we recognized is chris reynolds midwest deputy director for american farmland trust as the twenty nineteen friend of conservation award winner for his work this spring champion the ball covers covers for spring savings cover crop insurance award pilot program which was funded by lawmakers chris played a very important role in that effort. We're happy to provide him with that. We also recognized to farm families with the conservation farm family award. We recognize the mueller family taylor ridge illinois. That's in rock island and we also also recognize the aldrich family lawrenceville illinois in lawrence county illinois <hes> both families demonstrate a commitment to conservation and resource management at the honor and we're very happy to to recognize those two families we also recognize to conservation teachers one was brent miller from century high school <hes> in ulan illinois and also bill hammas with charlotte high school sherard illinois. Both teachers just tremendously impact their students. Both were phenomenal candidates. This year we recognize bill calvert from breese illinois without standing forestry contribution award bill is very active in the promotion implementation of forestry plans that he's got a background steeped and forestry. I mean we do this. Each year. We honor of an aspiring eggs student with a scholarship made in the name of george orch mckibben. If you know anything about george mccain he was an early advocate and pioneer for not arming <unk>. Award winner was making finfrock from clinton illinois. Who's a student at the university of don't ask you earlier to give us sort of summary or the takeaway from your annual meeting this year and you have some optimism back in in your department yeah. There's a lot of reason for optimism of lawmakers have passed to budgets back to back now. There's a census stability. That's returned lawmakers this spring being were talking conservation be soil health or nutrient loss reduction strategy resolution or no cover crops via the cover overcropped insurance reward program and also mentioned that you're starting to make progress back to maybe getting more staff members. You know back into the district district level yes. I think there's a sense of stability. That's returning that that that will help as w. c. d. directors across the state of make those decisions for the long-term arm. <hes> staffing included came over from the department of agriculture. We were here with the director of the colon callahan it. There is only excitement for you guys. Despite for more collaboration across the departments sure <hes> director callaghan is an excellent communicator <hes>. We're very very excited for her and her new role she really hit the nail on the head today talking about the intersection of agriculture in the conservation of natural resources grant hammer with the association of illinois soil and water conservation districts with that will break for markets and weather curb appeal. Did you know it when you see the home depot. Today is the day for doing boost your curb appeal with the best brands at the best prices from new garage doors oliver oliver flower exterior lights to a new coat of paint inspiration installation or let the home depot do it for you visit homedepot dot dot com slash services for more information on installing your next report's saving more doing you only see store for details and now an ad ad from dad all right save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive guys like what is this wow. Where did you get this. I'm talking to you with the hair yeah. Where did you get this good stuff solid. That's not the near that solid that stuff progressive can't save you from becoming your parents but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations whether buying langer selling grain protect your profits from insects from rescue treatments to long-term control central life sciences products such as dicon g._r. sentinel easy insecticidal title diane agr plus can help maximize your profits learn more at bug free grains dot com with the market summary for this monday morning. I'm jim taylor corn beans and wheat all ending friday higher september coin closing at three ninety nine and a half six and three quarters december corn up seven four nine and a half march corn poor twenty and a half up seven and a quarter august beans ending friday eight fifty and a quarter three and a quarter september beans up three eight fifty five and three quarters november beans eight sixty eight and a half up up three and a quarter september week closing at four ninety three quarters up fifteen december elite up ten and three quarters for ninety one and a half august being meal to ninety two forty down eighty cents august being oiled twenty eight nineteen fifty one cents in current electric overnight trading december corn down six september corn turn down six and march born down six four fourteen and a half august beans in the overnight down six september beans down seven and a quarter remember beans down seven september. We've in the overnight title nine and a quarter december week down eight and three quarters for eighty two and three quarters the outside markets october brent crude oil sixty one eighty nine up one thirty nine december goal contract contract up twelve fifty fourteen seventy even in the livestock market from friday august lean hog seventy six twenty seven down fifty two cents tober hct lean hogs down one seventy five sixty five seventy two august live cattle one. Oh seven sixty five down twenty two cents october live cattle down ninety cents one. Oh seven eighty two august feeders one thirty nine sixty two down one sixty september feeder cattle down three thirty one thirty eight twenty two tash livestock walnut livestock auction auction steers one hundred fifty top of direct bells and gilts trading three dollars lower forty nine to fifty five. I'm jim taylor good morning. Bring this is dan hicks from free sodas weather with the early morning egg weather updates on the r._f._i._d. Radio network for this monday morning warmer temperatures gradually returned to the mid west friday into the weekend with daytime highs back in the eighties low nineties across most of the region. There were a few widely scattered thunderstorms reported across the midwest this past weekend coverage of of any significant rain was quite spotty. Another warm day is expected across illinois today with highs in the upper eighties low nineties a cool front moving in from the northwest will bring bring some scattered showers and thunderstorms to the state primarily tonight into tuesday major rainfall is not expected with this system in most areas most rainfall amounts will be in the tenth to half inch range tonight through tuesday with just a few scattered heavier amounts expected it will be briefly dryer behind this system than a second system will bring some additional l. showers and thunderstorms to the region later wednesday into early thursday once again with his second system. Major rainfall is not expected across most of the area once again. Intend to half inch rainfall amounts will be common with the second system later in the week with just a few isolated heavier amounts forecast daytime highs tomorrow now through the end of the week. We'll be fairly close to normal for this time of year with highs mostly in the eighty s to around ninety across the midwest and no extreme temperatures are seeing coming up in the near future across the region looking ahead into the six to ten day timeframe. It looks like temperatures will tend to run near to a few degrees below normal over the northern half of the midwest blessed with temperatures running near a few degrees above normal in the southern midwest warmest readings compared to normal will likely be to the south of illinois over the southern half of the nation six to ten day rainfall amounts will likely be greatest in some far western in far southern parts of the midwest where above normal amounts are possible during that period elsewhere near to below-normal six ten day rainfall is forecast once again this is dan hicks from freeze notice whether if you're in the mood for some sprucing up you're in luck from big to small or farm to front yard your illinois farm bureau member discount from john deere is ready and waiting in to help it's easy to think green when its rewards loyalty program with savings on equipment special part in home and workshop products whether your task symbolic mowing planting or cleaning you'll be set or whatever your work requires all you need to do is sign up have your membership number handy and go to john deere dot com plush farm hero. L. wants to learn more about these nitrogen on your farm joy farm bureau university of illinois extension and area farmer's field day friday august thirty. It's free lunches included included. You'll evaluate best management practices to improve nitrogen use while protecting the environment and your bottom line discussions include on-farm data crop growth weather and disease <music>. The day starts at ten a._m. Field located at sixteen thousand nine hundred fiftieth street between monmouth kirkwood questions all the war and henderson farm bureau or visit us on facebook starlight lounge evening box <hes> tickling the ivories just saved by bundling home and auto progressive gonna finally by rings and ed gallagher is hugo extended my condolences this uh in my jan coming available in all states or situations of course the lexus golden opportunities sales event is about exceptional offers but it's also about the luxury of versatility with space for the unexpected expected and the freedom of a summer day all coming together for us at the perfect moment. Don't miss your perfect moment to experience exceptional. She'll offers on a full line of lexus utility vehicles now until september third experience amazing lexus dealer. Now there are a lot of smartphone apps out there but do they have what's important to us here. In illinois the farm week now app app does and it's always at your fingertips all ag all illinois and twenty four seven where and when you need it for free go to your app or play store on on your smartphone it search five in farm week now that's one word and download it today brought to you by illinois farm bureau where we're all about farm family and food farm leak and farm week now dot com journalists dina's draws connects rule rows for you from the farm bill crop insurance to g._m._o. Labeling her expertise expert jesus buried in the story she reports. Here's a bit about her room. Roots get to meet interesting people and share their stories and i get paid to do it. I cover egg policy galaxy and i'm really into keeping the farming community updated on these important issues riyadh route. Zoar roots are f._d._a. Radio you'll do it right to make refreshing up to your bathroom. Lows is here to help and help you save stop in today. It's smart core ultra vinyl plank flooring starting at just three dollars twenty eight sess. It's one hundred percents waterproof and we'll never swell when exposed to water making it the perfect replacement for your bathroom floor finish off your project with a new vanity and save on select models now up to forty percents off. Whatever updates do you have on your to do list for less start with lowes the entity offer valid through eight seven u._s. Only hi welcome to the subway ads for the neutral body collection election. How do you want it. I think a slam poetry sure italian juba with fresh mozzarella when hunger rains you might flavor umbrella casey garlic and provolone with you. Mighty spots are never alone savory chicken pesto. You have my affection for you. Complete the collection thank you. That was the news about a collection limited time only meeting restaurants.

illinois illinois farm bureau rita frazier director university of illinois sanderson illinois farm bureau university of illi president brian satorius Director menard county farm bureau japan henderson farm bureau gilderoy farm john kim nate effingham county k. washington johnson illinois beef association asso china
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: NPR Illinois' Statewide (August 10, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

56:45 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: NPR Illinois' Statewide (August 10, 2019)

"Critics agree nora and the lost city of goal is the family film. You've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your boots off to discover a lifetime dora and the lost city of gold rated p._g. Now playing critics agree nora and the lost city of goal is the family film you've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your boots off a lifetime dora in the lost city of gold radio fiji now playing this statewide. I'm shawn crawford coming up this hour. The illinois river will be shut down during lock and dam construction work next year the leaves farmers who rely on it to ship grain in a bind will hear how farmers are being warned to plan ahead illinois. He's been losing college students to schools in some other states like carthage college in wisconsin. We are close to home that they can still get home on a random weekend again if they needed to but yet they're out of state so they're giving back going away to campus. Feel what can we do to stem the tide of falling enrollments. We'll find out more about what's known as the illinois innovation network and we'll hear how some rural communities are working to make sure they have access to fresh food food those stories and more this hour statewide critics agree nora and the lost city of gold is the family film you've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your boots off to discover a lifetime dora and the lost city of gold rated p._g. Now playing critics agree nora and the lost city of gold is the family film you've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your boots off to discover a lifetime. Dora in the city of gold radio fiji now playing welcome to state wide reports in conversations from in and around illinois. I'm shawn crawford coming up this our when students leave villanova to go to college. Educations are benefiting. We'll take a look at that. Issue also farmers who rely on the illinois river for shipping. We need to be prepared for a shutdown of the waterway next year. We'll hear more about that and food deserts. They're not just a problem for urban areas those who live in rural parts it's of illinois you're having difficulty finding places to shop for fresh produce what some towns are doing about it that and more coming up on this episode of statewide aw i this week the illinois legislature appropriated half a billion dollars to the university of illinois for an endeavor ever known as discovery partners institutes and the illinois innovation network that first part d._p._i. Requires building a new high tech facility in downtown on chicago. The second part illinois innovation network involves collaboration among all the four year public universities but will these projects really mean and how will the funds be divvied up our education reporter dusty rhodes said down with the university of illinois vice president ed sidell to find out try to explain this. It's like you're not at an academic conference to you're talking to a guy driving to track down the road. What is it so the illinois innovation network and the discovery partners institute suit are a collection of universities across the state so we're trying to create an environment that brings together partner every university in the state to major universities around the world to work together with companies to enhance what they can do and to increase entrepreneurship and create more companies in the state things like happened and the legislature has appropriated half a billion dollars so far for this. I mean in my world. That's a lot of money that is a lot of money and we're are really fortunate that the state i think has agreed to to support this activity and i think they're doing it because they see that by having not just the university of illinois but all all the four year public universities major laboratories like argonne national lab and then incredible international partners are coming together to assemble all the talent than we can muster to address some of the challenges that the state has some of the best universities in the world like who tel aviv university and in israel hebrew university versity also in israel carve university <hes> in the u._k. As ramaya medical university in in india those are the the current signed one. There are several others that are in discussions that i'm confident will be signed in time. It all sounds great but a lot of it sounds like things you coulda done anyway so has not something you could have done anyway. I mean the the one part. That sounds like it actually needed money to happen. Then is you're going to build a new building dp of the five hundred million dollars. That's coming from the state so roughly half of that is going into the site in chicago. <hes> and the other half is being being distributed in innovation centers or research centers across all of the four year public universities in the state. You're saying roughly half. The money will go to this building being in chicago so roughly. How much does each have get well so the d._p._i. Itself gets the most money <hes> and then so or bana <hes> champagne campus and chicago campus have roughly similar amounts of money in terms of how much they're getting which is how much one hundred million dollars. I don't know the exact figure now but so that gets us up to four fifty so then there's like fifty million laughed for dollars for for the other hubs so they're smaller amounts of money you but in each case there's something significant that's being done. Usually it's money. That's being used to renovate a space. It kind of sounds like you got a pizza and you're cutting eating it up. How did you figure out how much each have got well. I would say first of all the u. of i conceived this project but as a state wide project so from the the beginning we had in mind that we would involve other universities across the state so we did think about what we needed in order to build the site in chicago and then what we needed to support the programs that we have in mind at the different sites and we did a carve out of ten percent of this this money four other public universities and we intend to help them raise money in addition so it's not just we we think the five hundred million not not like a fixed pot. We're going to grow this over time hi. It's our feeling that the hubs are actually very happy that the university is reaching out to them to bring them in and say this is a statewide effort so we really think now. It's not a zero sum game. It's not a fixed pie. We're growing the pie because we're working together. Ed sidell is the vice president for economic development and innovation at the university of dylan. Oi ni spoke with our dusty rhodes. Illinois is the third state to require graduating high school. Seniors fill out what's known as the free application for federal. All student aid also known as fafsa form. Lee gains has more illinois is following in the footsteps of louisiana. Since mandating students complete fleet the form and their senior year of high school. Louisiana now has the highest fafsa completion rate in the country texas. Lawmakers passed a similar bill this summer state senator andy. Andy manar sponsored the legislation in illinois. It takes effect with the twenty twenty twenty one school year. He says the new law will encourage schools to work with students on their post high school plans hands minora. A central illinois democrat says that's important for low income students. It's going to break down those barriers for the students on the end of the spectrum drum today that don't have clear unambiguous path forward to what happens to them after high school illinois schools will still award diplomas to high school seniors. There's who can't complete the forum due to extenuating circumstances. I'm lee gained nearly half of illinois. Public high school graduates enrolled in four year universities -versities. Leave the state for college. The competition from out of state schools to attract illinois students is fierce illinois. Universities and colleges are hoping they you can start to win them back. Peter medlen has details a few years ago when he was going to york. Ville highschool matt pitic saw college recruiters roaming his school that surprised is them and made his friends laugh. They were recruiters from a university more than seven hundred miles away the university of alabama. I saw like we all just joked about like oh yeah university of alabama but then you look into like oh actually you know what maybe that's not a bad idea and it was the scholarships. They were willing to offer that got his attention. He says he's sending his a._c._t. A._c._t. scores and eventually received a letter telling him he'd gotten a full ride scholarship around a decade ago forty five first time illinois college students enrolled at the university of alabama fast forward today and the university has catapulted into the top ten out of state schools were illinois students go by twenty sixteen that forty-five had turned into four hundred sixty four new students a year one of my best friends on planes one other friends is from granite city and there's there's a lot of people what alvin from illinois according to the chicago tribune alabama gave full ride scholarships to two hundred and three illinois freshman in two thousand seventeen pit stick did apply to schools in illinois but they couldn't offer him close to what alabama did. I got nothing from <hes>. I mainly applied to university of illinois and then my other one was iowa state but university of illinois wouldn't give me anything at all alabama is not the only out of state school that is pounced on the opportunity illinois has struggled with budget impasses and funding ending cuts far and away the top school illinois students who leave is the university of iowa nearly seventeen hundred first time illinois college students enrolled there in two thousand sixteen another outlier in recruiting illinois students is carthage college. There are small private liberal arts school in kenosha wisconsin. It's about fifteen miles from on the illinois border but like iowa. They've been growing in the last few years last year. They welcome their largest freshman class. Ever the majority of students are actually coming seen from outside of wisconsin. I'm an illinois. Is that big draw. That's ashley hansen. She's the assistant vice president of admissions at carthage judge. She says around four hundred new illinois students have been coming to carthage every your for nearly a decade. We are close enough to home that they can still. We'll get home on a random weekend if they needed to but yet. They're out of states so they're getting that going away to campus. I feel so it's kind of you know the best of both worlds back in illinois students are still leaving at an alarming rate and enrollment at the state's public colleges and universities christie's which rely on state aid has taken the biggest hit. Some of this has to do with some external factors that aren't about the quality of institutions here critic kriton. Clay is the director of admissions northern illinois university. I don't want to deny the student opportunity to see themselves in another place accomplishing a particular thing interacting with all sorts of people. I don't want to deny that clay says that the university's new strategic enrollment plan puts them in a realistic position thrive but he says it'll take change. It's it's feasible but it's going to be uncomfortable. I look to the day that we turn the page and we become proactive and predictive. Even though illinois's out-migration problem doesn't look to be going going away anytime soon. He's glad that is having the necessary conversations to combat it. I don't think this is a conversation. That's that's taboo or a negative conversation as somebody's done something wrong. I think we should fight after what we care about moses that's our students and that's our our local populations earlier this year governor jay pritzker pritzker increased funding for the aim high grant program to help ease the exodus. It provides merit scholarships to illinois students at the state's public universities. I'm peter madeline. Emerging technologies are transforming the health care industry as we know it investors say hello to h tech a portfolio dedicated to capturing the significant growth potential of healthcare innovation learn more at robo global dot com slash h._t._c. Seven eleven has more drinks than times. You've been caught singing in your car and random lyrics stored in your brain combined choose from flavour-filled slurpy big gulp drinks chris coconut water energizing is in cold brew and hot coffee fresh organic cold press juices invigorating energy drinks cooling pure leaf iced tea refreshing dear part one hundred percent natural still in sparkling spring water plus many more only at participating seven eleven stores. You wanna make sure you don't miss our show a reminder that each week our podcast is available through the n._p._r. One app you can also find oliver oliver episodes at statewide show dot com president. Donald trump says he's very strongly considering considering a pardon for former illinois governor rod blagojevich. He spoke with reporters this week. Aboard air force one said blazevic was quote treated unbelievably unfairly unfairly blagojevich was charged with corruption then impeached and removed from office. He briefly appeared on trump's reality show the celebrity apprentice before he was convicted by a jury and sentenced to fourteen years in prison trump's. Not the only politician who thinks blagojevich received too much time illinois senator dick durbin. A democrat is previously said he would support a shorter sentence illinois governor. Jay pritzker has ordered a review of child welfare services. After the high profile deaths of several children earlier this year steph whiteside reports that review revealed sweeping problems with the department of children and family services in late march a child welfare worker visited the family home of nine year old byron casanova in johnston city. He and his three siblings weren't removed. Despite the social worker expressing concerns about the environment four days later byron casanova was dead the intake workers there the tuesday before <hes> <hes> noted some things in the house and said that he was concerned about the cleanliness of the house. This is police chief william stark. He says he saw only one mattress for four four children and two adults. There was no crib for byron's infant sister when i got there on saturday. If that's how it looked i was very concerned about the clintons. Spiring casanova isn't the only child who has died this year. A report showed that he and his other brother were doing okay inside their home. You've probably heard the heartbreaking details around asia's and former family friends say a._j. Friend in the span of three years the department of children and family services investigated gated the deaths of one hundred and two children who had previously been in contact with the agency stark says he didn't know the d._c._f._s. was investigating the cazenove family. Stark says police in this small community could have kept and closer eye on the family. If they'd known there were concerns about drugs and neglect we have have confidential sources. We can rely on. We have neighbors that can talk a lot. We have tools we can use if we only would know about it that we needed to put those tolls in us stocks speaking out about the case to try and increase communication between child welfare workers and law enforcement byron's family had been referred to intact family services says that's a voluntary program to keep children with families while they receive help but families aren't required to work with them. That's one of the areas examined in a report from chapin hall. Ah policy research center at the university of chicago dana winer worked on the report which came out this may illinois removes fewer kids from their homes than any other child welfare system in the country so that means that we have a pretty high threshold for removing child that that isn't necessarily a bad thing but the chapin hall report said that d._c._f._s. workers they talked to didn't think that recommending removal would be supported by courts or supervisors it even in cases where they thought it was appropriate. The report also found that if parents don't want to cooperate with intact there is no easy way to refer the case back to investigators for further review. One of the concerning things that we found is that in those cases there's no loop or or pathway back <unk> to monitoring that case revisiting whether the referral was appropriate the chapin hall report came shortly after a report from the auditor general that report it found that between two thousand fifteen and twenty seventeen the department investigated one hundred into child deaths those all involve children who died of suspected abuse sir neglect and had previously been in contact with d._c._f._s. so should d._c._f._s. be more proactive in removing children from situations where they suspect abuse or neglect not necessarily the chapin hall report recommends revisiting removal standards but others involved in child welfare reform and say this needs further study. The department has committed to making many of the recommended changes. Whiner says a written plan provided by d._c._f._s. includes includes a commitment to changing internal procedures and structures as well as hiring forty three new investigators in johnston city stark hopes that future tragedies can be prevented prevented their whole goal is of course reunification is to get the kids back to the parents. I appreciate that i understand that i think that needs to be he there <hes> but i think that the child's will being needs to be looked at before all else byron casanovas brothers and sister were removed from the home in june. Parents of byron's classmates began fundraising for a memorial bench in a local park that his friends and siblings can visit to remember him steph whiteside l. annoy newsroom. The illinois state fair has begun. It's ten day run in springfield. The fair is an agricultural events and there's plenty more to do as well including pudding grandstand shows and a lot of food. The fares also offering a discount on admission for some weekdays. You can check the fears website to get all the details once. It's the illinois state fair is complete. The coin state fair begins in southern illinois. That's later this month just ahead on statewide her monica therapy how it can help those with respiratory problems. That's coming out. Emerging technologies are transforming the health care industry as we know it investors say hello to h tech a portfolio dedicated to capturing the significant growth potential of healthcare innovation learn more at robo global dot com slash h. t. e c and no an ad from dad right save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive gotta take these off right. What is this this. That's good wow. Where did you get this. I'm talking to you with the hair yeah. Where did you get this good stuff solid salad. That's not veneer that solid stuff progressive can't save you from becoming your parents but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states situations back on statewide instill coming up. We'll visit a clinic helping pregnant. Women deal with drug addiction and later a big portion of the illinois river is set to close next year. What problems could that create a specially for farmers. We'll find out every month. A handful of people gather on bloomington's linden's eastside make music together and as well as current of member station w. g. lt reports the tunes they produce are not headed to the top of the charts but the sounds are unlikely to improve their lives. That's nashville based singer songwriter and harmonica player extraordinary christianssen janssen the three time academy of country music award nominee suffers from asthma and three years ago signed on to become the national spokesman for a program called harmonicas for health breath. It's an effort designed to help those with breathing difficulties improve quality of life by regularly blowing into what's known by some older users as a mouth harp one such disease east chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder or c._o._p._d. Is the third leading cause of death with an estimated twenty. Four million suffers in the united states alone on the third tuesday of each month a half dozen or so central illinois residents all with breathing difficulties gathering conference room at saint joseph medical center's cardiopulmonary israel pulmonary wings all sitting up straight feet flat on the floor shoulders back remember in here the darker numbers numbers are actually your breathing in and then the numbers that are outlined. You are breathing out crissy. You're blowing day. Craft is leading the group all puffing arduously into harmonicas supply to them for free by o._s._f. Craft says good posture is a must for improved breathing. We really try to focus focused on really breathing deeply <hes> making sure that they're using their full lung function. This is kind of just like different spin that we throw on top of playing a harmonica tame beautiful music practicing better breathing techniques is designed to help craft says the harmonica therapy also creates a positive social activity for each individual joel. The goals of it really are to try to keep people not only socializing with everybody but also focusing on that deep breathing whether you have pulmonary hypertension pretension or c._o._p._d. Or something like that you really really want to try to show them that using the harmonica bum sucking in allowing out out really is going to try to help with that c._o._p._d. In the pulmonary hypertension four monica players is steve peterson. The retired rural mclean county resident has played harmonica like a for years and has been coming to the monica therapy sessions since they began nearly a year ago he helps a first time participant learn how to hit the correct notes to when when the saints go marching in you know the song so it was like well you got to find the right new orleans that didn't right would that is right so once you find it rains singer back to that spot ah you're look. We don't sound anything like that. No you know the campfire for fifty years. Peterson says he's been battling breathing problems for years but doctors have set him straight on just what to expect. I got diagnosed five years ago. I fifty percent lung function. I'm about thirty percent so i i don't have any illusions that this extend my life and i'm gonna live dalai and five but it does make you feel better so that's the key you know and i mean whether it's this or respiratory rehab cardiac rehab. It makes you feel better. Which is the key daily living with chronic disease the group practice on simple tunes to help ease the stress on the harmonica playing newbies facilitator. Jessica craft says some of the simplest and easiest to learn songs are holiday itunes christmas songs. We have up on the house top deck the halls richardson at night as a ah. We've tried that before the ready for the warming lyn scott who played silent knight shrugged off the appraise. She said she comes to the monica therapy because it helps her feel less isolated meet a lot of people that are kind of in the same boat as you are so that makes you feel not right so like you're the only one because none of my friends have issues again. Make sure she'll sign at night. In the rear view mirror the group dials back the degree of difficulty difficulty bell all the way back good. That was good all right. How do we feel dizzy all right well. Hey you know what that comes with it. So oh just make sure we're practicing our personal breathing throughout this whole thing okay in through that no smell the flowers will out through the mouth blown out that birthday candle afterwards afterwards if you are not out of breath in some way shape or form lightheaded dizzy something like that even though please do not continue doing it if you are busy. Okay just stop whenever we need to but typically if you experience any type of symptoms or something you are doing it correctly you are. You're exercising. Those lungs like you need to mary. Jo brag of lexington says she has noticed improved interbreeding after taking just two sessions of the therapy kind of makes me a little more conscious of how i should be in haley next hailing <hes> uh-huh yeah i think so i think it does help at the end of each session. Craft asks the group. If they're willing to share any concerns they have about their chronic. Health conditions brag says she's struggling with the high humidity and how that adds to the struggle of getting by in hot weather peterson says the heat and humidity caused him to miss out on an important family outing. May families want to see the cubs was doing because his ninety degrees so i can't make it from the train station station wrigley field and update my seat because i get free. They'll be hyperventilate and call nine one one. You know so. I stay over in europe. <music> exercise physiologist and facilitator jessica craft says the group is looking to expand monica therapy group sizes. She says though they're designed for people coping with breathing issues. That's not a prerequisite. She says sessions are open for anyone and their free the more people to attend the more beautiful the music. She says she smiles coyly. She describes the result that way beautiful music. One of the therapy participants described it as making a joyful noise when willis the hour long her monica therapy sessions are held each month at the o._s._f. Joseph medical center's cardiopulmonary wing in bloomington. Hi welcome to the subway ad for the collection. How do you want it. I'll take the slam poetry sure italian juba with fresh schmo rela when hunger range your flavor umbrella tasty garlic state can probe alone with you. My taste buds are never alone. Savory chicken get pesto. You have my affection for you. Complete the data collection thank you that was the new tobacco collection limited time only at participating restaurants just because it's called higher education doesn't mean high tuition costs have to be the norm at strayer university. We have the radical opinion that education should be affordable breath with our graduation fund. You can earn up to twenty five percent off your bachelor's degree tuition making it all the more possible to succeed in today's world. Welcome come to the future of education strayer university out with the old school square university certified to operate by chef babies as young as a year and a half old expect those they view as leaders to intervene when they see someone not being treated fairly that's according to some new research from the university camila roy. It was published in the journal proceedings of the national academy of sciences. The findings add to the growing evidence that children in their second year of life have a well-developed phillips understanding of social hierarchies and power dynamics to learn more christine herman spoke with the lead researcher renee byer john a psychology professor at the infant mm front cognition lab you advise urbana campus. The idea that like a young child would be frustrated if wronged dot was well established. I think all parents in the universe would believe that but what we're asking is not whether the child will be frustrated. Take that little victim whose toy was stolen what we were asking here is about the response of the leader so the parent or the daycare a teacher so what we're showing these that when these transgressions occurred her babies evaluate parents and other leaders and say well you saw this transgression. You know this is not fair. Are you going to do something about it. And if you don't then you you are shirking our responsibilities and it makes you less leader less of a parent. So how did you actually go about studying this because a one and and a half year old can say hey that's unfair. How do you actually measure when a baby feels that something they're viewing is not fair so we'd take advantage here. You're of a very well established methods. That's used by many researchers in the field. It's called the violation of expectation methodists looking time methods and and like most methods that are used with babies it takes advantage of babies natural response so in today life when baby see something unexpected so they are looking at the world events are on folding. They're trying to predict how the events will progress when something doesn't go as expected affected they tend to look longer at it because it means their little model of the world wasn't quite right. The expected a and they see be so something in is wrong. They have to revise their model of the world so that next time they better predict events so in this case what we showed them is a leader who intervenes when seen within group transgression and leader who doesn't intervene and babies look longer when the leader doesn't intervene when the protagonist is a non leader as i said they look equally at the fans so it's not that they prefer interventions in general and so you want it's only when the protagonist is a leader that we see that expectation what this is telling us is that babies have a very abstract tracked expectation of leaders authority figures babies evaluate others constantly with reference to are you acting acting fairly. Are you showing proper in group support or you acting in accordance with your responsibilities as a leader and you are either a good one or a not so good one. This is so fascinating to just think about how the minds of babies work and how they early operate very similarly to adults even at such a young age. It's fascinating. They're born with these initial expectations but then in each culture makes makes decisions about exactly how to implement them which wants to give more emphasis to or when they suggest different courses of action which ones should be given priority. Do you go with in group support or do you go with fairness for example and in some cultures you you have to go with in group support over fairness so there's rampant nepotism in other cultures. You go to jail if you do that. Fairness is considered more important but but what's interesting is what's this universal picture of human moral cognition that babies are born with that kind of orient them to think in the right way about their social world and then they will learn from their cultures exactly you know what to pay attention to how to implemented demented and so on very fun research that you have is psychology professor rene buyers john speaking with christine herman pregnant women indeed stay healthy to keep themselves and their babies safe for those struggling with drug use could be extra difficult addiction treatment for pregnant. Women is rare but as sara fence vinton with saint louis public radio reports clinic wants to make sure moms to be get the help they need twenty. One year old be grew up in saint louis. She started using using opioids when she was sixteen. After moving around the country and trying to quit several times she came back hoping for a fresh start but she had untreated mental health problems and after a few months she started using again she had a chest cold one day and went to urgent care. A nurse called her over and said they needed to talk and i just it didn't really know if it was true. <hes> it was really scary. It was really scary be was fourteen weeks pregnant and she he was still using heroin and fitting all. I knew i wanted to be a mom for sure but i didn't know how it's going to be able to do that when i was in the middle of a really dark time for myself. We're not using these name to protect her privacy. She knew she needed help for her baby and treat her addiction with her mom. She found a clinic at washington university which treats pregnant women with substance use disorder so i think it was about maybe fifteen minutes later. I got a call back from the doctor that i still see now. It was jeanie kelly the medical director of the care clinic it open last year to help patients like be who need addiction treatment treatment along with pregnancy care. We wanted to create a one. Stop shop for these patients. Kelly says there's a shortage of addiction treatment for all people who need help but that need it is especially acute for moms. Some doctors drop their patients when they find out they're pregnant. We've even seen patients who had established relationships with a <hes> doctors and providers treaties orders who to the intel them when they're pregnant. Were no longer able to take care of you every week. Patients meet with specially trained neonatologist tallest counsellors and psychiatrists they can get medicine like buprenorphine and methadone that helps manage addiction. Kelly says pregnancy allows doctors to help women who might but not otherwise seek treatment and they're seeking medical attention potentially for the first time in years but represents a great opportunity entity to basically connect with these patients from the medical community. She says patients with addiction are more likely to be dealing with other problems that keep them from going to the doctor and staying on track. That's where brittany von comes in. I am literally there for them off day like <unk>. Some patients text me phone. Call me <hes> i'll talk talk to each patient at least once a week. Vaughn's official title is nurse navigator but patients at the care clinic know her as a person who helps them get whatever they need that could be helping them find housing transportation or getting insurance approval for their medicine. Sometimes she'll just listen. They're used to being so judge that they think that everybody's judging them so when i noticed that myself and my co workers we don't really there to support them. That makes a world of difference like you can tell when someone interest you. Von was business be was worried about what the neonatal intensive care unit was going to be like about half of babies born to women at the clinic need to visit the nick you to get treated for withdrawal symptoms so that was scary like i've never been and never seen little tiny babies in little boxes. Von von arranged a tour of the knick. You so be won't be so nervous. That kind of support is important after women give birth to that's when the risk of relapse is the highest and why the clinic psychiatrists these patients for months after they deliver but pregnancy is also a powerful motivator that was true for be like now now on living to give her a life. You know that a different life than i had. She gave birth to her baby a few weeks ago. She says they're both tired tired but they're doing okay. I'm sarah fenton saint louis public radio <music> mole more statewide just ahead. Mowing food deserts what some are trying to do about the problem. That story is on the way <music>. Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the dominion energy reliability investment. Our new investment product offers competitive ed returns no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money. Make the reliable investment in reliable energy the dominion energy reliability ability investment to find out more go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com what does real feel like this summer at seaworld orlando. It feels amazing. Your inner superhero ignites as you plunge down. New infinity falls the world's tallest drop your eyes. Go wide with wonder as you meet your friends at the new sesame street land and your heart races as electric ocean lights. If the knife don't miss some rich fueled orlando the fifty dollars on select ticket world real feels amazing this a statewide on the way the illinois river will be shutting down to barge traffic for a few months next year. We'll find out about the work to be done. How farmers are getting prepared next. People have been leaving rural midwestern areas for decades and it's not just population loss often fresh food sellers move away to there might be some hope though tim shelly reports on how four central illinois towns or fighting for fresh food as well as community survival u._s. department of agriculture defines a food desert is a census tract the one of low income people or low access to grocery store rural areas. Here's warren ten miles from a grocery. Store qualifies a food desert. The nonprofit organization feeding america says two point four million rural households face hunger and seventy five. I percents counties with the highest rates of food. Insecurity are in rural areas. This includes central illinois several roles of senior only grocery stores disappear in recent years. Here's delvin finer foods burned down five years ago leaving tazewell county community without a grocery store. No one rebuilt it in february of this year. Manek's exc rosenbach grocery closed for good chris. Merritt is director of the institute for rural fares at western illinois university. He says many stores have been able to weather the hauling out of rural america. Grocery stores have always been a narrow profit margin industry to begin with very competitive and quite simply there are grocery stores in small towns that have just gone out of business teller general stores and gas station convenience stores filled the void many small towns leading to at one expert calls else food swamps rarer than food deserts because they sell food but it's frozen or canned and not fresh. Sean park is the program manager at the institute. The value added sustainable development center. He says in many cases dollar general goods are just cheap enough to drive out pot grocers what happened then is the unique unique left with. Nobody sells fresh produce fresh me. Those types of items park says he's trying to help to lan delvin. Prince phil and mount don't plaski bring back fresh food in principle. The village foods grocery store closed about a year ago. Mayor jeff trautmann's as a school district survey to assess village food wants and needs guard more than four hundred responses principles school district three twenty six superintendent shan dueling in principle state bank are working with sean park in the value added sustainable development center to open a co op grocery store run by the school district and assisted by students park to students in the high schools agricultural actual program could sell their food and store and soon special needs could work there. Meanwhile jim nolan is working open ben and julie's and converted hardware store in tucson who long in addition to fresh food nolan says a store will have a deli a cafe and a delivery service and this age of convenience nolan says it's not enough to be only a grocery. We live in a world of in looks conveniences demand that not only in big cities but also small towns whistler noise camara agrees. He says a small town loses something more than just a source of food when a grocery store goes under its social center can be a real gut punch if you will when <hes> a small town loses its grocery store because it's it's more than simply placed by serial opening a grocery store. Small town requires more than a blend of services. This tori doll hof is the world development coordinator for the greater purely economic development council kind of a all hands on deck approach. That's needed where it's community supported but it's also driven by technology and innovation to really come up with some different and new models that don't exist yet. Dollhouse says the s._e._c. focuses on building supply chain from farm dinner table. He says the reason already has farmers growing specialty crops mills processing raw materials and community grocery store selling the the final product but they're in coordinated early great low productivity but it's not happening in any real scalea that could feed more people u._s. E._p._a.'s local foods local places program might also help develop a supply chain pure mount pulaski and logan county are among fourteen selected communities nationwide doll off says he hopes having an urban and rural community in the year long program jerry new solutions to food insecurity. Jim nolan of two lan says smoking younis a mid sized towns bounds must find a niche as major cities attract more talents with the answer but the first step is to focus on don't fall towns can ultimately the fate of grocery stores in rural america may be ties. The fate of small towns themselves. I'm tim shelley. Next year could prove a challenge for farmers who rely on shipping commodities along the illinois river. A big portion of the river will shut down for an estimated four months in late spring and summer of twenty twenty. It's being done to repair six locks and dams kirby wagner's with the illinois farm bureau and says his organization is urging farmers to plan ahead well. I think anybody who relies on river. Transportation is going to have an inch. They're gonna need to reroute redetermine <hes> and planned clan <hes> to not be able to use the river for up to four months <hes>. I think that these closure can cause us problems. I do think there's alternative <hes> but i think it's gonna be a bigger problem. Ooh glands aren't made <hes> before twenty twenty gets here. Will you talked about <hes> some of the problems that they might that might occur that. Is that problems getting the materials else. They need through. Were getting you know anything that they need to get to market. <hes> is that going to be more of a problem. I would guess that it's going to be more in the market side of things <hes> a lot of the inputs and a lot of the other things that come up river a lot of those suppliers are planning for massive amounts storage <hes> they're planning to bring in a little bit more than normal <hes> and hold onto those inputs now on the green side of things and everything is going to go down the river. That's where the problems are probably gonna occur. We're gonna need to find new ways to get things <hes> south i think lewis and <hes> down into new orleans or throughout the country and i think that that's where the real issues a lot i saw some of the scheduling that had been put out by <hes> the army corps of engineers and it seemed as though they were trying to avoid some of the busiest times including a trying to get most of the work wrapped up before harvest time but <hes> there's gonna be an overlap most likely yes record did a great job of putting <hes> putting their heads together with navigation industry to say hey when when we do these closures <hes> and they're going to close six o'clock so instead of doing one closure every year they're doing them all at once <hes> and so that seems to be more productive instead of having a shutdown several ever years in a row and then additionally the timing of it is important <hes> they believe from their data that that is the lower shipping period <hes> <hes> and in coordination with the flood and they want to make sure that the lost ark flooded out while they're doing the work so they kind of coordinated the approach and get uh online around those factors you talked about planning ahead and that's something that <hes> farmers are going to have to probably do next year. What are some of the things that you're advising acing them to be prepared for that well first of all we want to make sure that they're getting with their their regional marketers and and those who are we're helping them do they're planning for the year <hes> and work saying hey you just get together with him ahead of time so that you have a plan if you're really relying on transportation listen to move everything you got <hes>. We're gonna need to find some alternative methods so <hes> we think it's a real regional impact. <hes> while most of the states would be affected acted within those who writes over really do smart for those that don't really follow the navigation of the illinois river this work. Mark wants a temporary headache. There's definitely going to be some long term benefits to getting some of these locks replaced absolutely so somebody's locked exceeded their life by <hes> by you know maybe twenty five to fifty years depending on which to lock it is <hes> and so with that fact these locks dwayne so no kidding things all the way down the river. <hes> is causing delays because of how slow these locks triple function so sometimes you're seeing an extreme delay just to get all the way through the system and it's causing issues with your delivery so having these lots working properly will help get get commodities move down the river more effectively. Do you think there's gonna be any type of market. Impacts first prices than i is that is going to be that disruptive. It's possible <hes> the you know there's factors. There's that that could change what i say ten minutes the market could be impacted. Yes <hes> the the marketing folks that we talked to. You seem to think that that there's gonna be <hes>. There's gonna be a spot for the green to go <hes> but you got another year that a lot of factors but change anything that we say today. We need to have our locks updated. <hes> and i think it's easily forgotten about. I think most people realize that yes tamales move on the river but just how important our system is <hes> to agriculture. <hes> and store really guided locker getting updated. Kirby wagner is assistant director of infrastructure and transportation for the illinois farm bureau. We talked to him about about work along the illinois river next year that will cause a temporary shutdown of river traffic. You can find out more at our website. Statewide show dot com scifi saifi writers have long warned us about the dangers of modifying organisms remember jurassic park but new futuristic gene editing technologies are becoming the reality and madeleine beckwith harvest public media talked with researchers about how to present the new tools to along skeptical public. This is the sound sound of giant locusts attacking towns and illinois gathering in mine. It's from a nineteen fifty. Seven movie called the beginning of the end. Basically a scientist use radiation to make giant fruits and veggies pesky grasshopper scott in eight some radioactive stuff accelerated immediately that is they started to grow abnormally fast giant killer locusts probably aren't that big of a threat but the movie demonstrates our long held fear of messing with nature but a real life revolt against gene editing came up when the public found out just how much food was being genetically modified. If if you put something out where the public is comfortable with it. It's not it doesn't matter what the sciences wants. Their mind is made up. They're not comfortable with it. It can be very hard to reverse it. Stephen stephen moose researches and teaches crop genetics at the university of illinois. He says that the fear of g._m._o.'s might have been avoided if the public had been led into decision making processes processes from the beginning and he says we should do that with new gene editing technology like with crisper something that makes it easier to edit jeans or with this kind kinda crazy thing called gene drive so gene drive is a case where you alter the outcome of inheritance. There are rules and you can. If you understand how that process works you can make violate the rules so let's say we edita mosquito gene so it's born with a trait that's bad for it even kills it usually baby skaters born without that trait would survive and takeover evolution evolution but what if we make it so one hundred percent of offspring get that killer trait. That's gene drive eventually. It basically creates. It's a dead end. Genetic debt in the population collapses in maybe decades off from regulatory approval. Researchers are making baby steps. It's like with water hemp in palmer amaranth. Some of the nastiest weeds midwest farmers battle the university of illinois patrick channel studies the plants and is looking into into using gene drives on them but let's be clear. He's nowhere near a finished product. They're just now trying to find the genes that they'd eventually need to edit so yeah. I mean we're a long ways away at this point and any approved gene drive will likely require some sort of fail-safe or kill switch to make sure it doesn't wipe out a species so it's not our goto radical water him from the face of the earth. Nobody wants to do that. Even though it's a weed i'm sure it has some benefits to some organism somewhere somewhere but channel says this research is important because it could help overcome herbicide resistance reduce the need for herbicides like roundup and cambe and help us produce as more food for a growing world along a similar vein. Omar akbari at the university of california san diego is researching how to use gene drives to potentially really deal with an invasive fly and it certainly sounds like the star of a sci-fi thriller drosophila suzuki it infests fruits and berries a a pretty intense way females have serrated ova positive her essentially it's like a knife that is on their posterior end and it enables them to dab the fruit with this knife and inject their eggs into the fruit eggs inside a fruit are hard to kill but akbari says they're looking at other ways to handicap the fly beyond gene drive because that tech is so far off still he in channel and moose agree. The public needs to come along on these early steps for gene drive to ever be tried in the field. They're not even asking for full support. They just want the public to make knowledgeable all decisions based on costs and benefits and of course no scientist wants to be personally responsible for unleashing some sort of sci-fi plague onto the you're talking about giant giant lovers to responsible for all of this madeleine beck harvest public media say metro by t mobile at the best deal in wireless silas and it's all for you all for me just which quickly because metro has to lance but eighty and to samsung galaxy j seven stock bones for free plus amazon amazon prime included. That's the way wireless should be only at metro. Plus sales tax inactivation fee fifty dollars plan required not valid for numbers currently on t. mobile network on metro the past ninety days offer subject to change offer valid for amazon prime members amazon prime has a twelve ninety nine per month restrictions apply see store for details and terms and conditions. What does real feel like this summer at seaworld orlando. It feels amazing. Your inner superhero ignites as you plunged down new infinity falls the world's tallest drop your <unk> eyes grow wide with wonder as you meet your friends at the new sesame street land and your heart races as electric ocean lights the night don't miss some ritzy world orlando although the fifty dollars on select ticket the world real feels amazing that does it for another episode of statewide. We're glad you could be with us. Join us. At this time i'm next week for more reports and conversations from in and around illinois find this episode and all the others at statewide show dot com. You can also get our the podcast through the n._p._r. One app <music>. I'm shawn crawford. Steve lied is a production of n._p._r. Illinois with help from other illinois public radio stations and critics agree nora and the lost city of gold is the family film. You've been searching for god. It's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your boots off to discover a lifetime door. I am the lost city of gold rated p._g. Now playing what does real feel like this summer at seaworld orlando it. It feels amazing. Your inner superhero ignites as you plunge down new infinity falls the world's tallest drop your eyes grow wide with wonder as you meet your <unk> friends at the new sesame street land and your heart races as electric ocean life the night don't miss ritzy world orlando see fifty dollars on select ticket seaworld real feels amazing.

illinois illinois river illinois university wisconsin chicago illinois farm bureau carthage college shawn crawford Jessica craft university of illinois johnston city Ed sidell united states vice president steve peterson nora byron casanova steph whiteside india
Joel Kim Booster

The Three Questions with Andy Richter

1:13:24 hr | 1 year ago

Joel Kim Booster

"I want to tell you guys about service on celluloid. It is a captivating historical podcast that takes a deep look at depictions of world war two on film over the last seventy plus years in house experts at the national world war two museum in new orleans which is a great museum they team up special guests and they hold lively debates on the historical merits parrots of treasured classics and smaller films like this series reveals the good and bad of how hollywood depicts the twentieth century's most dramatic event. Listen and subscribe describe to service on celluloid today. It's on apple podcasts and soundcloud. Check it out. Hello everyone hello oh podcast world internet. I don't know whatever people listening to this people with some time on their hands. Basically i'm andy richter and this is the three questions <hes> for those of you know. Those three questions are where you come from. Where are you going and what have you learned and today. I get to ask them of of one of the funniest people i know and just an all around sweetheart joe can boost all my guy hello and good eh. I famously walked in a few minutes later right right shoe iced coffee in hand right right which is an additional slap in the rice and can you let you let your cape fall. It really tells a story when you do that. It's like you really i will say it wasn't the iced coffee. That made me laugh. I i'm not worried about it. Was the breakfast sandwich eating that that would be good <hes> <hes> yeah that would be a all manner of things like holding dry cleaning <hes> yeah yeah. I am so anal about being late. I is the my least favorite thing in the world. I usually walk in drenched in sweat. Yeah yeah up of apologizing profusely but i don't respect you. I don't blame i've getting this. Podcast hasn't been on the air yet so you don't know whether you had no idea i will say i win. When i was in theater scored they would lock the doors. When the classes at nine nine would turn eight thousand nine hundred nine they would lock head teachers. Would it be allowed but it wasn't. It wasn't the only i only only really took one theater class and that was at the university of illinois and then i decided i don't what what is rolling around on the ground kind of like be a tree kind of what is this unfortunate if that's the first and only because i took him a lot of those classes too and i hated those classes business but i was also taking a lot of other classes that i do think and don't get me wrong theater school. Let me be the first to say it waste of money. Don't do it absolutely if you are a teenager listening to this thinking about it do not do so. That's already tackling what you've learned. Don't go don't take out a single student loan unless you get a full ride scholarship to yale university. Yes don't go but do. I think it shapes a lot of like who i am. In terms of like a lot of the i do use a lot of things i learned but a lot of it is stuff. That is not stuff. That was signing. Class is sort of like being at school like being on time college. College college is learning. I really felt like because i went to university of illinois just liberal arts and science. I was done. I was like forty five two minutes away. Where where'd you go millikin university. No milliken jerry yeah yeah <hes> where's that rock islets decatur soybean capital of america right. Now i indicator that was because when i started at u. of i because i was such a brave soul. I asked our guidance counselor in our high school when i told them i i said i think i want to be a writer. He went oh journalism and i was like no not really. I don't care about journalism. I was like maybe short stories. I said maybe even in writing for i even at that time was like for t._v. Or movies and he's got a journalism school. You can do all that other stuff in your spare time and you know brave so let it was. I was like okay a few of i and in order to get into the college of communications you just took liberal arts and for the first two years and so that's what i did i took liberal arts classes and then i had a meeting the beginning of my sophomore year with the dean of the college communications to just sort of get the whole program going because they had to maintain a pretty high great average to which i was doing and i told her what i wanted to do and she's like you shouldn't be at this school and i was like you mean. I should be like in the college college of fine arts and she goes no no. You shouldn't be you go to during college. I hadn't considered it at all but like it was like. She smacked me with a bat. I was in a daze two steps out of her office. I was like she's right there you go. I went to columbia college in chicago for school. I mean i couldn't afford to go to either the coast to the big game but that was fine but it was the same thing when i got to columbia. I didn't learn anything except for like who i was. How i how many drugs i could take how much drinking i could do. You know that i better chill out about being so serious. He's about relationships or i was never gonna get laid. That was one big thing but the reason i try that triggered me talking more than you. I said decatur. Has that was one of the things that she said to me. She goes like she said. If you become she goes we teach you how to be a reporter because like do you want to go to decatur and the report on grain elevator fire and i was like so dr. I know i love that like she's the one that's supposed to be encouraging. Kids yeah journalists when you're at. That's cool like you of i do sort of. You're not like desperate for students so you can be a little bit more real about it because i think like my school and i loved my school but they were very much like nope nope. This is the only place for you no matter what like a lot of conservatories because the b._f._a. Program at my school you had to like readmission or you get put on probation for either acting acting singing or dancing. I didn't do any of this and they probation like at the end of her. They were called hurdles roles at the end of your freshman year. You had an acting hurdle. If you were a musical theater majorie on an acting her nose singing hurdle and it helps theater that hurdle yet and so you and and everyone had to do it and then if you pass all three or you would get <hes> put on probation for sometimes all three sometimes just one or two or you we get redirected which means and most at most conservatories if you're redirected it means. You're out of the school to go somewhere else at our school we had a b._a. Program i'm in theater as well and that would that would sort of be where you go and they always and the thing is i went in. I never auditioned for the school because i had a very like weird. Milken was the only school school eight applied to because that was the only school that didn't have an application fee at the time and i it was one of the only schools that i apply to that. It was one of the first schools that like i was aware of that. You could apply online like villain. I remember filling out the application at the public library library. Doesn't six doesn't five probably when i applied i already have great but yeah so i just ended up there and night like thought i wanted to like addition to be in the b._f._a. Program then but everyone because everyone was sort of like the program is sort of like the rejects and the like the kids who got redirected out of the we're good enough to say program but and they all the teachers were sort of like no like the b._f._a. Program is for kids who are ready to go and the be a program is more for like if you have more diverse interests if like your path isn't sort of like go directly to new york beyond broadway like you should do this because you can sort of spread your wings and do a lot more things and that's what i ended up doing. I ended up getting a double major in english and doing a lot of i worked for the school. Newspaper did a lot of other things and also was very good so i was allowed to be all the clubs but the toast of decatur yeah <hes> but yeah. I don't remember why we got into this. Oh yeah that's why because every day the reason they didn't just send the kids away who got redirected was because they wanted to keep them in town most of them if you did get i ah oh this is the best part is at the end of the year right before the last day before everyone leaves campus they put letters on a board in the theater offices is for you to go and look and see if you passed your hurdles were put on probation or were redirected and it was just like they would go up at midnight when we're all fucking wasted wastage rama when we're always i remember my my future roommate lauren culver like literally like across the lawn in front the theater offices collapsing as she read her letter 'cause she was redirected for musical theater to be a fan acting which and it was like an alleged it was like at the moment we were we all crowded around her and like you hugged ensure sobbing and it's like the stake seem so high and now looking back talk about it and we're just like what are ridiculous moment and also too if there's any millet can faculty listening to this. It's just outright mind. Fuck very exploitative mind by people who are an indicator and probably don't wanna be indicated. They know what i mean. Here are professors. Festers guy just actually went back this last october and visited and performed for homecoming and there are professors that i had there that no that are very much like the enough separated from it that they're like some of this is bullshit and there are people who have been there for so long. They're so in deep entrenched in our bullshit that it is like crazy like that. They treat it this way because it it doesn't need to put them up at midnight. It's humiliating and like the whole the the theater of like finding out. All of this stuff in itself is so interested interest in there. There are directors professors. That like are just using. They're not. They're using the school in a way that is not helpful. This is like there was a production action of like urinetown the musical my senior year and the one of the famous the most psychotic like theater teachers. I had at school instead of doing a regular show. Oh everyone wore black. Everyone mask and no one was cast in any one part. Everyone had to learn every part and then at certain points in the performance you would sort of it'd be like an improv exercise where you would like in the middle of a song sort of like throw the ball to someone else and no one played a distinct part. It was in saying saying this in front of audience and this was yeah. This was like this was wash stage production. It was crazy my freshman year so that's ridiculous. That would be like you're going to do. It always be retiree. Whose life is this anyway but everyone has to carry a bucket of hot coals electors. You'll oh you'll never do this in a professional setting do it now 'cause i'm sad and lonely and champion watson mad. There was also production of carousel that took place in a concentration. It's a training camp. All women and this is actually okay and i'm not i don't want to defend this too much. Because of course now it is like two thousand six different time yes wildly but this is a real thing that the nazis would make people do in concentration camps which it is put on shows for the red cross <music> till like prove that they were being treated well which is psycho man so this directors idea it was all cast of all women except for one guy and and one someone was pregnant. This is where it gets a little dicey as the ushers had to dress up as nazis which now looking back is insane insane that we all just let this go and allowed this to happen and then like before the actual a carousel being because it was a play within a play basic news when they were doing like one girl came up and was like to the red cross. Thank you for coming in like in so you're watching basically people in a concentration camp perform form carousel and it was like really deeply fucked up and insane and like one girl was pregnant belly and like got like the at the end of act one like broke and was like trying to feel like no you know and then it was dragged off stage and then is replaced the character. She's he's playing in. The second. Act is crazy but also like it was crazy. It is a good point and the mask the urinetown fresh directly sure sure no that does there does seem to be like i mean it's not based on honest guided attendance suing some yeah yeah yeah yeah and not a jew in sight. I would not in not eight or not behind. The performances are not not on stage at all not a single one well. I actually think attic theater school. Though was the first time i ever met a jewish person in midwest. I did not know well. When my mom remarried i went to third and fourth grade in aurora illinois. I grew up in new york ville illinois which is a little town and then we lived in aurora illinois for two years which is a bigger town and we're the town i grew up where where you field on plainfield sure yeah yeah very close go wow but there was one jewish kid and that was whereas i like introduced to hannukah and really struck by weight the i just get to the next day you get socks. You know it's just like a synagogue by where we grow up. I don't remember there has to be one in aurora but i don't i don't remember specifically typically but then the only other ju i knew until i went to college was my pediatrician. How you know morton shafran who died at a cubs game on have we actually ended up seeing seeing he was sitting behind home plate and we saw paramedics. We were watching game. We saw paramedics and then later found out that was my pediatrician having a heart attack and dying my thank god the cubs game on all in the kiss cam yeah but we didn't know background with all their announcers seems to be a health health health issue going on in the stands but i remember when i was really young like four or five and we went to a cubs game and someone had snuka cat onto the field sure put a camera and like threw a cat out onto the field and it happens yeah and now it seems so insane to me back then but then i lived in west lakeview like view right next to wrigley all i know exactly the kind of research they're constantly. They're constantly in their pictures every single game yeah. I actually worked at a cold stone in york phil by the way i was trained at the goldstone in your fill and then moved to the goldstone in plainfield. Wow so you know yeah. I know i know your life and dino everywhere you came from. I've been although your phone now from. I mean i'm substantially older than you. When i was there we literally i think we had literally three stoplights when i was a kid in town and <hes> and what like when the mcdonald's opened it was a big fucking deal. It was like besides that the only restaurant in town was the barley fork. Which was you know l. Lake the coffee shop downtown that my grandma had lunch at day so yeah it's different town. I haven't been there in years but <hes> i drove plainfield was pretty similar to that yeah yeah growing up. I remember the mcdonald's going and being sort of a big deal and then the only thing really were known for our high school got blown away by twits right. I was and that it was during my childhood yeah yeah. I remember that because it was you know th that tornadoes our put us on the map. Yeah that's right and melissa mccarthy. Yes jenny jamie lecarr. Wow wow your new york. Phil has me. He and dennis hastert wow pedophile dennis hastert yep plainfield now has me and melissa and a <hes> jenny and shake lay. Who's a runner up by paul's drag race yeah yeah entice go with exciting. We were in a production of little shop of worst. I together for the plant audrey to incredible. That's fantastic. It's and it's very camp group. Yeah great can i. It's fantastic well. Let's let's get back to your childhood. I mean you've heard you talk about this but you are an adopted opted child and you were born in korea and how did your parents had did. They have other kids. Yes they had two kids to biological kids my older brother and my older sister and then then you know it's so strange so much of my childhood and the decisions that were made and things like that are so shrouded in mistreat me because we are family that does not talk about anything very modern and like i. I think they owe it. My mom says she always wanted to adopt which i believe and and it was very sort of in vogue and evangelical community yeah to be adopting babies from asia or abroad or africa yeah. I didn't didn't know for sure but like in thinking about talking to you. I made that assumption yeah. That was probably a cause and quite possibly still is it might be yeah. I know what would just say even babies basically <hes> yeah exactly yeah yeah and i it's definitely international. Adoption is harder and more expensive now than it was back in the eighties. I think i even like like my first. One of my first jokes on conan was about how korea used to be like the main spot because up until like the early mid nineties. It was the only foreign country you could that would fly the baby to america and you didn't have to go right like post mom yeah that rose the analogy that i made on shock uh-huh and so there was that but also here's the thing my parents like they didn't sleep in the same room the entire time i was growing up like i don't remember them ever like showing affection hugging kissing anything they were fighting and so part of me was always link growing up like oh like they wanted to third kid but they just weren't fucking so it's you adopt yeah yeah and now it's weird because i go home and they're back in the same room. They're like getting along really well and so and again it. It will be something that i will never 'cause. I remember i used to try to address it as like my brother my sister were very much like let's just play along like this is totally right and i was like this is weird. Why is no one talking about this. I was really as a kid very obsessed because i was home schooled two very obsessive. Asi all i wanted was a quote unquote normal normal family normal normal and i think they were there other kids in plainfield. That looked like you not a lot. No not i don't i. I was surprising like the eighth grade. When i met another another asian yeah kid that i was friends with yeah at my church and it was so i think like for me i like being like gay and knowing that from a very young age and being religious house and then being asian and being sort of like the only person of color that was like around. I like a truly triggered me. I was like i just want to be normal. Oh i want to feel normal and i was watching so much like raised by television truly and so every tv family. I just wanted that. I wanted a locker at school. I wanted to come home and have like my parents be sleeping same room. I wanted everything to be pristine in normal and like i'm so grateful that it wasn't in many ways now but yeah i think like that was one of the big frustrations for me i was like why aren't we normal and i would sort of like i don't know if i ever said those words but like i would constantly act out and sort of be like lies wire things like like this and no one wanted to talk about. Why do you think that you were that way as opposed to your brothers and sisters. Do you have any theories of that. I mean i think part of it is. I don't know like for me. I think like they were fairly slick satisfied. I mean the thing is is we had a great childhood like we were poor but like i and i've only sort of recently sort of realized how poor we actually work because my dad was laid off for a little while and i remember in those types. I just actually had this memory recently. He was talking to my sister about this. My dad one of the years that he was laid off. We postponed chris. My mom like we're postponing christmas pushing it into january and at the time name like looking back it was because they have money for presents but at the time i was like what a fucking bad ass. I didn't even know that was an up. Shaimaa cha powerful. You can just yeah christmas you santa. I was like home schooled so like i didn't have kids. It didn't matter time didn't matter later in the way because like i i wasn't on like a school schedule in the same way so truly time like looking back on. It was so weird and strange because i i wasn't in the nine month like summer summer going back to school a sure had none of that and so the christmas thing was because i didn't have any friends who were like. That's weird circling. There's no christmas no so that we weren't beholden to any of that yeah and and they just never made us those things they were. We were we were fed. We were clothed like <hes> they might. I remember like my tenth birthday. I wanted and sixty four so bad and my mom was like we cannot afford it. We cannot afford it. We cannot afford it. <hes> like truly like scream cry. I wanted it. That's the only thing and it was like that was like one of the first times i realized we were poor is when my mom could said that makes you truly can do it and she talked to my brother and my sister they four went their birthday presents so that all three of us for my birthday scott nintendo sixty four and that was like that was the kind of shit that they did. Oh you're like they were good so like in the broad sort of john ways that you need to be good like that. I mean not not that like buying your your kids. Shit is the thing that makes you a good parent but like they cared enough about like. I don't know it's weird like i. I'm very critical of my parents in a lot of ways because they were deeply conservative and like you know hard on me and in those ways but like at the end of the day we had a really good childhood and i don't fault them for that. <hes> you know the the notion of like buying in your kids. Things is not you know doesn't mean honestly. I'm apparent to kids at does that that they're they're very simple and there are transactional actional almost like little kind of simple machines. You know it's like they are need based and if you need an intendo sixty four and someone gives it to you that's satisfying to you because you're not you don't think expansively as a child you think by about like what you need but you must have felt very loved by that. That's kind of you know and that's exactly and i feel guilty as i remember really really sweet. It's a sweet store when i was like twenty three out of college like basically from the years of twenty three three hundred twenty eight or twenty nine i had no money and i was very poor and thinking about those moments in my life like in hindsight how painful it must have been for my mom to be like we can't do that as a kid. You don't get the realities of money you don't understand. All your parents are just like an endless a._t._m. And like so you don't you know no matter how you try and teach your kids about it. You just don't get it and i remember like being like i don't know just like miserable in a studio apartment in chicago and thinking about how poor i was thinking about my mom like thinking about how miserable i was being poor as a single person in my twenties when you're supposed to be thinking about my mom who was roughly the same age as like like only like maybe five or six years older than i was when i was like sitting in my apartment in chicago being like adding the pressure of having children who want things and who you want to give things nice to it just made me feel so bad and also great about like my my parents you know because the all the all the negative stuff really came when i was a teenager right and that that sort of normal and we've worked through that and we still have like issues and talk about i mean that's the biggest thing is we don't talk about anything and that's sad yeah because i was gonna ask because i'm always as a parent and as a as a product as a child through divorces and dysfunction this function. I was gonna ask you about what what do you think because that's tense household people that parents don't wear there's not an actual living marriage orig- going down to ten thousand and i was gonna ask you. What do you think the result of that kind of tension is but then to hear also too there was such love you know is really. Do you think that those things kind of balanced out in a way that made it yeah i arab or liveable or they did and it was like it was i mean to be fair fair to me as a kid like it was it was wild because we would take separate vacations with my dad and then go on separate vacations with my mom and like no explanation. No oh explanation. I remember when i was like nine being like what mom why don't you kiss that straight up like bringing into eastern. She's like i do and i remember leaving to go. Oh on a separate vacation to see my grand my dad's parents with my dad without my mom leaving in the driveway. My mom being like watch this and like truly the most chaste chaste kiss peck on the lips. Yeah i was like okay but then the fact that you have to call attention to it. That's weird. That's even weirder. They're not doing actually even at nine. I knew that this is bizarre and like yeah and now i don't know and so it was like i you know i don't know exactly how it's it's affected me psychologically because it's very low on my list of priorities to talk about in therapy because i've got a lot of other sure i'm sure i do. I mean it's obvious but it's like you know. I i do wonder sometimes how that affects your sort of understanding of what an adult relationship and like what romantic levels it's it's. It's a modeling that you probably can't even fathom how long it takes to sort of unwired to extremes going on. I had that that coldness the absence of affection of and then i had television that was raising me and every model for what i thought a relationship should look like i was getting from fucking nora ephron iran and sitcoms yeah rachel and ross and so it was just like of course now is an adult like i have. These screwy like things is that i have had to detangle in my brain yeah to be a functional acumen right especially when it comes to relationships i dunno. It's like wild funny. We're now known no one in my house so you're just sort of like you just a full anomaly and my sister is probably the closest. My sister was eight years older than me very maternal. I i might have identified as my best friend. Until i was the age of twelve she would like to movies and like we would go. We would do stuff like one on one a a lot growing up because i think my sister is the only thing my sister has ever wanted to so smart truly got a full ride to like north central college in april dropped out because all she wanted to do was be a mom and it's great that she knew about her. I don't i don't think that's a lesser decision on her marijuana and all but like she truly like was playing mom with me like so much yes so maternal but she's the closest thing probably to me like she was the first person she was in school plays out that we would go and see and like so she they had like a little bit of the bug to be on stage like introduced me to a lot of movie musicals and stuff like that and like we had a lot of the same a lot of my like interest early interests were specifically typically because of my sister and so we had that in common but no one in my house is very outgoing or has an interest in being around a ton of people my sister had friends but then was just like much more much happier spending time with our family and then like hanging out wow which is like so foreign to all i wanna do is like be around people until light on so yeah. I was always the loudest. I was always like trying to make people laugh. I think we're the a good audience. Yeah i mean they liked. They knew that warded yeah yeah my family. Everybody thought i was like so funny and it was usually because i was like saying something to like i had no. I had like no filter. Alternate has like a young kid. That's cute and then it starts to get frustrated and then you sort of have molded into something else but i remember it being like i would just like say you know whatever was on my mind. People would laugh and that's basically what i've done for a career. It's basically coming on podcast four and then like as a teenager it started become more of a defense mechanism my sense of humor because like when you're being teased and picked on it's like thank you can deflect with comedy. You either have to hide. I think like gay kids either go further and further into the show and just trying to make themselves invisible and like i didn't one i couldn't do that because i was. There's other things about me that made me to visible and the other option. I think for a lot of visibly k kids. It's like i'm just become the funny person right in your class you sort of become the cloud and then it weirdly like takes the pressure off and stuff like that and i think that's why there's the stereotype that gay men are funnier. I think it's just because a lot of us have to be very quick and <hes> in order to deflect some of that attention but yeah i do. I just knew so many more that we're like let me just hunched over and like be small and be disappeared and disappear and then that way it'll be easier. You've said that you knew you were gay. When you were four and now i mean why what about that i mean i have an idea what gayness whoa i remember memory. The memory i have love and the memory that is being confirmed is like my brother my sister night on friday nights. They would let us all sleep in the living room or sleeping my sisters from together together. It's like a sleepover and i remember like at four. We were sleeping my sister's room because they had just put glow stars darkstars on her ceiling. Yeah and i remember being like i like looking at naked boys better than naked girls and i remember my brother and my sisters news the funniest fucking than ever heard and you're off your entree into gayness is larry is so funny when people are like on youtube clips like oh he's just getting out there and talking talking about being gay and i'm like yeah it worked when i was four and it's working now. Bitch now people are laughing but yeah and that i always had crushes on boys and men like on television and in real life and stuff like that like i was always like yeah and i just remember that from the earliest memories that i yeah and i and i was like really sexual really early like i was drinking off at eight. Oh so really come out very iraq adjacent. We've turned blue here or medical because i remember this is the other thing so i was jerking off before i really come and then i remember remember like a year in something like a little bit came out. I thought i peed obviously because i think we all do sure sure and that's happening and your parents. You know my dad had a book called how to talk to your kids about sex and i would take that off the bookshelf and read it truly never used no never had coalesced into a conversation. If you read the book he certainly didn't use any of that knowledge. That book was also where i found out what it meant to be gay because there was like it was like a christian book and then the last chapter was like fifteen pages on homosexuality but yeah i remember that coming out and then i remember going turning to our encyclopedia britannica and looking and cross cross referencing like penis everything i i could find and then i still remember the moment i read semen the word semen for the first time and it was like i'm a genius crack the case uh-huh yeah well. That's that's exciting eight years old. That's crazy really. I remember the big ones were david hasselhoff. Baywatch scott macula quantum leap. Oh i have a type famously famously in in the quantum leap injured credits when he's like in the and in the blue smoke iconic imagery right thought that's naked man's body looked like for ages truly thought he was fully nude right ken doll style but but he was hot. It's much less threatening than the other threatening thing. I used to joke off to you. Is i have a collection of hundreds archie comics double and single digest wow every little strip like comic where they would go to the beach and like archie ones like wearing speeder. Oh as which i always found truly truly wild easier to draw yeah i guess and also different eras to i didn't get that as a kid that there were like older versions archie lake sorta mushed in these double and i would jerk off till like those pictures a lot of like archie joke head in reggie and speed us my my childhood was much more sex positive but in an like in geneva really know because well i in in retrospect i mean i don't want to take too much time with this but my dad is gay. That's why my parents divorced. My dad came out or was found out or something something like that so my mom's sister pat was sort of like my in many ways kind of like my inspiration to go into show business because she was it was funny and fun and like you know like the celebrity we all have an towel yonhap past she would come to town and that was like the highlight of the year when she would come. I am visit and she was wild like she was what in those days she was early. Sixties you sort of a pioneer of the sexual revolution which it just means. She was a slut but she married a bunch of times all kinds of different jobs but always just an emphasis on having fun and funny and i went to visit her and her husband when i was well it was because it was like for my fifth or sixth birthday when i was young and they had playboy sitting out and i was fascinated by them so she came to my birthday having known that i like playboy magazines and gave save me a playboy birthday which my mom my mom you like five or six i think it was five or six and which i mean in some ways i ah in some ways. I think like it was a different time in that. They're the notion of like the objectification of women and and sort of unrealistic portrayal trail of it but in terms of like treating a child is a sexual creature who has a natural look at naked people that i don't have any problem with them like with my kids. My one of my daughter's favorite books was a table a coffee table book that we got at an event of like fifty years as of playboy and it was all just like throughout history and like she was fascinated with the bushes bush hair. What's that you know <hes> <hes> but she loved the kids like to look at naked apple so it's no big deal but i was i remember i was i was thrilled to have this magazine and i remember looking laying on the floor on my stomach looking at it and there was a it was it like shots from an actual sort of playboy ski ski party and hugh hefner's there and it's you know when it starts at ski party and then it's devolved into league nudity and there was like one shot of a woman bottomless and with it was winnie the pooh seventy two something you so there was there was pubic hair and i that is indelibly etched into my brain forever and i <hes> i took it took the magazine over to my to my aunt and i said i said pat uber. I say patty you'd better take this back and she said why i said because it makes my weiner hurt on the floor and had an erection and she's at the time i early giggling okay honey and housing and i had to go even further and i was like this one. This picture is specially like pointed. That's the one that really does it for a and she's like okay on the i'll take it back but in retrospect and i think it may be even been been my wife years and years and years later when i told her this story said to me. It's obvious that your mom and her sister her. Were trying to make sure that you were straight. Really i really do think she's right. I really think that they were trying to. I mean they were sex. Positive ositive kind of who cares kind of stuff about that anyway i mean 'cause like we swore in our household and and we were the house that kid's drank runaway was and i i mean there was morality and we were taught to be nice to be polite and to be kind but you know but it was just more importantly absolutely but the kind of edge stuff like who gives a shit but yeah but i do think that she was an attempt imprint straightness on it. I don't think that's how that works but interests it. You know what i'm wearing right now. A pair of mac weldon underwear that's right with smart design. 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That's macworld and dot com promo code three questions for twenty eighty percent off your first order. I'm old so i like listening to what i call records now. They call them vinyl but i i don't call it vinyl because it makes me feel like a jerk but you turn audio is the way that i listened to my records. They are an independent turntable company and maker of the orbit turntable. Which is my turntable. It's great. They're the leader and affordable audio file turntables and all their tables are built by hand in boston massachusetts usa u._s._a. U._s._a. u._s._a. U-turn audio's vision is to make great vinyl listening easier and more affordable there turntable started just one seventy nine there elegantly designed so easy to set up a news and they're customizable with hundreds of configurations available from the cartridge to the deck to the the actual sort of whatever you you call the brown thing you put the record on there's plenty of options and upgrades they also provide industry-leading customer support and a two year warranty on all their products. I i love this thing. I listened to it all the time and <hes> and it's beautiful. It's mine has a a walnut plant. I think is what they call the deck. It's gorgeous. You can get free shipping on any order at u-turn audio dot com with promo code richter. That's the letter you u-turn audio promo code richter. You're for free shipping on any order now wendy. You think that your parents started becoming unaware. I came into my mom like three different times before they like before. It all really blew up. I remember when i was really young like like eight or nine saying something we're what was wild as we were watching one of those specials where it was like look at all these crazy commercials from overseas look what they look. At these fucking sexual commercials from overseas you remember blows like compilation and like some of them would just be like insane and i remember being like telling my mom. There's one from germany with a man in a speedo again like could gymnasts on a trampoline remember what they were selling trampolines i guess and being like i like that and then i remember being thirteen and having a much more sort of like self actualized like very real conversation with her being like i think i'm gay and truly nothing like i think we both blacked <music> out really because remember the response or anything it was not it was negative. It wasn't like she they didn't drag me to conversion therapy right away or anything i mean they did me in therapy christian therapy yeah and i'm sure she told him because i tried to like get me to talk about different stuff that was like and he was bad he he's like not good at all so it wasn't specifically conversion but it was sort of so many emotion like i was so deeply repressed like no one was talking about anything. I didn't feel like i can talk to my parents about anything. I was so i would have like emotional outburst chemical stuff going onto that i'm sure you're alert manifesting at a young age and then it really came to a head when i was like seventeen senior in high school early days senior of high school and they read my journal and aw yeah parents parents don't read his journey it was dark because at that point had been out at school for like a year and had like like been because they sent me to home school until my junior year and then i went to public school on a month diet smoked weed drank and come out of the cloud over indicator because i'm always curious purest plainfield plainfield. I'm sorry coming out yeah at that time fine. I did not have a lot of like serious pushback except approach. I didn't even come out at church. Someone re read like on my blog that i was hanging out with a gay kid and the youth leaders because i could smell blood in the water about yours was like we don't think you should hang out with this person and you can't come back to church unless you stop hanging out with them and i was like okay by because i think i was ready at that point too and sort of that's good to hear here though about plainfield because my my son who's eighteen is gay and has been out since he was eleven and i always wonder because it was his school the gay straight straight alliances the biggest organization to school and i wonder what it's like other places other than i had to. I started the gay straight alliance at my school right before he left and there was a little bit of pushback about it but not a ton yeah and then. How did you know about it. You had you just read about it online or something yeah. I knew that they had existed and like i had had boyfriends who at their school. They had them and i say that and so like sort of aping that but yeah i i actually had pretty decent time. I remember i got called called a faggot like more when i was like on youth group trips then like by like quote unquote christian people of kwame than i did at public looks good except it was so funny i tweeted and it was like half a joke about a year ago and half real i was like didn't even remember the last name of the girl heather who called me in fact at lunch junior here during college and truly many people responded with her full dave and i was like no no no but yeah so that was like the one thing you look i have yeah. I'm truly i'll lick. Look her any enemy. I had in high school. I will look up only exclusively while i'm links zooming down the one anytime i'm driving. I'm like i have to look up someone from my school on instagram because that's how i wanna die right. That's good though of you know for some reason the only time but yeah it was it was fine. It was weird like not very the only source of pushback i got was from my family and that was pretty much it and like i moved out after they read my journal. I had like a full mental break because it was like a paradigm shift for both of us. You know like i. I truly at that moment at seventeen. I will never tell them. I will go to college. I won't leave. I will live a full life second life that they will just never be privy to and and because i mean that was just the way we didn't. We didn't talk about things. There were so many secrets so many conversations. I was obsessed with all the secrecy in my house because people were always talking ah things and never letting us in about any of it and i was like that's just how it's gonna be and i'm going to talk about this and so i had a full mental break they sent me to an impatient mental hospital for kids search for a week was there for we came back moved out and christian no good yeah which is like a normal one which was actually probably you better guy because they sent me there because they were like this fucked up because he's gay and then a lot of the people at that facility were like well. That's not a part of this right because i remember when they sent me. They made them test me for aids twice h._i._v. Twice because i talked about like giving combo jobs and stuff like that in my journal and i was like it was insane and they thought it was insane. I remember really clearly that everyone at the facility like all of my counselors and stuff like your parents seem. A little nuts was that that was helpful because it's sort of like okay. I'm not insane about this. There's a lot of other stuff going on and so i moved out and there's like one girl in one class that i had who was like everyone knew because i disappeared for a week from school and and i was the voice of the announcements not to brank and so everyone knew that i was gone right and everyone recall my house and my parents would be like we don't know when he's coming back and so like what a mystery to present to you you see this like high school kids and so everyone was like when i finally did show back up there like where the fuck where you what was going on and so everyone was really aware and so this one girl just to be nice offered me a place on her couch and then i showed up like last on my list of i sort of exhausted all of my other couch options at this point and she her parents parents are like you can't just invite kids to stay out really well and then long story short. I ended up staying there the rest of the year. He's my best friend. In the entire world to this day best man in her wedding was nicer br you get along with their parents and in wildly her dad is method pastor might and and this nights that wild though tend to be some some christians actually do it right yeah and he it was really actually the the best situation i could have landed and because even after being out for a couple of years i was like i'm one going to hell like i was like i'm going to help but i might as well just lit up yeah and so it wasn't even like even though i was out it wasn't necessarily beheld his head space and i remember her parents sort of catching wind of that because i think he'd probably told sarah that at some point and her dad was like oh no no no no no that's not how this works and he really was like to have someone who was like in authority in church. Yeah be like pal doesn't exist. That's not how this works. That's not how god works. It's not how blah blah blah really was like oh my god like this weight and also it was just like nice to have again like that normalcy that i was seeking it was so interesting because it was not a normal situation by any means she had like it was a full family her paraplegic like she had two younger brothers. There's a lot going on in that house and then i was there. None of this is normal and yet it was all of the normal. It was the most normal year of my life as a lack of foreign sean. I can come home and talk about boys with mom. Her mom was interested in the you know like i was just able to leave because i was living a full double well life for a year for most of my life honestly and then just to be able to like kind of be at home and be myself and then be at school. You know it was really really it saved my life your galloway's and now she's a pastor too well. That's great. I mean that's that's nice that you at least get some healthy christian. Now howdy the <hes>. How'd you end up in standup. How how does that i was in. I moved into theatre school. I moved to chicago because i want to theater right plays. I wanted to act. I wanted to be involved in the yes. I mean that was the goal for a long time was like that's what i wanted like that. Because at some point mid way through college i like went and being like broadway broadway musicals and then like midway through. I was like no theater play. Tom stops areas like tracy. Lattes like let's do this us. Shakespeare in chicago seemed like the place to do that. Store amazing theater seen to this day. I miss it and i started doing theater there. I was doing theater for for like a year. There and ensemble member at this theater called the new colony and they were putting on a play that i was helping a writing insistent on calling five lisbon's unique and it started the time beth styling very great standardized testing standards successful comic who's been on the show or conan a bunch and i remember like just having a conversation with her because a certain point. I hit a wall with auditioning where i was like. All these like the bigger. The paycheck nick got for these rules. The less interesting asian role would be or i would only i was only getting called in parts that were exclusively written to be asian and it's very frustrating very well. You're writing you know. She's like you're a writer and your performance. She's like just do stand up and beth was like one of the first like stand ups ups that i had seen <hes> live like i went and saw one of her like she had barr show called entertaining julia with the putter busters and i went and saw that and then on friday adding nights after five those museums occasion theater put on a variety show with like improv and sketch and stand up and stuff like that and one night someone drought role you wanted to do something and i was like pure and they gave me eight minutes to do whatever i wanted to do. Stand up and i did it. That was the first time ever did it crushed nice and then bombed for like a full yeah. I think that's a fairly common and tell you. How long did you have to get material couple days. Okay that's good yeah. I never believed these people. That say like buddies. Dared me yet an open. Mike and i just went up and start. I just feel like no you didn't just wing it for. I win it. Yeah i was. I remember like being on on the train like writing down like little bits and stuff like that but here's the thing like i did. I did stand up so poorly in chicago as an art form because i thought you do a set set and then you don't do those jokes ever again and then you write a full new eight minutes yea every single time and that like that ambition i know and listen like i have a lot of material most of it very bad. I was like i was like pushing myself to write a ton of material yeah. Those first couple year entire early career was one long imprint. Yeah you gotta you gotta sit through kind of not so good stuff to get to the. I still do that. I still like try so much bad bad shit and then like find like 'cause. I don't write anything down. I never have i've never written here your whole act in your head. My settlers are just words like <hes> like pony grub like i will write those words down in that will cue me and but i write mostly on stage and so i'll just be doing like sort of forming forming and new york titan me up 'cause in chicago it was very loose and very stories and like meandering and a lot of that and new york when i moved to new york and i was doing three open mike tonight where you're waiting two hours to do a minute and a half sure ninety seconds of material say you got to get to the punch line and you have to and you're sitting through so many tedious yeah. I thought about theater and i felt this. I feel this even more so about standup. Watching bad stand up. Sometimes makes me really makes me a better stand up than watching good standups. Oh yes i'm like i'm. I've always been a very critical person. I'm always like watching it and something in the absence of what i'm watching is more striking breaking to me sometimes is really great because i would rather like be like i could do that better than this person not like cribbing jokes or anything but like rather than watching like a really amazing stamping eh. I'll never be that good. No i absolutely understand you and i have found i found specially and i do think that there is a specific kind of midwestern nece and a sort of like the frayed don't to your own horn. That was something i used to hear. My grandfather say so the notion of saying well first of all. I'm going to get in front of up in front of everybody in a room where all the lights are off except they were all pointing on me and i'm gonna stand on a higher level and everyone's going to shut up and listen to me. Just is <unk> against my wiring so i needed a motivator especially because when it came to the notion of i'm gonna do this for a living <hes> and one of the biggest motivators motivators is that guy sucks living. I can do better than that and that and that's like. It seems you in like that kind of relativism. Is i use it for behavior to. You know just like how to be a better human. Being most of what i know about how to being a human being is being around people and going like oh fuck don't do that. Don't do the attic. Don't make your goal or don't treat people that way. You know i think i think negative negative examples can be thrilling and really really useful now for standups just in from sort of an artistic point of view like people that are sort of starting out they wanna get into this is this is this is i think under the what have you learned kind of question here. What would you say to them like. Is there something about the actual art of this that you could be helpful. You know it's stand up is the weirdest one because it's so nebulous like there's just so many ways to digital well and there are so many and there's just like i actually hate getting prescriptive about like what stand up is or isn't it at the end of the day because sufficient coming up in new york. I was seeing so many different like kinds of like comedy that was good and is so weird because also stand up is the feedback. Is there immediately if people are laughing than it works works. It doesn't like you don't there isn't much else to do so whenever i have people. Ask me this question. I always say sort of the same thing which is like what i found found most helpful for me when i was coming up in new york especially is just fine the people that you think are funny and they'll find you funny and sort of like surround yourself by them and work with them like coming up. It's harder to stand up is sort of more solitary schedule improv or anything like that but like i just found and like the people that i surround myself in those early days. My class of standups pushed me artistically and pushed me to be funnier but were there to support more to the people that you surround yourself with in the beginning are so so important yeah i find because i it's so miserable at the beginning stand up is also so frustrating rating because it there is no like people like how did you get x. And it's like truly the way i got. My manager is so is so like a roll of the dice of you have to consistently insistently be killing and killing when the right person is in the room in the right moment when they're gonna see it you know and it's just like when they're in the right mood and so it's it's all such a crapshoot shoot and so it's so miserable that the people you surround yourself at the beginning of the things that are going to get you to stay and to do it. You can keep doing it. I think like the other thing in is for me is being always being prepared for when that moment happens because like when i had my first meeting with my manager he was like what do you want and being able to articulate that question as part of being prepared also like i am always preparing. Reggie made a conscious decision to be ready for that question westerner. You just have to be because you don't win. It's gonna come and sometimes will come earlier than you need it to be or later than you. I'm always thinking. I'm preparing myself career moment five years ahead of where i think i'm actually like i'm always moving. The goalposts which is sort of sometimes can be psychologically frustrating because i'm like i'm a complete failure because i haven't reached ex like 'cause i remember for years. It was like all i want is the late nights at all. I want is all i wanted to do is get paid to do stand up and then that happened and then suddenly is it's like well. That's not good enough like you'll never be satisfied and that's a double edged sword for sure because i'm always preparing for that next because i remember like he. When i met with my manager he was like do you have a sample and i was like yeah. I have sample script that i've just written and that's the hardest thing to do is to do that. Kind of preparatory work when no one is asking sure doc on also to have the wherewithal to know ahead of time what they're going to be asked whether you're in that situation. What does that person going to ask you. You know and so just like even if you're like. I'm so far away from this x y z thing it's just being able to be prepared for when it happens because you just never know. It'd be dropped in shirley. Charlie is so important. I definitely relate to what you're saying. It'd be especially if what i've always taken from what i've learned in show businesses that if you make an and i learned this from early on from conan o'brien who i think had really decided at a certain point. He knows himself very well. He's very ambitious person. He's an amazingly talented person with gigantic brain and he decided i wanna talk show host letting that he had been in a comedy writer and also but he decided he was going to do that and he was. He was a machine. That was just be about that and i think i saw early on on. I mean he may feel different. I feel like i saw him. Once attaining that being a little lost in a certain way like like just sort of personally i i like i say he might say different but and it made me feel like make your goal process may make it be like the best. Whatever you're you're gonna be or just and something you said earlier. You know be open to because i you know in many ways. My career was very kind of lackadaisical days ago. Just kind of getting into like this looks like fun and this looks like there's opportunity and then when a door opens you gotta step through it. You know you just you can't yeah you can't worry and you can't can't be shy and you can't be my first agent. I was in the real live brady bunch which was a show that was in chicago which people don't know was just live stagings of the brady bunch and it became came a huge hit. We were doing it in new york at the village gate. I was just playing mike brady which is the most boring heart but a casting person stuck around after the show show asked to see me said i have a friend who's an agent. You should go see her. I went and saw this woman. I don't remember i don't even remember her last name molly something but just great old broadway agent new york agent sad cross moore talked with her job for an hour she got on the phone started calling casting new york housing people but like c._b._s. and a._b._c. all these people that she knew and she said at one point what now he's not just a funny kid. He can do everything he can do. Everything and i thought how do you aw i realize it's all horsh and it's incumbent upon me to just it would be rude for me to deny the horse shit. I'm gonna go with the horse shit because if she says i always felt that way early on an audition i would be very intimidated by these established people in that'd be like fake it a. and that's and that's what you do. Fake it and you just add. There's not a lot of room for self. Doubt i mean you if you do have the self-doubt. Keep it to you yourself for sure so i wish better. Can i say one last thing you're of course very practical. There's so much about this industry that you can't control yeah so much but there are so many things you actually can control including and i know this is so hypocritical is how we started our day time. Have your ship memorized yeah. That's a part of whatever you're doing right and answer your fucking. It's not charming to be late. It really isn't and this is this is the injustice of it. People will never notice that your whole never ever ever notice if you're we're on time if you've answered the email correctly or if you have the lines memorized that is what you are expected to ensure they will only ever remember if you are conical late unprepared and and and then ask nights yeah that'd be nice because that's the only thing and it sucks because there is no reward being on time. No one will ever comment like oh. This person is so punctual. I mean the later you get into this industry. It does become more chronic thing people just show up late and so it does become almost more like wow this person is the only one on time you wanna. I want to be that person more than anything else. The other thing is like there are so many factors that you can't control the people who are astles late and unprepared all the time you have to be astronomically comically talented absolutely because especially now the way that comedy is so saturated there are so many of us any like the you're not in a commodity that is necessary for anybody in this town. If you don't wanna work be an asshole yes if you don't wanna work if you don't wanna work for a long time and have that make this be your career be an asshole. You know be selfish. Expect people expect there to be two sets of rules the rules for everybody else in one's for you because that happens. I know people that work e- ass hold their way out of this business. You know i you're absolutely right yeah. It's just not like i think people are like. I know so so many people who are like. I'm just a mess and that's just too i am. It's my brand sorry. I'm fifty and it's like that's not no one. No one likes that. No one finds that charming and even if that's your even if that it's your stick that your milieu that's franck camera that's ron stage but offstage. You gotta show up. You got to be there for people. This has been kinda and a great and i think we've kind of covered most of everything i mean you. You know we've got what you've learned. You know i mean what kind of more in a personal sense like is there something <hes> you'd like you're obviously very sort of analytical person and i wonder if like having been through really kind of you know like a very interesting life with a lot of kind of adversity and denial. You know people denying you who oh you are and what you are. What do you feel like instead of like. How do you be stand up. Stand up like how do you be happy like. Do you know do you have do you have any kind of like nick. What's on that yeah. I mean it's strange because like you're catching me on a good day. 'cause i live in the last couple of weeks like been pretty happy and i usually can't control that. We checked with your manager. John uptick get him in there. I think like for me in terms. I like what i have learned about how to sort of be here and be like happy and president or whatever that means. Anybody is like thinking truly about. I'm always sort of like this is so lame but it is like golden rule forward like i'm always i like empathy is not something i necessarily think can can be learned but you can fake it like put it there. I'm like an empathetic person almost to my detriment sometimes because i truly like i've called back delta her to try and track down of women who i was rude to once of because i felt terrible about the way i treated her and like truly been like no. You need to find her because i i mean it's just like steph. I think like i'm so so much of what i had shame about. Growing up up hurt no one you know so much about like what i'm shamed for now as an adult hurts no one and it's so hard to sift through all of the shame that we that is just so like tangible and all of our lives because of the way this country runs and the way that you know western society is any society it is there's different aspects to it but to be able to sift through that and be like okay what is like what is something that affects someone's life negativity that i have done on that. I should feel shame is universally blanket. We bad yeah no no absolutely absolutely what is the thing that i did wrong wrong that i should change what what is the thing that has affected other people and then what is the stuff that is completely artificial. Yeah you know oh and it has affected no one else but me and his choice that i've made is bullshit basically yeah and being able to really think about that is really important because it was just a blanket get over everything that i did and the thing that i thought and how i acted in an extended my stand up has been like truly reaction to that and a lot of ways i mean like is it's like a joke how open i am about a lot of things in my life and i think people do get the impression that i'm like ninety percents parent about my life on stage and stuff like that and that's a fallacy alice because i'm not there's a lot of stuff that i don't talk about but like the stuff that i do choose to be like transparent and open about like i do think it is like a reaction to the secrecy the shame and the all the stuff that was hidden that i wanted to talk about when i was growing up and i think we're all so much healthier if we do open up about certain stuff i don't know nothing. There's nothing shameful about humanity. I mean i i you know i've been going through a divorce and i've been and i find sometimes people. Ask me stuff and i don't. I don't like i'm not bad mouthing anybody in the situation but when i talk about like the other day i was talking to like some of the electricity russians on the show about like how much i've been crying lately and i you know i could tell they kind of like. I don't know maybe a little weirded out by it but i just kind of like no fucking kreil time now. I've cried more in the last four months. I haven't a previous ten years and that's just like i don't. I don't have any shame about you know. That's just what it's crying. We all fucking cry. What's the big deal and it's it's weird that we don't talk about it. Yeah absolutely well. You talked about just you just get get to the <hes>. Where are you going to this. Do you said that you've got these milestone goal posts or would you care to share some some of those others. I wanna be. I mean i wanna be phoebe waller fucking bridge yeah. I want basically what i want. I want to be an actor producer writer i i wanted. I mean that was always what i was building up to sort of be like i i look like mendis career like the office was like such a huge formative moment for me is like learning that like oh. She was a writer on that show and she was on the show and she created that character and made it something different than anything you've seen an indian american jordan on television asian prior to that and so specifically her and like i remember like researching all of that and figuring li literally mindy tailings career is the reason i thought i could go into. I like comedy writing because up until then i was like i'm gonna plays and drama and like six feet on like right on six feet under basically but the office meanwhile was my favorite show i was like i can't uh-huh funny and like truly reading about the way mindy like sort of found herself on that show i was like oh that's what i wanna do and then her own show and then like uh-huh lena dunham i like there's a lot to say about lena dunham but i do love that show and i think she did incredible work an absolute to have done to be executive producer loser. Starring writer at twenty four is insane. I think we were all mad at her for good reason is like people like that are like that's what i wanna do and i'm like i'm so pleased to be on this n._b._c. Show like unbelievable because again like the league. It's so weird to be in the offices slot on n._b._c. and like to have grown up watching the thursday night must see comedy block like again like that block raised me as a kid like friends and seinfeld of course but also like the single guy and carolina carolina sick at all yeah and i'm so pleased to do it but it is it does feel weird to be at this huge marquee moment in my life and be like i don't have like i don't have control over like i'm just an actor and i never thought it was. It's so weird to like go from wanting growing up wanting to be an actor and then like like real being a writer some much more realistic goal and then that sort of morphing into this and then now suddenly like it's the weirdness sadness of this is the way i did it. I'm now have the dream that i had at nine yeah but it up through a pathway of different stuff. It feels weird but eventually eventually yeah i want that. I want to be like greg berlanti. I wanna have like a fucking empire yeah yeah it's a tour it's being notorious being the author of your own things and that's something the thing that like i'm fifty two years old and i have that has been an issue for me throughout my career is like what do i wanna say in yeah and i. I still not sure i mean so it's it's really the fact that you're as young as you are and you're aware of that and you're working working hard on it is <hes> is very enviable to an old fart like me <hes> so you know keep it up. Do you how to write about pat. That's your story. That's that's the show all all right all right all right. I'll do a whole production company. When i'm greg berlanti. I'm green lighting and that's what i'm doing. I this project she has. She has alzheimer's now she still she's like the happiest person in the something's care ward every three the nurses fight over who gets here pat and the other day. I went to visit and she still funny because i said i said so. What have have you been doing and she said i have no idea yeah. She's still she's still very very funny. Joey laughed is truly broke. The studio is a legend in the nyc joe so are you. This is really really great. This is really a great conversation thank you i was two and thank you for sharing so openly and get a wallet. He's got his whole stack his light around with a rubber band credit bag after i got picked pocketed in chicago in two thousand twelve twelve during pride and the next day got my desk at group on and picked up a rubber band and was like i guess i'll use this money clip for a while and have not had wallet because every time i get like somebody will give me a wallet or i'll see electronic like a look at stores at wallets and i'll be like it just doesn't work as well as this rubber band so this is like poor kid like person logic is. I'm always like this works in. It's free so right. Why would i do. I literally got gifted effendi wallet and i was like but it can't fit as many cards as i have around this wallet. So why would i use that like you have well. It looks like it is about ten different cards yeah yeah. You never know when you might need the sag. Police pull you over and show your i._d. I need to see your short sure and you do it is he. Does keep the sag car outside. I have my writers guild. That's an accident a accident. I usually have my writers guild card out on this. That's got a little mac all right well. Thank you so much and god bless you. I'm not that i believe in god's house to i say it <hes> and <hes> good luck and thank you so much and thank you out there for listening to the three questions three questions with andy. Richter attor is a team coco annual production. It's produced by me. Kevin bartelt executive produced by adam saks and jeff ross team coco and chris bannon and colin anderson eddy golf are supervising producers aaron blair associate produced by gen samples and a high and engineered by wilburton and if you haven't already make sure to rate and review the three questions with andy richter on apple podcast. This has been eighteen cocoa production in association with newell.

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Radar Meteorology & Observations of Severe Storms

Weather Geeks

41:25 min | 3 months ago

Radar Meteorology & Observations of Severe Storms

"Today we're happy to welcome. Professor Stephen Nesbitt from the University of Illinois. Dr Nesbitt has his hands. In a variety of projects and research interests including scale and cloud dynamics radar and satellite meteorology and tropical meteorology. His feel research has taken him to five continents with more than twenty field campaigns. One such project took him to Argentina and Brazil to study. Some of Mother Nature's fiercest thunderstorms will learn all about the atmosphere Sciences Permanent Illinois and some of his exciting projects Steve. Thank you for joining us on the weather. Geeks podcast great to be here Marshall. Thanks I stephen. A colleague that I've known for many years and just one of the best in the business so it's great to have you on weather geeks. I have to start off with a question that I ask every single guests that we have on whether Steve. How did you get into meteorology? Well it's kind of a short story but ever since I can remember I've just been fascinated by what falls out of the sky whether it be rain or snow which is dear to me because I grew up in the snow belt regions of western New York where you can wake up one morning and there could be twenty thirty inches of snow on the ground. Due to lake effect. Snow is people know in that region of the country. It's just something that just inspires people to really get connected with the weather. Whether they're meteorologists are just everybody else just following the weather getting involved and getting out and observing. What's going on in what's causing all things. And so that was really my curiosity growing up is starting to understand you know from you. Know getting trained in physics and chemistry in high school. Taking those hard math courses trying to really muscle your way through those difficult classes through college Just trying to put together a picture and be able to describe How the atmospheric physics operates to produce hazardous weather like heavy rainfall heavy snowfall. And things like that so so it's really been a passion as long as I can remember and you know ever since I was a kid I mean when I was excuse me nine years old. I had the guts to call up the net local National Weather Service Office and ask for a tour which Kinda surprised to hear but yeah nine years old. I called up the National Weather Service Office in Buffalo and I remember going to see some of the technology that they had at that time in the eighties which were old teletype. Machines and facts charts and of weather. Radars with oscilloscope displays. Ws ARE FIFTY. Seven radars careers being fascinated by that. And and you know. Originally I wanted to be an operational meteorologist but for those of us that went through school in the nineties know that there are a lot of hiring freezes during that time that really got my is looking at research and so the rest is history. I guess yeah I WANNA give a shout out to those weather geeks listeners. That remember the old die facts. Wet maps that used to come off lots of trigger memory there because certainly during my time as a student at Florida state we had the weather lab up on the roof in those die facts. Maps would come out and wet and we'd hang them and that's what we did we'd sit there and look at the surface maps or the upper air charts. I reflect on our students today that they can pull all of those things up on their fingertips on various websites and in other places. That's just kind of an era gone by. Yeah Yeah I mean I you probably remember this when Anu model run would come out. It would come out of a printer and You know everybody be huddled around waiting for the line by line to come out of the printer and that would be like the forecast for the big snowstorm. That was coming the next day and everybody would just kind of look at look at it. And then you know we'd posted on the wall And looking at the model runs. And you know that's what we had back then slowly and I probably a little older a lot older actually maybe Several years older than Steve. Yeah we the all in GM LFM models tattoo. Today's European models and her so certainly in evolution. But I want to give some of these background before we dive. Further into our geek out. Here he has a meteorology bs with honors from the State University of New York College. A Sweet Amirah. Master's degree in meteorology from Texas Am University and PhD in Meteorology from the University of Utah. All Utah although I as I recall Steve and correct me. If I'm wrong on this you're at Texas am with Professor Ed sips or and I believe around the time he moved to the University of UTAH. I remembering that correctly. Yeah that's absolutely right. Yeah he he moved just at a perfect time for me as I was finishing my masters and followed him out to the the State of Utah. Where you know got involved in that great department which is one of the come. The best kept secrets out there. In terms of Good Meteorology Program at Utah. I completely agree with that. Shout out to all the people there At the University of Utah in Meteorology and also colleague of Mine Steve Berry in their civil engineering who I've collaborate at Clara operated with over the year. Steve's also a member of the committee on the scale processes and the scientific planning team for the NASA Aerosols Cloud convection precipitation mission He is the chair of the radar. Meteorology are what we call Stack Committee within the AMS from two thousand thirteen to two thousand sixteen at least and he's a former editor of the Journal of Applied Meteorology and climatology just before I kind of go back to Steve couple of his major awards. He's won the NASA Robert H Goddard Award. He's a member of the NASA global precipitation measurement Missions Science Team Ground Validation team in two thousand fifteen and he had the award for Outstanding Service to the radar meteorology community from the American Meteorological Society. And there's several others before I go too far down the road. I do want to get a chance because I think are the author. On what many consider the sort of current and best textbook out there on radar meteorology? Tell us a little bit about how you decided to write a book about radar meteorology. Yes so it really came out of me having to teach the class and having a lack of resources to go to for students and you know there were a couple of other textbooks that were out there by various team colleagues in very good textbooks But they're not really accessible for undergraduate students. We felt and so my colleague Bob Robber who is A Senior Faculty member here Illinois and I got together and said you know we've got to fix this situation because there's a whole generation of meteorologists who who really could get inspired by a full color textbook with lots of examples and problems to work through and so we set out and you know started writing the book and twenty twelve and it took a long process. You know we're a little busy and got through it and it was a very good experience to go through and learn those fundamentals again so we can try to display a teachable set of materials for students. And that's really what our motivation wants to make sure that the there was accessible so that future radar meteorologists could look at this as a resource to be able to learn from and and really a lot of experience from. We're talking with Steve Nesbitt from the University of Illinois talking all about radar meteorology and observing severe storms. We're GONNA get all into that but I kinda WANNA lay some framework and groundwork on who steve is. Because if you don't know him he's one of the best in the business in the field of meteorology as a research scientist a professor and so forth you are the head of a team called the cloud systems research group. Tell us a little bit about that group in what you're up to. Yes so we. We have studied many different types of weather systems around the globe. So basically my curiosity extends not necessarily one particular region. I know you mentioned tropical meteorology. That's really where I got started. We studied Different types of precipitation systems around the globe and we try to kind of sit in between different areas of expertise. You know there are people out there that study cloud physics in detail. People that study remote-sensing in a lot of detail People cloud dynamics of the motions in the cloud systems and really what I view. Our expertise is kind of trying to integrate a lot of that knowledge into improving our understanding of the holistic processes that go on in these types of clouds and so for example trying to understand how microphysics might contribute to severe storms or how the motions and the clouds contribute to the shapes of the clouds or how they evolve. I think this this is really where my curiosity is and I think it's also an under examined topic because when we think about weather forecasts were often times trying to forecast how systems evolve. And that's a really hard problem especially with severe storms. They are very rapidly changing and are observing systems that we usually use for model initialisation and forecasts really not well suited to look at the motions within the clouds and the processes within the clouds necessarily and so trying to come up with a better conceptual picture and also make analyses and use are complex equations that we use in meteorology to try to understand the causes of some of the things that we observe and so that's really where our group tend to sit and we've looked at systems from almost pulled a poll in different projects And Fair various different types of weather systems from the most benign snowfall. All the way up to The most intense thunderstorms on the planet. Yeah we we're GONNA talk about some of your work with. Mcs We're going to geek out on what? Mcs Is arm and talk about ago and other things. But before I go in those directions Steve. You've had a long career now. We're both getting up there. Where full professors are universities? Over the years. It's you reflect on your research in in various areas. Is there one or two particular things that you've discovered or learned from your research or your students research over the years? That just really stands out for you or sort of what people will say. Oh yeah that's what Steve as it's known for yeah so I would go back all the way to my Graduate Experience and you know you and I were both involved in the trim program which was tropical rainfall measuring mission. This is a satellite that came out of the ideas of some real big pioneers in our field like Joanne Simpson and Jerry North. Going way back but This mission was tremendously successful in opening our eyes to really how Thunderstorms and convective systems. Behave on our planet and before that time all we had were satellite imagery showing the tops of the clouds and we had really no idea what was going on underneath the tops of the clouds. And so you know this trim Mission was the first mission to have what we call the precipitation radar which was a radar on a satellite that can measure the vertical and horizontal structure of storms anywhere in the tropics and subtropics. And this was really a breakthrough I think for tropical meteorology because for the first time we could say for sure what types of storms produce different amounts of rainfall in different parts of the tropics What storms you know whether they be individual thunderstorm clouds which we thought were very dominant in the tropics up to that time to really the degree of organized convective systems or systems that self organize into large lines or collective clusters of updraft and downdraft that produce. We thought maybe they weren't that important. But it turns out that we discovered that they're actually responsible for at least fifty to almost seventy percent of the rainfall in the tropics. Wow this is really not known for an up until this time I mean we had some idea about rainfall patterns but we were able to show for the first time that organized convection was really a driver for the large amount of rainfall that falls within our global climate system. And that's really important for a number of reasons because it turns out that the heating within these systems really drive two thirds of the the wind circulation within within our atmosphere so understanding how that heating is produced and causes the winds to blow across the lower latitudes really important for understanding basic fundamental processes in our climate system. So the other thing I mean more recently. Now that we've grown up and have our own students you know I. I have a current student to his name is Randy Chase He comes from New York just like I do but he has really taken on machine learning and applying it to on trying to retrieve properties of of snowfall in clouds One thing that's as you know Marshall is very difficult from a radar perspective is trying to nail down how much precipitation falling out of clouds and APPs you know this is very important because You know all of our society depends on knowing where extreme rainfall is And trying to nail that number down so that people can take action whether they have issues with flooding or engineering design problems or whatever. It's really important to know how much precipitation as falling out of cloud and snowfalls even worse because as you know no snow snow. Flake is the same when we're trying to retrieve how much snow is falling out of clouds. It's very difficult to do. And so what? My student Randy Chase has been doing is actually trying to use a machine learning algorithm to combine information that we know about snowflakes in a more intelligent way into taking satellite data and retrieving snowfall and his. His research is used a lot of aircraft. Data validate all these measurements flying through clouds. Funded and funded by NASA to to really nail down. How much snow is falling out of those clouds and so his work is really going to revolutionize our understanding of the Hydrologic Cycle in the high latitudes from space. So that's you know from end to end my career. You know kind of two big things that stand out to me and we are back on the weather geeks podcast. And I'm speaking with Stephen Nezmet. He's a professor at the University of Illinois in their excellent atmospheric sciences program. I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd. From University of Georgia. You just heard Steve Talking about trim and these big convective systems in the tropics and indeed. I was a part of those missions. And the NAFF precipitation measurement mission science team which now has moved on from the trim mission to the global precipitation measurement. Gps mission which is taken that radar concept to the next phase now that has a dual frequency. Or what we call a dual frequency radar system that can extend the range of what the radar can see. Because you you didn't hear. Steve mentioned something about how difficult it is to measure precipitation falling from a cloud and we need to know that variety of reasons as he said flooding Initialisation perhaps of models and so forth Stephen Basic question that whether deeks listeners may have this is just a basic little geek out here why we need satellites or even radar to measure rainfall. Can't we just put rain gauges everywhere? And of course that's a loaded question because we know the answer to that is no and we know the reasons why but someone listening to this may not understand why trimmer. Gpa satellite is necessary or even a network of radars to measure rainfall. Yeah that's actually a really good question and it's it really relies on a simple fact that you know we all know many of us that are weather geeks you know. Put Ring Gauges out in her backyard and we can report that data in two networks like coke arise if you've talked to Russ Schumacher I believe that But you know we can have thousands of ring gauges across the country And even then you think about how much area A ring gauge actually collects. It's not that big of an area and you know we all have the sensation as people to know that especially when it's raining heavily across the street sometimes and it's not raining at all and where we're at right now. It's raining cats and dogs right so so that sort of variability is why we need things like radars and satellites to try to map precipitation over larger areas of course with that You know there's nothing like what we what we like ground. Truth being those gauges But it turns out that You know there are challenges in terms of making a retrieval of precipitation as what we call it in the field or an estimate of precipitation over an area based on the signals that we get back from a radar So on the ground you know. The National Weather Service is deployed one hundred and some radars across the continental. Us which Does a good job at mapping precipitation around the the continental us but those errors certainly have uncertainties. Because we're taking physical electro-magnetic signals. That are coming back from the clouds and turning those into an estimate of precipitation and there's error involved in that But of course outside the US you know most countries do not have a nice network of radars as we do and you know you start to go to places like South America Africa. These are places where there's very few radar stations. These are places also where a lot of precipitation falls that are important for understanding the climate system. But also you know. Local people in those areas are susceptible to hazards like landslides flooding and drought. And so it's really important as meteorologist to be able to measure Those large time space scales. What these big drivers are for those hazards and You know we've done projects in other countries to try to help countries improve their precipitation capabilities but ultimately satellites play a big role in that because there continuously viewing these areas all over the world so even though these projects are somewhat expensive they do provide critical information that impacts the global economy through things like agriculture and so forth. And I wanted you to spend a little time and you you answer that question beautifully because I mean weather geeks listeners a span. The rain from people like us to people just casually like the weather that may not fully understand the complexity of the research and Development Enterprise. The network of observations both satellite ground based Airborne and excetera. They all play a role in our understanding. Men In some cases also improving our forecast and prediction capability as well so. I'm glad that you went there. I WanNa talk about some of your more specific research now. I know what the A G you meeting in twenty nineteen. You talked about the importance of observing what we in the Meteorological Community Call Mc S.'s. So I talk about what an MCSE is and then what some of your research has shown regarding MCS is and then we can also transition to a discussion of The field campaign that you were. Rpi On call the remote-sensing of electrification lightning and Miss Gayle. Microscope processes with adaptive ground observations. I hope wherever produces nail that but we call it relaunched ago or hope. I'm saying that correctly but let's start off with a one on. Mcs In the transition to the broader. Rolando mission yes. Yes so we'll get to go on a second you nailed the pronunciation. Great the the basic idea about Mcs Is and why they're important is that you know we all know about you know we've experienced afternoon thunderstorms and your listeners. In the southeast you know that you can almost set your watch Sometimes in the summer to those individual What we sometimes call air mass thunderstorms or or pulse. Thunderstorms that develop in the afternoon. They grow and they go through their life cycle and die out by the time. The Sun goes down And you know those are those are what we call. The individual came in a Cumulus. Clouds that produce. You know lightning and heavy rain sometimes. But they're not particularly hazardous but thunderstorms can become more organized. And one of the most hazardous Organiz forms of thunderstorms. They're called super cells and they they tend to produce the majority of tornadoes in the Great Plains and also in the plains of South America These are storms that are very hazardous because they produce tornadoes heavy rain and hail often strong winds. But another type of organized. Thunderstorm is called as scale convective system. Some people call these systems squall lines depending on what they look like. These are storms are organized in different way rather than a super cells which are organized by these very strong rotating updrafts. Mci organized by other factors like for example a cold front or what? We call a cold pool which is not like your backyard pool in the spring. It's it's a cold pool of air. That spreads out from underneath the storm caused by evaporation of of Raindrops. And so typically these storms can can grow quite large. I mean they can exceed sixty to seventy miles in dimension. Some of them in South America get to be up two thousand miles in dimension. These are storms that that cover very very large areas They produce very very heavy precipitation and they can be very important in terms of driving. How much rainfall falls in a given region? Now if for those of us that live in the corn belt We know that these that form in some ways on the rockies and move across the Great Plains sometimes in the middle of the night produce a lot of rainfall sometimes one to two inches of rain in a given storm and these storms are really our primary source of summertime rainfall and they can also produce hazards. Sometimes they do produce tornadoes on their leading edge and this is something that is generally poorly forecasted and poorly understood in terms of why that happens but also they can produce very very strong winds. You may have heard of the term bow echo are ratio these are MCS produced strong wind. Storms that can affect a lot of places during the warm season and so these storms are very important to study because it turns out that are numerical forecast models that we run Do a very poor job. Typically at representing when these storms grow and decay and their possibilities for producing severe weather. So it's really a ripe area for study because They're so impactful in many parts of the world and yet we really struggled to forecast where they're going to track how big they're going to be. How much rain. They're going to produce and their severity so so. Mcs Is a really important from a forecasting perspective. You know they don't produce the big F five tornadoes that we see in Oklahoma but they do produce a lot of damage if you look at the total amount of damage thunderstorms produce in the US. Yeah I WANNA again. That was just a perfect geek out. It was a mess. Get hold one. Oh One right there from Professor Steve Nesbitt because MCS is are significant weather makers Particularly the United States but even around the world is. We've we've heard I also love that you mentioned Boaco H. O. In there because you know it's interesting radio terms There was a fair fairly significant significant. One I guess several years back that impacted Washington DC and all of a sudden people knew the term derived show and the thought it was one of these new terms like polar vortex or Bomba. But certainly as you and I know that term has been around and in the literature for many decades in in fact but it just When people are aware of these new terms I think it helps to helps folks like us to educate on what they are because certainly was not a new meteorological feature all of a sudden but I mentioned the importance of MCS is and Convective processes not only here but around the world. I mean you've been involved in two. Recent Project Romper go project and also I guess the CACTI project which is the clouds aerosols and complex terrain interactions. Tell us about first of all before we get there. Just tell why you enjoy or why you feel. Feel campaigns are important because you have done twenty feel campaigns on five continents. Why is that important and tell us about those two projects? Yes I mean. Feel campaigns are how I got started in meteorology basically in terms of getting my hands dirty and research. I think more than any part of our field there. Feel campaigns are important. Not only just because of the data that we collect and analyse but also about getting students passionate about our field. I mean. I can't emphasize that enough. How important I think it is for many students to be able to have the hands on experience of getting out there. Seeing the weather evolve there is and then applying the technology that we have whether it be radars or models or satellite data to really quantify. What's going on I? I think throughout my experience with a lot of the field campaigns that I've been on Being a student and a post doc and and now being a professor is is really seeing that inspiration that can really lead to future careers and and making sure as many students as we have across all backgrounds. Get out an experience that I think is really important. And that I think was a big motivation for Ramp ago because it offered the opportunity. Not only to get Students from the US to place in the world where we know very little about the meteorology but also to integrate those students with their counterparts from Latin America who obviously don't have the opportunities to be able to get their teeth wet with all the technology that we have here but are just as enthusiastic and share their own experiences about How they got involved in the field of atmospheric sciences meteorology and and really develop international collaborations As a result. You know our our capacity to to really improve. Our predictions of weather really relies on having a strong team of divers participants across all countries. And we're very international field and making that we're all kind of monitoring and learning from each other and making sure we can share our findings across national borders because it's a really truly international science. The global global climate systems relies on us. Having participants from every corner making Making our field better so so long ago really started back in twenty twelve when I was involved in another field campaign in Brazil called Shuba. This is a project to study that was funded by the Brazilian government to to look at MCS in southern Brazil and they're severe weather impacts and we had scientists there from Brazil and Argentina and the US and we really started the discussions. They're getting this big project started That involved the US and a really significant way and so at that point. You know we really Got are kind of the drumbeat going for this project. I was fortunate to have a sabbatical in twenty fifteen where we decided to my family. And I my my two kids at the time and my wife moved to Buenos Aires In Argentina to work directly with the National Weather Service. And My colleague. Polisario who's a professor at the University of Minnesota's who studies and We really flushed out a lot of the local participation in the campaign It was a lot of work you know learning Spanish To be able to communicate with folks and also getting all the logistics setup. Because anytime you try to take two countries and interface them at a high level. There's always lots of logistical issues. You have to deal with you know. We can't just walk in to Argentina with a doppler on wheels radar and expect to drive it off of the boat and take it out to a tornado. We can't do those kinds of things so there's a lot of logistics involved and it took several years But really the driver was making sure that we could get this project Done logistically but also make sure it was going to benefit the global scientific community. So fortunately I was able to draft a great team of scientists across disciplines. Here in the US everything from severe weather folks like Karen. Kosiba who I think you've interviewed or Kristen. Rasmussen from CSU rush Schumacher from CSU. Adam viable from Pacific Northwest National. Labs Josh Werman. Who's a famous tornado? Chaser All the way to hydrologist like francine domingos is another faculty member here. Illinois that studies how groundwater influences precipitation and so we had a really broad set of objectives including studying lightning radar severe storms meteorology all these different aspects of of these high impact storms and we were able to pull it off so it was. It was a great project and we really appreciate the support of the National Science Foundation and NASA Noah and getting this accomplished young that we also bring in the Department of Energy to fund the CACTI campaign that you mentioned This this project had a little bit different. Motivation and D. Is really interested in studying the improving of the Inter Inter workings of climate models so So we were able to get them to deploy a Complete Cloud Aerosol Observatory in central Argentina for nine months and we collected this data set of Clouds Aerosol interactions and thunderstorms that will be analyzed for a long time and we are back on the weather geeks. Podcast and I'm enjoying this conversation with Professor Stephen Nesbitt from the University of Illinois and WanNa send a shout out to all the students and faculty and staff at the University of Illinois at a great visit their Several years ago it was able to deliver a lecture invited lecture there so I enjoyed my time there. Visiting with the Department Steve. You're a what I consider one of the top radar meteorology experts out there right now so. I want to pick your brain now. We had sort of in the late eighties. During my time as a graduate student we saw the upgrade to the doppler radars here in the national of the operational system more recently. I guess in the last decade or so. We've had the upgrade to dual polarization radar which allows us to see things like the debris ball associated with a tornado through something holiday correlation coefficient. Or we can see different types of precipitation whether it's hail or rain drops snow flake because dual polarization. Radar allows us to sort of see different if you will harland vertical orientations of the polarized wave. If you will and we can do some nice processing and it tells us a lot about what's going on what do you see is the next advance in operational radar meteorology? Yeah so that's a great question. I guess there are multiple avenues that we can take in this in this direction and really the first Direction is really. You know right. Now we have a network of you know hundreds of radars across the US Fortunately Technology as you know is is making things a lot cheaper and one vision of expanding. Our detectability of severe weather is to perhaps deploy more radars. And we can you know with all the trade offs of Radar Engineering There are certain compromises you can make to design a system which is relatively inexpensive and could also provide a very high resolution and detailed measurements with a network of maybe hundreds of radars across the country. And there was a recent project called the CASA project. I don't know if you've heard of Marshall. But it was essentially deploy lots of expand these small radars that are relatively inexpensive across the country and they did a pilot project and Oklahoma and also in Puerto Rico and they were able to show that they were able to detect a lot of fine scale structures within storms Matt Precipitation. Very in a very detailed way and be able to Kinda complement the existing network and getting coverage very close to the ground. You know so for example radar meteorologists. You know we have to live with the fact that the earth is round and when we shoot a radar beam. It doesn't stay close to the ground very long curvature by the way by the way before you keep going. I just want to interject that radar. Meteorology is one of very recent that we know the earth is round the not keep going. Yeah that's true. It's a proof of concept every day. So yeah so. These beams are not staying close to the ground so the more radars we put out there. We can actually get those low level. Circulations that can help us. Perhaps detect Tornadoes has their their current occurring The other thing which. I don't know if you've discussed on. This show is as a technology. That's currently in development called a phased array radar. No we talked about this. I'm glad you're OK. Yes so this is a new technology. That's being developed Kind of In partnership between you know Department of Defense Type Research and partners like the University of Oklahoma Colorado State and Stony Brook University in New York. They have these systems and University of Massachusetts but what these are essentially new types of radar. Antennas that can scan an entire volume of the atmosphere Maybe one hundred times faster and instead of having to wait for a radar dish to spin scan the atmosphere over a period of minutes. These are systems that can really Can Scan an entire side of a of a volume of a storm and maybe a minute and so one thing that we struggle with observations as always trying to get the time of our observations to be faster so that we can understand how these fast processes at operating clouds like updrafts and down drafts and the formation of rotation within nascent tornado. Circulations is really happening on short timescales. And what can be really revolutionary about? This sort of system is that we can get updates every minute or less on these types of circulations so that we can increase the time of our warnings even longer perhaps than We have in the past and also just provider models a lot more information looking at the evolution of the storms as they're going around the country so this is another very exciting technology. It's also very expensive. Unfortunately so at this stage these are just prototypes. But maybe by the time that you know. We're getting ready to hit the the golf course here in Twenty Years Marshall We look at this as more of an operational technology. But there's a lot of very exciting research in this area going on and I should mention that we haven't really talked adept about phased array radar. So thank you for that description but I do recall that Jim Breitenstein who is the current head of NASA? The NASA administrator was on the show and he did mention that he thought phased array was a promising technology and now he's a former former navy pilot and so he has some experience with phased array radars. Not necessarily for meteorological applications I had also mentioned recently in my measure scale class at the University of Georgia about profiler systems which we do currently that you do currently exist. We give us information on wind profiles They're basically these sort of I- crate me from wrong. Steve Art they kind of a phased array system in themselves. But they're just sitting there pointing up and giving us information on sort of using brag and other types of scattering giving us information on wins. Yeah exactly so it uses a little bit. Different principle. It's kind of a really neat to physical kind of Process that happens in the atmosphere To to be able to track Basically energy coming back from small little Turbulence in the atmosphere That causes variations. And what we call the refraction index which is how light is going through a particular medium and in this case small. Little turbulent eddies in the atmosphere moving with the wind and we use a radar system like a profiler to be able to detect those variations and we can calculate essentially the vertical wind profile without having to send up weather balloon which is really obviously very powerful thing to be able to do so. Yeah we have one of these systems here at the University of Illinois and we're planning to use it in upcoming field campaign to study. Mcse's here on the planes and looking at the win win flows out in front of those systems and to look at how they might be producing severe weather so so it's a very important technology. Maybe underused I would say in our field. There's a long story about that but it's a very interesting technology that I think we could use more in our final question here with Professor Steve Nesbitt From University of Illinois. Just GonNa give you sort of an open Mike here anything. You want to just sort of leave the weather listeners. With and GEEKS listeners with in terms of where you see the field of meteorology heading or any advice for students or those interested in our field just kind of a parting shot from you. Yeah Yeah so really appreciate the opportunity to to say a little about the importance of of data science. I think in our field and this is something that is becoming more and more accessible with you know developments in computer software and so forth. So you know traditionally we as you know. Marsha we are students have to take a lot of courses in math and physics chemistry. They get very involved in a lot of heavy duty math And that is really important for understanding the dynamics or the essentially the you know how our atmosphere changes on whether climate timescales but as we developed more observing systems like I've just been talking about More models more runs of models at higher resolution more frequently more models being run We're just hit with this fire. Hose of data and You know you can kind of see the scaling past the point where we're able to as humans really analyze all this data. Coming at us from satellites remodels from radars from observations of other types. And so we need people that are you know not only interested in meteorology but also interested in taking all this data and be able to integrate it for forecasters and other forecast techniques like artificial intelligence to be able to really take the information that we have and make people be able to use it in a way to for example warn the public or make economic decisions and so forth so really. I see for Future Students. You know having that dual expertise of meteorology and be able to deal with data and data science as really being a an important thing for the future. So not only. Do students have to be able to do their math? And Science but also those computer skills are becoming more important than ever. Yeah I second that motion if you will. Because I'm seeing that quite a bit as well. Steve. Thank you so much for joining us before we get out of here though. It's that time of the podcast. It's time for our Geek of the week. We like to highlight his scientists superstar. Great geologist or a weather weenie. At the end of every podcast. This episodes Geek of the week is Patrick Duran. Patrick is an atmospheric scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville Alabama. He decided when he was twelve years old that he wanted to study hurricanes for a living and he has never stopped since he loves. Cool Chris Fall weather which is sometimes hard to find an Alabama. If you or someone else. You know should be deserving candidate for the Geek of the Week. Check out our social media pages on twitter and facebook Steve. Thank you again for joining us on the weather. Geeks podcast thank you. I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd. Thank you all for listening. We love it when you join us. Some Geek out. I'll see you next time on. The weather gets podcast in. Yeah.

Steve Us University of Illinois NASA Dr Marshall Shepherd professor Thunderstorm Steve Nesbitt Professor Stephen Nesbitt New York National Weather Service Brazil Argentina Illinois National Weather Service Offic Journal of Applied Meteorology South America Utah Oklahoma Great Plains
231 - 7 Strategies to Maximize a Break Without Losing Focus

The Savvy Psychologist's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Mental Health

11:52 min | 1 year ago

231 - 7 Strategies to Maximize a Break Without Losing Focus

"Welcome back. It's savvy psychologist, I'm Dr Ellen Hendrickson. And as always I'll healthy meat. Life's challenges with evidence based research a sympathetic ear and zero judgment. Everybody needs a break and two great inventions that speak to that need are the weekend. And the vacation both of which have distinct beginning and end but break in the middle of the workday is a more elusive challenge because deadlines demanding bosses guilt and sheer workload often make us power through we eat lunch while catching up on Email and consider a walk to the bathroom a luxury on the other hand, even if we value and prioritize breaks, sometimes they go off the rails unintentionally shape, shifting into a momentum killing two our rabbit hole of online shopping one more round of snake versus block or BuzzFeed quizzes anyone for a round of we can guess your color based on the trip. If you plan to Michigan anyone either way stopping to stare out the window or wander the halls at work may seem lazy guilty do seen willpower taxing or logistically impossible, however done right breaks can boost focus. Recharge your batteries and make you more productive. Not to mention happier. So should be meditate knockout, some burpee watch the latest SNL cold open stare out the window pester Q mate, or none of the above. How to do it? Right. Well, this week here are seven ways to make those few minutes really count. Tip number one is the basics any break is better than no break. So for anyone who so over scheduled that lunch consists of wolfing down a protein bar in a bathroom stall. Let's make it clear that taking a brake any brake is better than power in through a study in applied cognitive psychology. Ran a head to head comparison of five different kinds of breaks. Everyone was asked to focus on a task that required sustained attention for forty five minutes and in the middle. Participants took a five minute break to play on their phone. Sit in silence, listen to a cold place on watch a cold play video because apparently even researchers crush on Chris Martin or choose between the song and the video and compared to the group that took no break at all performance was better in every single one of the break conditions, and this makes sense after all hell, much productivity. You realist get out of that fifth straight. Our of studying. For your calculus exam taking a break. Whether it's quiet or loud, mindless remindful is better than nothing tip number to make your break different than your work. Everyone has that coworker. Who's Cologne makes your eyes water? But even though you can smell the drac hard war before he enters a conference room. He has no idea. Why? Well, it's a trick of the brain called habituation just like folks who live next two busy streets. Stop hearing the traffic or you tune now notifications because your phone pins all day long. We all tend to screen out sustained stimuli, and researchers from the university of Illinois hypothesize that even when we're actively attending to stimuli like a work project or other tasks they dub cognitive goals, we still habituate as time goes by making task unrelated thoughts, aka distractions more active, therefore, the researchers proposed that quote deactivating cognitive goal. In other words. Taking a break can keep habituation from occurring. And after the break the goal can be reactivated therefore for your break. Do something one hundred eighty degrees different than what you were doing. So for those of us who stare at a screen all day that rules out taking a break by staring at your phone. So instead doing something physical like a few jumping jacks going for a walk to pick up lunch at the type place down the street or strolling across the building to rehash the bachelor with jasmine from HR will benefit you more than playing love balls on your phone, again, love balls is better than no break at all tip number three counter-intuitively take breaks that keep you in work mindset. Okay. So we've talked about productive procrastination on the podcast before like unloading the dishwasher getting your insta- cart shopping done or catching up on that nonfiction book. You've been meaning to read it feels like you're getting something done, even if it's not the big thing with the looming deadline that you're. Supposed to be working on now productive procrastination may be full of pitfalls. But the very same types of tasks productive, but easy like sorted in the mail or searching online for plane tickets can be perfect for taking a break productive tasks that don't require much brainpower, but still provide contrast to your work can downshift your ears without taking you out of a work mindset. Now back in tip. Number two. We talked about making your break contrast with your work, but an activity that contrast with your work ethic, virtually guarantees, you'll still be watching honest trailers on YouTube Forty-five minutes later, therefore test outbreaks that don't break your productivity momentum walk across the hall to chat with your co worker about a project, reschedule your dentist appointment, or if you work from home throw a load of laundry into the machine. Annalong gourmet cookware can bring your inspiration to life on the dinner table. Whether you're gourmet cook or bake off or the Baker. They've got you covered. With everything from expertly crafted cookware, bakeware, cast-iron stoneware cutlery, tools and gadgets, you might try the analog advanced collection. It's twice as hard as stainless steel and with nonstick surfaces. It is easy to clean or you could try out the new Ville, copper looks collection with a copper base that looks beautiful and functions perfectly whatever collection you choose you can rest easy. Knowing your gourmet cookware will last for years to come all analog products are protected with a lifetime warranty. So I use analog cookware every day it heats quickly and evenly never sticks. And cleanup is shockingly easy. It's perfect for everything from quick scrambled eggs to homemade stock that simmers for a couple of days. So shop an-and at Macy's in store or it. Macys dot com. That's A N O L O N an-and designed. For creativity in the kitchen. Today's episode is sponsored by blinking the only app that condenses thousands of nonfiction books into the best key takeaways and need to know information. So you can read or listen to them in just fifteen minutes, the library is massive and constantly growing with titles, including self help business, health and history and titles. I'm excited to read like start with why by Simon cynic plus classics like how to stop worrying and start living by Dale Carnegie blankets, makes it easy to get. The key essentials from a book during a short commute a workout for while cooking or cleaning. So join the eight million people who are using it right now. And for a limited time Lincoln has a special offer. Just for you. Go to blink dot com slash savvy to start your free seven-day trial. That's blinking B. L I N K. I S T Lincoln dot com slash savvy to start your seven day trial, blankets dot com slash savvy. So now tip number four take a micro break a break doesn't have to be elaborate or lengthy, especially if you're trying not to break momentum and under a minute, micro break might be just what you need and the bonus they can actually be effective. Researchers from the university of Melbourne asked participants to complete a tedious task that required close attention, specifically pressing a computer key when any numerical digit except three appeared on their computer screen in the middle of the task half. The participants were shown a picture of a building with a bare concrete roof for just forty seconds while the other half or shown a picture of flowering green roof for forty seconds. Now, those who saw the green roof made significantly fewer mistakes on their subsequent task providing shout for both micro breaks and for green city, Bruce. So even under a minute of staring out the window. It turns out can be good for your productivy. Vity? Tip number five trade the mid afternoon slump for a morning break. Now, most of us had for Starbucks or catch up on Colbert monologues during the three PM mid afternoon slump. But a study out of the journal of applied psychology found that a break in the morning was more productive. Why? Well, essentially by three PM, it's too late. You're already drained and are good only for brainless administrative tasks or cleaning out your Email inbox. But in the morning, you can still regain your nine AM levels of focus after a rejuvenating break. Many of us focus better in the morning. So extend your peak productivity by taking a break around ten or eleven. Tip number six. Don't break flow as great as breaks. Are you don't need to follow your pummeled awro timer? Slavishly? If your work seems to be doing itself, your ideas or flow in as fast as your adrenaline or if you're so absorbed you've lost track of time rock on don't take a break. Just because you think you should because the dirty secret about breaks is that it can be hard to get your Mojo back. So if you're happily chugging along there's no need to step on the breaks tip number seven. But when it's time to rest rest like you mean, it after your work is over rest like you mean, it if your workweek keeps you tethered to Email dare to leave it behind on the weekend, or at least until Sunday night, use evenings and weekends to put away your to do list do activities that take you out and away from work completely and see your friends and family. So here's another way to think about it be inspired by your cat or dog when they. Rest they rest full on. They don't check Twitter or think about Monday morning. They find a sunny spot and rest, like it's the only thing on the agenda because it is to wrap it all up rather than stressing over what kind of break to take or what interval to follow the twenty five minutes on five minutes off of the Pomodoro method. The fifty two on seventeen off the desk time method. Do what works for your style and circumstances. So in short go ahead and the kit Kat jingle to yourself as you take a walk around the block gush about the great British bake off with Allen from accounting. Stay productive by making a grocery list. Or of course, listen to play no matter what you do. You'll be glad you took a break. Thank you for making savvy psychologist part of your life. We are trying something new here at the show. And now you can call the savvy psychologist voicemail line at eight five seven five two nine five six five zero. You can request an episode topic leave a comment or just tell us why you love the show. So give us a call. I'd love to hear from you. And you could hear your voice on a future episode. That's eight five seven five two nine five six five zero sevi- psychologist is audio engineered by Steve Ricky Burg and a big welcome back to editor extraordinaire be out of San Torah as always sevi- psychologist is strictly for informational purposes and doesn't substitute for mental health care from licensed professional. Thank you so much for listening, and I will see you next week for a happier, healthier mind.

SNL health and history Dr Ellen Hendrickson Michigan Chris Martin university of Illinois YouTube Macy journal of applied psychology Starbucks university of Melbourne Annalong Dale Carnegie Twitter Steve Ricky Burg Allen Lincoln Simon cynic San Torah
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Today (August 7, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

59:03 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: RFD Today (August 7, 2019)

"Here it comes again. Lunch will be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs- freshly sliced smoked turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for medium save time order the new jamaican can jerk turkey some on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives to screening location anytime only plus tax prices may vary from the great here it comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse. Oh subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new jamaican make your turkey south on the firehouse subs up firehouse subs enjoy more substance save more lives to scream occasions anytime plus tax prices may vary from the greek sixty <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> <music> <music> nine eight seven six five <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> day to you welcome to to the wednesday edition of our f._d. Today i'm rita frazier here in studio v._r. Radio studios inside of illinois farm farm bureau building in bloomington. We will talk insects with university of illinois. Kelly estes <hes> kelly with the illinois passed survey survey she and the loss at a wonderful conversation <hes> just recently and they talked him out what her scouts are picking up that only does she have a team of scouts that's but she works with all of our grammy friends across the state <hes> to get the very latest from the fields here in illinois so we'll catch up with kelly tally will also be in studio with todd lowry with the illinois leadership. Foundation todd is a monthly guest but always talking about route one of their class members and this time joe camp agrivisor services. We'll talk about his experiences. In this current class of the illinois leadership foundation and we'll wrap up the hour an interview with tricia braid annoyed corn growers as she sits down with one of her corn leaders talking wing issues. That's all coming your way on this edition of our estee. Today here comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey subs at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new jamaican jerky self on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives to screening locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary delivery here comes again lunch lippi the same old same mold or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new jamaican jerk turkey subs at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning. Just five fifty five remedium save time order the new jamaican jerky sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs. I enjoy more subs. Save more lives to screening locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary for delivery meet ingrid fiery spirit carrying grandma pro trucker more than four million miles in mitral. If people knew what i know last could be stayed. I was driving us out of ohio when the gentleman stops suddenly in front of me but it takes my eighty thousand pound trucks two hundred yards to stop at giving myself extra room but it's not a chance chance for taking is how safety visit w._w._w. Dot sharetheroadsafely dot gov. It's where your home is built. Your your landscape is planted and your children play. Land is all around us so illinois farmers have dedicated years to learning how to best care for it. Today we're bridging in modern knowledge with resources for mother nature to promote natural soil activity and choosing crops that enhance soil health to learn more about conservation efforts visit hi al farmers could serve dot com preserving our water protecting our land providing our food. This message brought to you by illinois farm bureau farm weekend weekend farm week now dot com journalist daniel grant connects rural routes for you with more than two decades of reporting under his belt. Dan is the go-to source for farmers when it comes to commodities. Here's a bit about his rural roots. I grew up on a grain and livestock farm near roseville worn county. What i love about my job is working with people people traveling across illinois in visiting farms along the way be it routes or routes are f._d._a. Radio dot com and farm we keep you connected are your mandate is protected from the ravaging effects that stored grain insects whether buying or selling alling brain protect your prophets with solutions from central life sciences for pennies bushel grain protected such as diet j._r.'s ec insecticide or kinds you are plus laws can help maximize your profits from rescue treatments with the knockdown broad spectrum insecticides that long term control with an insect growth regulator. Keep your grains clean with. It's central life sciences. Learn more your local dealer or at bug free green stab. Tom welcome back joining us on the program. Now from over in champaign urbana <hes> is kelly estes and kelly is the state's pest survey coordinator so first of all kelly how are you thanks for doing miss again. I'm going well thank you. I guess my first question should just be about japanese beetle based on you know we had so much trouble last sure in such a wide space. What about this year at least reports so far you know that's a great question to start off with two and i've been getting those same reports of japanese beetles and there's obvious feeding around the state and we just finished up our statewide corn and soybean gene survey and the numbers aren't nearly as high as last year and not nearly as high as what i was expecting which was a surprise good in and of itself so we've made it through all of our samples and now we're in data entry in summary and analyze ation mode owed to see where those numbers are and where they compare with last year and then of course looking forward to twenty twenty where we see those numbers going knows oh you based on what we had last year and based on some of the weather conditions we had earlier in the year you could have expected the the conditions have been even worse this year instead of better not necessarily worse that we weren't exactly sure <hes> how things are going to play out <hes> we figure that or maybe assume that there would be some impact. We knew it wasn't going to wipe out japanese beetle populations <hes> but we were very interested because the numbers were so so high in both the western part of the state and increasing in the north west you know when the population's high in these still only have a small impact the numbers would still be there was our question and there are some maher but not nearly as many as what we expected why things side have no idea loves talking to about this but it was a couple of weeks ago and the thought was well if turns dry. We'll talk about insects of it stays moist. We'll talk about fungal diseases such and you know some people have not had much or any rain lean in you could say a couple of weeks and you could also say. Some people haven't measurable rain since june so so yes did. I assume that would be tough for our would be a bonus into to worry about insects. Yeah i know i had just seen the most recent drought map this morning on the news news and you have those pockets here in the east central part of the state and then over towards the west and i really thought about it until somebody mentioned it to me last weekend. We'll things are drying up in areas. Are you seeing spider mites and soybeans and like wow no we haven't but in some areas it could become a concern here coming weeks with things if we don't get some measurable rain so spider mites will be something to keep an eye out on out four. I should say souls instead of fungicide. I certainly seem plenty of planes around but <hes> making sure that insecticide is is part of where it needs to be enough us. You know i wouldn't take a look and those fields because there were not a lot of insects and soybeans when we were out here in the last two weeks <hes> yes japanese beetles were president. We saw some grasshoppers stink bugs here and there bean leaf beetles increasing in a few areas but when you look at <hes> the fields themselves there's some affiliation but we weren't in any field where defoliation asian was so high that i was concerned that there needed to be an insecticide treatment put on i will i will say this survey. I've survey surveyed the greatest range of soybeans in my life <laughter> we saw fields that were probably early v three v four over in ear koi livingston county and of course down in southern illinois double-cropped beans but <hes> things were just so very across the state with different developmental stages of corn and soybeans that it was an interesting <hes> to drive from sidon east to west and north to south and <hes> based on your stage of your means and what you're seeing. That's gonna be a bigger <hes> factor in whether or not you need insecticide treatment where there wasn't much to feed on in the first place <music> it could be. I i keep talking to <hes> all of my colleagues around here and it was it was a concern. I trying to hold off as long as we could to get this survey done to give some of these soybean fields a chance to develop a little bit more but in order to it'd be able compare these numbers from year to year. We have a window in which we need to survey because regardless if the crop is there. The insects have emerged. I you know we've tracked japanese emergency new route when beatles were out and so we needed to survey in order to be able to compare the information we get this year to the previous years that we've done this. We <hes> continue to do sweeps and <hes> just general observations nations in our <hes> trapping locations that we have for our invasive species surveys but overall even talking with joe spencer. He's seen a general will decline and his japanese beetles so we feel pretty good about our survey. At this point that we hit the most appropriate time <hes> and the insects should have been there they were going to be there will continue a conversation with kelly estes losses back in just a couple of minutes. Eh they look out in the fields of illinois also coming up on this program this hour. We'll talk to tom lowry with illinois leadership foundation as well as joe camp. Joe is one of their class members just getting back from a mid co meeting <hes> this weekend they are planning. It's not only some local trips with the ad leadership foundation but also a foreign trip will be going overseas with that entire class so much more to come. Stay tuned are your commodities protected from the ravaging effects of stored grain insects whether buying or selling grain protect your profits with solutions from central life sciences for pennies bushel grain protect fetches. Thank agr central easy insecticide or that kind you are plus can help maximize your profits from rescue treatments with the knockdown broad spectrum insecticides that long term control with an insect growth regulator. Keep your grains clean with central life sciences. Learn more at your the local dealer or at bug free greens dot com and our next segment today. We'll be brought to you by gromark. Grow mark and it's f. S. and grey remember cooperatives. This is our f._d. Today <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> here it comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican can jerk turkey subs at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast cradle sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey some on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives screening locations looney time only plus tax prices. May vary for delivery here comes again lunch. Will it be the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican making jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast creatively sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five for media nia save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs. Save more lives to screening locations limited time in plus. Tax prices may vary from the r._f._i._d. Radio networks to loss yonki connects rural routes for you to loss delivers essential farm and food related news to our listeners listeners. He's witty voice has been heard on the air for more than two decades. Here's a bit about his rural roots. Growing up on a farm prepared me for my career. I tried to know a little about a lot a lot of things and let the people. I interview the experts. I've always wanted to be on the radio. I'm just happy to do what i enjoy. Routes or routes are f._d. Radio farm week now dot dot com and farm. We keep you connected. What's the excitement about buying a brand new car when you pay full price for it county farm bureau members have a reason to be excited. A farm bureau membership gives you two car our purchase discounts when members by a new ford vehicle they receive five hundred dollars off their purchase and with purchase of qualifying. Lincoln vehicle received seven hundred fifty dollars. All everyone loves a good deal deal and the money save is worth the price of our annual membership. This is just one of our three hundred thousand plus discounts that are always changing fit. Our members needs not a farm bureau member visit illinois farm bureau online and join today. You're going to need me <music>. You're going to need us <music>. All of us going to need our technical. The skills are math or engineering skills. You're going to need our help with your water. Your ask your food. You're going to need our organizational skills. Our problem-solving skills going to need our determination our honesty our compassion. You're going to need the next generation of leaders to face the challenges. The future aubrey and we promise we'll be there today. Four h is growing the next generation of leaders support us at four great dot org. I was visiting my seventy five year old the other day when her phone rang hello it's you again. She seemed nervous nervous well. I don't think i need anymore life insurance. The caller was doing a great job keeping my thoughts on the line okay so you need my credit card number. My aunt went to get her purse so so. I decided that i would ask a few questions well. As soon as i introduce myself. The collar hung up the crime dog here. Recognizing the signs of fraud can be difficult for older people often. They're very trusting and considered impolite to hang up the national crime. Prevention council wants to educate senior so that these scams can be reported the local a law enforcement agencies financial fraud could include identity theft fake check in wire transfer scams investment credit card fraud and online charitable solicitations. Unfortunately only one in five of crimes reported to learn more go n._c._p._c. dot org forward slash seniors that n._c._p._c. dot org slash seniors a message from the national crime. I'm prevention council and the u._s. Department of justice is he is the hague survey coordinator university of elbowing <hes> can find her on twitter at i l. pest survey i was we're looking at bulletin recently <hes> and in particular i was looking at their twitter page. <hes> you can find that an i l. pest bulletin but they're not a a lot of posts about pests on bulletin so as big as this just say carefree by any means but there suddenly doesn't have to seem to be concerns cernan that there have been in recent years there hasn't been any large outbreaks that have <hes> caused <hes> <hes> us to write any bulletins or anything real noteworthy that are pressing issues that people are concerned about quite honestly i we had talk of japanese beetles early you know and that's about the biggest insect threat if you will i i had come across my desk this summer <hes> corner or beal numbers were low <hes> and there hasn't been anything that has <hes> snagged anyone's attention that they've called me. We haven't had any reports of western meats. Cut worm issues european corn borer armyworm. It's been very very quiet on the insect front so it's it's one thing to you said if you're sticky traps so then you don't see much on the traps cbs after a while when you're going around those rethinking well but but you would have like you mentioned calls like there weren't any anecdotes stories either so so that i wouldn't doubt those tramps or anything like that i mean if if people would have seen something they probably would have called you too. I it's not me i'm sure her they talked to dr and exciter and i haven't heard anything from him and he's been so great about relating information either to me or through the bulletin or other avenues and it and when we're out there in i'm not finding stuff. You do kinda wonder. Is it just that the location but then as we keep going throughout about the state and we're not finding it hardly anywhere then you feel pretty confident in what you're seeing and then maybe we hit a pocket. <hes> um for instance here in champaign county. There was a soybean fields like whole thank goodness. We found room beatles because i was concerned. We missed the window but they are out there and we did pick some up in very small numbers in different locations across illinois so so insects are there. I think we're just we're running. Below threshold in many areas visit speak will to see treatments or any the other kind of preventative work earlier in the year. Potentially i think <hes> the very wet spring probably also played apart in perfectly route numbers as well <hes> we had low populations coming in tonight twenty nineteen we have that the cold spell followed by very wet spring seed treatments. I think multiple factors worked with each other to keep those numbers. It certainly doesn't mean we can lull ourselves to sleep about to me either but <hes> i mean you could have worse problems to deal with at this point. They're that's exactly it <hes>. They're definitely not extinct. We're we're finding them and we do have lots lots of growers around the state that do choose to either non g._m._o. Or we're doing just a silent sectocide ride or we're not doing a phone set aside so <hes> different management strategies are gonna play a part in <hes> affecting the population moving forward as well. Do you have similar. You have colleagues whether that's purdue or mizzou or anywhere else kentucky. They are getting similar reports from neighboring states. I have not seen any reports. Come out yet. As far as i know we're the only stay in the midwest. That does a survey like this. I was state does do a bunch of route worm tracking and i know we have a bunch of <hes> agricultural protection companies here in illinois that are doing some different studies and looking at traps and things like that so i'm sure sure there's numbers will come out here in the next couple of weeks because most of those traps generally go through the beginning of august and <hes> those the will probably be winding up soon what about when it comes to a stored grain standpoint. You get involved with with anything thing like that. Because you certainly don't wanna get a docket the elevator when you you know when you finally deliver <hes> the the crowd that you've been storing for however long. I don't get into involved in that every once in a while. We'll get a request to identify some insects found in stored green <hes> but overall <hes> since it's not my expertise most people don't come to me for it. I'm not really sure they do go towards though so hopefully they don't find it very much but i didn't know that you're not putting sticky traps in grain elevators but the know how that sort of thing works. I don't what we do. Keep an eye out for different invasive. <hes> capri beetle is a big one that affects imports and exports and so <hes> there's there's different capra beatles surveys that are done either departments of egg or u._s._d._a. Across the midwest as well. You have anything in agronomy day. I will be there with summarise result and <hes> as much information as i can fit into that a lot of time over the current insect populations based on our summer surveys. All right sounds good kelly. Thanks so much for your time. Season no problem thank you thanks to loss and kelly and we'll be back with an in-studio conversation live and direct with todd lowrie and joe camp stay tuned <music> here. It comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican can jerk turkeys up at firehouse ups freshly sliced smoked turkey breast cradle sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium you save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey south on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs- saved more lives to screening locations anytime only income tax prices may vary for delivery. Let's say you just bought a house. Bad news is you're one step closer to becoming your parents. You'll probably know the long aw ask if anybody noticed you mow the lawn. Tell people to stay off the lawn. Compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complain about having to mow the lawn again. Good news is it's easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car insurance which of course we'll go right into the lawn progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurers insurers discount not available in all stages situations more farm news and information ahead stay tuned for more r._s._d. Today here on the illinois farm kiro radio network the food safety modernization act or fizz. Ma is your produce farm ready for safety inspection join illinois farm bureau and the f._d._a. For two free on-farm readiness demonstration field days don't miss this opportunity to walk away with the tools for successful inspection join us from nine a._m. To two thirty at be prairie earth parliament atlanta illinois on august twenty eighth or flam orchard and carbonell annoy on august twenty nine months will be provided seating is limited visit. I l f dot org slash slash on-farm ready to register today. The illinois economy runs on our homegrown. Agricultural products are dairy beef pork corn and soybeans. Whoa the agricultural cultural industry by nearly twenty billion dollars each year but we don't just grow illinois we grow north america canada mexico account for over forty five million dollars person who has agricultural exports and support more than one million american jobs exports to canada and mexico matter to everyone in the agricultural and food industries a message from l. annoy farmers and their checkoff programs does the warmer weather have you. It's a weekend getaway. Take your illinois farm bureau memberships savings with you. Farm farm bureau members can save up to twenty percent at choice hotels including favorites like comfort suites sleep in quality and suites with even more to choose from call eight hundred two five eight two eight four seven or visit the choice hotels website to search all the hotels at once and to make advance reservations contact your local local county farm bureau for your discount code number farm family food those three words best describe illinois farm bureau far for one hundred years ears farm bureau in illinois has represented and serve the men and women who make illinois one of the top food-producing states family at the heart of rural illinois our traditional arm arm families who work together through illinois farm bureau and food farm bureau families are proud to grow the healthy food they provide their families and yours farm family food the heart of farm bureau illinois. I'll lag all illinois off now. There are a lot of smartphone apps out there but do they have what's important into us here. In illinois farm league now app does and it's always at your fingertips all ag all illinois and twenty four seven where and when you need need it for free go to your app or play store on your smartphone. It's search type in farm week now. As one word and download it today brought to you by illinois literally farm bureau where we're all about farm family into warmer weather means a longer honeydew list your county farm bureau can help you stay on top of your project list and save view money along the way a farm bureau membership offer includes discounts on equipment and supplies from grainger plus free shipping on all standard grainger products browse thousands of items from landscaping equipment to power tools anything. You need to get the job done grainger. Has it not a farm bureau member. Call us at three. Oh nine five five seven two six eight nine or visit illinois farm bureau online and join today back on r._f._i._d. Today okay and we're gonna talk agriculture on the illinois leadership foundation with todd lowrie. Hi todd alot joe camp one of your star our students in the class right the current class for illinois leadership twenty but now that you've got me all thinking about what was on t._v. V right when we were growing up in the summertime now. This is summertime who had stuff to do otherwise but we were children. I don't know how old you are me. <hes> let's just say pushing fifty and we'll leave it at that. We'll leave it at that. We are in the same ballpark when it comes to summertime. What would you be doing today. When you were what eight <hes> probably grandma's house ac- see we have <hes> prices right would come on a half an hour that would be followed by young and the restless then then you'd have a the local news choline callahan markets and then you know then you go to as the world turns and then you know by then it snacktime this was all done this all ended though when the task started about three years later <hes> and then working on the grounds crew with the golf course in it so this was the high the high water mark for me at <hes> saint at moms. Are mama grandma's house name. When you got into your teen years you had to actually start working. I had to work although we still found time for lunch at the golf course where the t._v. We watch young and the restless cels joe. What do i don't know what you're talking about it. We've lost. He's so young and and all of that but what did you do. During the summer wrote a bicycle mostly korea. She did one house to another. You know grab the group of buddies and just kept going. You put the cards in the spokes to make it sound like a ma. Oh i had like the fiber of some sort. That's put so and you were in paxton. Excellent young joe camp riding a bike in paxton. Where where did you grow up urbana. Oh so you had a big city urban bounced back between her bannon and gibson city and elliott which is right by secure data pack <hes> yes one other question before we get to the real bulk of the show year but the ram tool <hes> base. You both grew up sort of riot pretty close. So when did they go. Tell me about it. Were you involved at all. My my grandfather was a painter on the base but he retired before it shut down. I believe <hes> but yeah that's that was a big deal. We'd always drive by it. They always had the the icbm missile on the west side of the gate and yeah we used to drive out because that's where we went and we would go up to elliot to see my grandma was on forty forty forty five forty five took it up and then you'd go up the blacktop. Do we blacktop blacktop. How about you. What's your base memories. Yash ashaninka air force base driving around with my dad just looking at the old <hes> military housing aircraft that used to be you know position position there and just generally speaking. There's a golf course right on the bulldogs wilpon and so is that what's going on there now. Do you know i have i've. I've lost touch. Maybe joe with no more but i don't know what's going on there. No i think they did take away a lot of the cool planes. They still have the air force museum. If i recall i visited that a couple of years ago and enjoyed it <hes> but you know it's just being redeveloped takes on huge employer. I know for that part of the state date you kind of mentioned it <hes> but for us <hes> agriculture's number one industry in the state <hes> and lucky for us we work in this industry and todd you get to work would the best of the best that's right. <hes> the best <hes> the best in their their their leader's future leaders of someone like joe as has has already been a very instrumental in agriculture. We've got a lot of our fellows <hes> that are in that position and they want to learn more. They went to expand their knowledge. They they want to expand their abilities and their leadership and management <hes> capabilities and that's what we're here for and and advocacy as well so <hes> you were very happy. We've reached the halfway point of our seminar. We ended with the gromark global challenges seminar last last <hes> last month and <hes> well round things off <hes> down in saint louis front of energy and ecosystem seminar the martin andreas energy ecosystem seminar and then we'll take a break for awhile tour up at kellogg kellogg in northwestern in november so it's been it's been a pretty active summer we we. We started in again in june and they're they're. They're pretty close together. Just the way the summer lays out and yeah what has been your highlights so far so far. I think a huge benefit of the program has been in and networking and you hear that going into it. Everybody says oh it's such a great networking opportunity and you're like oh okay okay. Well and it's so true. Not only the staff folks like todd leave the c._e._o. We talk about <hes> the alumni the different speakers that we have in for the programs that's so crucial but then maybe first and foremost just our classmates and these are folks from all over the industry and so just by getting to know others. You're you're getting to know other parts of the industry that you know i'm not totally familiar with here coming from risk management folks from seed fertilizer areas all all abound in the industry so it's a lot of fun just to network to talk with people and to share the experience and you see and hear this last month our guest i was joel johnson very similar to joe's <hes> situation young and energetic intelligent and the sky's the limit exactly and you know we've if we've got some younger members of our class <hes> but we've got some that are in their late forties so we do have a varying roy two generations if you look at it <hes> and i'd say the median average of our classes in the early thirties if i'm doing off the top of my head but <hes> it's this what joe mentions is so important and you see it evolve as the class gets to know each other some have known each other in circles before but you see that development you see things going on when we were down in saint louis. I think there's <hes> outside of the class an extra curricular activity. We're gonna do might involve a baseball <hes> but things like that so it's great to see the class develop not just professionally but also personally we'll talk more about the illinois <unk> leadership foundation what they're going to be doing here in the fall and then beyond when we come back. This is our f._d. Today here it comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican vacant jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey greece craig will be sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedial media save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey some on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs saved more lives to screening locations anytime and only plus tax prices may vary for delivery here. It comes again lunch olympia the same old same old. Are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new jamaican jerk turkey subs at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium remedium save time order the new jamaican jerky sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives to screening locations anytime the time only plus tax prices may vary for delivery farm week in farm week now dot com journalists dina stroz connects rule routes for you from the farm the bill to crop insurance g._m._o. Labeling her expertise is buried in the story she reports. Here's a bit about her rule routes. I get to meet interesting people oh and share their stories and i get paid to do it. I cover egg policy and really into keeping the farming community updated on these important issues route sword roots r._s._v. radio radio dot com and farm. We keep you connected if your in the mood for some sprucing up you're in luck from big to small or farm to front yard. Your komo farm bureau member discount from john deere is ready and waiting to help. It's easy to think green when it's the rewards loyalty program with savings on equipment special part omen workshop products whether your task zimbabwe mowing planting or cleaning you'll be set or whatever your work requires all you need to do is sign up. Have your membership number a handy and go to john deere dot com slash farm bureau a stick the numbers this hour we are lower cross the board corn soybeans and wheat at your nearby september corn this hour down three quarters for three and a quarter december down one and a half at four eleven march down to four twenty and may corn down one and a half at four twenty five august beans down two and a quarter eight forty five and a half september down to in the quarter a fifty fifty and three quarters in november down to eight sixty three and three quarters september week chicago down five and a quarter for seventy eight and and three quarters december down four and a half at four eighty three and a quarter and out tomorrow tour down four at four ninety two august meal down one ten to ninety four even and the august soybean oil up six were at twenty seven fifty four. Those are your numbers on the r._f._i._d. Radio radio network back in studio today with todd lowrie illinois leadership foundation joe camp agrivisor services in class member and you know we can't not talk about markets since we just gave them our kids geds and joe camp <hes> the one only is in the hot seat there so why are we trading trading lower on wednesday joe trading lower but not that much lower right uh i think a controlled move back and forth nothing really clear as far as a directional play from the bulls or the bears because everybody's just simply waiting for more guidance in that comes hopefully from monday's crop report that august till twelve report will give us an indication on a better indication we hope on acres and maybe some i look at the adjustments amounts to come for yield. <hes> we talk you know outside of the weather and the projected yields its trade and that is a daily battle. You got it yeah. That's it. I mean we are suffering from the trade war. There's no doubt about it. When you lose your top sway swayed being buyer in china. That's an issue we've also had sluggish demand for other products corn and we to there's an abundance of grain for the most part held around the world and we're competing with with with you know tough competitors todd you know we talk about the issues of the day when you get a group like this together. That's that's probably how you start. You know you talk about. What's going on in your industry. How do we work together. It's interesting that you mentioned that in our upcoming seminar. We're going to break aac down <hes> it is energy ecosystems but we've we've tried to do some things different with this this class even though we have a direct theme we've tried to break break it down away from the theme go towards more of leadership discussions <hes> one of the one of the things we're going to be doing in august is we're going to be <hes> having <hes> our fellows participate just with them <hes> on challenges in a certain segment <hes> of agriculture and a chance for them to hear air from their fellow classmates on the challenges what they're going through and have some interaction and and maybe some ideas from those outside of that specific sector of agriculture how they can work together and they can they can give them advice and help and bounce ideas off each other so that's one thing with the program this time around <hes> that we've that we've tweaked a little bit and i think the the fellows are really going to enjoy that that's gonna be happening <hes> coming up on august twenty first of the twenty third in doing that on the second day exciting t.j. Oh yeah there's i've really enjoyed <hes> the split between what we have in the way of technical presentations in real in depth complex classroom style learning and then personal presentations to hear from these leaders about their own experiences their journey to the to the place sir at now we'd take away tips you know from as far as being a better co worker to a better supervisor to <hes> you know this so much but the good split between between i think more technical and more personal has been really great and i'm excited for the opportunity to give back and are groups and tackle some of these issues like hud's preview and one of the things that i know a lot of people accord to when they're in your illinois at leadership foundation. Your class is the overseas visit what i know. It's like a big secret right. It is yeah it is not been really is not ready for primetime rita there to go but it will be very shortly within the next couple of weeks well. We're going to announce it to the class here in august okay so a couple of weeks at basically about two weeks from today. They'll know where they're going so so we can't talk about where you're going but joe. What are your thoughts on where you'd like to go almost anywhere. He's going into love antarctica greatest time of year. I don't know we we we you know. We feel like we were thinking. We knew it'd be one way and then we'd hear something else would be thinking it's another way and so we're just left uncertain but excited no more so good thing. They're not markets. They'd we all over the place three minutes remain. We went to go back to something that we do every time that you're on and that is okay. How how do you become the next joke camp. How how does a person listening out there become a part of your next class. Well you can always visit our website at egg leadership dot org. You'll see the linked to basically start the process of applying for our class of twenty twenty two sounds weird to say that yeah <hes> and <hes> i always give of <hes> a little bit of a heads up. It's it's not just filling out a one sheet form <hes> we have. There's a there's a process there and it can take time if you think you're going. I wanna do it in a couple of days before the deadline. You're going to be really help against it not saying it can't be done but you know this is not just about the applicant wanting to be in the program this. This is about a portion of it with your employer. They understand that you're going to be gone. Well you know joe is going to be gone for for almost two weeks here <hes> coming up in in february radio. That's exactly. We've got to make sure that that's okay what the employer also the spouse or significant other is involved as well so <hes> so all of these things have to come together and we encourage if you are interested in the program at least start the process at least gordon the website got <hes> click on the link for the application and at least look and see what you need to do <hes> to get your ducks in a row as far as getting that taken care of because we will be closing that off in february i believe and joe you remember filling out the application the whole process your employer. How did it go for you. It was a commitment the application itself and and just the general oh you know consideration of do i have you know the time the do i have the commitment and because it really is one to to go away away for two three days or for the longer trips ah but it's it's one that's worth it can say that well and the other thing. Is you know you no ultimately that you're going to be a better leader yes but a better employee and a better adviser for those farmers i think so todd mention mention both professional and personal growth opportunities and i can see you know dividends being paid already in the relationships. I have on both levels at work workin at home anything that we missed tied about the program what what's coming up that we should know about <hes> yes like i said our next seminar will be in the saint louis area and then <hes> we're very excited. <hes> about our continued <hes> relationship with northwestern university in the kellogg school <hes> so many it's our most popular seminar is coming up. <hes> it's gonna be right before thanksgiving this year and <hes> it's it's two you and a half days or i should say three days of just some of the best leadership training <hes> that that you'll find anywhere and we always have wonderful the feedback from our fellows when we complete that seminar and then it becomes a whirlwind after that because about two and a half weeks later we have another seminar we'll take a break january seminar february and then at the end of february the international and then graduation jo wake me walking. You'll be walking up to accept now. Go quick. I always say this and you said you folks in your late. Forties and you're cut off is forty nine forty nine. I you know we know that you know. I'm i'm fifty one. We talked about that but you know. Maybe there's some folks out there that you know could you could you push that age agent all. Have you ever been asked to do that not to my knowledge not to my knowledge. It's either that or the nursing home to now. I just i get ya yeah. No no i think like i said though it is really interesting though to see i mean we've literally got people in our class. That could be the apparent of some of the folks that are do but that's what makes it great because from different viewpoints it's a fantastic program and and the other thing here in just a lasting seconds is i know that there's a list out there but you're your who's who of pask afterwards is basically who runs illinois exactly guys. Thanks so much for joining us next time. We'll talk about what you watched in the night hiked evening. When you were ten years old we'll be back and tricia braid. We'll talk with elinor corn growers when we come back. <music> here comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican vacant jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey greece craig will be sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedial media save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey some on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs saved more lives to screening locations limited time and only plus tax prices may vary for delivery here. It comes again lunch olympia the same old same old. Are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with a new jamaican jerk turkey subs at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast crave ably sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty five remedium remedium save time order the new jamaican jerk turkey sub on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs saved more lives to screening locations limited time only plus tax prices may vary from the segment stock markets on the radio network. I'm dolores yongki tuesday. The packer day at fairview sale barn was sweet to a dollar lower steers in every choice to two floors from one fifteen and a half to one seventeen and a half i yielding lots what's someone eighteen to one nineteen and a quarter mix elected joyce from one ten to one thirteen and a half and selects from one hundred ten on down all scenes the top of ninety eighty three and a half top for slaughter cows was seventy four fifty illinois to write tog markets steadied two week on tuesday forty eight to fifty three three dollars. One hundred weight so market was also steady thirty to forty dollars hundred weight for lightweights and thirty four to forty six for heavyweights. I voice over the top up to thirty five and a lot of volatility and hog futures yesterday down close to the three dollar limit for the october. Contract is the r._f._i._d. Radio network having people benefit from raising livestock here in illinois risky bird eleanor farmer president the illinois farm bureau grownup on livestock farm was always interesting and i enjoy it more today than i did back then it did give me the opportunity to have a good work. Ethic learned to get up in the morning and you know that was difficult. During my senior days at high school oh and college stays heavy tendency not to go to bed respectable our but no it was always enjoyable farm and getting up before daybreak skin milk in the cows and get the chores done then go about the rest of the day's eleanor farm bureau with beef porn milk fourth and soybean association associations make us a livestock development group supporting the illinois livestock sector for more information check out illinois livestock dot dot o._r._g. We're back here on r._f._i._d. Today and we'll join tricia braid with this week's edition of the illinois corn growers report for illinois corn on the r._f._i._d. Radio network. I'm tricia braid talking today with someone new to the illinois corn staff colin waters is on board as the director of exports and logistics colin comes to us from montana. He's actually coming home to illinois so calm before we get into the topic of the day which will be trade with china and in all the difficulties were facing there. Tell us a little bit about you. What's your background so i grew up in henry county grew up in alpha illinois and basically spent the last fourteen years working in montana in the last five years. I was the executive director for the montana wheat and barley committee so got to know checkoff boards awards really well and when the opportunity came up to move back home and worked for the illinois coroner base had jumped at it so it's really exciting. It is exciting to have you on board. We have a partner in common between montana wheat and barley in illinois corn marketing board being the u._s. grains council so that's our major partner in export market development and what i kind of call customer relationship building with our expert customers so as we pivot that direction let's go. I hadn't talked about china. It's something that maybe we don't necessarily like talking about but it's the question that everybody is asking what is going on with the trade war with china. Oh that's a really good question to be honest. I think that we're on some level kind of a low point. Obviously you know in in the negotiations and maybe even just relations on a larger scale are experts really fell off from seventeen so in the years previous to two thousand seventeen. <hes> china was a huge huge customer of ours and basically in the last couple of years. We'll last year and a half. We've pretty much completely lost the market <hes> and most recent news is that <hes> it's it's kind of <music> a cake. I guess there's not much clarity there but <hes> the news is that of a complete <hes> <hes> stop to to imports from from the u._s._o. Even though we've we've already seen a really significant drop the last year and a half <hes> what what market we still have left is still significant and it'd be ashamed to actually lose all of that so so i'm hoping that we can get back to the negotiating table your soon <hes> and really hoping for a speedy successful resolution to the uh to the trade tensions so resuming prior trade balances would be a positive for sure for us here in illinois but the outlook for for potential trade with china. I mean it's a it's a great bright spot for us. As corn farmers ethanol producers and jeeze as china is looking for <hes> <hes> the opportunity to feed their own corn consumption habit specifically they have their own renewable fuel standard type initiative in place and so we know there's a home for our products addicts if we can just get them there right that's exactly right so i think that the long term there is a huge opportunity in china and that's maybe you you know kind of the the silver lining in this cloud is the <hes> when the <hes> negotiations the trade tensions wrap wrap-up. It should be a really really good fit for for u._s. Farmers and the chinese consumer whether it's in fuel fiber food <hes> <hes> everything that we produce there's a home in china. If we want to pivot right now to what we can take action on actually have an impact on as the trade negotiations with china ah really happening at the highest levels of government and there's not a great deal we can have here at the grassroots level except to say that it's important if we look at the u._s. m._c._a. Agreement however are we have members of congress home right now <hes> they're on their august recess were heading into <hes> the farm progress show the state fair where we're likely to run into some some of those elected representatives calling so white shit our message be to them at this time yeah well. I think that obviously the u._s. m._c._a. Deal is basically weekly. You know it's it's at the point now where we're congress has has input and it sounds like the negotiations between house democrats and the u._s. Are i'm going well so i think it's just a matter of encouraging everybody to get behind it. This is an improvement over nafta as important <hes> <hes> for for us to get this thing done and i think we really can't overstate the importance of the mexican market not u._s. Corn farmers is mark is so critical especially illinois and <hes> yeah we think we can make a difference in in in helping push for the ratification of the of new trade agreement and is we're looking at the domino's that we can kind of push into that that fall down mechanism them to keep things rolling here. Japan is right on the heels of u._s. m._c._a. We hope maybe even a trade deal light with japan abc and auto something like that <hes> yeah that's right and japan is another here comes again lunch lupi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with with the new jamaican jerk turkey sub at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast creatively sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty eighty five remedium save time or the new jamaican jerk turkey south on the firehouse subs app firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives to screening locations kitchens limited time only plus tax prices may vary the great here it comes again lunch lippi the same old same old or are you ready to take a vacation from the ordinary with the new jamaican jerk turkey up at firehouse subs freshly sliced smoked turkey breast credibly sweet mustard sauce and a hint of caribbean seasoning just five fifty fifty five for medium save time or the new jamaican jerk turkey south on the firehouse subs up firehouse subs enjoy more subs save more lives to screening locations anytime only plus tax prices may vary.

illinois firehouse subs illinois farm bureau lippi Joe illinois leadership foundation todd kelly estes todd lowrie tricia braid china tom lowry university of illinois midwest Farm farm bureau joe camp dot radio network eleanor farm bureau coordinator
Baseball Is Back, And The Woman Who Changed Illini Football

Reset with Jenn White

23:45 min | Last week

Baseball Is Back, And The Woman Who Changed Illini Football

"Hi, I'm Justin Kauffman and this is reset. There's a lot of sports news happening around. Chicago today in just a bit. We'll talk with Ashton Washington the first woman to be part of the football staff at the University of Illinois but I. It's opening day for Major League Baseball and it's the first time ever opening days and threatened by a snowstorm. But sunny skies aren't the only thing different about today's games. First thing you'll notice no crowds, and of course, the constant threat covid nineteen with us to talk about it all Cheryl Ray Stout wbz sports contributor, so you have seen these games in person. Yup, what is it like to be in the stadium when there's no crowd whatsoever? It is so Erie Justin. The stadiums feel like the darker, too because you. The people that stand you don't have that extra lighting. there's some noise pipe in. You could hear the chatter from the dugouts. You could hear the crack of the Bat. You could hear the ball admits. It's it's. It's very odd. The cubs been using the regular announcer regular organised. The white sox used recorded music and recorded or organise staff members during the PA. But it's very odd feeling and. The national anthems have been recorded. They have the seventh inning. Stretch is recorded, but the cubs gave us information just now that they will have somebody live during the national anthem. And they will have healthcare workers mayor lightfoot governor, Pritzker and Ryan San Antonio I. That's the only thing otherwise. It's very very weird. I would just assume just thinking about that. The players about the players did they talk about the factor playing in front of no crowd. Hartford some of them is that they don't have even their families their. Their whole lives, they've always been able to have their families especially. Opening Day you got the White Sox have cardboard cutouts in the stands. The trying to get the energy could be interesting, because energies usually given to the players through the fans, and that's what's going to be missing now. Well, let's talk about the cubs and the white sox. They open up tomorrow. One of the weird things about baseball right now. Is that many of the players? Are Showing up on injury lists without you know without an actual specified injury, and that's because of the way that they're classifying cove it, but when you just look at each team's roster, there seems to be you know. Players left and right that are recovering or in the midst of trying to get a a negative test. If you will 'cause, they've tested positive one point, but there are a lot of MLB players that won't be on the field for opening day. Yeah, and that's probably be the case all the way especially when they start traveling. With the white sox. We knew they had two players had tested positive. One of them was Johann mcada? A less the player. Allows the team to reveal their names? That illness cannot be given to us, so it wasn't so you're on. mcadoo came back. Did he personally tell us that he had it, so we can speculate, but until they specifically tell us we can't report it, so that's that's a. that's a problem that you know is going to be going on I think through the the sixty game season. When you see all the teams that have you know players on what they're calling. The KOVIN list right? The cubs escaped. and. I'm not sure what the update is, but they have been one of the teams that has been the healthiest when it comes to covid nineteen. What you. Said I believe when they knew their pitching coach Tommy. How to he had it? That scared the Bejesus out of these players, so they knew how series it was when you see it I. Think they'd have people when you see it. Hear it and you know somebody then all of a sudden. You realize this is real. This can happen to me because he was. He's a healthy guy. He he's now with the team. He's fine and same thing. I think that all the players know realize this is something that they have to do with they better be careful now the that said the players they. They're taking a lot of precautions where we go it the stadium I know they're doing even more so with the players. The thing is once. They get on those buses once again. Those planes once they go not rooms once they go into restaurants. What's going to happen when they're out of Chicago? And Cheryl the other thing too is we make a transition at actually talking about baseball, which is lovely, actually talk about baseball as opposed to playing baseball, but the, but there's GonNa be a change to the rosters to the they're gonNA flex, and that's going to have an effect on on players that are going to stay with the team or have to go back to one quote, unquote deminers, but this is different than an enormous season. Right what what the teams are doing? They have sixty players and today they had announced the rosters. We haven't got the white sox. We did get the cubs. What they have is they have thirty players that could be with the opening day for two weeks then after that it will be twenty players when they're on the road. They have a three player taxi squad. They could be with them the other players. Are Put into their their taxi squad. Of Facilities, the cubs will be South Bend. The white sox will be in Schaumburg at the BUBER stadium, so those players will be continually. Be Ready to go. In case there's an injury cases Cova into incident, so there will be played at. It could replace of no minors right. That's was miners. And the thing is with those players. Vital more pictures. Because this is going to be interesting to see how pictures are going fair in this type of season, let's talk with the South side. There's been a lot about the rebuilding of this team. But WHOA did they put on a display against the cubs over the weekend and I think every white sox fan, and maybe even some cubs fans we're. We're talking about drinking the KOOL aid when it comes to what we can expect from the Chicago White Sox in the trunk aided season, I think the fact that the cubs former prospect white sox possible star Aloi menace. Hit the Grand Slam. But they have Louisa. Robert is considered a rookie of the year candidate in center field. You'RE GONNA love the way he plays. He's got a lot of power. He really covers centerfield well. They have a lot of young players. You've got Tim Anderson just keeps getting better and better you on Mocatta. He has a MVP potential. You have the veteran. Jose Abreu, but I think when they added the different free agents when the added does Kyko and And the big one was yeahs Mardi. Growl with added him an all star Catcher with all star Catcher James McCann. You set yourself up real well, and you look Lido. Really you know. He's come into his own, so there's a lot of good things they can put it together, or you know what they could struggle. We don't know they. They definitely rebuild their into the next stent. Real Quick Nick Magical, so you're gonNA make the team. I don't know you know what that could be the cost you know. It's service time issue with him. And that's that's the problem. They could put him down for a couple of days into Texas. bring them up and then they get another year out of him. I. Don't even talk about that as a fan that. Annoys me the way they do that. Because we would like to see the first round and the former first rounder playing baseball for the white sox on on the north side, the team looks very similar a a new manager of course in Rossi but but what are the issues with the with the cubs? Because I I couldn't even tell you besides Kimbrel. WHO's closing? What's going on with that bullpen? It's totally revamped bullpen. Really when you look at it, so you know th the here's the thing though. When they lost Jose Catanha to that thumb injury that put their starting certain rotation into a tizzy. Kyle Hendricks will open tomorrow than they have darvish than they have. Tyler TAT would would be third or fourth guy will be John Lester. And, so that's interesting that he's. He's in this spot. At Alec, Mills will be your fifth starter. It's GonNa. Be Interesting to see how David Ross has to maneuver this. Because remember just they've changed the rules. Each pitcher has to face three minimum batters. So you can't go for righty lefty type? Time right now to make that change of course, because you're going to need as much flexibility as possible especially when it comes to Cova and things like that, but the good thing is with the D. H. it allows the managers Nafta. About you know putting in a player for a pitcher for banning, so they kind of help that situation somewhat. But the crazy rule which I think is bizarre is if it goes into extra innings the tenth inning. The team is at bat has a runner at second base to start the inning yeah. There's going to be so many changes. It's overwhelming in a way because that would have been awesome in April in a normal year, but this is not a normal year. My final wrap question for the cubs. They still have Kris Bryant Anthony Rizzo Wilson Control Hobby bias and they have a core. That have won a world series and it's really i. find it hard to sleep on the cubs. Yeah and I think the fact that second base you've got a veteran. Jason Kipness, but Jessica they did keep Nico Horner. Second base and I think he's going to be something Special Wilson cutrier's. He's been hitting the ball really well. Summer camp is long as he can catch to the potentially could, but victor cared. Teeny may be one of one of those plays you look at going. You could catch, but he also could go on. If I d H. The H. is going to help. The cubs Ward. They're going to have a rotating players. Would job added did with this team Two years is the players that he had a lot of these are also players. They didn't play just one position at the time, and so they have the capability to move around, and that's a good thing for this team right now and for David David. Rawson familiar with these players. He knows what they can do, and you have veteran leadership Anthony Rizzo. Coming back, you know. When he came back the other night for the first time he had a demand hit a home run his first at Bat. You knew that that meant a lot to this team. Because he's not just a leader on the field is a leader in the clubhouse. He's very much respected, and that helps a team especially in the short season. It's interesting to see how this all works out. Well Cheryl. You heard it here. First a cross town world series is coming to Chicago right. Secret. Right much more sports that are happening and we can't get to it today, but we'll talk about the sky, the blackhawks, and and some other sports getting back online next week. WBZ sports attribute of showery race doubt on opening day for Major League Baseball Cheryl. Thanks for joining US you're welcome. Other sports continue to wrestle with the pandemic. There might not be a college football season. The start date has been pushed back and mostly division. One schools have committed to playing in conference, only limiting travel beyond Cova, though there's continuing tension between the schools and the athletes when it comes to racial equality, diversity and inclusion or issues that many coaching staffs are confronting, but at the. The University of Illinois. That's not an issue coach. Lovey Smith is celebrated for having one of the most diverse staffs in the country, and that includes his latest higher Ashton Washington Ashen becomes the first black woman to be part of the football program in the you've of is one hundred thirty year. History Washington is the director of relations for Illinois football and she joins us now. While come to reset, hello, hello, how are you? I'm good. Thanks for joining us and congratulations on the role. Tell us more about it. New Director of High School, Relations. Yes so it's pretty much what says there title The key part of my job. Our high school coaches across the state and outside of the state, so the highest will coaches are accused me going. Assumed that has a lot to do with recruiting and and having conversations about trying to get some of those athletes to come to come to campus in Champaign Urbana. Yes look getting. One of the most beautiful campus in the nation I. Look I I gotTa bring them in. What was your initial reaction to being brought in? Tell us how this all came. About about you being hired three part of coach Lovey Smith Staff. I'd say it all goes back to coach price. Coach Joe Price he's meant a mentor for me. He's not UTSA, but he was actually in this position before me, and it was just you know building that relationship with him, and then somehow you bet relationship turned into a job opportunity at it was necessarily like hey, coach price. I need a job I need help. It was just like coach price I just WanNa, learn from you and this is when he was down in Texas coach at high school football. And then from there, you know got in contact with director of recruiting, which is still with US Patrick Emerson, and then from there goes down list. One Zoom call with the legendary coach Lovey. Smith! And I look I guess I did a good impression on him. Because here we are now amazing story for you just to be involved with football, and in Texas at the high school level. That's a that's gotta be a dream. Come true for anyone who who loves football this fall with it, but for you. Where does the passion come from when it comes to the sport? Oh I got always say within, but most importantly just family only girl, so I don't have any I have no close say, girl cousins. All my cousins are pretty much all guys. They're older and younger and then my brother. Look. It's a little big ten robbery. In the house, I just dropped him off at Penn state two weeks ago, so we got that going on, but Then and then family. Did. You know that coming in. was that something that was on your mind when you got the opportunity to interview with the coach, Smith and to understand. How you'd be breaking barriers at at Champaign Urbana. Not, at all coach Smith. He never told me that I'd be making history. Never said it on the zoom call. He just told me about the job. The job description, and what does it take? Get Ashton Washington University Illinois and it went from there, so when that came out the night that it was public to everyone when our university dropped the news. I was like way Whoa okay you. 'cause me going in. I knew I wanted to be in college football. I got the job. You know what I mean like are never thought about making history and I just want to get to the job. Do the Best I can do and my bud for everyone around me. For you to to be a woman in the sports, and the. On staff. I would assume that you're always breaking barriers. There's not a lot of women that are part football programs. Throughout. The country so the idea of of starting a new job. You're always going to be confronted with that. I agree with you and look I'm hoping in the near future. You know it, it's not. Of Normal when a woman is hired right in football, position or anything like that I just want people to feel like. Oh, she was hired okay. Just keep it in the norm. Well. It sounds like that was the process and that was that was what happened with you with coach Lovey Smith I. I'm interested because the article came out. In the Tribune just a couple weeks ago about? As many universities around this country face the fact that they are not diverse when it comes to equity and inclusion, football staffs across the board. Don't reflect the student body. The athletes and they're primarily white. When you see the that coach, Lovey Smith is the outlier I mean coach Lovey Smith at one of the most diverse staffs in all of college football. What does that mean to you as somebody? WHO's joining the staff? That means a lot to make beautiful melting pot as call it and I think coach Smith he started something again like no other team. University has done so far he starting something news, and making that the new normal, making it diverse automate and I think with us in just being in the time that we are in now far as you know talking more about. About, race and being open about it I think this is a great step. Be a part of because with. It's kind of like. He sat down on I in a zoom call, but we were open to you. Know say was on our mind how he felt and no one was judging anyone in that moment and I think again it goes back to that. That beautiful melting pot where all coming in from different backgrounds, all different races shades of colors, and that's just what makes it even greater and especially when you know come into the coaching form of it, you're coaching players that are coming from all. Look all across the nation from different backgrounds. You know what I mean so I think again. It's just playing A. A part into the new normal making it happen. You know a lot of coaches. They talk about it. They don't make it happen. They're not about it right. It's all about actions and results in college football now I would imagine at the high school level and the State of Illinois, but also just around the country in your experiences in Texas. It was similar. Probably a lot of dudes and I would assume a lot of white guys right, but when when it comes to coaching in in Illinois and you have to find a way to relate to these coaches and to to make sure that the University of Illinois and the coaches in the state of Illinois are on the same page, or at least you know you can have good relationships with them. What do you have to do? What are you have to do to to reach across and develop a relationship with some of these coaches? Or One. You know with for me. It was coming from Texas. You know known in a state across across the from here to there known in different states across the nation, but not really much so in the state of Illinois so me, it's like a whole new brand revamp. I got. A, of course you know what I mean, Star from the bottom and meet people or meet these coaches and build up good relationships with them and show that I'm authentic I'm here. I'm excited for Illinois football. And if you're not excited about it, I hope you get contagious energy for me to be excited about it, and so it's a little, tricky or a little difficult because of the pandemic right, so zoom caused as in our like our coaches meetings. Things like that, but. I think it's not the same because you're not. You know actually shaking hands with the guy across the table I, the high school coach, Jan. You can't make recruit you can't. You can't make visits. You can't talk to people I mean that. That's got to change the way that relations with a high school bolted of the recruitment level, and just the relationships with the coaches work. But I'll say the positive out of his subtler causative would be shows you what we're capable of doing with technology. You know what I mean, so it caught up. Shows can do, and then we work with the negatives in the progress. The cons and we try to make it as best as we can. For you and we're talking with Ashen Washington. She's the first ever woman to be hired by the Illinois football. Program after one hundred thirty years of existence since giving some insight on what it's like to be a part of lovey. Smith staff, but also to be a trailblazer within the program. What's the goal are you are? Do you have aspirations larger aspirations to to continue in a career in football to to continue to be a you know, rise the ranks, and at some point you know, be in charge of recruiting or or even further be coaching on the field. Like I think will make a lot of people mad when I say this. But I haven't even thought liked past this job. Man Rights at all I have adopt tasks Illinois so ball so if I can be Illinois football for a while I think that'd be great. I hope everybody is ready to welcome with open. A keep me close knit into the family. But. Yeah I have adopted eight. I think why because I haven't even made up I'm still in Texas right now as we really. WanNa. Make a you know. Get my feet in the Illinois soil and get from start moving from there, but now honestly haven't passed the well. I WanNa give away your age, but three years old. Are you comfortable with the spotlight with the fact that articles are being written about you're on the radio. You're talking about different things about your life about being a part of the Illinois program, but it's always. It's a lot of spotlight because you are trailblazer. Yes Sir I agree with you and I think you know what plays a factor in this is not necessarily age. It goes back to what I said earlier. It's all about results. What can you bring to the table? How can you help University Illinois Football Program? You know what I mean. What can you do to help the coaches around you and the staff members around you player personnel on and on so I think that's my main goal. Right now is bringing results the table, and then of course revamped that brand in spreading the brand of myself, and then the legacy already at hand the University of Illinois. I Like I say nothing greater. That's good to hear and as an ally fan I like the talk that way, but do you have any advice to pass along to two young women or people have probably they might be interested in pursuing a career in sports like you are the fact of joining coaching staffs and starting to build a career at a young age. Why would be fine. Fine, which love. And when you're trying aside, passion and I, guess once to do five. It figure out if you can do that without the plate. And, if you can do that without getting paid, you found your passion, but if you're like I, don't think I can do that without getting paid I don't think might be your passion. Keep trying odd number. Two is going to be continue or build your in-person linked in I. Know a lot of us are linked in, and we're connecting social media, but like I said earlier again with the zoom calls and things like that. It's a little different when you start seeing people face to face. So continue to build a in person linked in a work at this time pandemic, because most people are on their laptops, so start reaching out start sending emails started trying to figure out how the set of those ten minute phone calls because all you need is ten minutes right. The last question for you is just you know we're not sure if there's going to be a college football season. Obviously, everything's being done virtually. There's a big story today just about what a what a difficult time it is for for. Because there's a lot of high hopes for for the program this year right now, all I can say is they are working their butts off six feet apart of course. Santa taste sanitation to at were all contested almost every other, not every other week, but every week like it's up there. We're like you know making it. You need to wear masks. You need to be Coronas, free corona safe, and if you're around, somebody has not taking the covert nineteen seriously you to get away from. Ashton Washington the new director, of high. School relations within the Illinois Football Program, the first ever black woman to work there in the hundred and thirty year history of the program Ashton a pleasure to meet you. Thanks for joining us and good luck this season. Thank you so much and I look I. Love How you said you're already. A Fan s talking. And today's reset for more great conversations with the people working to make Chicago a better place go to wbz dot org slash reset. I'm Justin Kauffman. Thanks for listening and we'll catch you right here tomorrow.

football cubs White Sox Lovey Smith University of Illinois baseball Illinois Chicago Cheryl Ray Stout Ashton Washington Texas Justin Kauffman Cova Erie Hartford University Illinois Football P Illinois football High School Director Illinois Football Program
Episode 254 - Best of the Midwest: Columbus & Chicago feat. Brett Payne and Bryan Quinby (10/15/18)

Chapo Trap House

1:42:09 hr | 1 year ago

Episode 254 - Best of the Midwest: Columbus & Chicago feat. Brett Payne and Bryan Quinby (10/15/18)

"Hey, we're talking shop. Oh, it's Madden will coming to you from Madison Wisconsin a threat. We are full of cheese, Kurds and Randy on fashions, and we'll be performing tomorrow Tuesday night the fifteenth at the very more theater. There are tickets still available, but I'm here to talk to you now about these two segments that you're about to hear on this sort of best of the midwest tour compilation now, I know it, it there two segments from live shows, but you know, bear with me here. Let let me tell you on the first act live in Columbus, Ohio at the Athen EM theater, which is literally a giant haunted spooky masonic temple through not not lying. Not making it up. We did. We've were now free MRs. Yup, that's came to will Cain FAM. I'm not suspect so to say it, but I'm just going to let it out there too. Will came for ten. Percent off quiz? No, say tubal came and do the secret handshake, of course. So live on stage with Britain. Brian, come on chop. Oh, and streetfight together. You know you're in trouble. You gotta you gotta listen to that. If you're still not sold, we spent our acts talking breaking down Charlie kirks, incredibly hilarious, direct mail, pin Flett. I mean, book about his war against the s j ws when college campuses across America, would you believe there are some incredibly funny stuff in their kid? Could you believe in folks? Okay, not sold yet. In the second part, you will hear us from just last night from the live on stage at the cagas house of blues. A stage that we were assured by the stagehands was one shared by Steven Seagal and his band. Yes, from the crystal cavern the Poon on me. Now, this is very important if you're chop offend again. No, it's a live show, but you will not want to miss the introduction of a brand, new character into the chop over this. I'm not even gonna. I'm not even going to tell you who it is or what it is, but you are not gonna wanna miss the induction of a, let's say, local media columnist from the greater Chicago area into the Chapo pantheon of it's hard to believe that we will not be referring to him again in the future because holy mackerel. He is just a gold, mine of content. Yeah. Get in on the ground floor. Now again from let just the other Night, Live from Chicago's house of blues. The place where Dan ackroyd invented blues music in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. So without further ado, I'll just remind you again that we have a show tomorrow night in Madison, Wisconsin at the very more theatre Tuesday, the sixteenth, and there are still tickets available for our early show in Minneapolis on Thursday, the. So if you are in the Great Lakes or kansin area, we hope to see you soon. That any further delay here. We are live on stage at Britain Bryant in Columbus, Ohio, hocken. So the second active, I show your tonight. We're gonna take a dive into a recently released book. This is a book that's about it's about war. It's about the ideological war that is tearing this country apart. And this battle is being waged on college campuses. That's right subs versus dubs. You guys, you guys know about this. You know, Ohio State is right here. You know, nobody say h, no stop that. So, yeah, like the, you know, one of these big battlefields just down the road here gotta keep fighting and the general leading this important battle is a boy with dolphin style teeth named Charlie, Kirk, looking. Okay. It was just released this week. First of all, I just want to note his hand. He's Andre. Very white Andrei here. He's in the face. He's white Wardell in the hands. He's white, Andre. He's doing the reverse steepling with his hands on the cover. Yeah, Don Jr. is supposed to come there to put his hands and the hands in vertically, so they could Jack off. Just never made it. That's so sad that he put the, that's his big claim to fame down there. The forward to this book was written by Don Jr.. Oh, yeah. So just a few facts about Charlie, Kirk before we, this is just like a few facts about him to to frame this discussion to just keep in mind as you. As you hear me, read the words that he wrote every chapter. This book is basically like a written in the style of a direct mail item to old people that just eat gruel all day. So this is this is the first one here. Go. This is from a politico profile of Charlie. Kirk, his skull was entirely covered with gum. Think those are both live strong bracelets. I would love to stand behind Shirley, Kirk in a bathroom, mirror and just flaws him. Measure as gums so bad. Like I just wanna take a ruler and put them up to those top gums and see how big they are. Maybe do a poll. He's a natural Dipper. Very lucky. I love the human style posture. He's adopted cover this book. So yeah, this is from a political profile, Charlie, Kirk, and I just want to read this one quick thing. The issue is tied to turning point. USA's founding told me and has said in public several times that in highschool, he received the congressional -pointment to the US military academy at West Point, but lost that slot to a different candidate. A person he told me was of a different ethnicity and gender. He believes the other candidate may have been admitted because of affirmative action. West Point officials have said they do consider racing admissions, but only for candidates who also fully meet their admissions criteria. So Charlie is saying, I definitely would have served in the military as an officer, of course, but an affirmative action in candidates stole that slot away from me. And what I love about that is like Charlie, you still could have enlisted in the military. Yeah. No, he had to be a West Point graduate dollar with you went through, apply for the army, and they said, sorry, we're full. We just gave your spot to a disabled Latina. The next one is from actually Feinberg and Huffington Post headline turning point. USA keeps accidentally hiring racist. Why do these homosexuals keeps sucking. I mean, you know, you could criticize them, but that's the only way to fight affirmative action. The group's former national field director crystal clanton. With a case, right? No, I saw that was her nickname crystal Clinton who wants texted a fellow turning point employees. This is all caps. By the way, I hate black people. Where do you want to go for lunch? That's conservative Romeo dialing. Hey, you up. I hate black. All calves. I hate black people like, fuck them. All. I hate blacks. End of story van. This is a Wendy's. The next turning point employees, I swear to God. This is her real name Shaly Grumman. What the fuck. Ember frost. And even I'm calling bull shit that the next tweet of hers is I am always making racist comments LOL. Just a by. Never sweet from shyly if you're a race, other than white, I promise to make racist jokes towards you. That's the Shaly I promise. That's a bad deal. I know fake you, man. So Ashley got a on my card. So actually got an internal memo from turning points USA that was circulated to all staff is breighton the red at the top internal memo to all staff regarding social media policy as always turning point. USA is constantly evolving to better protect the organization and our staff to ensure that our staff is adequately supported. Teepee USA is providing a new all new and former staff with complementary social media background checks that will begin to be conducted over the next month. If you have anything in your social media pastor president that could potentially damage your credibility or the credibility of your organization, please contact your manager myself or if necessary human researcher for human resources at HR teepee USA dot com. There's there's what does it say that the conservatives at least give you a warning shot and the libs we'll just go right after you. Well, the thing is they're searching to make sure you have tweeted the n. word. Well, I mean, you say like, why are they giving you a warning? It's because this grassroots political organization has a fucking HR department. By the way, none of you. I don't want to give you the anyone here in the audience tonight. The impression that you should Email HR at teepee USA dot com. Again, that's HR TT USA dot com. Your HR. My balls thing. Okay. So let's dive into Charlie's book campus battlefield, how conservatives can win the battle on campuses and why we fight. All right. How do you how much you wanna bet that he got this thing written by fiber. He was just like wanted someone to write a paragraph like five hundred times. I mentioned that the forward to this book was written by Don Jr. and I just want to read just a little bit from Don Jr. he says during the summer of two thousand sixteen I met Charlie, Kirk, he was twenty two years old at the time, and I will admit, I had my reservations. We already had enough political novices working on our campaign. And the last thing I wanted was another key young kid who had no idea what he was doing. But the more time I spent with Charlie Kirk and the more I learned about turning point USA the more I realized there was something unique that we were missing fucking penthouse letter. I had reservations about our new hire. So then we spent a lot of time together at the office lead at night. I realized he was fucking hot. We all three way with key field director, clan clan. This clump. Here's my favorite line though. The more I realized that there was something unique that we were missing. Our core teams soon adopted Charlie. They filled out the papers and everything. Surely Eric is now, oh, that explains why wears diapers all the time. Dopp did infant recommended him a barber shop Taylor. You might say, we groomed him. I. Our core teams soon adopted Charlie to travel the country with us to plan events, hit college campuses. He's talking about it. I'm like they're active shooters or something. And bar in the store in the country. It was a ragtag army of listen to these names, gentry beach, Tommy Hicks, and Charlie, Kirk shit, tree beats? Yes. Three. You fucking kidding me. That is the name of a man with one nostril and an uncle, Tom. Patterson was busy. This is my or our team of all the dukes of hazzards enemies. The way he ends this forward. Please enjoy this book. Share it with your friends, support turning point, USA and get involved. The fight is only beginning and we need your help to save the greatest country ever to exists. We could. We cannot do this alone for making America. Great. Again, Donald Trump, junior. I mean, this is just telling us that the audience for this book about fighting on college campuses like the median age is like eighty five years old. Yeah. Yeah. It's just scaring grandpa into giving you money because if the kid goes to college, they're going to come out without a gender and they're terrified of that. Car wash, they just scrape your gender off the perfect spokesperson for them because he's like a twenty four year old with the politics of Monty Burns's mom. He's the most disgusting of all these young really cynical. You know, safe-space people who just get by on outrage because somebody like Caitlyn Bennett, or you know, these dip shits, these women grind. They're basically instinct ramp thoughts for politics. You know, they, they wear a gun to the commencement or they like fucking fire. And I, I now rocket and fuck in Koran or something. They they go through the work of pissing people off. Like, you know, they like go new bikini in a pool and they just like deep throat, five hundred straws to trigger the libs like they're going through the work as much as any of those Instagram grinders do this guy literally just skipped up to his dad while we're in crushed velvet coup lots and holding a giant lollipop instead Papa. Could you ever so much like to trigger the libs. What you please tell your rich Fred to give me some money so that I may have ever so much fun, Brian, you sit right? You told me that you you. You saw teepee USA on campus as walking through the oval, not too long ago, and there was a guy just sitting there that said, freedom of speech includes hate speech, change my mind. Why didn't have to do anything because there were already like fifty college students just screaming at then. It was. It really was. It was like three people that looked to be about seventeen years old and like like with rich parents, probably. I guess. I don't know. They just was not a cool grunt. They route that they let like Stephen hundred. They love that. Now they put up the thing and they say inflammatory thing. And then they say, change my mind because all they want is footage of triggered college. Kids crying at them about how awful it was, and I just don't understand the urge like in the when it's phrase that way, like change my mind who fucker you. You know, it's like if you, if you have a science, racism isn't a big deal to train. My mind is like, I'm sorry, do you have the end racism button under that fucking table? And I have to convince you to press it. You're just so fucking asshole. Fuck what you think. I. Okay. Well, refresh my memory about this didn't Don Jr. can I have Charlie Kirk, meet Donald Trump and afterwards, Donald Trump got pissed and was like, this guy sucks. You fucking sucked because Charlier demoted to baron. Little friend never bring your fancy little friend over around again because Charlie Kirk was like Mr President, isn't it true that your supporters or tune routinely beat up booked pants and stuff to the toilet just for pointing your policies and Donald Trump, like he can't think that he's unpopular anywhere, and he's like, no, everyone loves me. Yeah, that was really funny. The math club. Admit that it was hard to be a Trump fan on campuses, but he's like, no, everyone loves me everywhere. What are you talking. Cheerleaders are breaking out and spontaneous songs about the apprentice show wonderful at their isg of leaning too heavily on Simpson's comparisons. This is Don juniors mill, yes. Can you imagine how many mill houses Don Jr. is brought to me. It's mill houses Bill house. Awful concept possible Ralph's. Mill house Ralph's mill house. Charlie Kirk is such a tough sell because even as someone that rise in electric bicycle is my main form of transportation. I went to roll coal all over that fucking powder, blue jacket. All right. All right. I want to go to such a nerd. I wanna get into Charlie's actual writing writing here. This is from the introduction. You may have seen this clip shared, but it's it's worth reading. This is the introductory paragraph of this book. This is the one who established your relationship with the with the reader. You got your credibility and your will while you should be listened to. He's PD gins who could have imagined that I would need police protection to talk about freedom on a university campus. I never thought anyone else. All you ever a university of all places whose very essence is the freedom to pursue knowledge and wisdom, no matter where it takes us. Now it's about reproducing the class. Go on yet. Here I was needing eight private security agents in thirty police officers to secure my safety at the university of Illinois at her bandaged champagne. So I could deliver another of my smashing, socialism lectures, here's, here's your agus. Goes. Watermelon that says socialism on it any hits it with the fuck it. Hammer. Here he goes as like climbed onto the stage the wild screaming louder and louder. Charlie, Kirk is a jerk carlee church Charlie. Holy shit. Here we go here. Nice alliteration that, but I've been called worse. That's fucking rhyming. Book. He talks about how universities have lost their way, and they used to educate kids in like the classical canon and grammar. And on the very first paragraph, he badly bunches what alliteration is. Driving back to Chicago. I reflected on the event and was struck again by how intellectually curious, university of Illinois students were they really wanted to learn and see another point of view. There was something good happening on American campuses that the media was ignoring it was the spark that would grow into a bonfire at e. He goes talks about all those luxuries that he goes to at each. I was met with resistance from far left radicals, but I saw firsthand thousands and thousands of students, curious more to learn more about America, free enterprise and the constitution dole chance. It's in the thousands, not even one thousand. Not any one of them, three digits max. A lot of people probably like went up to him in our like, why do you stand that way? Why does that? Why do you always look like sort of pain? And he's like, they wanna learn about enterprise? Are you okay. Call someone. A lot of students are too drunk to go to fuck in history class, and they need to sober up for a minute. I and talk to Charlie, Kirk. Okay, real thing. Thousands of students went up to me and said, where are your parents. Okay. Boy, chapter one is called your job is gonna. Reduction clinic is down there. That's the thing. Chapter one is. Push back. Reduce the gums. It's real. I feel like I'm more better insulting people's appearances and you should do the more political. It's fine. Chapter one is called your job is to shut up and listen. I, I have a podcast. I really, I really like this is really hot Charlie, the Dom. Awesome. It begins. I lo- I love the back walls blown out by Charlie, Kirk cool. It begins. How can you say that America is a good place? This student was is one of Charlie's many very real encounters that he's had all over at universities all over America pay Charlie. I like nine eleven. How can you say, how can you say that America is a good place? The student was incredulous that I could make such a bold and to her dishonest assertion. The very idea, violated everything. She had learned from her college professors, and now he was challenging me in one of my very frequent college lectures that I give about liberty, the free market and conservative values. She wasn't ranting. She wasn't being nasty. It was just that it was so outside her experience that she couldn't believe that anyone would actually defend America and it was a great question. It went to the heart of what turning point USA is all about and deserves an answer. Here's the answer if America is so bad. Why do so many people want in millions or so anxious to come to America that they're literally climbing over fences, swimming rivers, and figuring of the countries that America's bombing. Yeah, I would say I mean, most colleges teats the Islamic state curriculum teaches that they you don't want to come to. America thing is it's a great flag. It's a very sexy flag. So this Charlie's answer is people love America so much that they're literally climbing over fences, swimming rivers, and figuratively busting down doors river. Okay. Rio Grande. This is this is a trope that comes up again. And again, whenever Charlie wants to talk about how good America is in that whole reference something that's happening now, like people trying to get into this country that he's actively trying to stop. I don't know. His dad probably makes like drones, shoot missiles at people trying to climb over the fence currently building, or he'll reference something in America's pass that conservatives of that era were forthrightly against one thousand percent, and he probably still is too. So he goes, if America is so bad, why is it the most generous country in the world, the first to show up with food water and other lifesaving aid for those whose lives have been devastated by natural disasters? Lily. I can't think of any recent news event where America hasn't done that. Why? Why are we the first country that steps up and fall in solves the overpopulation problem and all other countries? Actually, one of the things I always loved about Cuba is that they always sent more doctors then. In America which is which is such a big dick buying your girl, drink move. I like the v. like Charlie's thing that like all her professors tell her how bad America's all the time. Like no matter what professor you have no matter what subject to right wing professors. Every professor is marine Todd professor. You go into geometry in there like I wanna prove that God isn't real and then American fad cool. If America is so bad, why do we give away billions in foreign aid to struggling countries like Israel and Saudi Arabia? Crying. I added the last part. He didn't actually say that. Why are we the biggest supporters of the United Nations despite its hostility to our values? So we're not come on. I'm not gonna say anything. He's destroying this poor girl. If America is so bad, why does it lead the world in creativity inventiveness and discover. We don't. These dash cams have produced more culture than American. The last. Here's, here's the thing about that is it's like it's packs over feelings. Once again, like you shredding with facts, you know, she's like America's not good. He's like, I will have you look at this chart of gumption per capita for citizens like dammit, you got us. We don't even lead the world in e sports. We lead the world and marvel movies. Whole slate there to show you how great this place. Chunk of that though. Right? The only reason there is a North American sports scene is a Canadian. You're right, but. Yeah, no, it's just like this entire paragraph is like, oh, yeah. Could you listen to Hopson in Germany? Very cool. Charlie, my favorite thing is in a lot of people fight this out. It's like we give so much to charity. Well, first of all, as a as a percentage, no one of the lowest numbers of foreign aid middle of the road in terms of charity thing. Well, okay. So it was a raw number. It's a lot of money. Sure. Because we are the grotesque all consuming ogre at the center of the world economy. It's like some fucking fat asshole, like shuffled off to a Dunkin donuts to drink off his hangover, and there's a homeless guy. They're asking for money and like the quarter that's been stuck to his stomach. My sweat falls off into his fucking cop. But when you imagine Charlie kirks skipping around to imagine dragons, how can you think that America's not the greatest country go be? Have you have you seen Shirley? Kurtz like me tweets. There is one I swear to God. It's for some reason whenever Ryan Lewis in Michael Moore's thrift shop comes on. I slammed my pedal till I'm going eighty. I mean, yeah. I mean, if you had that guy's brain, you'd be like, this is the most creative society ever. With his Chetty rub spin till he was fifteen years old. His last argument for why America's so good if America is so bad. Why is it survived for more than two centuries as the world's most success? Do you know how many countries have survived longer than two hundred years? China has been around for over a thousand. It's yeah, that's that's. That's not. That's padding out the stats there. Yeah, America is that like Instagram girl, twenty three. You'll old. Here's an. Here's another example from the first chapter, he goes an undergraduate. This is a very again, very real thing that happened on undergraduate student took took her up on it and brought it along an audio recorder. Here's how their conversation went transcribed from the recording when he asked why he couldn't in a course taught at a Catholic university, discuss something that the church it self teaches. In this case, why homosexuality is evil? Oh teacher, okay. There are some opinions that are not appropriate and that are harmful such as racist, opinions, sexist opinions, and quite honestly. Do you know if anyone in this class is homosexual student? No, I don't teach her. And don't you think that that would be offensive to them if you were to raise your hand and challenge this student? If I choose to challenge this, it's my right as an American citizen teacher. Okay. Well, actually you don't have a right in this class as especially as an ethics professor to make homophobic comments, racist statements, sexist comments, student Houma, phobic, comments. They're not. I'm not saying that gays, that one guy can't like another girl or something like that, or one guy can't like another guy. I think I think I know what he's doing. He's doing a thing where it's like, well, gay people are are allowed to get married. They can get married to somebody of the opposite sex. They love that love that are here. It's like a riddle. -servative toker. Oh woman that very real dialogue goes a lot. Here is a woman. I know that. I have a feeling that the Catholic would really like to teach Greek style. If you know what I'm in. That's argumentation style because ultimately they have no sense of themselves as disgusting because it's like the most perfect. You're not wrong Walter, you're just an asshole, and they've never considered that possibility in their lives. That dialogue goes on like that for a while. But there's one other thing that I'd like to point out about this book. He like in the section breaks, he lords out like the page length and word count by just publishing his tweets and in the middle of chapter one. In a section break, he has this the furtherest society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it. This tributed to at Charlie, Kirk, eleven quoting George Orwell. That's or will didn't even say that that's a fucking incorrectly, attributed Orwell quote. No, but that's literally an office joke. It's like Michael, Scott being like that's myself quoting Wayne Gretzky. If this, if nineteen Eighty-four continues this way we will end up on an animal farm Charlie Kurd quoting George. He got it off of one of those Facebook pages. It's like, I love you, and I love my life. It was like just me m- that said she attributed that quote to George Orwell. Yeah, he had published that in the book. He had to take the million off of it. This is another one of his tweets that he's published in his book. At Miami college founded by Cubans exiled under communism officials, shut down the pro capitalism club. That club. Sounds cool. Yup. If you can just say capitalism, why at the pro? Why waste of time? I don't know. We're talking about a guy who probably spent his entire book advance on Photoshop, the millions out of the memes. This is for the chapter about how it's not safe to be a conservative on campus. Samantha Lizardo generally feared retaliation for her views for too many conservatives students that fear remains unspoken. In that regard. Their safety indeed feels threatened as recent as our field rip put it the biggest thing that conservative students fear is it losing friends and not being invited to social outings? Nothing to fear there. Yeah, although that does matter. But the biggest thing is grades, they worry that their grades will suffer and about everything else that comes to the bed Mark. Do I speak up with my viewpoint? If I speak up in class to disagree with the teacher will migrate suffer. There's no oppression like that of the apple polisher. Well, most intimidation on campus is of the psychological emotional kinds instances of hostile environments that are that's physical or illegal are not unknown. Charlie, I'm gonna own a break it to you here. The biggest threat is just not having friends that seems to be the uniting bond among all college Republicans. No, they all failing all of their classes because of their right wing viewpoint. They're being say, I went to like basically a glorified Munich community college, and I made terrible grades and I'm doing great. Sometimes you take your lumps. This really remember the woman on Twitter. This was a college student who said, you know, might professor failed me because I wrote this essay, said America's good and then posted the essay, and it was just the biggest pilot. Dog shit. Yeah. Ever greater wrote it. Yeah, it's like they should rescind your acceptance if you write something. All right. I really like this one. This is an example of like campus gone out of control Ono. Here's a second example, and it also involves the university of Illinois at her banish campaign that fucking place professor of media and cinema studies. Jay Rosenstein took to his social, took his camp, took his campaign against a popular and revered school mascot, chief chief align no wick into a public bathroom where he got himself arrested for video recording people inside. Why. Conservatives facing now. They were taking pictures of my duties. Chuck Berry was a revolution. I just I feel like we skipped a lot of steps to get to this point. Here's the story, offensive mascot, and he's just videotape in the stalls your, here's the story. Rosenstein has made a career of ridding the world of any memory of the chief who has retired in two thousand seven in the face of criticism of it being offensive. It wasn't exactly that most students in alumni relish the sight of the respected chief. Wore a feather headdress and beaded buckskin as he did. Seth lettuce and other events. I love the chief. I love I thank you chief for making the sunrise today. I'm I'm respecting the cheese who's doing the traditional native American dance of raising a foam finger while whoop there. It is. So we will go, I'm showing him his cultures, respect by shooting in his speech to make fancy Jake. He goes not at all. Like the Cleveland Indians degrading chief Waku logo, chief allina wick symbolized strength, courage and determination. Every every mega Chad in Ohio just call them a cock. Doc for saying there was something wrong with chief Wahoo. So the chief never regular never disappeared from campus and his passionate fans. Unofficially dressed in the chief's regalia regularly appeared at school events, an exercise of free speech and freedom of association. They have, right. We all have rallies or not an exercise of free speech. There. Also enthusiastic students who seemed to love l. Jolson. And so when Rosen seen spy chief in an ally? Yes. The school in the state Stiller allowed to keep their on Ariffin of the native Americans of Illinois. He tracked the offender who he thought might be a school employees to the washroom to as he put it catch the chief putting on his constume to document all the ways the university employees ease might be involved in helping except that taking pictures of someone in a bathroom is he legal and develop which I learned the hard way little known fact, there's a hard way to prove a point. I have to say this is one of those stories with no protagonist, yeah. Yeah. I'm not really on anyone side. Chapter three. This is my favorite title of any of the child's chapter three is called the majesty aerial classroom, leopard. Oh my God. Let's see. It really is the white Andre. In this chapter, he lists examples of all the insane outrageous things that left this college professors are settling their students. Here's an example, Dr Dana cloud professor of communication and rhetorical studies at Syracuse university and a member of the international socialist organization blames America for nine, eleven writing a new pledge of allegiance. She pledged allegiance to the people of Iraq Palestine, Afghantistan, and to their struggles to survive and resist slavery to corporate greed, brutal wars against their families, and the economic and environmental ruin wrought by global capitalism. Oh, yeah. I mean. No, I take my daughter to kindergarten and they say the pledge and talk about God and pledge and all of that. And I just don't even know what to do with it. I wish I had assembled once again. I get the sentiment is not as catchy, you know. William Penn, a teacher in the creative writing program at Michigan State University was recorded complaining and one of his classes about dead white Republicans who raped his country. You noticed Charlie doesn't mention what country this guy's from, but I bet it with lineup pretty well with Pennsylvania. Ferrets Dr, Todd couch, Dr, Todd couches, sociology professor at Coker college. No, that's not re-. I spurted gone. That's a fake name. We've made up. Wasn't. It didn't didn't the Browns trade for him at one point. The quarterback. I've heard Dan Quinn address address Dr Todd. Lake. Doc professor, Todd cash, listen up. He's a sociology professor who said that racial oppression was central to the founding fathers philosophy? Yes. Yes, that's either teaching college students. This. Dr. Chris Hamilton, a professor at Washburn university accused conservatives such as Ron, Paul and Ted Cruz of working to strip people of the civil rights. He wrote in his class curriculum about Neo confederacy movements that are part of big money ultra-right powers, coke Industries Co. and co. Founders of the John Birch society that is part of a broad, new white nationalist movement. That's what he disagrees. Totally Kirk while literally stuffing bags of cash back into a fucking closets. Yeah. No, that's that's the saints as man with zero talents who's paid one hundred seventy five thousand dollars a year to behave this way. A Columbia University school social work lecturer defended socialism by blaming capitalism for two world wars centuries of slavery and the genocide of native Americans. He. Okay question though. Which two world wars. He, he agreed with the mistaken assertion that the Reverend Martin Luther King was a socialist before it was cool because he literally said, I'm a socialist. These guys don't anything about irony, but he's a hipster. MLK was supported queuing on. Don't ask me to. I just what I love about this. These things are so clearly pitched to the as we were saying the old people who fund him just telling these horrible stories about what's going on on college campuses. There was one professor at a college who said that it was okay for to make in home healthcare workers to steal the change off your mandate. He's also like bringing up shit like Columbia and Columbia is still the biggest funnel for CIA recruitment in in the country. So like I don't know where you guys are pretty evenly matched at least one sickle professor at Harvard University encouraged his students to cut phone lines to prevent your grandchildren. Calling you to invite you to thanksgiving professor professor, Craig homo of sociology at Penn State. It said that people have no right to learn how to upload photos on face. Okay. So like this whole chapter is just a long list of like outrageous things that college professors have said about conservatives or their politics. Here's my favorite booking one. I get countless messages from students who say, professors are lowering their grades in penalizing them for being conservative. That's why as it aside as an aside, I posted that on Twitter, liberal journalists, Jesse Farrar. Hold on. Hold on. Hold on about it. He just go Jesse for our journal a suit yet. Yes, he was in the movie, the post. He spilled a hoagie into the printing press. Yes. Are journalists liberal journalists just in it's actually six guys. When I've been there, many are saying that Jesse Farrar is the new Bob Woodward. I'm saying. Liberal journalists. Jesse Farrar an occasional contributor to deadspin. Vice sports tweeted that professors should quote hold, conservative students heads underwater. So they stop breathing. They put it on the front page of the New York Times. Huge book you Charlie for not plugging the go off kings in your Kickstarter sucks. Charlie, those latest projects get it right. I says, I'd hold their heads underwater until they stop breathing. I responded. I'm sure he is joking, but imagine if conservatives made a joke like that against liberals. For our wrote back. I am not joking. So jealous Jesse right now. The king, the king. Most naturally funny person on is Louie. You gotta Pulitzer for that tweets. Ask a liberal, why conservatives aren't demanding their own safes, but you did you did earlier in the book and it was unsafe for conservative. You what safe spaces for conservatives, and you'll be told that conservatives aren't a historically marginalized group as if marginalizing conservatives now is perfectly okay. It should be mandatory. Well, I mean, conservative is worthy. I lives. So this, this is funny. Chapter seven begins the name of chapter seven is six thousand Soanes may break my bones, but then he goes, but words will never hurt any bird bones. Egos, but words will never hurt me. Oh, but they will if you're attending any number of American universities today, words have become sticks and stones, actually worse. They can hurt your sensitivities wreck yourself, and he goes on to be like, this is the this is the kind of like trigger warning chapter, but I just want to know that he begins chapter six chapter that immediately preceded this one by saying the for liberals, the entire college campuses a safe space. They can call conservatives anything they want without criticism without penalty without rebuke official or otherwise. Fascist bigot homophobe racist, birther misogynist wingnut. Oh, and let's not forget deplorable. So he just began next chapter by asking for universities to officially. Sanctioned students who call him a deplorable, then he's beginning seven by being like, what are you doing in the women's lounge? Two o'clock in the morning. Thanks to the American psychologist for elaborating on the list. Says, for example, it's a micro aggression to say, you speak good English or ask an Asian American to teach them words and their teach you words in their native language. Oh. A report I did was follow into the bathroom and ask for some vocabulary lesson. Here's some more banished expressions from college campuses, those people, and I don't like short hair on girls. Here's. Yeah, you can no longer say you don't like short heroin, girls, fair enough. By the way is a huge weird of session of the Ave hate it. Yeah, it's it's gender criminality. Here's another example that Charlie uses about like how speech codes and in just everyone's incredible. Hypersensitivity is gone too far on college campuses. What this brings the mind is the famous nineteen Ninety-three case of a white university of Pennsylvania, freshman eating eating Jakubowicz, who got busted for calling four black women students, water buffalo. What he's saying this. Yeah, this is the example of how people sensitivities have gone too far right. He got busted for calling four black women students, water buffalo, he hid leaned out his dormitory window and yelled at the women outside because they were making a ruckus. There was interrupting his studying, shut up. You water buffalo. If you're looking for a party, there's a zoo. A mile from here. That's. Wait a minute. We're supposed to be on his side. Because if you're reading that book, you're just like, yeah, of course. Yes, you do. What. Study in here just yelling at a group of black women that their water buffaloes and belong in a zoo. Okay. Jakubowicz deny that his comment had anything to do with race. He said he, this is amazing. He said it roughly translated from the Hebrew word for foolish person. He's. God, that is the first Hebrew version of it just means ignorant person look at holy shit. That's not the first. The said Senate before it just said it. Our on Google, trying to figure out a good reason to have called somebody a water buffalo. Never mind that water. Buffalo wasn't forbidden in the schools, speech code and no one could figure out why water buffalo is supposed to be racist. Yeah, I think someone probably could've figured that out Charlie. Doing like airbud with racism. Oh, there's nothing in the rule book that says, I can't tell them to go to the zoo. I mean, like removing that element from an entirely, you just screamed out your window at strangers like that's should be. Now. He was trying to read diaries. He was. It was possible to see if it's actually possible to count to six million. Okay, here's come on. That's too far. Jesus. All right. Here's some chapter called the ill liberal arts and signing good. And this is just the list of like a stupid classes that you can take, including like, you know, race, gender culture, and the US national identity. I mean, that doesn't sound like that. Ridiculous. They're much stupider stupider literally beyond say closes, one dude capitalist decadence. One class at Georgia state is called Konya versus everyone, which is ironic because surely Kirk has done well, one eighty on con- yeah, now considers him to be like we every class should be about com-. Yea. Charlie, Kirk versus everyone, including this one, the sociology of Miley Cyrus, race, class, gender in media, from my alma mater Skidmore and demystifying the hipster from tufts. But this last one is telling finally the university of California, San Francisco offers an online course called abortion quality care and public health implications that that sounds like a pretty adequate college class. That's the least weird. There are a lot of bullshit underwater basket. Weaving classes that part is true, but that went just sounds like, oh, you're going into advanced nursing? No, no. He thinks it's like those correspondent classes were like you learn how to become a locksmith owed in the mail. At home. You draw that turtle? Yeah, and mail it back in. You got to abort the turtle. So they needed this is abortion quality care and public health implication out bear the among its features are weekly lectures that will incorporate the stories of women who seek an abortion in order to better portray abortion significance in rationale, noticeably absent or women who suffered from an abortion as if there were no bad side effects. Also absent the deadly impact of abortion on voiceless unborn baby. They don't have a lot to say about it. How come a fetus has never spoken to our class. Keep bringing up intersection -ality, but they're not talking to feed his. Dig through the trash. Cantu knows I, they want someone to have a segment talking to feed where they bring out a fuck it, a ouija board. I love. I love the thing about like how come they don't talk about the bad side effects like there's just it's like smoking billboards, like, you know, I'll just come Aveline. There's literally nothing. You don't feel bad in any way. Everyone should get one like the reason for that class is so that like nurses will like do a better job at administering them. I love the idea that Charlie spent a whole paragraph like outlying university classes about like fort night and one class that just called Chilin. But, but he literally wants a class called the silent scream. The unborn holocausts. And then why abortion causes breast cancer centering fetus voices. Okay, chat. I said, chapter three was called the magisterial classroom lectern lied. That's not my favorite chapter title. It's chapter thirteen which is just called black victimization. Bunko. What it's bunko. It's what it's bunko. It's implant. Push wa. Hundred years. It's a load of Larquie. It's all bunk. I tell ya. I wonder who this. I wonder. This book is a. Boulder dash. It's all hokum. This is what he says about the roots of the left's Atala -tarian he's describing true collectivists however, go further. They're not just for public control of utilities in schools, but also for public control of any everything. They adopt the reasoning of Karl Marx, frigerator angles and their admirers. They insist that the people should own the means of production f. Yeah. Pretty reasonable. Actually, it's the workers but close enough. Actually, it should be my dad. He them. And if I want to produce some large projectile from between my teeth, I need your toothbrush. So he goes. It's a system based on the belief that people cannot be trusted to care for themselves that they're not smart enough to secure housing food and other essentials, no, they're just rich enough. That's they're not. It's not that they're not smart enough. All that shit is like taken. I mean, like, all right, I'm going to be a hunter gatherer. Yeah, good luck before cops on your. Here's here's Charlie's ultimate own of the idea of a collective ownership of the means of production. It is an extremely dark philosophy and one that is at war with itself consider. I mean, again, these are the ideas he thinks aren't being civilly discussed and taught at universities and being angrily censored and shouted down. Consider if people can't be trusted to care for themselves, then what about a government that is run by people. What though never thought of it that way. Not one. Oh, if this fan to see if the university that teaches Marxism and not Neil Liber food Qodian bullshit. Wait a minute though. Doesn't. It also work the other way. If you could trust people to run themselves, then you could trust the government made out of those people who you could trust. Sean young, like it works either way you could trust them either way. Then we'll Charlie says, if people left to their own resources left to their own fucking. Charlie's dad has everything. Pie resources. Just like at the outskirts of their Arpad cop pound, and we'd like some fucking resources if people left to their own resources, I think he's thinking of the frizz left to their own devices. That's another. Have no sense of the come in good or despise their neighbors. Then how do they suddenly become enlightened when they go to work for the government. Okay. But. If you hate your neighbour any, there's nothing to guarantee you're gonna like your neighbor, your neighbors, probably an asshole. That is why we need socialism because your neighbor is an asshole, but shouldn't starve. This is this is the last thing I'm gonna do from Charlie here. Oh, thank you. This this is, oh my God, it's just like the auditory version of a hangover. It's fucking wretched. It just so boring. I dunno man after listening to that, I have this hankering to ask my doctor about Cialis, Dale us and also look into maybe investigate some gold coins. Just like anyone who who's like an adult who is an in school anymore, who cares as much about college anyways, who gives a fuck man. But this is just it's so dole. Hundred pages of arguments people got into all of which didn't happen. Yeah, you're just making shit up. All I know is the Charlie is getting my next reverse mortgage check. It's definitely giving me the courage to yell at the water buffalo outside my room when I'm doing my studies on four Chan. I just want to this last one. Just keep in mind the Charlie and turning point. USA is absolutely an astroturf front for that clerk industries and probably a shitload of other really evil people keep this in mind, especially in regards to this week's UN climate change report that says, you know, got another twenty years maybe. Yeah, listen to what Charlie said. Even the hard sciences are not immune need evidence of human caused global warming government funded studies will provide it private sector studies that cast doubt on the link between civilization and warming. We'll be mocked as anti-science merely because they don't have the imprint mature of United Nations funded bureaucrats and researchers. Unlike those respectable men in Exxon, yes, I, I love how powerful he thinks United Nations is like the fucking liberating body that only exists as a wave to get like Saudis out of parking tickets in New York. In the stooges movie donations exists for that and to like, give non-binding condemnations of genocides. That's it. It's it's just a bunch of fucking week Dutchman standing around a room going. I wish you wouldn't do that. I agree. I agree. And that's why is an international forgiving step dad? I agree with you feel and I agree with you that it is time for the United Nations to deploy troops to Syria to take out the Assad regime. This book is this is d. m. t. for dying reactionary boomers. They they, their last thought will be, I'm I'm, I'm mad at a safe spaces on college campuses and then eternity. And I think that is where we all are all going later tonight to DMC attorney, Columbus, Ohio. You guys have been awesome tonight. Thank you so much. We go. I have to say one. If you give us just like ten minutes, we will be in the back signing and selling books. But most importantly, I have to say you're on stage Brenton. Brian is such a joy to share a stage of you anytime. Anytime anywhere because the simple back to the matter is I would not be here right now chop. Oh, trap house with not exist without Brenton Brian and radio. So don't Email version anymore. Email them. I'll be emailing Virgil, Email, my wife, please streetfight the number one in ARCO comedy, radio show on any station across the nation who Lopez, Ohio. Thank you guys. So we are trap house. Goodnight. So a big thing with you on this show of course, is the reading series where we highlight the work of pundits, opinion, artists and writers who have been called up to the majors. You know, these are people with a national platform on that like Washington Post or New York Times op Ed, real estate, your Thomas Friedman's. You're gonna cry your, yeah, your Meghan. Mcardle 's your berry Weiss says, oh, you guys know you already know. You already know. You want it so that don't you. But of course, that leaves that leaves. You know, I don't want to know where there's a whole minor league of local, unbelievably shitty up and Reiner's. Then. Honestly, I think deserve a call up to the majors when we when we were in Boston, we dedicated a whole segment to Boston Globe on this Jeff Jacoby we all know we all we love. Jeff's Jacoby. Awful evil candy. Filching son, Caleb, oh, curses to Kahlo. You're rude at will child. So you guys you guys here in Chicago, you already know where this is going this Chicago, Jeff, Jacoby, Chicago Tribune columnist John casts. Literally no familiarity with this person. So you'll get to watch me experience this for the first time you are in for a treat feel like, why don't you kick it up? How would you describe John giancana's both physically and intellectually John Kass is a human tourist attraction to Chicago is he has a suburbanite who sort of trots out this phony tough, ethnic white Chicago win persona is that he is that avatar for every other shit had suburbanite and he's just he wants commonsense solution for Chicago. Like, let's make cops immortal. No cop is ever done anything wrong. Women, women need a monitor that keeps them from leaving their house, this type of thing. But he, you know, he may be debase fucking golden, dawn columnist, but the there's a little fun Chicago slice of life in there. Sometimes you get to read jobs own some side recipe chicken. Awesome, John. Okay, that's so cool. John told me more about your life. You boring shoot head fascist. He's what Hannah are Entwistle talking about when she said the obesity of evil. Cass gas or grass, knowing pines for free. I mean, just your Koby is he's one of my favorite guys. We've ever read on the show because he has like he is a special type of clumsiness and anti charisma just in oafs. Perfect clumsiness to the world's confidence. Yeah, but John cast is there is a deep evil to him a deep, boring evil to this terrible man. I have just seen this leering assholes face. Eighty two because he was given Mike Royko sold spot. Yes. But what does he think of his son? I have you ever written an columns calling out his own children. I have not found any cast columns about his kids. I'm looking at his face right now on the Chicago Tribune website. And he basically, it looks like a very red sort of reddish Brown Easter Island head or sort of one of those big like Olmec statues. But but blue lives matter, he. Yeah, he's fischel blue lives, magic columnist. And I don't know if in the course of your research, you ever like hurt, like washed video of him, but how you did not John cast has the voice. It sounds like he's just always doing an offensive impression of a native American. I'm going to read his his bio here from the Chicago Tribune to sort of frame where we're gonna go here. The son of a Greek immigrant grocer Kass was born June twenty third nineteen fifty-six on Chicago's south side and grew up there and in Oaklawn. So yes, Felix said, he's really milking this like white ethnic tough guy thing. And he says he held a number of jobs, merchant marine sailor ditch digger, waiter. This is my favorite part. He was a merchant marine sailor a ditch digger and a waiter before becoming a film student at Columbia college. Chicago, where he worked at the student newspaper. So he had all of those jobs ditch digger, merchant marine and waiter in high school, and then he became a film student and like, you know, college newspaper guy in college? Yeah, John John cast is one of those boomer liars who's like when I was thirteen years old, I was made the executioner of my town. Killing me about my white privilege. He obtained an internship at the daily calendar in one thousand nine hundred eighty and ended up working there as a reporter until he left for the Tribune. In one thousand nine hundred three. He is on honors including the society of professional journalists, sigma delta shy national award for general column, writing the scripts, Howard foundations, national journalism award for commentary and the Chicago headline clubs, listener award for best daily newspaper columnists and the Chuck Kogyo Tribune's Beck award for writing. He lives in the western suburbs with his wife and twin sons. Fuck. I didn't search John cash twin sons for the call to see what would happen. These are two large boys who terrorize you're fine down Stavris one and stuff to. Every year. He writes a just a deeply scathing article about how much they disappoint him, but then he just puts it under his pillow. He does not have Jeff Jacoby courage of raising his son through the newspaper. But you know, I don't like to make wild accusations, but if I was a gambling, man, I would say if John Kerry had children, they probably kill dogs. I just like I guess I made an inkling. I feel. All right. I'm gonna kick off. John Kass is a body of work like just like I said, as an outsider, coming to this as a as a cast a neophyte. I mean, the first thing you realise about this guy is that he l- he loves cops. He loves cops, cops spent and. They're more. I love this. This crown don't. We. We go, we love the crowd. We. I gotta say, I'm sorry, you just show this guy in the front row who just has like cue cards for us, one of which just says, oh, love it, and it keeps hole big enough. And I can't not say it. Yeah, we love it. We love the cue card. Can we love. Use that as a cue whenever we want the audience to love something. Oh, yes. Oh, yes. We got, we got, we got a chop. Fuck you mean team in the front row? She out shot out the gang. Out the twitch stream. Okay. So this first, this first John cast com is so good because of the twist. That's that's like baked into it. So I'm just going to begin with this one. It says a retired Chicago cop says he's worried about anti police sentiment. This dude, this is how begins the killing of FOX, the killing of FOX of a FOX lake police. Lieutenant had nothing to do with our hashtag politics about which lives matter then Glenna wits whose body was found in a marshy area. Near FOX lake was just the cop who'd been doing his job. I think you guys already go the twist, but I'm gonna just read it and he was killed for it. Left stripped of his gear. He was the twenty th police officer shot to death in the us so far this year because I know it's was no rookie. He had more than thirty years on the job at wicker park. He's got four sons who are going to have to go it alone. His mother-in-law Terry recitor told the Tribune on Tuesday, just hours after Glenna wits was killed. If you've been following the news, you know about the killing of police officer and suburban. Chicago national TV news was full of the manhunt for three suspects. Images of police dogs on the ground and helicopters in the air and swat teams fanning out. I'm so pissed about this Cup getting killed. I can't believe this cop who is one hundred percent murdered by another individual. I furious. I demand Justice and he goes, but now when a police officer is killed for whatever reason, it is sentenced a larger context of anger and seething politics of police shootings and dead minorities, some unarmed when they are killed and dead Cobb shutdown simply for wearing their uniforms. And while many follow these tragedies or as provocative commentaries on our politics, there is a group that is too often forgotten, ignore. Lord, they're the people who don't make waves. They're not good at angry identity politics. They don't protest yet. They have deep and elemental connections all this to their Felice families. Okay. So you see where cast is going with this one. Check this out. This is a follow up to this story. I'm reading from a local Chicago black newspaper that says, writing under the headline police lives matter to John c. n. b. Chicago Tribune this John cast summed up the sentiment and mass hysteria surrounding the supposed- September first murder of a policeman and bedroom community fifty miles north of Chicago. He's talking about the killing of Glenna wits. We have since learned that it was all the hoax or as the chief investigator put it a carefully sage suicide by the man known as GI, Joe, as he was about to be exposed as a thief who had been stealing funds, intended to mentor. Young people ended up becoming police on. Look, I don't understand. I don't understand what you're talking about. Yeah. Okay. Killed themselves. That's just because he's black, lies bed or harassers forced him to self harm at. That's not okay. He was noticed GI, Joe, and he was about to be exposed for stealing funds, intended to mentor, young people interested in becoming police officers to pay his mortgage, a gym membership, travel and of pornographic website. I know which one I need it. Oh, still paying for porn in two thousand eighteen is he? He was subscribing to bang. Paddy wagon. No payments are one hundred percent brasow skies. I believe that with my heart and Phil, hey, you know, you say that map, but a lot of these websites make you join before he can even watch the little trailers. Okay. So that's like, that's your kickoff for John Kass is you know you back the wrong pony there. It can happen to anyone. So I want to just go through this is like the John cast page of the Chicago Tribune website, and I'm just gonna like just go through a quick selection of his most recent columns star. Starting with the most recent one Democrats shame Kanye west to protect themselves. Makes sense. The next one. The headline is fleeing the anger of the leftist mob, finding comfort in bacon buns. So I, oh my God. John cast is one of those writers where his just his archive looks like things that we did to make fun of him. So I actually had to look on this one and this begins you may have noticed that I did it right my column for Thursday. A note in the paper on page two said, John Cass has the day off, but nobody really believes that nobody so speculated that I'd finally been silenced by an angry political mob of leftists more perhaps by the powers that be they drove out to shamburg. And yeah, some speculate that lift prevented my grandson from coming over and telling me how to log onto hotmail. No column. What happened? You're a mayoral candidate now, said a chief strategist of one Chicago mayoral candidate who'd been conferring drinking with a chief strategist of another candidate. We were thinking that as a candidate, you have to be careful about what you say. No careful is not my way I give not to figs for careful. He sounds a little Elizabethan turn of phrase, they're careful. I'm a lumbering idiot. Is he actually running for mayor? Never even heard that that sounds something like a bring back firefly message board. That's the most bullshit baby ass thing I've ever heard Reggie, it's he's doing the suburban dead thing where he thinks he's being like, like he's being slide, but he just sounds like a fucking prospector. Yeah, it's like he, he's, he's body was possessed by all Oscar Wilde while he was writing that sentence. You're right now for all the thugs said the fucking hip hoppers who want me to be gone. I care not a whip for your concern to you. I say, men ask that's going to ask. Readers worried that the fault was with the mob of angry, leftist sarosa Ellen worried, and then in parentheses, witting or unwitting servants of the Lord, George Soros. He went from. He's a nerd. It is that is an amazing character for fascist suburbanite to also be. Yeah. A firefly guy to be like an epic online hub is boop is guy. In a recent column, I dared suggest that cake is a lie. Can I have border wall. In a recent column, I dared suggests that since the hard left is busy trashing the ideas that bind our nation, like the presumption of innocence for the accused. I wonder who he's talking about there. What's that reference? He says they might as well burn the great books that contain these ideas. Immediately, the left went stark. Raving mad just don't let them give you the net stark treatments that are friends. First of all, if you went under ride along with Chicago PD and you made the references fucking beat you to death of the flash. I'd have to be blue less matter because you know what they were right. First of all, to give him the net star treatment, you would need the biggest sword ever made. That is one guy, Nick, I swear to God. Remember. Remember how this column began. It was the bacon bones. It was the bacon bonds sort of got this goes on. There's a Star Wars reference a game of thrones reference. He references the TV show Chicago, the great Chicago fire. He referenced his different, he'd re, I swear to God. He lists just different kinds of tomatoes. He talks about the rain. It just utterly rambling talks about his podcast that he does the Jeff Carlin. Yeah. And then I, it's just utterly random in baffling and then he gets to the very end and just starts talking about the delicious bacon buns at the Racine bakery that he likes so much. But I, this is really interesting to me because we've discovered a new kind of right winger. It's the reactionary oatmeal fan. Oatmeal fan, but also like guy who's writing this because his kids won't call him back. Like I no longer am speculating the Joe that John Kasich's sons, our dog murders. I just like it just sounds like they don't talk to him because it's just all all these last couple years of comes just meandering bullshit. And it just all the things that he would mumble to you over a fence, but no one talking, no one is talking to them. Let me tell you about an epoch rebel who defied the police and the government regulations? I'm talking about fucking Nicola, tesla. Epoch for the win. So he just gets to the end of it. And just said, I talk just again talking to some random person at the bakery, and he goes, he was ruthless. He was ruthless, but civil. But there were a few bacon buns left, maybe five, no, thanks. I just ate. He said, rain, running off his face. Wait, are those bacon bones from Racine? I'll take them a handed. The bag him with a smile, a civil smile. What the fuck away did he get an punked for his bake it putz what is that? The fucking muck, and he gave up his bacon bum or something. Bacon funds treat that never heard of the fuck dude. You're so lucky that fifty police officers aren't here with me or else. These buns would be mine. So he mentioned a previous column in that one when he was going through a pristine reverie about fucking hot dogs or the last meal. Eight. He's talking about his column before that was by the way about hot dogs. We all roasted Felix earlier on the store. So we saw on eat a hot dog with two full tomato slices on it. He's. Is your hats. Hugh. You should be ashamed of yourselves. This is the most shameful nationalism. I have ever know this dude, this, this tire city. This is Yugoslavia. Those were the only vegetables. Who the only vegetables Felix gone on this entire tour. Not not drew my mom had carrot sticks. So he he read on you. So cast references the column that we're like the leftist put him inside the, you know, the telephone box that's big on the inside or whatever the fuck he's into. So that column was headlined burning books like to kill a Mockingbird, is the honest next step for the anti Cavanaugh left. Yeah. Well, all right. Let's do. It fell. John cows. My new column when Dir Pena's accused epoch Sirs of things they have to provide evidence. I really do love a massive concern for the rights of the accused from a guy who probably did a fucking fundraiser to by John Berge fucking boat. After he got out of prison. Angry leftists have been comparing me to boo Radley a badge all wear with honor. And this next one is really good. I mean, this is like again, just like as a early initiate in the mysteries of John cast. First thing I noticed he loves the police. Second thing I noticed. The second thing I noticed he really loves and deeply identifies with Brett Kavanagh for some. I can't hear quite put my finger on it, but he's very, very sensitive about Brett cavern being accused of things. How dare you. Laughing go, yes, yes, this is the next comb. I swear to God when the bread cavenaugh circus ends. We won't forget your sins, Matt, Damon. Okay. Okay. I don't know what Matt Damon said, but I feel like we will. We'll forget pretty quickly while you're next so thick that Damon, what the fuck my name is John cast, aren't that goodwill hunting is a true story. What's your move? Angry left. No, he says what's different than fucking cavenaugh. He is a sloppy, perverted Greek Orthodox drunk. Future historians probably won't devote entire volumes. The Hollywood actor, Matt, Damon for his for his. We fucked up somewhere along the line. If that happens, if there's an Oxford history of the United States in the twenty first century, somehow we survive as a species and there's like a chapter on Matt, Damon. We took a wrong turn unless the Kennedys ascend again, that's not going to happen. I think I think like everyone like one of the most repulsive things by John cast is like how witty he thinks he is. And just like every column kind of opens with something like this. Like I don't believe that pussy house. We'll be on the runways and. Peres like the same, like Schutte tone and then like three paragraphs later, he's like just beat red and crying about a copying dishonored. He goes. So future story probably won't devote entire volumes. The Hollywood actor, Matt, Damon, for his part in the grotesque savaging of judge breath. I don't even remember Matt, Damon. We. Okay, Matt, Damon portrayed Brad Kavanagh on SNL. Yeah. Literally, all of these people. We all of us here for SNL every single person who watches SNL fucking call them somewhere. Just a close circuit TV for people with local up at poem. I also watch it sadly. I can't not being met or for fifty years old. So of course you, Matt, I swear to God. It would be healthier for you. If you watch twitch with me. I swear to fucking God. Doodoo you'll be happier. That's the delight. That's the Baleno divide. Whether you watch us in, you watched which look there's something just very reassuring about knowing that no matter what happens in a week. The girl gang SNL is going to show up and just like reenacted with memes. It's nice. I love reading a an exact transcript of the news, but they make the epoch face. Sadly, Damon will most likely just be a footnote, some gesture in motley participating in the American political circus. Settle out buddy for Suth the blackbirds in louts mock. You're not allowed to be a homophobe yet. Also try to be camp. I'm sorry. You don't get to do both there. I'm John cast and they're calling me Mr. to racist for the renaissance fair. But I do the language anyway. So Mr. Damon, I'm going to say it. You're a name. It means ignorant person. So I love the anger at Matt, Damon, but then I love like Felix this alluding to just like, you know, like. He's usually mad about the cops being disrespected or Brett cavenaugh being disrespected. But then he'll just he'll just out of nowhere have a column called the evil creator of candy corn versus social media bullies. Well. Knock not gonna not gonna go for. Explain that not reading reply. If you don't explain it. I'm gonna get yours them. You're gonna stay awake all night. Thinking about that. That's the killing word tested the fucking killing word. He's just pouring Milan all over his hot dogs. One more just like totally random one, no punishment too severe for the oak park peach thief. Too severe. Cordery I the whipping up their children. The limitations. Two, two. So. I believe has Stroger gets Alzheimer's as writing columns, like no punishment to severe for the hamburglar. All Joey propose yak of the Chicago police department. Beloved columnist, John cast today was unfortunately clerical damage after he called ATV to take on a man stealing pies, cooling on window sill. We have nonetheless permanently aspertain the crook. So like in between columns in which he bemoans, you know. You know, pin headed hashtag politics and tribalism. That identity politics. He will have one column just absolutely just stoking full on race war about Molly Tippett's. It says you wanna talk about separating families. Let's talk about Molly Tibbets and then I swear to God. The next column is called the hunt for the perfect peach lands downstate to Calhoun county. It really it really just it's amazing. Like every fifth cast column is just it's Turner diaries. It's just bull fucking like police. Should they hear elope baseline? They should be able to empty fire into the car. And then the next one is like, how come no one goes on picnics anymore. That article about the perfect beach also has paragraphs saying that the Peachtree should have permanently stationed police officer with shoot to kill orders for anyone who tries to take one of them. He, he's like, I mean, he loves game of thrones. This is like if hot pie was a fascist. All right. So the last one I wanna do that I wanna give a full dissection of, I think one that struck me as the most indicative of his soul. It's called what not to get dead for Father's Day. Stav one and stuff to our even reading his columns at this point. The rumpus room, smashing, fluorescent lights, the hammer. You still running those gas letters e books report night, have fun. Begins a father doesn't need that extra piece of homemade blueberry pie with fancy allies cream on Father's Day. My wife will tell you that you're right, Honey. Other things other things father doesn't really need include thick. Bacon says the doctor that bottle of eighteen year old, single malt scotch Dr. Pasta tailor those delicious. Gratin potatoes. Dr n Taylor or the jalapeno garlic olives for MARTINI wife. And there are some listing food and shit. He likes the eight. And there are some things you should never ever give your father on Father's Day. Aka patriarchs day. Has anyone ever called Father's Day that is that. Official. I'm going to be honest, I have friends who have called it that really. Yeah, me. They're not my funnest friends, but there when I have problems. He goes goes on like tickets. The so movie like the book club, really. Do you hate your father that much? Yes, they have that. You'd have him watching Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton movie. I know this is great. I'd rather poor a jar full of baby black widow spiders into my ears. I just what he thinks the Chicago police should be allowed to do to someone in interrogation. I honestly don't think he's telling the truth there. I think he'd rather watch the movie. Realistically, if he was offered the choice, he picked the film charming? Yeah, one of the best actors generation John. You can get a hot dog. You know those with that set of performance outrage, anodyne thing like that. You know, he wrote a fucking article in the nineties called the case against Barney. Yeah. No, this is like, yeah, this is like sort of early two thousands internet where it's like, oh, great. This is just a bunch of fail hole filled with aids. Don't Leary is Chicago PD should be allowed to murder. Justin beaver on site. He goes and please let stop with those how to grill steak for Father's Day stories. The ones that explain in detail the difference between bone in rib and sirloin you'd think man worth his salt. Doesn't already know the difference between thick ridi- and sirloin he knows well, yes, I don't even understand all the father needs for grilling. Steak on patriarchs day are Kohl's a grill, salt and pepper. An instant read thermometer. Take the stake off the grill at one hundred twenty two degrees and let it rest then please just shut up about it. Okay. And let me watch my constant video loop of the myla massacre. This sounds like the I, Chris Benoit's suicide. Just let me make a car. Tem, steak, meat isn't religion, dammit. So forget those old John cast columns about the way to grill meat. I'm a life form to and I've evolved who needs red meat. Anyway, beans are fine. Doing what's happening. I don't know. I don't know what is sounds like he had a heart attack. I think he's his wife is like John. You're like, she summary want him to die and he's like time to skewer her with my pen. I mean, I think he's on the life insurance with anything else. John. No, I don't know John. Are you saying that John cast doesn't get goop. Probably folks every night John. I love to think about it. John for the love of God's stop, eating all that meet your life. Insurance doesn't fest for another two years. Think about John cast just rolling his neck like a bull frog and just going to town on some clam. Awesome. No. I think it's. Oh, jeez. So I think he's doing irony here and he's basically like, so he's so braiding his wife, and he goes and it's children, and he goes, who needs sub ordering his meal. And he goes, who needs good American beef on Father's Day or corn with again about the skewering sweating thing. This is like clearly. Or corn with butter or pie or anything. Really tasty, don't waste your time doting on father's their relics of our shameful pass soon to be replaced by science and sex spots. Wait, what. Who who is buying who's ordering right now. So in ten years they can get the perfect dad sex pot. Is this all just for your hometown? Yes. Yeah. Who do do anything like that? There are. There are thousands of women in Chicago who are like, you know, I just fucking his opinions are so rancid there, so fascist and racist, but I just love fucking John Cass, if I could just get a John Cass sex robot, it would solve all my problems. Most people in this crowd love fucking John cats. We love to fuck him. Perfect in an algorithm that will I lift up his gut. And while I'm at it, can we please ask editors for a moratorium on hand, wringing columns and stories about demon fathers, I guess, is twins, have a column in their college newspaper. Well, holding hands. Stories about demon fathers. You know, the kind father was cold, distant and terrible father. Father ran away. Yes. I know there are bad fathers out there and someone to punish them hundreds of birds. We in the media love to deconstruct Father's Day with those bad father stories. The very word bother offends some people triggering them perhaps because it's too another word also fraught with peril mother. I love it. I love it more than anything. When guys like mockingly used the word triggered who spend their entire days basement just getting pissed fucking sharpening machete for the coming like reckoning. Like they're fucking tattooing this column on his body like he's Robert deniro in Cape fear. It's like there. So fucking traitor. What triggers just furiously to fingering hunted packing a manifesto. He's he's literally like putting a howitzer and his backyard to prevent the knockout game. And he's like, the looney left is triggered again. What I love about this kinda writing is the way portrays the things he thinks is like just common sense that everyone believes so he's like, you know that another word that sends everyone into a weird panic mother. Women hate it when I call them this. Women get triggered when I go up to them and say, mother, will you tie my shoes? Oh, what you don't? Oh, the patriarchy. Would I ask for women at the Tribune office to white me, they respond with hysterics. Also get so fucking triggered father, innocent father, shoot him in the back of the head with BB guns during dinner and say, that's what people are doing to police. Ultimately future humans will find fathers only in museum exhibits stuffed or made of wax next to the knee ender thal man. So please just allow the few remaining herds of fathers the die off and peace. I agree with that. Yeah, he goes beyond my guess, Johnny the mar bike. That's the thing. It's like, he's like, oh, don't eat beat. It's like, dude, eat all the meat. You want, man. Oh, don't need to drink, whatever you want to go for the March of progress may be uncomfortable for a few. But then again, fathers are experts at repressing bed juju. That's what we do. We're good at only three things turning out lights while muttering repression of anxiety and napping. Everyone knows this also. Firing anti material missiles at pictures of de Ray. His editors took out a line where he said, we're good at suppressing bad juju except for George Soros. He was like, that's a little too far John. Why don't you take a bath in the Italian beef dip in the office. I. If you're dead really need something for Father's Day, try cushioned insoles, but who the hell would think of that? Nobody. Not my rotunda grip pests. I'll tell you that. The thing he wants to see on Father's Day is a brand new car tied up with a big blow in the driveway. Are you insane? Do you want to give him a heart attack? He's just like all the things that his family won't do for. He's mad that for Father's Day, his fucking family, don't get him a brand new car with a bow on it to thank him for all his dad wisdom and grilling. Dad, here's Alexis telling me about that extra bone when I was six. Fucking freak. The looney lift is so triggered that they fold my family into hating me. Some. Another thing dad. Another thing dad doesn't need is a sumptuous leather, dad chair. If he doesn't have one, all it means is that he really didn't want to pay for one just let the guy have his corner of the couch and he'll be fine. He'll fall asleep in a few minutes anyway. Then you can use him for a pillow that snores a pillow. You can jab your elbow before it stumbles of stairs mumbling incoherently about the lights or the dog or what the hell will I write tomorrow? Dammit. You can use them as pillow. Please use him as a pillow. This is man very dark. All. Yeah. This Benz poor. In the article he wrote about himself. He's just an insane jabbering maniac. This is very Karolyn, Colby. No, but like Karl like loved, Colby, and held no resentment towards him. He just wanted to spend time with him. John caz is just like, oh yeah, you know, you could just do you bother. Treat them like a piece of shit on your shoe. Never want. Never watch. World's wildest. Police. Chases with them, never give them a big cupcake with the local on the never just kiss. Don't even look at him. Not as him which police officers died today. Yeah. The last thing you want to do for a dad is show up to their Van Dyke victory party. What? What is large sons get him for fathers ages a car that says on the cover your old and you'll been inside says, also your gate. I like the more I think John Cazes sons or super Li like awesome. Like, yeah, this year they probably gave him like the people's history of United States. Booking rock. If he's acting like this, they probably rock. There's got to be one casts on one big, cast boy in the audience tonight, and thank you. Thank you. I'm town premium subscription for Father's Day. I am. Sorry. What I said about you Cass on you don't kill dogs. You fucking rock. Yeah. If you could. So for vote, your dad to have a rage stroke, you get a free t shirts. They kill dogs, but it's canine police dogs. Practice. Okay. Okay, buddy. If you wanna get my cocaine, it's rounded by chocolate. Go ahead. Closing out here. He says, there's only one thing dad needs on Father's Day anyway. If his family is healthy and happy, he doesn't need much. He doesn't want stuff. Hi, Honey. The wife says, hi dad. The kids say that's all the dad needs really. And maybe that second piece of homemade blueberry pie. Hi know flipping third piece and a fourth. Listen to the Chicago way podcast with John Cassin, Jeff, Carlin everybody, our sister show. So that Chicago is your favorite son other than Felix petermann dish icago Tribune's John Cass. Someone needs to do a wellness check on his family literally every day because eventually he's going to kill Chicago, the house of blues. We are trap house. Thank you guys so much good night. Start spreading the news. Even today.

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